Department of Planning, Policy, and Design

Scott A. Bollens, Interim Department Chair
300 Social Ecology I
949-824-0563
http://ppd.soceco.uci.edu/

Overview

The Department of Planning, Policy, and Design utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of urban and regional planning, public policy issues, and the built environment. The Department faculty devote their scholarly and teaching efforts to theory-driven and empirically oriented urban research and their interests include urban and community development, environmental policy, health promotion and policy, and urban design and behavior. The faculty focuses on education in urban, social, public policy, and environmental problems.

The Department offers the B.A. degree in Urban Studies; undergraduate minors in Urban Studies and Urban and Regional Planning; the Ph.D. degree in Planning, Policy, and Design; the Master of Public Policy; and the Master of Urban and Regional Planning professional degree (fully accredited by the national Planning Accreditation Board). The Department’s graduate degree programs feature innovative teaching often involving students in community projects, and a significant degree of accessibility by students to faculty members.

The faculty members in the Department are productive and influential scholars. The Department’s teaching, research, and graduate training utilize UCI’s proximity to both urban centers and planned communities, as well as the University’s location within the dynamic and multicultural Southern California and Pacific Rim regions. Collaborative academic and research ties are maintained with UCI’s Institute of Transportation Studies, Center for Global Peace and Conflict Studies, Newkirk Center for Science and Society, Environment Institute, Focused Research Group on International Environmental Policy, Center for Community Health, Community Outreach Partnership Center, Center for Unconventional Security Affairs, Center for Organizational Research, and the Urban Water Research Center.

The common mission linking the Department’s undergraduate, master’s, and doctorate-level instruction and faculty research efforts is to bring applied research to the cause of bettering individuals, neighborhoods, communities, and regions. Southern California has grown dramatically over the past four decades and will soon become the nation’s largest urban corridor. The challenges to maintain the quality of life, provide employment opportunities, and reduce the deep socioeconomic disparities of this bi-national and multicultural metropolitan region are enormous. Extremely diverse, multiethnic communities face the necessity of solving their problems in ways that are acceptable to their populations. Older central city areas that are vital to the region face issues of social and economic sustainability. The need to create employment opportunities, through the application of new technologies in industries and services, will be a constant feature of an urban region undergoing such population increases. At the same time, urban growth and transportation will have to meet increasingly stringent environmental regulations that can safeguard the population’s health and quality of the diverse natural environments. The urban design and landscape of most communities stand to be reshaped as never before, as the building stock ages and the need to redevelop intensifies.

The Department is grouped into four major clusters, each addressing sets of important issues to contemporary society. Faculty members and students who study urban and community development examine contemporary planning approaches to managing local, community, and regional development and explore the spatial dynamics of urbanization in diverse settings and how public policy can guide urban and regional growth to balance environmental and economic concerns. Faculty members and students engaged in design-behavior research investigate the interrelationships of people and their socio-physical environments at all scales, from micro to macro, with emphasis on urban design and community-scale issues. Faculty members and students who examine environmental policy focus on the environment and natural resources as important policy and planning issues and provide a clear understanding about how politics, economics, ethics, and institutions affect planning and policy choices. Finally, faculty members and students who study health promotion and policy investigate issues at the interface between (1) urban planning and health policy and (2) community and individual health. They examine the public welfare, psychological, and health implications of social and physical planning, and the techniques and goals of public health policy making.

Undergraduate Program

Undergraduate students who major in Urban Studies will become acquainted with the global challenges of urbanization and the analytical skills needed for addressing them. Students will acquire the background for entering graduate study in related fields, including urban planning, community and economic development, and transportation, to name only a few, or for seeking entry-level positions in fields that address urban problems, including urban planning, community development, transportation, and housing.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Urban Studies

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Departmental Requirements

Twelve courses (48 units) as specified below:

A. Three lower-division courses:
ECON 20A Basic Economics I
PP&D 4 Introduction to Urban Studies
PP&D 40 Urban Sociology
B. Three of the following core upper-division courses:
Urbanization and Social Change 1
Urban and Regional Planning 1
Environmental Sustainability I 1
Elements of Environmental Design
Urban Design Principles
Urban Public Policy 1
Public Policy and Management
C. Six additional upper-division electives from PP&D 100-177 or ECON 144A-ECON 144B
1

Integrative course.

Urban Studies Minor Requirements

Eight courses (32 units):

PP&D 4 Introduction to Urban Studies
Select any seven upper-division PP&D courses.

Urban and Regional Planning Minor Requirements

Nine courses (36 units):

PP&D 4 Introduction to Urban Studies
PP&D 107 Urban and Regional Planning
Select seven of the following:
Cities and Transportation
Housing and Urban Development Policy
Urban Economic Development Policy
Foundations of Community Health
Poverty in Developing Countries
Environmental Sustainability II
Water Resource Policy
Urban Design Principles
Urban Design and Graphics Studio
Urban Public Policy
Public Policy Analysis

On This Page:


Graduate Program

General information about the School of Social Ecology’s graduate programs, including admission requirements, career opportunities, and Ph.D. program milestones can be found in the School of Social Ecology Graduate section of the Catalogue. Specific information about the Department of Planning, Policy, and Design’s graduate program appears below.

Master of Public Policy

The Master of Public Policy (M.P.P.) program is a two-year professional degree program administered by both the School of Social Ecology and the School of Social Sciences. Students are required to complete 72 units of graduate courses. In the first year, students will attend an introductory conference, participate in a workshop, and take seven core courses and two elective courses. In the summer after the first year, students will participate in a policy-relevant internship in an appropriate government, business, or nonprofit setting. In the second year, students take three core courses and five elective courses.

The core course requirements in year one of the program are Qualitative Methods and Public Policy, Statistical Methods for Public Policy, Information and the Policy Process, Microeconomics and Public Policy, Policy Processes and Institutions of Governance, Collaborative Governance and Public Management, and Social Mobilization, Power, and Justice. The core course requirements in year two are The Economics of Government, Policy and Ethics, and Capstone Research Project and Briefing.

Additional information is available at the Master of Public Policy website.

Master of Urban and Regional Planning

The Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P) provides students with a rigorous intellectual foundation and critical analytical skills that prepare them to work in public, private, and non-governmental planning and related fields. The program is fully accredited by the national Planning Accreditation Board and has more than a dozen full-time core faculty. Students gain knowledge of planning problems and practices through a series of courses related to the environmental, economic, and social challenges in Southern California, and the United States, as well as other national contexts.

A total of 72 graduate units are necessary to satisfy the master’s degree requirements—including 32 units of core courses and successful completion of a capstone project, thesis, or comprehensive examination. A normal course load is 12 units per quarter (three courses), which enables students to complete the degree in two years. Required core courses are History of Urban Planning (PP&D 202), Theoretical Foundations of Planning (PP&D 203), Design and Planning Graphics: Fundamentals (PP&D 204)Microeconomic Analysis for Urban Planning (PP&D 206), and Quantitative Analysis for Planners (PP&D 214). Students are required to take three additional courses from the subject areas of methods, law, and urban settlements, selected from a menu of courses approved to satisfy this requirement. The curriculum culminates with a capstone requirement that may be fulfilled through one of the following options:

  1. Completion of a Professional Report (PR), which provides students an opportunity to prepare an independent planning project for a planning organization. This entails a two-quarter course sequence: Professional Report (PP&D 292), and four units of Independent Study in Urban Planning (PP&D 299) with a PR faculty advisor;
  2. Completion of a Planning Practicum, which is a team-based course taught by a planning practitioner and conducted in conjunction with planning organizations. This entails a two-quarter course sequence: Urban Planning Practicum I (PP&D 294A) and Urban Planning Practicum II (PP&D 294B);
  3. Completion of a master's thesis, which is an independent academic research project. Students must complete PP&D 297 Research Design before applying for the thesis option. If approved by the MURP faculty program director, thesis students must complete a two-quarter sequence of four units of Independent Study in Urban Planning (PP&D 299) with a thesis faculty advisor.
  4. A comprehensive examination.

Students complete eight elective courses. Possible elective course topics include; housing and community development, international development planning, environmental planning, transportation planning, health and social service planning, economic development, regional growth management, state and municipal governance, and urban design. Students work with faculty members to define their concentration and identify appropriate electives. Elective courses are selected from within as well as outside the Department of Planning, Policy, and Design.

The program supports a diverse set of educational opportunities for master’s students including events and workshops sponsored by the department, student organizations, and the MURP Alumni Council.  In addition, several students each year incorporate an international educational experience as part of their degree either through the University of California’s Education Abroad Program (UCEAP) or the Network for European and U.S. Regional Urban Studies program (NEURUS). Practical experience in planning in the form of part-time planning internships is also strongly encouraged.

The range of employment opportunities for planners in the public, private, and non-governmental sectors is expanding due to rapid urbanization, rising concerns over environmental issues, and increases in social inequality. Career paths exist in public entities dealing with urban planning, economic development, transportation, community development, regional growth management, air quality, water treatment, community health, community revitalization, and public infrastructure. Employment possibilities also exist with private firms that specialize in transportation, general plans, economic development, environmental planning, emergency management, and residential, commercial, and industrial development. Finally, planners are increasingly pursuing meaningful careers in the growing non-governmental sector. These career opportunities include working with affordable housing developers, environmental and conservation organizations, community-based organizations, advocacy groups, and labor unions.

Concurrent Master’s Degree Program with Civil and Environmental Engineering

The Department of Planning, Policy, and Design (PPD) in the School of Social Ecology and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering offer a concurrent degree program that allows students to earn both a master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) and a master of Civil Engineering (M.S.) in less than the three years required if the degrees were pursued sequentially. Students in the concurrent degree program must meet a minimum of twice with the PPD graduate coordinator and/or MURP faculty program director. The first meeting is at the start of the student’s concurrent program to review current requirements and devise a plan of study for the MURP. The second meeting is the start of the third quarter of the first year of the concurrent program to assess progress toward the MURP, identify the student's Capstone choice, and review the plan for completion of MURP course work.

The concurrent degree program involves a course plan that fulfills requirements in both programs. The engineering focus of the concurrent degree program is organized around two tracks: (1) transportation systems, and (2) environmental hydrology and water resources. The course load for the MURP is the same for both tracks; however, the number of CEE courses varies for the transportation systems and the environmental hydrology and water resources tracks. Students should check with the CEE graduate advisor to review course requirements for the appropriate track. Concurrent MURP-MSCE students must complete a Capstone requirement. Students choose among multiple options for the Capstone including professional report, practicum, thesis, and comprehensive exam. Capstone requirements will be reviewed with concurrent students in their initial meeting with the PPD graduate coordinator and/or MURP faculty program director at the start of the concurrent program.

Undergraduates seeking admission to the concurrent master’s degree program should have a strong record of course work in disciplines related to urban planning and civil engineering, and they must meet the requirements for admission in both departments. For more information about these requirements, visit the CEE Graduate Admissions and PPD Graduate Admissions websites.

Program in Law and Graduate Studies

Highly-qualified students interested in combining the study of law with graduate qualifications in Urban and Regional Planning are invited to undertake concurrent degree study under the auspices of UC Irvine's Program in Law and Graduate Studies (PLGS).

Students in this program pursue a coordinated curriculum leading to a J.D. degree from the School of Law in conjunction with a Masters degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Additional information is available from the PLGS Program Director's Office, 949-824-4158, or by email to plgs@law.uci.edu. A full description of the program, with links to all relevant application information, can be found here.

Ph.D. in Planning, Policy, and Design

Today’s complex urban, social, and environmental issues can best be understood by researchers who can work across disciplinary boundaries, and who understand the relationship of research to action. For example, efforts to control transportation problems by building neighborhoods that encourage alternatives to the automobile require an understanding of travel behavior and human interactions with the built environment. Understanding how to reduce tobacco use requires an appreciation of how behavior is shaped by programmatic interventions, community settings and norms, and policy tools. Environmental cooperation across national borders often requires understanding of political processes, infrastructure systems, and metropolitan structure and governance in regions, such as the U.S.-Mexico border, where population is concentrated in urban settlements that span the border. And, issues of public safety are increasingly related to the design of public and private spaces, and how those spaces are used and regulated.

In all of these areas, public and private officials are increasingly working on topics that span the boundaries of several traditional academic disciplines. The Planning, Policy, and Design (PPD) doctoral program at the University of California, Irvine trains scholars for national and international prominence in the analysis of social problems related to the built, natural, and institutional environments. Faculty members and students combine perspectives from urban planning, public policy, and design behavior. The Planning, Policy, and Design Ph.D. is based on the Department’s internationally prominent research and teaching strengths, including design-behavior research, environmental policy, health promotion and policy, and urban and community development. Students in the Ph.D. program take a common core of classes, and then specialize in study related to their research interests. Students may design their own specialization or may follow the guidelines provided to specialize in Policy and/or Urban and Regional Planning. In either case, the elective courses must be approved by the student’s faculty advisory committee.

The Ph.D. program consists of four components: course work, comprehensive exams, advancing to candidacy, and dissertation research, writing, and defense. Each component is described below. A typical pattern for completion of requirements is the following:

Years 1 and 2: Take required departmental courses supplemented by electives.

September after year 2: Take comprehensive exams.

Year 3: Finish required course work, write and defend dissertation prospectus, advance to candidacy.

Years 4–6: Dissertation research and writing (students are expected to complete and defend their dissertations within nine quarters of advancing to candidacy).

Students must also TA for at least one quarter. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. in Planning, Policy, and Design is six years, and the maximum time permitted in seven years.

The following courses are required of all students and must be completed before advancement to candidacy:

A. Complete the following:
PP&D 297 Research Design
SOCECOL 200 Seminar in Social Ecology
B. Select two of the following three research methods courses:
Qualitative Research Methods: Overview (or equivalent)
Data Analysis (or equivalent)
Data Analysis (or equivelant)
C. Complete one advanced research methods course
D. Two courses providing disciplinary/theoretical orientation
E. Two quarters of PP&D 298 or PP&D 299
F. Nine electives

Graduates with a doctorate degree in Planning, Policy, and Design are employed in a wide array of activities, ranging from university teaching and research, to administrative and research—oriented positions in governmental agencies, international organizations, nonprofit organizations, and private consulting practices.

Planning, Policy, and Design Courses

PP&D 4. Introduction to Urban Studies. 4 Units.

Introduces the substantive areas, concepts, and tools in the field of urban studies. Acquaints students with physical, environmental, social, economic, and political dimensions of cities. Examines the challenges facing cities, including poverty, sustainability, development, globalization, and others.

Restriction: School of Social Ecology and Urban Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

PP&D 40. Urban Sociology. 4 Units.

Overview of theoretical, substantive, and policy issues in urban sociology. History of urbanization, the school of human ecology, and recent trends regarding urbanism. Time is devoted to understanding the causes and possible solutions to urban problems.

Overlaps with SOCIOL 43.

PP&D 100. Special Topics in Urban Studies. 4 Units.

Special topics courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 101. Urbanization and Social Change. 4 Units.

Surveys the global and historical co-evolution of cities and social institutions, including religion, the economy, governance, the arts, technology, and family life.

PP&D 102. Urban Inequality. 4 Units.

Examines structural inequality and the influence that urbanization has in affecting race, ethnic, and class relations. Explores how race/ethnicity, class, urban space, housing, economic development, public education and land policy intersect in cities, both historically and today.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 103. Comparative Urbanization in a Developing World. 4 Units.

An introduction to comparative urbanization in developing countries. The first part of the course introduces students to the geography, history, and theories of urbanization, and then reviews urban planning, public policy, and governance.

Restriction: Public Health Policy, Social Ecology, and Urban Studies majors only.

PP&D 104. Urban America . 4 Units.

Students examine the historical, social, political, and economic factors that contributed to the construction of the American urban context, one that is poverty concentrated and racially/ethnically segregated. Students also critically assess the consequence of growing up in America's urban neighborhoods.

Same as SOC SCI 163A, CHC/LAT 162A.

PP&D 105. California's Population. 4 Units.

Surveys California's human population (past, present, and future) and its interactions with trends in society, government, the economy, and the environment.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 106. Technology and Economic Development. 4 Units.

Importance of technology for urban economic and social development. Concepts of technological innovation and diffusion, and their relevance for cities and metropolitan areas. Principles of networks and their importance for diffusion. Relationship of technology to urban infrastructure and metropolitan form.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10 and SOCECOL 13.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 107. Urban and Regional Planning. 4 Units.

Important substantive areas, concepts, tools in the field of urban and regional planning. Topics include: forces that have historically guided and are currently guiding U.S. urbanization; land use, economic development, housing and community development, environmental planning; legal, environmental, governmental contexts.

Prerequisite: PP&D 4.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, Earth System Science, and Environmental Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 108. Cities and Transportation. 4 Units.

The relationship between urban areas and transportation systems. Economic analysis of cities, transportation and urban form, highway congestion, environmental impacts of transportation, public transit, land use and transportation, and political influences on transportation planning.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 109. Housing and Urban Development Policy. 4 Units.

Surveys public policy issues and develops analytic techniques in the areas of housing and urban development. Examines a range of policy topics including housing assistance to low- and moderate-income families, housing finance system, incentives for economic development and neighborhood preservation.

Prerequisite: Recommended: previous course work in economics.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 110. Urban Economic Development Policy. 4 Units.

Theoretical and practical perspectives on local economic development policy. Integrates economic, planning, and political perspectives. Overview of economic role of cities and metropolitan areas. Specific development issues include: link between taxes, regulation, job growth; redevelopment planning; evaluation economic development policy.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 112. Foundations of Community Health. 4 Units.

A social ecological framework for understanding community health is presented. Measures of individual and community health are compared, and the influence of personal and environmental factors on individual, group, and population health is examined. Community health promotion strategies are discussed.

Same as PUBHLTH 125.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 113. Poverty in Developing Countries. 4 Units.

Focuses on poverty in developing countries. Analyzes the magnitude and changing nature of poverty in the global south. Critically examines poverty conceptualized in terms of economic deprivation, well-being, and social exclusion.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 129. American Public Policy. 4 Units.

Focuses on the development and implementation of public policy in the United States. Lectures cover theoretical models of the policy process as well as significant problems facing contemporary American decision-makers.

Same as POL SCI 121G, PUBHLTH 132, SOC SCI 152C.

PP&D 130. Cities and Food . 4 Units.

Explores the role of cities in transforming global diets: how urbanization has shaped what and how we eat, and what the co-evolution of diets and city life portend for the future.

PP&D 131. Environmental Sustainability I. 4 Units.

Provides an introduction to sustainability from different points of view; historical, scientific, political, ethical, and economic.

Same as EARTHSS 180.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 132. Environmental Sustainability II. 4 Units.

Investigates how sustainability can be implemented in a variety of contexts including water, energy, non-renewable resources, biodiversity, and urban policy, and also how it could be measured.

Same as EARTHSS 182.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, Earth System Science, and Environmental Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 133. Environmental Law and Policy . 4 Units.

Environmental law as a combination of traditional legal principles and newly created statutes, rules, and decisions applied to environmental protection. Investigates roles of courts, legislature, executive branch and administrative agencies, and private citizens attempting to regulate environmental quality.

Prerequisite: ENVIRON E8 or PP&D 4.

Same as CRM/LAW C128.

Restriction: Majors only.

PP&D 134. Human Ecology. 4 Units.

Explores the interaction of social choice and physical constraint in shaping the earth's human carrying capacity, including ramifications for local, regional, or global environmental issues.

Prerequisite: PP&D 4.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 139. Water Resource Policy. 4 Units.

Examination of contemporary water problems worldwide, with particular attention to the competing water demands in the western U.S., and water demand by the poor in developing countries. History and analysis of U.S. water policies at local, state, and federal levels.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, Earth System Science, and Environmental Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 142. Environmental Hazards in an Urbanizing World. 4 Units.

Development patterns, including urbanization, can contribute to environmental hazard severity. Humans can plan, mitigate, and prepare to reduce costly hazard losses. Students learn about environmental hazards and human response to these threats.

(III)

PP&D 151. Environmental Psychology. 4 Units.

Impact of the physical environment on individual and group behavior. Three basic concerns examined: (a) environmental determinants of behavior at the individual and interpersonal level; (b) social planning and urban design; (c) methodological approaches to the study of environmental issues.

Same as PSY BEH 171S.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, and Psychology and Social Behavior majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 152. Cultural Ecology and Environmental Design. 4 Units.

Introduction to cultural ecology and environmental and architectural design. Addresses the understanding of people’s relationships with their built environments, the basic elements of architecture, architectural analysis, and cultural analysis are covered. Examines values in design and design for multicultural societies.

Prerequisite: PP&D 4.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 153. Elements of Environmental Design. 4 Units.

Basic elements of environmental design such as scale, proportion, rhythm, color, sound, lighting, surfaces, texture, architectural definition of spaces, volumes, massing volumetric analysis, solids and voids, and cultural aspects of design. Excitement and creativity in design, imageability.

Prerequisite: PP&D 4 and PP&D 152.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 155. Urban Design Principles. 4 Units.

Introduction to principles of urban design and its applications. Study of contemporary and traditional theories of urban design formulated to improve physical characteristics of built environment to facilitate an enhanced quality of life. A variety of case studies are discussed.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 156. Urban Design and Graphics Studio. 4 Units.

Introductory course organized around a variety of assignments to encourage learning by design in a studio setting. Students work on design projects and graphic representation assignments to learn practical aspects of urban design.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 166. Urban Public Policy. 4 Units.

Examines why and how urban policies are enacted and carried out in contemporary U.S. cities and regions. Topics include evolution and organization of city governments and policymaking over the past century; who directs public policy and controls how cities develop.

(III)

PP&D 167. Public Policy and Management. 4 Units.

Exposes students to best management practices that assure effective planning and implementation of policies and programs in government, business, and nonprofit sectors. Includes guest lecturers who are proven leaders in four principal institutions of community: business, education, government, and nonprofit.

Restriction: Urban Studies and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 169. Public Policy Analysis. 4 Units.

Examines different approaches to the analysis of public policy, what constitutes good policy, the role of government, and citizen participation in policy-making. Suggests a policy-design perspective which builds upon other frameworks but concentrates on goals, implementation structures, tools, and rationales.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL E8 and (PP&D 4 or PP&D 166).

Same as POL SCI 121E.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 170. Health Policy. 4 Units.

Considers social and economic aspects of health and disease in the United States. What are the proper roles of the individual, community, and government in improving health and health care? International comparisons will be made wherever possible.

Same as PUBHLTH 122.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 172. Latino Metropolis. 4 Units.

Explores the processes of Latino urbanization in the United States and the spatialization of Latino identities, particularly in the context of Southern California with selected comparisons drawing from other cities.

Same as CHC/LAT 154.

(VII)

PP&D 177. Chicano Movement. 4 Units.

Explores the history of Mexicans in the U.S. with particular attention paid to their integration into the U.S. capitalist economy. Examines this economic history and the Chicano movement, "El Movimiento," within the wide context of socio-economic change.

Same as CHC/LAT 166.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies, Urban Studies, and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 178. International Divided Cities. 4 Units.

Investigates urban divisions in international cities where deep-seated nationalistic ethnic differences create pressures for intergroup conflicts, autonomy, or territorial separation, and can incite violence. Urban political polarization as it is manifest in the urban setting.

Same as SOCIOL 176, POL SCI 157B.

PP&D 202. History of Urban Planning. 4 Units.

Introduction to the historical roots and fundamental perspectives of urban and regional planning. Exploration of the significant historical phases and personalities which have shaped the profession. The roles and responsibilities, the limitations and potential, of urban planning.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 203. Theoretical Foundations of Planning. 4 Units.

Intellectual excursion into central themes in policy and planning, including philosophy of the market, institutionalization of space, hypostatizations of policy, constructions of communities, logics of spatial analysis. Objective is engagement of the professional in thoughtful reflections on practice and institutions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 204. Design and Planning Graphics: Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Graphic representation and communication of physical place characteristics, design and physical planning ideas and concepts using a variety of graphic techniques of free hand drawing, sketching, orthographic representations, scale drawings, 3D representations, maps, photo-documentation, and various media.

Restriction: Masters in Urban & Regional Planning graduate students only.

PP&D 205. Environmental Economics and Policy. 4 Units.

Provides a broad introduction to environmental economics and to environmental policy. Environmental problems facing the United States and Europe are analyzed, and whenever possible, the environmental problems facing developing countries.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 206. Microeconomic Analysis for Urban Planning. 4 Units.

Provides students with a working knowledge of basic microeconomic concepts. Emphasizes applications related to urban planning and policy analysis. Topics covered include demand analysis, firm behavior, market structure, public goods, externalities, and the role of economics in land markets.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 207. Land Use Law. 4 Units.

Investigates legal and institutional frameworks for development control. Review of constitutional issues implicated in land-use regulation. Traces development control historically and analyzes contemporary approaches to land-use control which reflect environmental and economic development concerns.

Same as CRM/LAW C207.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 209. Qualitative Research Methods: Overview. 4 Units.

Introduction to fundamentals of “qualitative” research and non-positivistic inquiry. Formulation of research questions, selection of method, data collection techniques, and analysis (briefly). Overview of selected methods from ethnography, naturalistic field research, phenomenology, ethnoarchaeology, critical approaches, and others.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 210. Practice Experience . 4 Units.

Provides Master of Urban & Regional Planning Students an opportunity to link classroom knowledge with real Planning situations through a ten-week unpaid practice experience.

Restriction: Masters in Urban & Regional Planning graduate students only.

PP&D 212. Transportation Planning. 4 Units.

Introduces current topics in transportation planning. Includes an analysis of the economic role of transportation in urban areas, land-use impacts of transportation projects, traffic congestion, air quality, alternatives to the automobile, and other transportation topics.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 213. Advanced Qualitative Methods: Analyzing Qualitative Data. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the theory and practice of analyzing qualitative data. Student must have already learned about data collection and research design for qualitative research and they must have qualitative data they can analyze.

Same as POL SCI 273A, MGMTPHD 297K.

Restriction: Grad students only

PP&D 214. Quantitative Analysis for Planners. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the basic statistical concepts used to address issues of public concern. Prepares students to perform, interpret, and evaluate quantitative data analyses commonly used in professional studies.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 215. Analytical Methods for Planning. 4 Units.

Emphasizes the development of analytical techniques proven useful in the fields of management and administration. Topics include multiple regression, cost-benefit analysis and discounting, decision trees, and other techniques useful for the purposes of community analysis and planning.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 220. Qualitative Methods: Fieldwork and Data Collection. 4 Units.

Covers fieldwork, data collections techniques, and related issues for anti-positivistic research. Data collection techniques include observation, physical traces, participation, in-depth interview. Data checks include veracity, detail, completeness, rigor.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor

Restriction: Grad students only or Consent of instructor to enroll

PP&D 221. Public Policy . 4 Units.

Explores different approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PUB POL 221.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy graduate students have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 223. Regional Analysis. 4 Units.

Major concepts and techniques of regional analysis, with applications for urban and regional planning and public policy-making. Definition of regions, processes of economic change, regional structure, location of activities, and analysis of selected policy issues. Emphasis on practical applications.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 224. Environmental Politics and Policy. 4 Units.

Reviews and critiques literature on discussion topics including: the nature and effectiveness of environmental movements and policies; the role of science and technology; the use of economic incentives in policy; decentralization of decision making; and creating arenas for public involvement.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 226. Public Health Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. 4 Units.

Examines using cost-effectiveness information to allocate limited resources to maximize health benefits to a population; defining and measuring cost, survival and health-related quality of life; and how to calculate cost-effectiveness using decision trees and Markov simulation models.

Same as PUBHLTH 220.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 228. Demographics for Planning and Policy. 4 Units.

Provides planning and policy practitioners with a condensed, nonspecialist orientation to the sources, applications, and interpretation of population statistics, and conveys the steps used in constructing local-area population forecasts and projections.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 231. Transportation and Environmental Health. 4 Units.

Critically evaluates how transportation can promote sustainable, healthy, and equitable cities. Examines the interaction of transportation systems with urban form, land use, community health, and environmental quality.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 235. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Problem Solving in Planning. 4 Units.

Explores the application of geographic information systems (GIS) in urban planning. Steps through a GIS-based planning procedure that balances housing, jobs, tax base, utilities, transportation, and the natural environment.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 237. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the field of urban and regional planning. Emphasizes current issues that occur in actual implementation settings. Lecture/discussion followed by laboratory demonstrating the area of GIS discussed. Offers "hands-on" student usage of GIS software.

PP&D 239. Urban Design Theories and Applications. 4 Units.

Introduction to contemporary and traditional theories of urban design and their applications. Organized around one question: How might planning and design of built environment contribute to making a good city? National and international case studies are introduced.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 241. Health Promotion and Planning. 4 Units.

Focuses on health and health care in the United States, but discussion of global health issues and/or international comparisons will be made whenever possible. Considers both the social and economic aspects of health and disease.

Same as PUBHLTH 221.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 242. Regional Development Theory. 4 Units.

Regional economic development concepts and studies, with applications for urban and regional planning, and public policy-making. Roles and performance of economic sectors, technological innovation, and communications in the process of development. Analysis of regional development policies and programs.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 243. Health Policy and Management. 4 Units.

Multidisciplinary inquiry into theory and practice concerned with delivery, quantity, costs of health care for individuals and populations. Explores managerial and policy concerns regarding structure, process, outcomes of health services including the costs, financing, organization, outcomes, and accessibility of care.

Same as PUBHLTH 222.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 244. Land-Use Policy. 4 Units.

Examination of the role of public policy in guiding growth and development in urban and suburban environments. Description of a wide-ranging set of growth policies, the rationales underlying their use, controversies and legal constraints, and evaluation of their effectiveness.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 246. Housing Policy. 4 Units.

Examines theories and practices of housing policy and the relationship of housing to larger neighborhood, community, and regional development issues. Considers the roles of private for-profit and not-for-profit developers, lenders, and all levels of government in the provision of housing.

Prerequisite: Basic statistics.

PP&D 251. Poverty and Development . 4 Units.

Critical examines competing conceptualizations, methods of measurement, and poverty alleviation strategies widely used in developing countries. Focuses on poverty conceptualized as economic deprivation, well-being, vulnerability, and social exclusion.

Same as SOCIOL 235.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 252. Issues in Environmental Law and Policy. 4 Units.

Treatment of legal and policy strategies for promoting environmental protection and deterring environmental degradation within the context of other societal objectives. Topical approach with a focus on problems of special interest to criminologists and to environmental policy specialists.

Same as CRM/LAW C252.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 264. Planning, Policy and Design Seminar. 1 Unit.

For first- and second-year doctoral students. Topics include professional development; journal publication process; academic conference presentations; and the job market for doctoral students in and out of academia.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 265. Urban and Community Development Seminar. 1 Unit.

For first- and second-year doctoral students. Topics include scholarship related to the urban and community development area. Discussion of assigned articles and book chapters and how they relate to urban and community development.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 270. Environmental Ethics. 4 Units.

Introduction to major themes and debates in environmental ethics, with application to contemporary environmental issues.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 273. Global Urbanization. 4 Units.

Examines the spread of cities worldwide in the twentieth century. What are the political and economic causes of this process? What are the social-cultural, political, and economic effects? How is contemporary urbanization linked to global restructuring of other kinds.

Same as SOC SCI 254J, SOCIOL 252A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 275. Special Topics in Urban Planning. 4 Units.

Special topics in urban and regional planning are offered from time to time, but not on a regular basis. Course content varies with interest of the instructor.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 278. Culture, Community, and Space. 4 Units.

Covers how cultures relate to natural and built physical environments. Ways in which culture influences space; ways space influences culture. Concepts for understanding the interrelationship, including values, norms, traditions, religion, and place attachment. Culture and cities, urban form, ethnic communities.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 279. Theories of Power and Empowerment. 4 Units.

Studies different ways of thinking about power and its uses. Explores theories of power that inform various notions of empowerment, including resistance, participatory democracy, and workplace empowerment.

Same as POL SCI 223A, MGMTPHD 297R.

Restriction: Ph.D. students only.

PP&D 282. Urban Design Studio for Planners: An Introduction. 4 Units.

Introductory urban design for planners. Organized around a variety of assignments to encourage learning by design in a studio setting. Students work on design projects and drawing assignments to learn practical aspects of urban design.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 283. Collaborative Governance and Public Management. 4 Units.

Introduction to inclusive management. To make effective use of public resources, public managers are inventing ways of managing that alter relationships within organizations, between organizations, between sectors, and with the public. Requires rethinking fundamentals such as leadership and motivation.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PUB POL 283.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy graduate students have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 292. Professional Report. 4 Units.

Workshop designed to assist M.U.R.P. students in conducting their professional reports. Students select topics, design projects, conduct professional investigations, and write up reports.

PP&D 294A. Urban Planning Practicum I. 4 Units.

Engages students in practical planning projects in the community under a central theme within Planning. Students take a problem-solving approach and employ and further develop data gathering, analysis, graphic and oral communication, public engagement, and report writing skills.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 294B. Urban Planning Practicum II. 4 Units.

Engages students in practical planning projects in the community under a central theme within Planning. Students take a problem-solving approach and employ and further develop data gathering, analysis, graphic and oral communication, public engagement, and report writing skills.

Prerequisite: PP&D 294A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 295. Master's Thesis Research and Writing. 1-8 Units.

Independent research with Planning, Policy, and Design faculty.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 296. Doctoral Dissertation Research and Writing. 2-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Planning, Policy, and Design faculty.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

PP&D 297. Research Design. 4 Units.

Provides training in research design and methods. Students learn how to evaluate the strength of research findings based on the methods used by a researcher and learn to use lessons from the course to develop a research proposal.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 298. Directed Studies in Urban Planning. 2-4 Units.

Directed Studies in Urban Planning.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 299. Independent Study in Urban Planning. 2-8 Units.

Independent Study in Urban Planning.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Public Policy Courses

PUB POL 215. Statistics and Methods for Public Policy. 4 Units.

Introductory course with focus on gaining a sound understanding of what constitutes credible evidence in support of policy arguments and management decisions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUB POL 219. Information and Public Policy. 4 Units.

Evaluates strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative methods and the data used in making public policy claims. Looks at the bases of certain widely accepted measures of poverty, growth, environmental quality, and the like.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy graduate students have first consideration for enrollment.

PUB POL 221. Public Policy . 4 Units.

Explores different approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PP&D 221.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy graduate students have first consideration for enrollment.

PUB POL 225. Qualitative Methods . 4 Units.

Fieldwork, data collections techniques, and related issues for anti-positivistic research. Data collection techniques include observation, physical traces, participation, in-depth interview. Data checks include veracity, detail, completeness, rigor.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy graduate students only.

PUB POL 227. Economics of Government. 4 Units.

Prepares students to analyze public policy questions with tools from economics. By the end, students should be able to identify important economic issues in public policy debates and consume and critique economic research on these topics.

Same as ECON 275.

PUB POL 240. Microeconomics and Public Policy. 4 Units.

Introduces the fundamental principles of microeconomics that are required for applied policy analysis. Provides students with an intuitive understanding of the microeconomic approach, and familiarizes them with concepts used in applied public policy analysis.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as ECON 255.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUB POL 260. Policy and Ethics . 4 Units.

Examines the challenge of identifying ethical principles that can guide us in formulating and assessing public policy, the public policy process from an ethical perspective, and the ethics of the individual engaged in the public policy arena.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy students only.

PUB POL 283. Collaborative Governance and Public Management. 4 Units.

Introduction to inclusive management. To make effective use of public resources, public managers are inventing ways of managing that alter relationships within organizations, between organizations, between sectors, and with the public. Requires rethinking fundamentals such as leadership and motivation.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PP&D 283.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy graduate students have first consideration for enrollment.

Faculty

Victoria Basolo, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design
Scott A. Bollens, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Drew, Chace and Erin Warmington Chair in the Social Ecology of Peace and International Cooperation and Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design
Kenneth S. Chew, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment of Planning, Policy, and Design
Ross F. Conner, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor Emeritus of Planning, Policy, and Design
William J. Cooper, Ph.D. University of Miami, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Biomedical Engineering; Planning, Policy, and Design (environmental chemistry, advanced oxidation processes for water treatment, aquatic photochemistry of carbon cycling)
David Feldman, Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science
Martha S. Feldman, Ph.D. Stanford University, Roger W. and Janice M. Johnson Chair in Civic Governance and Public Management and Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Paul Merage School of Business; Political Science; Sociology (organization theory and behavior, stability and change in organizations, decision-making and information processing, public management, qualitative research methods)
Ajay Garde, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Associate Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design
Douglas Houston, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design
Helen Ingram, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emerita of Planning, Policy, and Design
Jae Hong Kim, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Assistant Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design
Raul P. Lejano, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Planning, Policy, and Design
Nicholas J. Marantz, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Assistant Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design
Richard Matthew, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science
Sanjoy Mazumdar, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Asian American Studies
Walter Nicholls, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (urban sociology, politics and policy, social movements, immigration, comparative urbanism, theory, planning conflicts)
Judith Olson, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Donald Bren Professor of Information & Computer Sciences and Professor of Informatics; Paul Merage School of Business; Planning, Policy, and Design (interactive and collaborative technology, human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work)
Seth D. Pipkin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Assistant Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design
Maria G. Rendón, Ph.D. Harvard University, Assistant Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (urban sociology, immigration, race/ethnicity, sociology of education and social policy)
Michael Ruane, M.A. University of California, Los Angeles, Lecturer of Planning, Policy, and Design
David M. Snow, J.D. Loyola Marymount University, Lecturer of Planning, Policy, and Design
Daniel Stokols, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Social Behavior; Planning, Policy, and Design; Program in Public Health
Luis Suarez-Villa, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor Emeritus of Planning, Policy, and Design
Rodolfo D. Torres, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Culture and Theory; Political Science

Affiliate Faculty

Graeme T. Boushey, Ph.D. University of Washington, Assistant Professor of Political Science; Planning, Policy, and Design
Tim-Allen Bruckner, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Program in Public Health; Planning, Policy, and Design
Jan K. Brueckner, Ph.D. Stanford University, Department Chair and UCI Chancellor's Professor of Economics; Planning, Policy, and Design
Damon Clark, Ph.D. Oxford University, Assistant Professor of Economics; Planning, Policy, and Design
Joseph DiMento, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; Paul Merage School of Business; Planning, Policy, and Design (planning, land use and environmental law, use of social science in policy making, legal control of corporate behavior)
John R. Hipp, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (community context of crime, household decisions and neighborhood change, research methods)
Richard D. McCleary, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design (criminal justice, research methodology, statistics)
Michael G. McNally, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Planning, Policy, and Design (travel behavior, transportation systems analysis)
David S. Meyer, Ph.D. Boston University, Professor of Sociology; Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science (social movements, public policy, peace and war, social justice)
Sylvia Nam, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Anthropology; Planning, Policy, and Design
Mark P. Petracca, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Political Science; Planning, Policy, and Design
Brett F. Sanders, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Department Chair and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Planning, Policy, and Design (environmental hydrodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, coastal water quality)
Jean-Daniel M. Saphores, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Economics; Planning, Policy, and Design (transportation economics, planning and policy, environmental and natural resource economics and policy, quantitative methods)
David A. Smith, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professor of Sociology; Planning, Policy, and Design (world systems analysis, urbanization, development, comparative-historical sociology, dependent development in east Asia)
George E. Tita, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design (criminology, community context of violence, urban youth gangs, homicide studies)
Kerry Vandell, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Paul Merage School of Business; Planning, Policy, and Design; School of Law
Linda T. Võ, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Asian American Studies; Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (race and ethnic relations, immigrants and refugees, gender relations, community and urban studies)
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