Department of Linguistics

1231 Social & Behavioral Sciences Gateway; 949-824-7161
http://www.linguistics.uci.edu/
Mark P. Petracca, Acting Department Chair

Language is one of the most fundamental human instincts. It is an extraordinarily intricate system which all of us master as young children without special teaching, and which gives us the ability to communicate, tell stories, and express our deepest feelings. Linguistics is the scientific study of human language. It is concerned with understanding the nature of language and our knowledge of it, how we acquire it, and how that knowledge is put to use. It is connected to many other fields of study, including psychology, anthropology, sociology, biology, physics, mathematics, computer science, philosophy, and literature.

The Department offers an undergraduate minor and undergraduate courses.

Linguistics Minor Requirements

Requirements for the minor in Linguistics are met by taking seven linguistics courses (28 units) as specified below:

A.
LINGUIS 3 Introduction to Linguistics
LINGUIS 10 Introduction to Phonology
LINGUIS 20 Introduction to Syntax
B.
Four additional linguistics courses, three of which must be upper-division.

Residence Requirement: At least three upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI.

Courses

LINGUIS 1. Languages of the World. 4 Units.

The world has over 6,000 languages, with an exuberant variety of sounds, words, grammars. Introduction to a representative(about eight), drawn from every continent. Students not expected to learn these languages, but rather to explore and study their structure and complexity.

(VIII)

LINGUIS 2. Discovering Language. 4 Units.

Explores language's pervasiveness and diversity; demonstrates ways linguistics illuminates language's crucial--albeit hidden--societal role. Issues: self-and group-identification, language death, language in legal and educational settings. Illustrations: spoken and signed languages, varieties of English, Native American languages.

(VII)

LINGUIS 3. Introduction to Linguistics. 4 Units.

Emphasis on the notion that language is a remarkable achievement of the human mind. Current insights into the nature of language. Survey of various subfields of linguistics. Introduction to linguistic analysis.

(III, Vb)

LINGUIS 10. Introduction to Phonology. 4 Units.

Basic concepts in phonetic description and phonological analysis.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 3.

(III, Vb)

LINGUIS 20. Introduction to Syntax. 4 Units.

Basic concepts in syntactic description and grammatical analysis.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 3.

(III, Vb)

LINGUIS 51. Acquisition of Language. 4 Units.

What children say, what they mean, and what they understand. Theories about the learning of language by one-, two-, and three-year olds. Comparison of kinds of data on which these theories are based.

Same as PSYCH 56L.

(III)

LINGUIS 68. Introduction to Language and Culture. 4 Units.

Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world.

Same as ANTHRO 2D.

(III)

LINGUIS 99. Special Topics in Linguistics. 4 Units.

Special Topics at lower-division level.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 100. Grammatical Theory. 4 Units.

Has both a phonology and a syntax component, and forms and bridge between lower-division course offerings and more advanced courses in phonology, syntax, and morphology. Emphasis on development of analytical skills, and evaluation of alternative proposals.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 10 and LINGUIS 20.

LINGUIS 102. Formal Languages and Automata. 4 Units.

Formal aspects of describing and recognizing languages by grammars and automata. Parsing regular and context-free languages. Ambiguity, nondeterminism. Elements of computability; Turning machines, random access machines, undecidable problems, NP-completeness.

Prerequisite: (I&C SCI 23 or CSE 23 or I&C SCI 46 or CSE 46) and MATH 2A and MATH 2B and I&C SCI 6B and I&C SCI 6D. I&C SCI 23 with a grade of C or better. CSE 23 with a grade of C or better. I&C SCI 46 with a grade of C or better. CSE 46 with a grade of C or better.

Same as COMPSCI 162.

LINGUIS 107M. Computational Methods for Language Research. 4 Units.

Focuses on computational methods useful for language research. Students become familiar with software and programming languages used for extracting information from electronic datasets and for creating basic simulations of linguistic cognition. No prior programming experience assumed.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 155 or LINGUIS 155 or PSYCH 156A or LINGUIS 150.

Same as PSYCH 157M.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Concurrent with PSYCH 247M.

LINGUIS 109. Special Topics in Computational Linguistics. 4 Units.

Topics in Computational Linguistics.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 111. Intermediate Phonology. 4 Units.

Fundamentals of phonological theory. Intensive practice in phonological analysis.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 100.

Concurrent with LINGUIS 211.

LINGUIS 112. Advanced Phonolgy. 4 Units.

Overview of recent developments in phonological theory.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 111.

Concurrent with LINGUIS 212.

LINGUIS 119. Special Topics in Phonetics/Phonology. 4 Units.

Topics in Phonetics/Phonology. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 121. Intermediate Syntax. 4 Units.

Examines various phenomena within a generative theory of syntax, focusing on the nature of syntactic rules, representations, and constraints. Introduces methods of experimental syntax, providing students hands-on opportunity to recognize the connection(s) between theory and experiential results.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 20.

LINGUIS 124. Current Topics in Syntactic Theory. 4 Units.

Research seminar in syntax. Intensive study of a small number of well-defined topics which have had significant impact on the development of syntactic theory. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Concurrent with LINGUIS 224.

LINGUIS 129. Special Topics in Syntax. 4 Units.

Topics in Syntax. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 139. Special Topics in Morphology. 4 Units.

Topics in Morphology. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 141. Topics in Philosophy of Language. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of language, e.g., the nature of meaning, mechanisms of reference, speech acts.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 145, PHILOS 145.

LINGUIS 149. Special Topics in Semantics. 4 Units.

Topics in Semantics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 150. Acquisition of Language II. 4 Units.

Focuses on native language learning, exploring the way in which infants and very young children unconsciously uncover the rich systematic knowledge of their native language. Examines both experimental and computational studies that quantitatively investigate the "how" of language acquisition.

Prerequisite: Recommended: PSYCH 56L or LINGUIS 51.

Same as PSYCH 156A.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LINGUIS 155. Psychology of Language. 4 Units.

Examines language using the tools of experimental psychology. From sounds to words to spoken and written sentences, explores how language is used in real time, and how its use reveals how it is represented in the mind.

Same as PSYCH 150.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LINGUIS 158. Language and the Brain . 4 Units.

Research analysis on biological bases of human linguistic capacity. Development, focusing on hemispheric specialization, plasticity; localization of specific linguistic functions in adults, with emphasis on study of aphasias; relation of linguistic capacity to general cognitive capacity, considering research on retardation.

Prerequisite: BIO SCI 35 or BIO SCI N110.

Same as BIO SCI N160, PSYCH 161.

Restriction: Psychology and Biology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LINGUIS 159. Special Topics in Psycholinguistics. 4 Units.

Topics in Psycholinguistics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 163B. The Structure of English. 4 Units.

An examination of American English phonology, morphology, and syntax. Useful for prospective teachers of English in elementary and secondary schools and for teachers of English as a second language.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 3.

LINGUIS 164A. Topics in Romance Languages. 4 Units.

Topics in Romance Languages. May be repeated as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 164B. French Phonetics. 4 Units.

Study of the sound structure of French. Introduction to elements of general phonetics, contrastive (French/English) phonetics, and French phonetics and phonology. Designed to help students improve their pronunciation. Also serves as a preparatory course for language teaching.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1C.

LINGUIS 169. Special Topics in Language Studies. 4 Units.

Topics in Language Studies. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 172. History of English. 4 Units.

External (historical and social) and internal (linguistic) changes which have affected the English language from its Germanic roots to the present day.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 3.

LINGUIS 175. Language Origins: Evolution, Genetics, and the Brain. 4 Units.

Examines how human language(s) may have originated. Studies pertinent techniques (reconstruction) and addresses related questions, including Is our language faculty inborn (i.e., genetically encoded)? Can brain imaging and population genetics research help to unlock this mystery of human evolution?.

Same as HISTORY 135G, ANTHRO 152A, GLBLCLT 105.

LINGUIS 179. Special Topics in Historical Linguistics. 4 Units.

Topics in Historical Linguistics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 189. Special Topics in Cognitive Semiotics. 4 Units.

Topics in Cognitive Semiotics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 198. Directed Group Study. 4 Units.

Directed study with Linguistics faculty. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 199. Independent Study. 4 Units.

Independent research with Linguistics faculty. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Students may enroll for only one 199 each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Teresa A. Griffith, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Linguistics
Gregory S. Hickok, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Linguistics
Kent E. Johnson, Ph.D. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Linguistics
Virginia Mann, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Education; Linguistics
Keith Murphy, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Anthropology; Linguistics
Lisa Pearl, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Linguistics; Logic and Philosophy of Science
Armin Schwegler, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese; Linguistics
Bernard H. Tranel, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Linguistics