Pharmacological Sciences

undefined

Frederick J. Ehlert, Graduate Program Director/Advisor for the Interdisciplinary Program

Graduate Student Affairs: 949-824-7651 (Program administered by the Department of Pharmacology)
http://www.pharmacology.uci.edu and http://www.pharmsci.uci.edu

The Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences join forces to offer an interdisciplinary program leading to the Ph.D. degree in Pharmacological Sciences with a concentration in Pharmacology or in Pharmaceutical Sciences. For complete program information, see the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

The Department of Pharmacology also admits students through the following two gateway programs:

Graduate Gateway Program in Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology (MCP). The one-year graduate MCP Gateway Program is designed to function in concert with selected department programs, including the Ph.D. in Pharmacological Sciences. Upon successful completion of the MCP curriculum at the end of their first year, students choose a faculty advisor who is affiliated with one of the participating departments, and transition into their “home” department to complete the remaining degree requirements. They will receive their Ph.D. degree from the department of their chosen advisor. Detailed information is available at Department of Pharmacology website.

The Department also participates in the Interdepartmental Neuroscience Gateway Program, described in the Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences section of the Catalogue. Students who select a focus in Neuroscience and a research advisor in the Department begin following the departmental requirements for the Ph.D. at the beginning of their second year and will receive their Ph.D. from the department of their chosen advisor. Detailed information is available at Interdepartmental Neuroscience Gateway Program website.

Courses

PHARM 210. Chemical Neuroanatomy. 4 Units.

Organization of the nervous system, especially with respect to chemical identity of elements, for students of pharmacology. Major cell types, methods of study, ultrastructure, synaptic organization of functionally defined systems, localization of chemically defined cells and receptors, and brain development.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PHARM 241. Advanced Topics in Pharmacology. 2 Units.

Application of pharmacological principles in disease therapy. Advanced pharmacological mechanisms and in-depth study of drug action. Discussion of several major drug classes/therapeutic strategies: molecular mechanisms of action, physiological consequences of administration, and clinical use.

PHARM 241B. Graduate Pharmacology. 6 Units.

Principles of pharmacology and in-depth study of drug action. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: absorption, distribution and metabolism, general principles of action and receptor concepts. Discussion of major drug classes: molecular mechanism of action, physiological consequences of administration, and clinical use.

Prerequisite: PHYSIO 206A and PHYSIO 206B and BIOCHEM 210A.

PHARM 251. Experimental Pharmacology. 4 Units.

Introduction to the concepts and techniques used in pharmacological science. Molecular biology, quantitative and biochemical pharmacology, fluorescent probes, behavior, genetics, animal handling, anatomical and receptor binding analysis, methods for ion channel study, the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of drugs.

PHARM 254. Introduction to Pharmacology. 4 Units.

Receptor analysis: bioassay measuring contraction, calcium mobilization, second messenger responses; operant conditioning: whole animal, single neuron; radioligand binding; quantitative autoradiography; immunocytochemistry; in situ hybridization for analysis of mRNA; Western and Northern analysis; transgenic mouse knock in and knock out techniques.

PHARM 255. Chemical Transmission. 4 Units.

Mechanisms underlying chemical signaling processes in the brain and periphery. Molecular biology, signal transduction, transmitter synthesis and inactivation, pharmacology of integrative function and behavior.

PHARM 256. Experimental Design for Pharmacologists. 1 Unit.

Population and sample statistics, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, experimental design, power, and the use of statistical computer software.

Prerequisite: PHARM 252.

PHARM 257. Ethics in Research. 1 Unit.

Ethical conduct in research including data handling, authorship, conflict of interest, animal rights, handling of misconduct.

Prerequisite: PHARM 299.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

PHARM 270. Applied Pharmacology . 3 Units.

One week (five days, 40 hours) in-residence course offered on the UCI campus. Introduction to pharmacological techniques and current research problems; includes laboratory demonstrations and research seminars.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 271. Principles of Pharmacology . 3 Units.

Principles of pharmacology: pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics, drug interactions, and toxicity. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 272. Receptors and Drug Targets . 3 Units.

Molecular basis of drug-receptor interaction. Receptor properties including gene and protein structure, signaling mechanisms, trafficking and physiological effects: G-protein linked receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases, nuclear receptors, and ligand regulated transcription factors. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 274. Research Techniques in Pharmacology. 3 Units.

Experimental techniques and model systems used in pharmacological research. Receptor analysis, bioassay, molecular biology, in vitro pharmacology, biochemical pharmacology, imaging, electrophysiology, in vivo pharmacology, disease models. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 276. Experimental Design and Data Analysis . 3 Units.

Experimental design, data analysis and interpretation. Population and sample statistics, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, and power calculations. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 277. Ethics in Scientific Research. 3 Units.

Ethical conduct in research including data handling, authorship, conflict of interest, animal rights, and handling of misconduct. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 278. Concepts in Drug Discovery. 3 Units.

Critical steps involved in discovery and optimization of a new drug. Target selection, relationship of molecular structure to pharmacological activities, screening methods, strategies to identify lead compounds, and preclinical characterization necessary for development of the drug for clinical trials. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 279. Special Topics in Pharmacology. 3 Units.

Topics of current interest in pharmacology; discussion of recent research publications. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 280. Master's Project in Pharmacology. 3 Units.

Capstone research paper on topic of interest in pharmacology. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 281. Neuropharmacology . 3 Units.

Autonomic and central nervous system pharmacology, including major drug classes and therapeutic uses. Mechanisms underlying chemical signaling processes in the brain and peripheral nervous system, including neurotransmitter synthesis, inactivation, and receptor action. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 282. Behavioral Pharmacology. 3 Units.

Pharmacology of integrative function and behavior. Drug treatment of pain. Mechanisms of reward, addiction, and drugs of abuse. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 283. Cardiovascular Pharmacology. 3 Units.

Basic understanding of drugs used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms of action, clinical and adverse effects. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 284. Endocrine, Respiratory, and Gastrointestinal Pharmacology . 3 Units.

Basic understanding of drugs used in endocrine, respiratory, and gastrointestinal conditions, including hormone replacement, contraceptives, and drugs for diabetes, asthma, obesity, ulcer, and gastric reflux. Mechanisms of drug action, clinical and adverse effects. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Master's in Pharmacology graduate students only.

PHARM 298. Seminar. 2 Units.

Presentation and discussion of current problems and methods in teaching and research in pharmacology, toxicology, and therapeutics.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PHARM 299. Research. 1-12 Units.

Independent research with Pharmacology and Toxicology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

Geoffrey W. Abbott, Ph.D. University of London, Professor of Pharmacology; Physiology and Biophysics
James D. Belluzzi, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology
Stephen C. Bondy, Ph.D. University of Birmingham, Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Pharmacology; Program in Public Health
Emiliana Borrelli, Ph.D. University of Strasbourg, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Pharmacology
Catherine M. Cahill, Ph.D. Dalhousie University, Acting Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Pharmacology
A. Richard Chamberlin, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Department Chair and Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Chemistry; Pharmacology (chemical biology, organic and synthetic)
Olivier Civelli, Ph.D. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Department Chair and Eric L. and Lila D. Nelson Chair in Neuropharmacology and Professor of Pharmacology; Developmental and Cell Biology; Pharmaceutical Sciences (novel neuroactive molecules)
Sue P. Duckles, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor Emerita of Pharmacology
Frederick J. Ehlert, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Pharmacology
Pietro R. Galassetti, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Pharmacology
Kelvin W. Gee, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Professor of Pharmacology
Stephen Hanessian, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Director of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Graduate Program and Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Chemistry; Pharmacology (organic chemistry)
Naoto Hoshi, Ph.D. Kanazawa University, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology; Physiology and Biophysics
Mahtab F. Jafari, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Vice Chair of the Undergraduate Program in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Pharmacology
Diana N. Krause, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology
Arthur D. Lander, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Donald Bren Professor and Professor of Developmental and Cell Biology; Biomedical Engineering; Logic and Philosophy of Science; Pharmacology (systems biology of development, pattern formation, growth control)
Frances L. Leslie, Ph.D. University of Aberdeen, Professor of Pharmacology; Anatomy and Neurobiology
Ellis Levin, M.D. Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Professor in Residence of Medicine; Biological Chemistry; Pharmacology
John C. Longhurst, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Susan Samueli Chair in Integrative Medicine and Professor of Medicine; Pharmacology; Physiology and Biophysics
Sandra E. Loughlin-Burkhead, B.A. University of California, San Diego, Specialist of Pharmacology
Zhigang D. Luo, Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Pharmacology
Daniele Piomelli, Ph.D. Columbia University, Louise Turner Arnold Chair in the Neurosciences and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Biological Chemistry; Pharmacology
Ralph E. Purdy, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology
Stefano Sensi, M.D. Gabriele D'Annunzio University of Chieti Pescara, Associate Adjunct Professor of Neurology; Pharmacology
Larry Stein, Ph.D. University of Iowa, Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology
Jeffrey R. Suchard, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Emergency Medicine; Pharmacology
Qun-Yong Zhou, Ph.D. Oregon Health & Science University, Professor of Pharmacology
Xiaolin Zi, Ph.D. Shanghai University, Associate Professor of Urology; Pharmacology
Back to Top