2016-17 Edition

Department of European Languages and Studies

David T. Pan, Department Chair
243 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-6406
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/els/

Overview

The Department of European Languages and Studies provides undergraduates with the opportunity to study Europe in its geographical, linguistic, historical, literary, artistic, and cultural diversity. The literatures, histories, and cultures of European nation-states have always been closely interconnected, even before the individual regions became nation-states. It is nearly impossible to study any era—the Renaissance, the Early Modern period, the Enlightenment, the Romantic period, or the Modern period—without taking into account the influence of one European nation on other European nations. Almost all significant European literary and artistic movements have been cross-cultural and transnational. The current configuration of Europe—the European Union—is merely the most recent socio-political and economic realization of the intense cross-pollination of ideas and institutions that defines—and has always defined—the continent. Immigration and the displacement of populations throughout the continent are constants of European history and have long inflected literary and artistic production in ways scholars continually explore. The history of European colonial enterprises and their afterlives have had a profound impact on the shape of the world in which we live; the Department is committed to a critical engagement with these legacies.

The Department offers majors in European Studies, French, and German Studies; minors in European Studies, French, German Studies, Italian Studies, and Russian Studies; as well as a graduate program (M.A., Ph.D.) in German. The Department also offers language training in French, German, Italian, and Russian with emphasis on the communicative and interpretive aspects of language learning. The goal is the achievement of translingual and transcultural competency. University language study is the critical investigation of a foreign linguistic system and the cultures defined by it. It is also an investigation of one’s own native language(s): it is nearly impossible for us to scrutinize and analyze something we know as intimately as our native language and yet this is the order by which we formulate our thoughts and the order which may sometimes formulate our thoughts for us. The “foreignness” of a foreign language allows us to objectify an entire linguistic system, to observe its structure and its usage, and then to make comparisons with our own linguistic situation. This kind of knowledge of one’s own languages is the foundation of critical reflection on texts of any nature—historical, philosophical, literary, political, legal, journalistic, and others. Thus serious study of a language other than English is crucial to a university education. The Department teaches its language courses with this principle in mind and seeks to provide its students with a framework for critical linguistic and cultural learning.

UCI Career Center

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. For additional information, see the Career Center section.

Undergraduate Program in European Studies

The European Studies program focuses on the study of Europe from the vantage points of several disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Because Europe is both a geographical place and an idea that changes throughout history, it has had different meanings at different times and in different places. The study of Europe thus requires an open, pluralistic, and interdisciplinary curriculum that takes a critical approach to the idea (or ideas) of Europe.

The program provides a multidisciplinary view of Europe as a whole and of its historical, political, and cultural formation and global implications and encounters with the non-European world. It also provides a focus on a specific area of European experience that cuts across traditional disciplinary and national boundaries. Participation in the UC Education Abroad Program in a European country is strongly recommended for all European Studies majors.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in European Studies

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Requirements for the Major

Completion of two years of language (through the 2C level or equivalent) in French, German, classical Greek, Italian, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish.

Fourteen courses, of which five may be lower-division:

A. Complete:
HISTORY 70B Problems in History: Europe
B. Complete:
EURO ST 101A- 101B European Studies Core I - Early Europe (Pre-1789)
and European Studies Core II: Modern Europe (1789-Present)
C. Six courses from an approved emphasis list (see sample below), four of which must be upper-division.
D. Four multidisciplinary electives: two courses in European History or Political Science or Social Science outside the student’s emphasis, and two courses in European Literature or Arts outside the student’s emphasis. 1
E. Complete:
EURO ST 190W Senior Seminar in European Studies
1

For the student with a focus on modern Europe, at least one of these courses must be on a pre-1789 topic; for the student with an emphasis in Medieval or Early Modern Europe, one of these courses must be on a post-1789 topic.

NOTE: One course from either the approved emphasis list or the elective category must be from the Encounters with the Non-European World emphasis.

NOTE: Courses are sometimes approved in more than one emphasis. Any course that appears on the approved list for a student’s emphasis cannot be used as a course outside the emphasis even if it also appears on other lists.

Residence Requirement for the Major: At least five upper-division courses required for the major must be completed successfully at UCI.

Emphases and Approved Courses: The following emphases are available in the major in European Studies:

  • British Studies
  • Early Modern Europe (1450–1789)
  • Encounters with the Non-European World
  • French Studies
  • German Studies
  • Italian Studies
  • Medieval Studies
  • Modern Europe (1789–present)
  • Russian Studies
  • Spanish/Portuguese Studies
  • The Mediterranean World: Past and Present

The list of approved courses is extensive and varies from quarter to quarter, depending upon course scheduling. For complete up-to-date information about approved courses, students are advised to consult the European Languages and Studies website.

Requirements for the Minor

A. Complete:
Problems in History: Europe
B. Complete:
European Studies Core I - Early Europe (Pre-1789)
and European Studies Core II: Modern Europe (1789-Present)
In addition to requirements A and B, European Studies minors take:
C. Three courses selected from a single emphasis.
D. Two electives outside the emphasis: One course must be in European History and one course must be in European Literature or Culture.

NOTE: Courses are sometimes approved in more than one emphasis. Any course that appears on the approved list for a student’s emphasis cannot be used as a course outside the emphasis even if it also appears on other lists.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: At least four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department Undergraduate Director.

Additional Information

Career Opportunities

A degree in European Studies prepares its graduates to enter advanced degree programs in international business, history, law, and political science. The strong academic skills and professional orientation acquired by European Studies majors are necessary to pursue successful careers in such fields as international banking, law, journalism, management, public relations, publishing, and government service, as well as social justice and non-governmental organization (NGO) work both in the United States and abroad. Humanities graduates in general learn to express ideas clearly, do independent research, and think analytically and imaginatively—the required tools for success beyond the undergraduate career.

Undergraduate Program in French

The Undergraduate Program in French offers a broad humanistic course of study designed for students in the liberal arts. The orientation of the program is multidisciplinary, where the study of literature is linked to critical, historical, and political concerns. Courses reflect the faculty's interest in the related disciplines of history, philosophy, anthropology, visual studies, gender and sexuality studies, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, and comparative literature.

Lower-division language courses encourage students to participate in the creative process of language, to think in French as they learn to understand, speak, read, and write. These courses are taught entirely in French, and the approach to teaching stresses the interdependence of the four basic language skills and makes them mutually reinforcing.

At the intermediate lower-division level, texts of contemporary literary and social interest provide the focus for advanced conversation, reading, and composition. After the second year, advanced courses in conversation and writing enable students to attain a greater degree of proficiency, preparing them for study in the upper-division program.

All upper-division offerings are taught in the seminar mode. Because classes are limited in size, they promote and encourage participation and discussion and facilitate direct contact with professors. In recent years, courses have been offered in literature and the Enlightenment, Surrealism, autobiography, Francophone literature, literature and human rights, tales of the fantastic, the French New Wave, representations of terror and terrorism, Paris as art capital, “engaged” writing, French critical theory, France’s relationship to Algeria, gender and sexuality in pre-modern France, and the literature of childhood. The content of courses changes yearly according to the interests of both faculty and students. In the junior or senior year, students have the opportunity, in the context of the capstone seminar (FRENCH 185), to pursue a single project in depth, leading to a final research paper.

The program strongly encourages its students to take advantage of the study-abroad programs in French-speaking countries to improve their language skills and gain invaluable cultural experience in a foreign university setting. The program recommends the UC Education Abroad Program, which runs programs of differing lengths in France (Lyon, Bordeaux, and Paris). Credit for courses taken through study-abroad programs is available. Students are advised to discuss their course of study with the Undergraduate Director before their departure and to arrange to bring home proof of their work.

Language placement examinations are not required, although an optional placement examination is available. Students will be placed in French language courses according to their years of previous study. See Language Other Than English Placement and Progression.

Transfer students who have had a previous course (or courses) in French from another college or university who want to enroll in any French 1A through 2C course at UCI must take a copy of their transcript to their academic counseling office in order to receive authorization to enroll in the appropriate course.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in French

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Departmental Requirements for the Major
A. Complete:
FRENCH 100A Advanced French Writing: Reading and Telling Stories
FRENCH 100B Advanced French Essay Writing: Argument and Evidence
FRENCH 101A Introduction to Nineteenth-Century French Literature
FRENCH 101B Introduction to Eighteenth-Century French Literature
FRENCH 101C Introduction to Twentieth-Century French Literature
FRENCH 185 Junior/Senior Seminar in French Literature and Culture
B. Six additional upper-division French courses. Students may take up to three French courses taught in English.

Residence Requirement for the Major: FRENCH 185 and four upper-division courses (excluding FRENCH 100A, FRENCH 100B, FRENCH 101A, FRENCH 101B, FRENCH 101C) must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved by the Humanities Office of Undergraduate Study and the Director of the undergraduate program in French.

Planning a Program of Study

Students should consult with the faculty to plan a coherent program of courses to fulfill the major requirements. Students also should consult with faculty members concerning career plans in areas such as teaching, business, journalism, law, public service, as well as social justice and international non-governmental organization (NGO) work.

Requirements for the French Minor

A. Complete:
FRENCH 100A Advanced French Writing: Reading and Telling Stories
FRENCH 100B Advanced French Essay Writing: Argument and Evidence
B. Five French courses, four of which must be upper-division; four of these must be taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or equivalent.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: At least four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department Undergraduate Director.

Additional Information

Career Opportunities

The great majority of students who major in French pursue careers in business and commerce, where they can take advantage not only of their proficiency in French language but also of their knowledge of French and Francophone literature and culture. Students also go on to law school, to medical school, and to careers in the diplomatic service and education. The multidisciplinary approach to the study of literature and culture teaches students to think critically and develops analytical skills that can be applied to a wide range of problems. It also helps students develop the interpretive and writing skills necessary to express their own ideas clearly and persuasively. Whether they enter business or professions such as law, education, or government, French majors acquire the intellectual and communicative skills requisite for success.

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Undergraduate and Graduate Programs in German Studies

The German Studies programs emphasize the humanistic endeavor of understanding and evaluating culture. Courses are focused on language, literature, and film in context, that is, within the historical, social, philosophical, linguistic, intellectual, and political circumstances of their production and continuing reception. Courses on German, Austrian, and Swiss literature, film, and culture offer a variety of critical perspectives from historical, social, or politically engaged readings to feminist analysis and cultural studies. Topics range from authors, periods, and genres to the history of German-language literature and film, philosophy, theory and criticism, European cultural relations, and cultural artifacts in a globalized social and political context.

The German Studies major can be combined as a double major with any other UCI course of study, and the minor may be taken in tandem with any UCI major.

Courses in the program are taught in German to the extent compatible with the aim of the course. In the lower-division language courses students develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing through an engaging, collaborative, task-based curriculum. The courses place a great deal of emphasis on meaningful cultural literacy in German, employing a diverse range of authentic texts and materials from the beginning. During the second year (intermediate), students benefit from a curriculum based on authentic literary and cultural content (theatre, media) and simulation of “real world” situations. These courses have the additional goal of contributing to students’ education in the humanities and developing their skills in critical thinking.

After completion of the intermediate level, students enroll in the GERMAN 101GERMAN 115 series, which emphasizes advanced reading, writing, and speaking skills while providing an introduction to a variety of German topics and texts in literature, culture, film, linguistics, and business. Courses in this series are taken in preparation for  GERMAN 117, GERMAN 118, GERMAN 119, GERMAN 120, GERMAN 130, which provide advanced instruction in periods ranging historically from the Reformation to the present and cover a variety of topics and approaches. A further series of courses (GERMAN 140, GERMAN 150, GERMAN 160, GERMAN 170) is taught in English for both German Studies students and those who do not speak the language, and covers topics in German, Austrian, and Swiss literature and culture, literary theory, philosophy, linguistics, and criticism as well as German-language cinema.

Students are encouraged to participate in work- and study-abroad programs in German-speaking countries. The Department recommends the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) in Berlin where students may enroll at any of the city universities (Free University, Humboldt University, Berlin Technical University) and take courses at others as desirable. UCEAP students complete an advanced language program before enrolling in university courses.

German placement tests are recommended for students who have successfully completed foreign language classes in high school or elsewhere. To obtain information about the German placement test, contact the UCI Academic Testing Office at 949-824-6207. Students with college-level course work should present their transcript to their academic counseling office, for assistance in determining which UCI course to take.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in German Studies

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Departmental Requirements for the Major
A. Select six of the following:
Introduction to German Literature and Culture
German Culture and Society
German Film
Introduction to Germanic Linguistics
German for Professions
Advanced German for Business and Economics
Topics in German Literature and Culture 750-1750
Studies in the Age of Goethe
Studies in Nineteenth-Century German Literature and Culture
Studies in Twentieth Century German Literature and Culture
Topics in German Literature and Culture
German Internship
B. Select six additional courses chosen from Section A and below: 1
Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism
German Literature and Culture in Translation
German Cinema
Topics in German Linguistics
Historical Foundations
Contemporary Issues and Institutions
European Studies Core I - Early Europe (Pre-1789)
European Studies Core II: Modern Europe (1789-Present)
Introduction to Linguistics
Comparative Literature 2
German history 2
German philosophy 2
German political science 2
1

GERMAN 140, GERMAN 150, GERMAN 160, GERMAN 170 are variable topics courses and may be repeated for credit as topics vary; one of which can be taken in satisfaction of the upper-division writing requirement.

2

 Must be approved by the advisor for the major.

Residence Requirements for the Major: Five upper-division courses must be taken in residence at UCI for the major. However, if a student participates in the Education Abroad Program, two of those can be taken abroad, pending approval from the department.

Education Abroad Option: Up to a maximum of six upper-division courses taken during study abroad may be counted toward the major requirement. All such courses must be approved by the Undergraduate Director and students are advised to consult with the Undergraduate Director both before and after their stay abroad. Course approval typically involves the following: (1) presentation of syllabi and other pertinent course materials (term papers, exams, etc.) from the foreign host university, and (2) approval by the Undergraduate Director and the Humanities Office of Undergraduate Study. In planning their undergraduate career, all students should keep in mind the Residence Requirement (see above).

Departmental Requirements for the Minor in German Studies

A. Select four of the following:
Introduction to German Literature and Culture
German Culture and Society
German Film
Introduction to Germanic Linguistics
German for Professions
Advanced German for Business and Economics
Topics in German Literature and Culture 750-1750
Studies in the Age of Goethe
Studies in Nineteenth-Century German Literature and Culture
Studies in Twentieth Century German Literature and Culture
Topics in German Literature and Culture
B. Select three of the following:
Introduction to German Literature and Culture
German Culture and Society
German Film
Introduction to Germanic Linguistics
German for Professions
Advanced German for Business and Economics
Topics in German Literature and Culture 750-1750
Studies in the Age of Goethe
Studies in Nineteenth-Century German Literature and Culture
Studies in Twentieth Century German Literature and Culture
Topics in German Literature and Culture
Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism
German Literature and Culture in Translation
German Cinema
Topics in German Linguistics

Residence Requirement for the Minor: Four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided that course content is approved in advance by the German Undergraduate Director and the Humanities Office of Undergraduate Study.

Graduate Program

The graduate programs in German at UCI combine innovation with a solid foundation in traditional approaches. The course of study focuses on both the German literary tradition and foreign language pedagogy, with the goal of integrating works of literature, philosophy, and art into pertinent cultural, theoretical, and historical contexts in teaching and research. UC Irvine has a decades-long reputation for excellence in the study of Critical Theory, having placed first in most rankings, and the campus provides a learning context that encourages students to push the boundaries of thinking in their discipline.

Students may apply to either the M.A. program or the Ph.D. program, but only students applying to the Ph.D. program can be admitted with fellowship funding. Students with a B.A. may apply directly to the Ph.D. program and receive fellowship support, but their official advancement into the Ph.D. program is contingent upon successful completion of the M.A. before or during the second year of study. Students who already hold the M.A. degree are also encouraged to apply to the Ph.D. program.

The Ph.D. program is organized to encourage completion within five years, and there is special funding and potential employment available for those who do finish in five years. A student arriving with a B.A. normally will require three years to complete course work for the Ph.D. degree and qualify for advancement to candidacy. A student arriving with an M.A. will normally require two years to advance to candidacy. Most of the course work is done within the Department, but students are encouraged to broaden their studies by taking related courses in other departments in the School of Humanities, such as comparative literature, critical theory, feminist theory, or visual studies; other combinations of courses may be selected in consultation with the graduate advisor. Our innovative exam structure (involving course-syllabus development) and post-exam timeline are designed both to expedite progress to degree and to enhance the professional training of our students.

For students who enter with normal academic preparation and pursue a full-time program of study, the normative time to degree for the Ph.D. is six years or less.

Master of Arts in German

Before entering the program, a candidate is expected to have the equivalent of the UCI undergraduate German Studies major. Students with a bachelor’s degree in another subject may be considered for admission. Normally their course of study will have to be extended in order to make up for the deficiency. However, each case is considered individually by the faculty. The minimum course requirement for the M.A. degree is nine courses, eight of which must be taken from offerings of the German graduate program. Reading knowledge of a foreign language other than German also is required for the M.A. degree. Whenever possible, a candidate is urged to complete this requirement before entering the program. Further requirements follow.

Students entering with a B.A. must complete their requirements for the M.A. by the end of the second year of study (six quarters) at the latest.

The Preparation of a Reading List. All candidates should prepare as early as possible a list of works read in the field of German literature, both primary texts and critical works. This list should be augmented by critical texts and by works from other literatures which, in the candidate’s opinion, relate to the German works on the list. Since it should ultimately contain representative selections from various eras of German literature and some works of criticism, a tentative list must be discussed with the graduate advisor before the end of the fall quarter of the year in which the candidate expects to receive the M.A. Candidates should indicate on the list a number of works with which they are especially familiar. In its final form (including works read during the course of study both in and outside of class), the list will be submitted together with the master’s essay two weeks before the oral examination. It is the student’s responsibility to keep the reading list current. On the basis of this list, the candidate should design one course as an Introduction to German Literature and Culture. The course must include reading lists of required and optional texts, main and secondary literature, a written justification/course description, and a basic syllabus for a 13-week semester course. The course must be submitted to the committee at least two weeks prior to the oral exam date.

M.A. Comprehensive Examination (consists of two parts):

  1. The Master’s Essay. The purpose of the written part of the M.A. comprehensive examination is to show the candidate’s methodological progress in interpreting German literature and film. It consists of an essay in which a text is elucidated and related to (a) pertinent works by the same author, (b) its social and historical context, and (c) other works of German or other literatures with which the candidate is familiar. The level of the discussion will normally be enhanced by the candidate’s knowledge of the relevant secondary literature. The topic of the essay should be tentatively formulated and reported to the graduate advisor before the end of the second quarter of the student’s residence.
  2. The Oral Examination. During the oral examination the following items will be discussed: (a) the essay, and (b) the reading list, focusing on the course description. The discussion based on the reading list will focus on works which the student knows well, but may broaden into other areas.

One Year of Residence.

Doctor of Philosophy in German

The program requires a minimum of 22 approved courses from students entering with a bachelor’s degree. These may include courses in philosophy, history, comparative literature, and others suitable for the individual student’s program of study. The student also will participate in each of the German Program’s colloquia. The student will augment the reading list and keep it current during the whole course of study. At least two years of residence are required.

Students entering with the master’s degree will be advised individually as to remaining course requirements.

Since the majority of German Ph.D. candidates choose careers that involve teaching, the faculty recognizes its obligation to offer them preparatory experience. Therefore, all candidates for the German Ph.D. are required to teach under the supervision of a faculty member at least one course in each of three quarters (for which they will receive credit as GERMAN 399). Three of these courses may be counted toward the 22 courses required for the Ph.D.

Faculty Mentors. Each graduate student will be assigned a faculty mentor to consult at least once each quarter about progress, the program, academic questions, or any other issues pertaining to the student’s graduate career. A student may change mentors for any reason (indeed, without giving a reason) at any time after meeting with either the graduate advisor or chair.

First-Year Review. Students ending their first year of study at UCI must undergo a more comprehensive review procedure. This applies to students entering with either a B.A. or an M.A. After the review, students will be apprised of the faculty’s evaluation and advised on a future course of study or recommended for discontinuation of the program.

Annual Review. All students will undergo an annual review by the faculty of the program. Each spring the faculty will meet to discuss students’ progress in the program. Annual review and evaluation of student performance and progress assure both the student and the faculty that each student is meeting the academic standards, teaching standards (for teaching assistants and associates, readers, and “ABD” lecturers), and professional standards of conduct expected of graduate students in the program. The review process provides an opportunity to assess and make recommendations regarding any deficiencies in student performance and progress. The following factors will be considered in determining graduate student performance and progress: grade point average, time to degree, foreign language requirement, and teaching performance.

Grade Point Average. All graduate students in German, including those in both the master’s program and the doctoral program, are expected to maintain a 3.3 GPA. A GPA below 3.3 in any quarter falls below the academic standard expected by the program. Pursuant to the terms of appointment, a student whose GPA falls below 3.3 in any given quarter and whose cumulative GPA is not 3.3 by the end of the academic year may be ineligible for funding, and faculty may recommend the student be disqualified from the program.

Foreign Language Requirements. Students must possess reading knowledge of one language other than German or English. This can be demonstrated by completing one year or the equivalent of University-level language study (1C), or passing one of the 97 graduate reading courses, or passing a translation examination administered by the Department. In the two-hour examination, the student translates selections from a scholarly book or article in the target language into English. A dictionary may be used during the examination. Full-time students must demonstrate near-native speaking abilities in German and English. Students with significant deficiencies in language competency that will adversely affect their academic progress normally will not be admitted to doctoral candidacy. Students in the doctoral program will meet language requirements on a schedule established by their doctoral committees, but in all cases the requirements must be met prior to taking the Ph.D. qualifying examination. If these requirements are not met in a timely manner, faculty may recommend disqualification from the program.

Qualifying Examination. In order to advance to candidacy, the student must take and pass a qualifying examination. At least two months prior to the planned date of the exam, students must submit a comprehensive reading list, prepared in consultation with their committee chair, to the examination committee. The committee may make recommendations to the list. On the basis of that list, students must design four courses. One course should be designed as an Introduction to German Literature and Culture. The other three courses, drafted in consultation with the student’s committee chair, are graduate seminars and must ensure breadth and depth of coverage of German literature and culture. They may be organized around topics, genres, authors, or periods. At least one of these courses must comprise the student’s intended area of dissertation research. The four courses must be clearly distinct and have minimal overlap. These courses must include reading lists of required and optional texts, main secondary literature, a written justification/course description, and a basic syllabus (for a 13-week semester course). No more than one course may be a modification of a seminar taken in the program. These courses must be submitted to the committee members at least two weeks prior to an oral examination date. Students must submit a dissertation prospectus to their advisor and, following approval by the advisor, circulate it to the entire committee. The oral exam will be a three-hour exploration of the reading list, focusing on the courses. In addition, part of the qualifying exam will involve a discussion of the student's dissertation prospectus. Upon successful completion of the qualifying examination, the candidate will have advanced to Ph.D. candidacy.

Dissertation Prospectus. Students must submit a dissertation prospectus to their advisor and, following approval by the advisor, circulate it to the entire committee.

Dissertation Chapter Review. Students must submit a substantial piece of writing (approximately 45 pages) from their dissertation ordinarily in the form of a chapter and a comprehensive bibliography. In consultation with their dissertation committee chair, they schedule a date and time for the oral review with the committee, which lasts approximately two-three hours. Prior to the oral review the student will make a public presentation, open to the UCI community and guests, in the form of a lecture with questions and answers.

Doctoral Colloquium. Students who have advanced to candidacy and are in residence must attend a colloquium for doctoral candidates. The colloquium will be held at least two times per quarter. Students will be expected to present sections of their prospectus or dissertation.

Dissertation Defense. The oral defense of the dissertation focuses on the adequacy of the student’s research and thesis.

Two Years of Residence.

Normative Time to Degree and Expected Programs of Study

For students entering with a B.A.:

Year 1: Course work;

Year 2: Course work; M.A. completed;

Year 3: Course work; Qualifying Examination and Dissertation Prospectus (latest, fall of year four); advance to candidacy;

Year 4: Dissertation chapter review and public presentation;

Year 5: Completion of dissertation; defense.

For students entering with an M.A.:

Year 1: Course work;

Year 2: Course work; Qualifying Examination and Dissertation Prospectus (latest, fall of year three); advance to candidacy;

Year 3: Dissertation chapter review and public presentation;

Year 4: Completion of dissertation; defense.

Career Opportunities

The ability to speak and write German can open up opportunities in communications, international business and banking, transportation, government, science and technology, tourism, library services, and teaching, as well as in social justice and non-governmental organization (NGO) work. Because German plays an important role in modern technology, employers in international law, business, the film industry, the airline and travel industry, journalism, professional translating, and all levels of education increasingly seek students with a knowledge of German. German is excellent preparation for professional schools. It can be combined successfully with work in the natural sciences, business and management, and computer sciences, and it is invaluable for advanced work in the humanities and the arts.

Undergraduate Minor in Italian Studies

The minor in Italian Studies is an interdisciplinary curriculum that allows students to go beyond second-year Italian and engage in various aspects of Italian culture by taking courses in Italian literature and other courses related to Italian history and culture in the Departments of Art History, Comparative Literature, English, Film and Media Studies, History, and Philosophy.

Requirements for the Italian Studies Minor

A. Complete the following:
ITALIAN 1A- 1B- 1C Fundamentals of Italian
and Fundamentals of Italian
and Fundamentals of Italian
ITALIAN 2A- 2B- 2C Intermediate Italian
and Intermediate Italian
and Intermediate Italian
B. Seven courses selected from the following two groups, when topics are appropriate. At least five of the seven courses must be from Group 1. Also in Group 1, no more than two courses may be taken from any one department, with the exception of Italian courses.
Group 1
Studies in Renaissance and Baroque Art
Studies in Southern Renaissance Art
Studies in Southern Baroque Art
National/Regional Cinemas and Media
Introduction to Italian Literature
Introduction to Italian Literature
Topics in Italian Literature and Culture
Topics in Political and Social Philosophy
Group 2
Studies in Roman Art
Advanced Seminar: Topics in Art History
Classics and History: The Ancient World
Classical Mythology
Topics in Classical Civilization
Topics in Early Modern Europe

Residence Requirement for the Minor: At least four upper-division courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken at an Italian university through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided they are approved in advance by the Director of the minor.

The Department strongly encourages its students to take advantage of the study-abroad programs in Italy to improve their language skills and gain invaluable cultural experience in a foreign university setting. The Department recommends the UC Education Abroad Program in Italy.

Credit for courses taken through study-abroad programs is available. Students are advised to discuss their course of study with the Undergraduate Director before their departure and to arrange to bring home proof of their work.

Undergraduate Minor in Russian Studies

Spanning both Europe and Asia, Russia is one of the world’s dominant political entities. Its rich cultural traditions have enhanced world literature, theatre, art, film, and dance. As the world’s first socialist state, it became a major political rival of the United States after the Second World War. In the past decade, Russians have abandoned their socialist system and are now in the process of making a rocky transition to capitalism. Although Russia lost sizeable amounts of territory in this transition, the Russian language now serves as the lingua franca throughout many areas formerly controlled by the Soviet Union.

While the demand for specialists in various sectors of government has eased, relationships between our countries at other levels of society are growing more active and business opportunities are exciting and rewarding. Other areas in which the need for Russian language competence is evident right now include trade, environmental protection, social services, law, medicine, and technology.

All students in Russian language courses are encouraged to take part in the UC Education Abroad Program and spend a portion of their junior or senior year studying in Russia. Visit the Study Abroad Center website for additional information.

The Russian Studies minor is a multidisciplinary curriculum combining the Humanities and Social Sciences. It is designed to introduce students to the rich history and culture of Russia and provide them with the intellectual and linguistic tools necessary for sustained engagement with this area of the world.

Requirements for the Russian Studies Minor

A. Complete:
RUSSIAN 2C Intermediate Russian (or equivalent)
B. Complete:
RUSSIAN 50 Russian Culture (three different topics)
C. Select sixteen units of upper-division courses from the following:
Topics in Russian Literature
Topics in Russian Language Through Film
Imperial Russia: 1689-1905
Twentieth-Century Russia
Colloquium (when topics are related to Russia)
Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia
Special Topics in Comparative Politics (when topics are related to Russia)

A maximum of four units may be chosen from the following courses devoted in part to Russian themes: HISTORY 114, HISTORY 126A, HISTORY 126BHISTORY 158A, POL SCI 142D, POL SCI 142E, POL SCI 142F, and SOCECOL E113 (same as INTL ST 121).

Students may petition other relevant courses.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: At least four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department chair.

European Studies Courses

EURO ST 10. Historical Foundations. 4 Units.

Offers an overview of the European experience from its social, political, and cultural foundations to modern European issues and institutions in a globalized world. Topics covered include social, political, and cultural history up to the founding of the European Union.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

((III or IV) and VIII ).

EURO ST 11. Contemporary Issues and Institutions. 4 Units.

Offers an overview of contemporary European societies in social, political, and cultural terms. Topics include shifting geopolitical borders, social movements, and various forms of cultural expression (film, art, literature) as they intersect with and shape contemporary issues and events.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

((III or IV) and VIII ).

EURO ST 101A. European Studies Core I - Early Europe (Pre-1789). 4 Units.

Introduction to multidisciplinary approaches to important themes in European society, culture, art, literature, and politics; encourages students to explore intersections among disciplines. Possible themes: Concept of Europe in Renaissance, Self and Other: Europe and Islam, Hybrid Cultures in Medieval Europe.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 101B. European Studies Core II: Modern Europe (1789-Present). 4 Units.

Multidisciplinary approaches to important themes in modern European society, culture, art, literature, and politics, encouraging students to see points of intersection among disciplines. Possible themes: Subjects, Citizens, and Representation; Europe in the World; European Revolutions in Art and Society.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 102. Topics in Early European History and Culture: Pre-1789. 4 Units.

Addresses historical and cultural events, issues, and texts (art, literature, music, political theory) from the pre-1789 period in more than one European country.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 103. Topics in Modern European History and Culture: Post-1789. 4 Units.

Addresses historical and cultural events, issues, and texts (art, literature, music, political theory) from 1789 to present in more than one European country.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 190W. Senior Seminar in European Studies. 4 Units.

Capstone research seminar. Students engage in rigorous, in-depth, interdisciplinary exploration of specific topics, periods, or themes, investigating and analyzing the intersection of material and discursive culture in different historical periods and geographical locations.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

EURO ST 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed reading and research in consultation with a faculty advisor. Substantial written work required.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

EURO ST 200A. Core Seminar I: Foundations of European Thought and Culture. 4 Units.

Provides a historical, geographical, and methodological overview of foundational texts and issues in European thought and culture. Covering several historical periods between the Middle Ages and the present, students will see how ideas and institutions change over time.

EURO ST 200B. Core Seminar II: Theorizing Periods and Movements in European Thought and Culture. 4 Units.

Periods and movements still form basic units for organizing European thought and theory, even as such categories are problematized. This course will allow for greater focus on a specific time period or constellation of issues around a period or movement.

EURO ST 299. Independent Research. 4 Units.

For students to do independent research with advisors on their master's thesis or master's examination reading lists.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities majors only.

French Courses

FRENCH 1A. Fundamentals of French. 5 Units.

Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French and meet daily. Language laboratory attendance is required.

Overlaps with FRENCH S1AB, FRENCH 1AB.

Restriction: FRENCH 1A and FRENCH 1AB and FRENCH S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

FRENCH 1AB. Intensive Fundamentals of French. 7.5 Units.

Accelerated first half of first-year French. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, viewing, and discussion. Course may be offered online.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1A, FRENCH 1B, FRENCH S1AB.

Restriction: FRENCH 1AB and FRENCH 1A and FRENCH 1B and FRENCH S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

FRENCH 1B. Fundamentals of French. 5 Units.

Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French and meet daily. Language Laboratory attendance is required.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1A. FRENCH 1A with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH S1AB, FRENCH S1BC, FRENCH 1AB, FRENCH 1BC.

Restriction: FRENCH 1B and FRENCH 1AB and FRENCH 1BC and FRENCH S1AB and FRENCH S1BC may not be taken for full credit

FRENCH 1BC. Intensive Fundamentals of French. 7.5 Units.

Accelerated second half of first-year French. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, viewing, and discussion. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Placement into FRENCH 1BC. FRENCH 1AB or FRENCH 1B or FRENCH S1AB. FRENCH 1AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S1AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1B, FRENCH 1C, FRENCH S1BC.

Restriction: FRENCH 1BC and FRENCH 1B and FRENCH 1C and FRENCH S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

FRENCH 1C. Fundamentals of French. 5 Units.

Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French and meet daily. Language Laboratory attendance is required.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1B. FRENCH 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH S1BC, FRENCH 1BC.

Restriction: FRENCH 1C and FRENCH 1BC and FRENCH S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

FRENCH S1AB. Fundamentals of French. 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year French in an intensified form. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1A, FRENCH 1B, FRENCH 1AB.

Restriction: FRENCH S1AB and FRENCH 1A and FRENCH 1B and FRENCH 1AB may not be taken for full credit.

FRENCH S1BC. Fundamentals of French. 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year French in an intensified form. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH S1AB or FRENCH 1B or FRENCH 1AB. FRENCH S1AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1B with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1AB with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1B, FRENCH 1C, FRENCH 1BC.

Restriction: FRENCH S1BC and FRENCH 1B and FRENCH 1C and FRENCH 1BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

FRENCH 2A. Intermediate French. 4 Units.

Texts of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1C or FRENCH 1BC or FRENCH S1BC or placement into FRENCH 2A. FRENCH 1C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S1BC with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH S2AB.

Restriction: FRENCH 2A and FRENCH S2AB may not be taken for full credit. School of Humanities and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

FRENCH 2B. Intermediate French. 4 Units.

Texts of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2A. FRENCH 2A with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH S2AB, FRENCH S2BC.

Restriction: FRENCH 2B and FRENCH S2AB and FRENCH S2BC may not be taken for full credit. School of Humanities majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

FRENCH 2C. Intermediate French. 4 Units.

Texts of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2B or FRENCH S2AB. FRENCH 2B with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2AB with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH S2BC.

Restriction: FRENCH 2C and FRENCH S2BC may not be taken for full credit. School of Humanities majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

FRENCH S2AB. Intermediate French. 6 Units.

First half of second-year French in an intensified form. Texts of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French. Prior high school or college French recommended.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1C or FRENCH 1BC or FRENCH S1BC or placement into FRENCH S2AB. FRENCH 1C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S1BC with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH 2A, FRENCH 2B.

Restriction: FRENCH S2AB and FRENCH 2A and FRENCH 2B may not be taken for full credit.

(VIII)

FRENCH S2BC. Intermediate French. 6 Units.

Second half of second-year French in an intensified form. Texts of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French. Prior high school or college French recommended.

Prerequisite: FRENCH S2AB or FRENCH 2B. FRENCH S2AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with FRENCH 2C, FRENCH 2B.

Restriction: FRENCH S2BC and FRENCH 2B and FRENCH 2C may not be taken for full credit.

(VIII)

FRENCH 10. French Peer Tutoring. 1 Unit.

Tutoring Program in which advanced French students provide assistance to students at a lower level. One hour of tutoring per week.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

FRENCH 13. Conversation. 4 Units.

Helps students increase their fluency and enrich their vocabulary. Taught in French.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or Corequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC.

FRENCH 50. French Culture and the Modern World. 4 Units.

Introductory course for non-majors. Focuses on France's role in the modern world and its cultural connections to Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Taught in English.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

FRENCH 97. Fundamentals of French (with Emphasis on Reading). 4 Units.

Designed primarily for students interested in acquiring a solid reading knowledge of French, and to facilitate the understanding and translating of French texts dealing with a variety of disciplines.

Restriction: Non-French majors only.

FRENCH 100A. Advanced French Writing: Reading and Telling Stories. 4 Units.

Study and practice of various forms of writing including,description and narration. Students build vocabulary and increase reading comprehension while developing the ability to communicate ideas, tell stories, and articulate questions. Readings from texts of literary, historical, and social interest.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC.

FRENCH 100B. Advanced French Essay Writing: Argument and Evidence. 4 Units.

Introduction to essay writing with an emphasis on strategies for identifying a problem, developing an original argument, and,organizing evidence. Introduces idioms and vocabulary to prepare students for advanced courses on French and Francophone literature, culture, and cinema.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 100A.

FRENCH 101A. Introduction to Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry of the nineteenth- century studied in relationship to a specific literary or historical problem.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 100A and FRENCH 100B.

FRENCH 101B. Introduction to Eighteenth-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Literature and philosophy of the eighteenth century studied in relationship to a specific literary or historical problem.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 100A and FRENCH 100B.

FRENCH 101C. Introduction to Twentieth-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Literatures of the French-speaking world studied in relationship to a specific literary or historical problem.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 100A and FRENCH 100B.

FRENCH 110. Topics in Problems in French Culture. 4 Units.

Examines a controversial or critical issue in French culture of different ages through a variety of genres and media.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 116. Topics in Sixteenth-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the diverse literature of the Renaissance and the Age of Exploration.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 117. Topics in Seventeenth-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the age of drama and other vibrant forms in French literature of the period.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 118. Topics in Eighteenth-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the literature and philosophy of the Enlightenment, the Ancient Régime, Classicism, and/or Revolution.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 119. Topics in Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Focuses on the literature of an era that experienced many modernist transformations.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 120. Topics in Twentieth-Century French and Francophone Literature. 4 Units.

A study of modern and contemporary literature and culture.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 125. Topics in African Literature of French Expression. 4 Units.

Introduction to the principal African and Caribbean works written in French. Offers opportunity to study literature and culture in French in a non-European context. Lectures and papers in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 127. Topics in Francophone Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Literature and cultures of the francophone world.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 139W. Literature and Society. 4 Units.

In English. Readings of masterpieces of French literature in their social, political, and historical contexts. Requires at least 4,000 words of assigned composition based on French works. Several essays required.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. French majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

FRENCH 140. Topics in French Literary Genre. 4 Units.

Examines the development and transformation of a single genre, such as the poem or the novel.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 150. Topics in French Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Study of a theme, movement, or problem crucial to understanding French Literature and Culture.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 160. French Cinema. 4 Units.

Study of a period, movement, or theme in French or Francophone cinema.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

FRENCH 170. Topics in History and Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the dialogue between historical events and literary texts.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended as prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 171. Politics and Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the role played by politics and ethics in French literature, film, and culture.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 180. Junior/Senior Seminar: Topics in Theory and Criticism. 4 Units.

Advanced study of theoretical and critical texts.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC. Recommended prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 1 times as topics vary.

FRENCH 185. Junior/Senior Seminar in French Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Required intensive writing course for French majors to explore in depth selected topic in French literature and culture. Students complete major independent research project on topic studied, making use of literary and critical materials in their capstone essay. In French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 100A and FRENCH 100B. Prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 101A and FRENCH 101B and FRENCH 101C. Only one course in the French 101A-101B-101C series may be taken as a corequisite.

FRENCH 199. Special Studies in French. 1-4 Units.

A project proposal is prepared by the student and approved by the faculty member who directs the project. Procedure must be completed by the end of the first week of classes.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Repeatability: once for M.A. candidates; twice for Ph.D. candidates.

FRENCH 216. Studies in Renaissance Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the Renaissance period.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 217. Studies in Seventeenth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the 17th century.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 218. Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the 18th century.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 219. Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the 19th century.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 220. Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the 20th and 21st century.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 9 times as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 225. Francophone Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Studies in different francophone literatures and cultures (of Canada, the Caribbean, West and North Africa, and Southeast Asia).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 231. Studies in Fiction . 4 Units.

Examines the art of fiction.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 232. Studies in Nonfictional Prose. 4 Units.

Examines non-fictional genres such as the essay and the memoir.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 233. Studies in Poetry and Poetics. 4 Units.

Examines the genre of poetry and theories of poetry.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 240. Studies on a Major Writer. 4 Units.

Focused study of one author.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 250. Studies in Theory and Criticism. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in theory and/or criticism.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 254. History and Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of literary works in their historical context.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 272. Cultural Studies . 4 Units.

Examines the theoretical paradigm of cultural studies.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 280. Directed Study in French Literature. 4 Units.

For graduate students taking the Master's examination the same quarter.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 290. Research in French Language and Literature. 4 Units.

A project proposal is prepared by the student and approved by the faculty member who directs the project. Procedure must be completed by the end of the first week of classes. Limit: Once for M.A. candidates; twice for Ph.D. candidates.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. French major only.

FRENCH 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

For graduate students writing a dissertation with a faculty member in French.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities majors only.

FRENCH 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

For graduate students completing a course on foreign language pedagogy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities majors only.

German Courses

GERMAN 1A. Fundamentals of German. 5 Units.

Emphasizes the development of meaningful communicative skills in German for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. With a learner-centered approach, the courses help students develop speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Overlaps with GERMAN S1AB, GERMAN 1AB.

Restriction: GERMAN 1A and GERMAN 1AB and GERMAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

GERMAN 1AB. Intensive German Fundamentals . 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year German in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge. Course may be offered online. Materials fee.

Prerequisite: Placement into GERMAN 1AB.

Overlaps with GERMAN S1AB, GERMAN 1A, GERMAN 1B.

Restriction: GERMAN 1AB and GERMAN 1A and GERMAN 1B and GERMAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

GERMAN 1B. Fundamentals of German. 5 Units.

Emphasizes the development of meaningful communicative skills in German for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. With a learner-centered approach, students develop speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1A or placement into GERMAN 1B. GERMAN 1A with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GERMAN S1AB, GERMAN S1BC, GERMAN 1AB, GERMAN 1BC.

Restriction: GERMAN 1B and GERMAN 1AB and GERMAN S1AB and GERMAN 1BC and GERMAN S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

GERMAN 1BC. Intensive German Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first-year German in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge. Course may be offered online. Materials fee.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1AB or GERMAN 1B or GERMAN S1AB or placement into GERMAN 1BC. GERMAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. GERMAN S1AB with a grade of C or better. GERMAN 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GERMAN 1B, GERMAN 1C, GERMAN S1BC.

Restriction: GERMAN 1BC and GERMAN 1B and GERMAN 1C and GERMAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

GERMAN 1C. Fundamentals of German. 5 Units.

Emphasizes the development of meaningful communicative skills in German for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. With a learner-centered approach, students develop speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1B or placement into GERMAN 1C. GERMAN 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GERMAN 1BC, GERMAN S1BC.

Restriction: GERMAN 1BC and GERMAN 1C and GERMAN S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

GERMAN S1AB. Fundamentals of German. 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year German in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Overlaps with GERMAN 1A, GERMAN 1B, GERMAN 1AB.

Restriction: GERMAN S1AB and GERMAN 1A and GERMAN 1B and GERMAN 1AB may not be taken for full credit.

GERMAN S1BC. Fundamentals of German. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first-year German in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1AB or GERMAN 1B or GERMAN S1AB or placement into GERMAN S1BC. GERMAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. GERMAN 1B with a grade of C or better. GERMAN S1AB with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GERMAN 1B, GERMAN 1C, GERMAN 1BC.

Restriction: GERMAN 1BC and GERMAN S1BC and GERMAN 1B and GERMAN 1C may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

GERMAN 2A. Intermediate German. 4 Units.

Emphasizes communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and intermediate study of German. With a learner-centered approach, helps students develop reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammatical, and cultural skills and knowledge. First-year grammar is reviewed and expanded.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1BC or GERMAN 1C or GERMAN S1BC or placement into GERMAN 2A. GERMAN 1BC with a grade of C or better. GERMAN 1C with a grade of C or better. GERMAN S1BC with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GERMAN S2AB.

Restriction: School of Humanities majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment. GERMAN 2A and GERMAN S2AB may not be taken for full credit.

(VIII)

GERMAN 2B. Intermediate German. 4 Units.

Emphasizes communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and intermediate study of German. With a learner-centered approach, helps students develop reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammatical, and cultural skills and knowledge. First-year grammar is reviewed and expanded.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2A or placement into GERMAN 2B. GERMAN 2A with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GERMAN S2AB, GERMAN S2BC.

Restriction: School of Humanities majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment. GERMAN 2B and GERMAN S2AB and GERMAN S2BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VIII)

GERMAN 2C. Intermediate German. 4 Units.

Emphasizes communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and intermediate study of German. With a learner-centered approach, helps students develop reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammatical, and cultural skills and knowledge. First-year grammar is reviewed and expanded.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2B or placement into GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GERMAN S2BC.

Restriction: School of Humanities majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment. GERMAN 2C and GERMAN S2BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VIII)

GERMAN S2AB. Intermediate German. 6 Units.

First half of second-year German in a time-intensive form. Emphasizes communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and intermediate study of German. Learner-centered approach develops reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammatical, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1C or GERMAN S1BC.

Overlaps with GERMAN 2A, GERMAN 2B.

Restriction: GERMAN S2AB and GERMAN 2A and GERMAN 2B may not be taken for full credit.

(VIII)

GERMAN S2BC. Intermediate German. 6 Units.

Second half of second-year German in a time-intensive form. Emphasizes communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and intermediate study of German. Learner-centered approach develops reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammatical, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2B or GERMAN S2AB. GERMAN 2B with a grade of C or better. GERMAN S2AB with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GERMAN 2B, GERMAN 2C.

Restriction: GERMAN S2BC and GERMAN 2B and GERMAN 2C may not be taken for full credit.

(VIII)

GERMAN 50. Science, Society, and Mind. 4 Units.

Historical, philosophical, and literary reflections by German writers on the rise of the modern sciences. In English. Designed primarily for nonmajors.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

GERMAN 53. Advanced Conversation. 2 Units.

Includes reading of political and cultural material. Conducted in German.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 2C.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

GERMAN 97. Fundamentals of German (with Emphasis on Reading). 4 Units.

Primarily for students interested in acquiring a solid reading knowledge of German. Facilitates comprehension and translation of texts in various disciplines. Does not serve as prerequisite for any higher-level German courses or fulfill any undergraduate foreign language requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Non-German majors only.

GERMAN 101. Introduction to German Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Sample interpretations of texts in their cultural and historical contexts. Introduction to critical language in German.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 102. German Culture and Society. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary introduction to German culture from the perspective of its aesthetic, social, and political aspects. Methodological problems arising from an analysis of culture in its historical context.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 103. German Film. 4 Units.

Introduction to the history and interpretation of German film within its cultural and social contexts. Enhances German grammar knowledge and vocabulary and develops sophisticated speaking, writing, and reading skills.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 104. Introduction to Germanic Linguistics. 4 Units.

Introduces German or other Germanic-language linguistic, sociolinguistic, or ethnography-of-communication topics. Taught in German.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 105. German for Professions . 4 Units.

Explores the structure of German business practices, including in scientific fields and engineering, while developing verbal and written skills important for professional life in Germany. Taught in German.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better.

GERMAN 115. Advanced German for Business and Economics. 4 Units.

Explores the structure of the German economy and business practices while developing advanced verbal and written skills important for professional life in Germany. Taught in German.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 105.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 117. Topics in German Literature and Culture 750-1750. 4 Units.

Specific course content determined by individual faculty members. Example: Luther and the European Renaissance.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 101 or GERMAN 102 or GERMAN 103 or GERMAN 104.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 118. Studies in the Age of Goethe. 4 Units.

Individual authors such as Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, and Hölderlin, or the drama of the "angry young men" of the German 1770s.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 101 or GERMAN 102 or GERMAN 103 or GERMAN 104.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 119. Studies in Nineteenth-Century German Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Individual authors such as Büchner, Grillparzer, Keller, and Nietzsche, or broader social-literary phenomena.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 101 or GERMAN 102 or GERMAN 103 or GERMAN 104.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 120. Studies in Twentieth Century German Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Individual authors such as Thomas Mann, Brecht, and Kafka, or topics addressing questions of genre and/or social-literary problems.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 101 or GERMAN 102 or GERMAN 103 or GERMAN 104.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 130. Topics in German Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Literary and cultural topics not fully contained within the periods listed above, such as "German Comedy" and "Turn-of-the-Century Vienna.".

Prerequisite: GERMAN 101 or GERMAN 102 or GERMAN 103 or GERMAN 104.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 140. Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism. 4 Units.

In English. Theoretical dimensions of literary criticism and the German philosophical tradition. Topics have included Marxism, Freudian thought, German Idealist aesthetics, Historicism, twentieth-century hermeneutics, Frankfurt School, and Rezeptionsästhetik.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 140W. Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism. 4 Units.

In English. Theoretical dimensions of literary criticism and the German philosophical tradition. Topics have included Marxism, Freudian thought, German Idealist aesthetics, Historicism, twentieth-century hermeneutics, Frankfurt School, and Rezeptionsaesthetik.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

GERMAN 150. German Literature and Culture in Translation. 4 Units.

In English. Major works in Germanic literature and culture in context.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 150W. German Literature and Culture in Translation. 4 Units.

In English. Major works in Germanic literature and culture in context.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

GERMAN 160. German Cinema.

Historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives on German cinema.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 160W. German Cinema. 4 Units.

Historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives on German cinema.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

GERMAN 170. Topics in German Linguistics. 4 Units.

Explores linguistic, sociolinguistic, or ethnography-of-communication topics of German or other Germanic languages (Swedish, Icelandic, Yiddish, and others). Taught in English.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 170W. Topics in German Linguistics. 4 Units.

Explores linguistic, sociolinguistic, or ethnography-of-communication topics of German or other Germanic languages (Swedish, Icelandic, Yiddish, and others). Taught in English.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

GERMAN 197. German Internship . 4 Units.

In this internship course, students will engage in professional practice (e.g., Engineering, Business Administration, government) in a German setting and thereby increase their knowledge of German language and culture in a setting beyond the academic classroom.

Prerequisite: German 2C.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

GERMAN 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with German faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

GERMAN 200. Literary Criticism . 4 Units.

Topics in literary criticism.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 210. Literary Theory . 4 Units.

Topics in literary theory.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 220. Selected Topics in German Linguistics . 4 Units.

Topics in German linguistics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 230. Literary and Cultural History. 4 Units.

Topics in literary and cultural history.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 290. Independent Study. 4 Units.

Counted toward course requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. A term paper or project is required.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities majors only.

GERMAN 298. Independent Directed Reading. 4-12 Units.

For students preparing for doctoral examination.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

For students who have been admitted to doctoral candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities majors only.

GERMAN 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Italian Courses

ITALIAN 1A. Fundamentals of Italian. 5 Units.

Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and meet daily.

Overlaps with ITALIAN S1AB, ITALIAN 1AB.

Restriction: ITALIAN 1A and ITALIAN 1AB and ITALIAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

ITALIAN 1AB. Intensive Italian Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year Italian in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with Italian speakers and beginning study of Italian. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge. Course may be offered online.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1A, ITALIAN 1B, ITALIAN S1AB.

Restriction: ITALIAN 1AB and ITALIAN 1A and ITALIAN 1B and ITALIAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

ITALIAN 1B. Fundamentals of Italian. 5 Units.

Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and meet daily.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 1A or placement into ITALIAN 1B. ITALIAN 1A with grade of C or better.

Overlaps with ITALIAN S1AB, ITALIAN S1BC, ITALIAN 1AB, ITALIAN 1BC.

Restriction: ITALIAN 1B and ITALIAN 1AB and ITALIAN 1BC and ITALIAN S1AB and ITALIAN S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

ITALIAN 1BC. Intensive Italian Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first-year Italian in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with Italian speakers and beginning study of Italian. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Placement into ITALIAN 1BC. ITALIAN 1AB or ITALIAN 1B or ITALIAN S1AB. ITALIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN S1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1B, ITALIAN 1C, ITALIAN S1BC.

Restriction: ITALIAN 1AB and ITALIAN 1A and ITALIAN 1B and ITALIAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

ITALIAN 1C. Fundamentals of Italian. 5 Units.

Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and meet daily.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 1B or ITALIAN 1AB or ITALIAN S1AB or placement into ITALIAN 1C. ITALIAN 1B with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN S1AB with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with ITALIAN S1BC, ITALIAN 1BC.

Restriction: ITALIAN 1C and ITALIAN 1BC and ITALIAN S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

ITALIAN S1AB. Italian Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

First-year Italian in an intensified form. Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and meet daily three hours for five weeks each session.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1A, ITALIAN 1B, ITALIAN 1AB.

Restriction: ITALIAN S1AB and ITALIAN 1A and ITALIAN 1B and ITALIAN 1AB may not be taken for full credit.

ITALIAN S1BC. Italian Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

First-year Italian in an intensified form. Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and meet daily three hours for five weeks each session.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN S1AB or ITALIAN 1B or ITALIAN 1AB. ITALIAN S1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1B with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1B, ITALIAN 1C, ITALIAN 1BC.

Restriction: ITALIAN S1BC and ITALIAN 1B and ITALIAN 1C and ITALIAN 1BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

ITALIAN 2A. Intermediate Italian. 4 Units.

Texts of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 1C or ITALIAN 1BC or ITALIAN S1BC or placement into ITALIAN 2A. ITALIAN 1C with grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1BC with grade of C or better. ITALIAN S1BC with grade of C or better.

Restriction: School of Humanities and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

ITALIAN 2B. Intermediate Italian. 4 Units.

Texts of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 2A or Placement Exam into 2B. ITALIAN 2A with a grade of C or better.

Restriction: School of Humanities and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

ITALIAN 2C. Intermediate Italian. 4 Units.

Texts of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 2B or Placement Exam into 2C. ITALIAN 2B with grade of C or better.

Restriction: School of Humanities and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

ITALIAN 99. Special Studies in Italian. 4 Units.

Both student and instructor arrive at the theme of the course and the critical approach to be followed in consultation. Intended to offer courses in Italian otherwise unavailable.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ITALIAN 101A. Introduction to Italian Literature. 4 Units.

Introduction to all of the genres of a narrowly defined period in relationship to a specific literary problem. In Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 2C.

ITALIAN 101B. Introduction to Italian Literature. 4 Units.

Introduction to all of the genres of a narrowly defined period in relationship to a specific literary problem. In Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 2C.

ITALIAN 150. Topics in Italian Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Major themes, periods, and/or movements in Italian literature and culture. Taught in English.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ITALIAN 199. Tutorial in Italian Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

The student must submit a written description of the proposed course to the instructor and the Chair prior to the beginning of the course.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Russian Courses

RUSSIAN 1A. Fundamentals of Russian. 5 Units.

Focuses on reading, comprehension, basic composition, and conversation skills, and gives the student an initial exposure to the Russian cultural scene.

Prerequisite: Placement into RUSSIAN 1A.

Overlaps with RUSSIAN 1AB.

Restriction: RUSSIAN 1A and RUSSIAN 1AB may not be taken for full credit.

RUSSIAN 1AB. Intensive Russian Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

First half of first‐year Russian in a time‐intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with Russian speakers and beginning study of Russian. Learner‐centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Placement into RUSSIAN 1A.

Overlaps with RUSSIAN 1A, RUSSIAN 1B.

Restriction: RUSSIAN 1AB and RUSSIAN 1A and RUSSIAN 1B may not be taken for full credit.

RUSSIAN 1B. Fundamentals of Russian. 5 Units.

Focuses on reading, comprehension, basic composition, and conversation skills, and gives the student an initial exposure to the Russian cultural scene.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 1A or placement into RUSSIAN 1B. RUSSIAN 1A with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with RUSSIAN 1AB, RUSSIAN 1BC.

Restriction: RUSSIAN 1B and RUSSIAN 1AB and RUSSIAN 1BC may not be taken for full credit.

RUSSIAN 1BC. Intensive Russian Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first‐year Russian in a time‐intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with Russian speakers and beginning study of Russian. Learner‐centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 1AB or Russian 1B. RUSSIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. RUSSIAN 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with RUSSIAN 1B, RUSSIAN 1C.

Restriction: Russian 1BC and Russian 1B and Russian 1C may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

RUSSIAN 1C. Fundamentals of Russian. 5 Units.

Focuses on reading, comprehension, basic composition, and conversation skills, and gives the student an initial exposure to the Russian cultural scene.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 1AB or RUSSIAN 1B or placement into RUSSIAN 1C. RUSSIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. RUSSIAN 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with RUSSIAN 1BC.

Restriction: RUSSIAN 1BC and RUSSIAN 1C may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

RUSSIAN 2A. Intermediate Russian. 4 Units.

Students read simple passages from contemporary Russian literary texts and newspapers. Development of oral skills and exposure to Russian culture continue.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 1BC or RUSSIAN 1C or placement in RUSSIAN 2A. RUSSIAN 1BC with a grade of C or better. RUSSIAN 1C with a grade of C or better.

Restriction: School of Humanities majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

RUSSIAN 2B. Intermediate Russian. 4 Units.

Students read simple passages from contemporary Russian literary texts and newspapers. Development of oral skills and exposure to Russian culture continue.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 2A or placement into RUSSIAN 2B. RUSSIAN 2A with a grade of C or better.

Restriction: School of Humanities majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

RUSSIAN 2C. Intermediate Russian. 4 Units.

Students read simple passages from contemporary Russian literary texts and newspapers. Development of oral skills and exposure to Russian culture continue.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 2B or placement into RUSSIAN 2C. RUSSIAN 2B with a grade of C or better.

Restriction: School of Humanities majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

RUSSIAN 50. Russian Culture . 4 Units.

Study of varied topics in Russian culture, area studies, and society, both in the present and in historical perspective.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

RUSSIAN 99. Special Studies Russian. 1-5 Units.

Special studies under faculty supervision.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

RUSSIAN 150. Topics in Russian Literature. 4 Units.

Examines major themes in Russian literature, film, and other media from the eighteenth to twenty-first centuries. Taught in English.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

RUSSIAN 190. Topics in Russian Language Through Film. 4 Units.

Uses Russian films of the late 20th century to enhance students' language skills and deepen their cultural knowledge. Work involves intensive conversation, reading and listening comprehension, and the acquisition of written skills and grammatical accuracy. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Corequisite: RUSSIAN 2C.
Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 2C.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

RUSSIAN 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent study under direct faculty supervision.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Faculty

Luis Avilés, Ph.D. Brown University, Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (Golden Age literature and critical theory)
Etienne Balibar, Ph.D. Catholic University of Nijmegen, Professor Emeritus of French; Comparative Literature (political philosophy, critical theory, epistemology of the social sciences, ethics)
Nina Bandelj, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of Sociology; European Languages and Studies (economic sociology, culture, organizations, social networks, political economy, globalization, social change, central and eastern Europe)
Anke Biendarra, Ph.D. University of Washington, Associate Professor of German (20th- and 21st-century German literature, culture, and film, cultural studies)
Daniel R. Brunstetter, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Associate Professor of Political Science; European Languages and Studies (political theory, international relations, French political thought)
Kurt R. Buhanan, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language; European Languages and Studies; Humanities
Ellen S. Burt, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century French literature and nineteenth-century poetry)
David Carroll, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emeritus of French (critical theory and twentieth-century French literature)
Nahum D. Chandler, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Director of the Graduate Program in Culture and Theory and Associate Professor of African American Studies; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (modern intellectual history, history of the human sciences)
James T. Chiampi, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Italian (Dante and Italian Renaissance)
Edward Dimendberg, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, Professor of Film and Media Studies; European Languages and Studies; Visual Studies (film and literature, history of the book, scholarly communication)
Kai Evers, Ph.D. Duke University, Associate Professor of German (20th-century German literature and film, modernism and Holocaust literature, theories of violence and catastrophic imagination)
Herschel Farbman, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Professor of French (modernism, critical theory)
Sarah Bennett Farmer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of History; European Languages and Studies (modern French history, twentieth-century Europe, social and cultural history)
Suzanne Gearhart, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emerita of French (seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French literature, philosophy and literature)
Zina Giannopoulou, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Graduate Advisor and Associate Professor of Classics; European Languages and Studies (philosophy and literature, Classical tradition, Plato, Greek tragedy and epic)
Michael A. Green, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Russian (eighteenth-century Russian theatre and literary theory, Pushkin, Chekhov, Kuzmin, Russian Symbolist theater, cabaret theatre, Russian literature and theater of the 1920s)
Elizabeth Guthrie, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emerita of French (second-language acquisition and teaching)
Franca Hamber, B.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Italian
Gail K. Hart, Ph.D. University of Virginia, Professor of German (18th- and early-19th-century German drama and fiction, Schiller, history of punishment)
Douglas M. Haynes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Vice Provost for Equity and Diversity and Professor of History; African American Studies; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (social and cultural history of modern Britain, social history of modern medicine)
Judd D. Hubert, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emeritus of French (seventeenth- and nineteenth-century French literature)
Ruth Klüger, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emerita of German (Kleist, nineteenth-century literature, Stifter, Holocaust literature)
Meredith A. Lee, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emerita of German (lyric poetry, eighteenth-century literature, Goethe, music and literature)
Matthias Lehmann, Ph.D. Freie Universtät Berlin, Director of the Interdisciplinary Minor in Jewish Studies and Teller Family Chair in Jewish History and Professor of History; European Languages and Studies (early modern and modern Jewish history, Sephardic studies)
Herbert H. Lehnert, Ph.D. University of Kiel, Professor Emeritus of German (Thomas Mann)
Glenn S. Levine, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, German Language Program Director and Professor of German; Education (applied linguistics, foreign language pedagogy, German-Jewish culture and history, Yiddish language and culture, European culinary history)
William J. Lillyman, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of German (Romanticism, Goethe, Tieck)
Nancy Ann McLoughlin, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Associate Professor of History; European Languages and Studies (late Medieval Europe, intellectual history, gender)
Maryse J. Mijalski, Ed.D. Univeristy of Southern California, Lecturer of French (Second-language pedagogy and teaching.)
Lora D. Mjolsness, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Lecturer of Russian (Soviet and Russian Animation; 19th century, 20th century and Contemporary Children's Literature; Russian Folklore.)
Santiago Morales-Rivera, Ph.D. Harvard University, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese; European Languages and Studies (contemporary Spanish intellectual history, literature and culture)
Eve C. Morisi, Ph.D. Princeton University and the Sorbonne, Assistant Professor of French (19th- and 20th-century French and francophone poetry and prose; relationships between poetics, politics, and ethics; modern representations of extreme violence, oppression, and resistance; Hugo, Baudelaire, and Camus studies)
Gonzalo Navajas, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth through twentieth-first century Spanish literature and intellectual history, film, critical theory, cultural criticism, creative writing)
Jane O. Newman, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; English; European Languages and Studies (comparative Renaissance and early modern literature and culture [English, French, German, Italian, neo-Latin], Mediterranean Renaissance studies, Baroque, afterlives of antiquity, Walter Benjamin, Erich Auerbach, pre-modern lessons for the modern and post-modern)
Carrie J. Noland, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of French; Comparative Literature (20th-century poetry and poetics, avant-garde movements in art and literature, critical theory, performance studies)
David T. Pan, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of German (18th-, 19th-, and early 20th-century German literature and intellectual history)
Amy Powell, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Art History; European Languages and Studies; Visual Studies (Late medieval and early modern art of northern Europe, critical theory)
Gary Richardson, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Economics; European Languages and Studies
Annette M. Schlichter, Ph.D. Humboldt University of Berlin, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (feminist theory and criticism, queer theory, critiques of heterosexuality, contemporary American literature, gender and literature, voice studies)
Beryl F. Schlossman, Doctorate University of Paris 7, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor of Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (Modern literature, critical theory, film studies, psychoanalysis, the arts in society.)
Gabriele J. Schwab, Ph.D. University of Konstanz, Department Chair and UCI Chancellor's Professor of Comparative Literature; Anthropology; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (modern literature, critical theory, psychoanalysis, comparative literature)
Martin Schwab, Ph.D. Heidelberg University, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (philosophy and aesthetics)
Victoria A. Silver, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of English; European Languages and Studies (early modern literature and culture, religious studies, history and theory of rhetoric, literature and philosophy)
John H. Smith, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Comparative Literature; German (18th- and 19th-century literature and intellectual history, literary theory)
James Steintrager, Ph.D. Columbia University, Director of the Emphasis in Critical Theory and Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century comparative literature, ethical philosophy and literature, systems theory, amatory and erotic fiction)
Georges Y. Van Den Abbeele, Ph.D. Cornell University, Dean of the School of Humanities and Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (French and European philosophical literature, travel narrative and tourism/migration studies, critical theory and aesthetics, francophone literature, history of cartography, media history and theory.)
Andrzej J. Warminski, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean for Academic Personnel and Professor of English; European Languages and Studies; Humanities (romanticism, history of literary theory, contemporary theory, literature and philosophy)
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