Department of Political Science

undefined

Jeffrey Kopstein, Department Chair
5229 Social Science Plaza B
949-824-5361
http://www.polisci.uci.edu/

Overview

The Department of Political Science offers a wide variety of courses at the introductory, lower-division and more specialized upper-division levels. The curriculum is organized into four areas: American politics, political theory, international relations, and comparative politics. In addition to the traditional fields of political science, the department offers an introductory course in Law and a variety of upper-division courses where students can explore specialized areas in Law. The department also offers an Honors Program in Political Science for juniors and seniors, culminating in a senior honors thesis.

The department is composed of a strong and diverse faculty especially interested in analyzing central questions of political science related to such topics as policy-making, political structures, participation, conflict, change and development, transition to democracy, voting theory, power and authority, and interstate relations. The faculty has particular strength in interdisciplinary approaches, in comparative analysis, and in democratic theory.

Undergraduate Program

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Political Science

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Departmental Requirements for the Major

School requirements must be met and must include 12 courses (48 units) as specified below:

A. Select four lower-division (one or two digit) POL SCI courses below. One must be the introductory course for the module selected under II below.
Introduction to Political Science: Political Analysis
Introduction to Political Science: Macropolitics
Introduction to Political Science: Micropolitics
Introduction to American Government
Introduction to Political Theory
Introduction to International Relations
Introduction to Politics Around the World
Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in Political Science
Introduction to Law
Complete any one additional lower-division POL SCI course (not used above) (4 units)
B. Seven upper-division POL SCI courses (28 units) chosen from among the POL SCI modules numbered 120–179. Three of these courses must be from one module.
American Politics and Government (POL SCI 120-129)
Political Theory and Methods (POL SCI 130-139)
International Relations (POL SCI 140-149)
Comparative Politics (POL SCI 150-159)
Public Law (POL SCI 170-179)

Honors Program in Political Science

The Honors Program in Political Science is open to all senior political science majors who meet the minimum academic qualifications (3.5 GPA in political science courses and 3.2 GPA overall). Students submit an application to the department office before the end of their junior year.  In addition to satisfying the requirements for the major in political science, honors program participants must complete additional course work as specified below.

During the year prior to the year in which the thesis will be written, a prospective honors program student should identify a Department of Political Science faculty member who is willing to supervise the student’s thesis. Students are ordinarily expected to take an upper-division political science course or a POL SCI 199 Independent Study course with the advisor prior to their senior year.

During their senior year, students must enroll in the Honors Thesis Workshop (POL SCI H182A), offered during the fall quarter. This course is in addition to the seven upper division courses required for the regular major. Honors students also enroll in three quarters of the senior thesis course (POL SCI 190) with their advisor, which are independent study courses for writing the thesis. The POL SCI 190 courses do not count toward the upper-division political sciences courses required for the major although they are counted as "other" upper-division social science courses towards graduation requirements. Students write their senior thesis, which is designed and completed under their faculty advisor’s supervision. Upon successful completion of the program, including approval of their senior honors thesis by the faculty advisor and a GPA of at least 3.5 in their political science courses, the students will graduate with honors in Political Science and their transcripts note that they were in the Honors Program in Political Science.

Minor in Political Science

Political Science Minor Requirements

Requirements for the minor in Political Science are met by taking seven political science courses (28 units) as specified below:

A. Select one of the following:
Introduction to Political Science: Political Analysis
Introduction to Political Science: Macropolitics
Introduction to Political Science: Micropolitics
B. Three upper-division POL SCI courses, chosen from one POL SCI module.
C. Select three coures from the following:
Introduction to Political Science: Political Analysis
Introduction to Political Science: Macropolitics
Introduction to Political Science: Micropolitics
POL SCI 20–79

On This Page:


Graduate Program

The Department of Political Science offers a Ph.D. degree program in Political Science. The department has attained a reputation for producing the very best innovative and interdisciplinary scholarship. Faculty are engaged in the study of such key questions as the politics of advanced and democratizing societies, international cooperation and peace, the politics of racial and ethnic minority groups, and the origins of altruism and morality and their impact on world politics.

Graduate students can pursue concentration in public choice and specializations in democracy studies, international relations, and race and minority politics. The Ph.D. program offers big payoffs to graduate students, in fact, because of the extended range of inquiry an interdisciplinary program affords.

Political science faculty members are regular participants in and help direct several research units on campus. The Center for the Study of Democracy, an Organized Research Unit at UCI, sponsors research and education aimed at improving the democratic process in the United States and expanding democracy around the world. The UCI Interdisciplinary Center for the Scientific Study of Ethics and Morality explores questions concerning the origins and causes of morality. The Center for Global Peace and Conflict Studies (CGPACS), housed in the School of Social Sciences, is a multidisciplinary program dedicated to promoting scholarly, student and public understanding of international conflict and cooperation. The Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences, also located in the School of Social Sciences, offers opportunities for participation in ongoing faculty research, notably with faculty members engaged in fields of public choice and political economy.

Admissions

The deadline for application for fall quarter admission is January 15. Students are admitted for winter or spring quarters only under exceptional circumstances. Additional information is available in the general section on admission to social science graduate programs. Please note especially the required examinations.

Requirements

During the first two years in the doctoral program, students must complete three of the following five seminars: Field Seminar in American Politics, Field Seminar in Comparative Politics, Field Seminar in International Relations, Field Seminar in Political Theory, and Foundations of Political Science. Prior to advancement to Ph.D. candidacy, doctoral students must complete two fields of study, one of which must come from the following list: American Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations, or Political Theory. Each student must complete a second field, which may come (1) from one of the four listed above; (2) from an area of faculty strength, such as democracy studies, methodology and modeling, critical theory, ethics, political psychology, political economy/public choice, race and ethnicity, or public law; or (3) from a specialized area of interdisciplinary study. If the student chooses the specialized area of interdisciplinary study (3), this area must be approved by the student’s advisor and the graduate committee. Students must complete four or five courses in their first field and three–five courses in their second field. The precise number is to be determined in each field by the field faculty. The field seminar in each field counts as one of the required courses.

Students are expected to have successfully completed course work resulting in knowledge of basic introductory statistics. Students who do not have this preparation must acquire the equivalent background during their first or second year in graduate school. Undergraduate statistics courses are considered to be remedial, and thus will not count toward graduate course credit needed for the Ph.D. Competence in a foreign language is required. Students may substitute mastery of an advanced research skill or an advanced qualitative skill in place of a foreign language. To acquire such a quantitative skill (which could involve course work in such disciplines as economics, mathematics and computer science, or statistics), students must complete at least one year of upper-level, undergraduate course work in mathematics, economics, or computer science or one year in graduate-level statistics beyond the required minimum of two quarters of introductory statistics. To acquire a qualitative skill, students must complete at least one year of graduate-level course work in qualitative or interpretative research methods. A student electing to meet the foreign language requirement should select a foreign language which is useful for research in his or her dissertation or in which there is a substantial body of scholarly literature.

Reviews and Examinations

Students ordinarily are expected to maintain a grade point average of 3.5 or better. At the completion of the first year, a review of performance in the graduate program will be conducted for each student by the political science faculty.

Students must complete two qualifying papers. The first qualifying paper must be completed and approved by the end of the winter quarter of a student’s second year in the program; the second qualifying paper must be completed and approved by the winter quarter of a student’s third year in the program. There must be two faculty readers on each qualifying paper, and only one faculty reader may serve as a reader on both papers. Upon successful completion of these papers and demonstration of competence in a foreign language, mastery of an advanced quantitative skill, or an advanced qualitative skill, a candidacy committee is appointed to oversee the qualifying examination and the formal advancement to candidacy. Students are expected to advance to candidacy by the end of their eighth quarter in the Ph.D. program. All students must pass the advancement to candidacy examination by the end of the tenth quarter in the Ph.D. program.

After the student advances to candidacy, the doctoral committee, usually composed of three members of the candidacy committee, reviews a dissertation prospectus and supervises work toward completion of the dissertation. Within six months of the oral qualifying examination (the formal advancement to candidacy), students are expected to meet with their doctoral committee, in order to discuss with the members a dissertation prospectus.

The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is six years, and the maximum time permitted is seven years.

Concentration in Public Choice/Political Economy

Public choice is an interdisciplinary field, at the intersection of political science and economics, which draws on sophisticated quantitative tools to model the functioning of political institutions. Public choice examines such areas as theories of voter and party choice; the theory of constitutions; the theory of committees and elections; models of regulation; problems of public goods and externalities; rent-seeking models; and issues in social choice, social welfare, and demand revelation.

This concentration is administered by an interdisciplinary committee of faculty from the Departments of Political Science and Economics. Students who elect this concentration are admitted under the normal procedures for the program in political science and must fulfill all the requirements for the political science degree, with the following modifications:

  1. Students must complete the three-quarter core sequence in public choice, which is taught jointly by political science and economics faculty. This sequence is usually taken in the student’s second or third year.
  2. Students must complete three additional graduate-level, four-unit courses in related fields with the consent of their graduate advisor, chosen from a set of courses designated by the interdisciplinary committee. The courses chosen are to be tailored to the individual interests and academic background of the student and usually will include at least two economics courses (such as Econometrics, Game Theory, and Law and Economics) and one political science course (such as those on electoral systems, party systems, constitutions, courts).
  3. Students are expected to write their dissertation on a topic related to public choice. Usually the dissertation advisor will be a political science member of the interdisciplinary committee.

4+1 M.A. Degree in Philosophy, Political Science and Economics (PPE)

The goal of this program is to train students in three critically important and related approaches to understanding the social world around us. Philosophy develops analytic rigor and trains students to reason logically. Political Science provides an understanding of how institutions impact modern societies and helps students evaluate the choices that such institutions regularly make. And economics is the study of how individuals, firms, and governments make decisions which together determine how resources are allocated. An appreciation of economics has increasingly become crucial for an understanding of institutional policy making. The objective of the M.A. in PPE is to prepare students for careers in government, law, private or public corporations, and non-profit organizations.

In order to be admitted to the program, undergraduate students must submit an application in the winter quarter of their third year. More information can be found in the School of Social Sciences’ Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science.

Program in Law and Graduate Studies (J.D./Ph.D.)

Highly qualified students interested in combining the study of law with graduate research and/or professional qualifications in political science are invited to undertake concurrent degree study under the auspices of UC Irvine’s Program in Law and Graduate Studies (PLGS). Students in this program pursue a coordinated curriculum leading to a J.D. degree from the School of Law in conjunction with a Ph.D. degree in political science. Additional information is available from the PLGS program director’s office, 949-824-4158, or by email to plgs@law.uci.edu. A full description of the program, with links to all relevant application information, can be found at the School of Law Concurrent Degree Programs website.

Courses

POL SCI 6A. Introduction to Political Science: Political Analysis. 4 Units.

Presents various modes of understanding politics. Emphasis on basic approaches to political analysis, their uses in constructing theories, and their application to particular national political systems.

(III, VIII)

POL SCI 6B. Introduction to Political Science: Macropolitics. 4 Units.

An overview of macro-political inquiry, emphasizing the various determinants of political life in a political community. We also explore the origins and challenges of democratic governance focusing on the tension between liberty and equality in a democratizing nation.

(III)

POL SCI 6C. Introduction to Political Science: Micropolitics. 4 Units.

Introduction to political behavior of individuals and groups within national systems. Three questions addressed: How do individuals come to understand the political world? How do individuals behave within this world? How do groups and individuals engage in the political process.

(III)

POL SCI 10A. Probability and Statistics in Political Science I. 4 Units.

Introduction to the variety of statistical applications in the social sciences. Descriptive statistics. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Percentile ranks. Standardization and normal approximation. Basic probability theory focuses on application to statistical inference and binomial distribution. Laboratory required.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 3A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10A, ECON 15A, PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9A, SOCIOL 10A.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(Va)

POL SCI 10B. Probability and Statistics in Political Science II. 4 Units.

Introduction to statistical inference, sampling distribution, standard error. Hypothesis tests for proportions and means. Inferential techniques for nominal variables including chi-square, study measures of strengths, significance of relationships between variables, assumptions, data requirements, and types of error in significance tests.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 10A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10B, ECON 15B, PSYCH 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9B, SOC SCI 10B.

(Va)

POL SCI 10C. Probability and Statistics in Political Science III. 4 Units.

Focus on correlation, regression, and control for effects of variables. One-way and two-way factorial analysis of variance. A priori and a posteriori comparisons. Introduction to repeated measures design and non-parametric statistics. Discusses use of statistics in newspapers and popular magazines.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 10B.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10C, PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9C, SOC SCI 10C, SOCIOL 10C.

(Vb)

POL SCI 21A. Introduction to American Government. 4 Units.

Introduction to American political processes and institutions. Topics include elections, political participation, parties, interest groups, the Presidency, Congress, the bureaucracy, and the judiciary. Course may be offered online.

(III)

POL SCI 29. Special Topics in American Politics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of American politics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 31A. Introduction to Political Theory. 4 Units.

Types of questions: What is politics? What are the theoretical and philosophical bases for different types of political arrangements? How do these perspectives get translated into reality? Among others, the works of Rousseau, Locke, Mill, and Marx are read.

(III)

POL SCI 32A. Dilemmas of Diversity. 4 Units.

Focuses on racial, ethnic, and gender diversity, multiculturalism, and their impact on our social and political ideals. Traces the sources of ideas about difference, equality, and toleration, and examines tensions that occur when forms of identity conflict with one another.

Same as INTL ST 32A.

(VII)

POL SCI 39. Lower-Division Special Topics in Political Theory. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of political theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 41A. Introduction to International Relations. 4 Units.

Analysis of political relations between and among nations with emphasis on explanations of conflict and cooperation. The role of ideologies and their relation to international problems are also examined. Course may be offered online.

Same as INTL ST 14.

Restriction: International Studies and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III, VIII)

POL SCI 49. Lower-Division Special Topics in International Relations. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of international relations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 51A. Introduction to Politics Around the World. 4 Units.

Introduces comparative politics. Compares political systems in a variety of countries. Includes elections, parties, parliaments, presidents, protest movements, and other aspects of national politics. Addresses how to make meaningful comparisons across countries.

(III, VIII)

POL SCI 61A. Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in Political Science. 4 Units.

Examines major theories that attempt to explain the roles of race and ethnicity in U.S. politics. Course may be offered online.

Same as CHC/LAT 64.

(III, VII)

POL SCI 69. Lower Division Special Topics in Minority Politics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of minority politics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 71A. Introduction to Law. 4 Units.

An introduction to the study of judicial politics. Questions include: what is law?; what is a court?; who are the judges? Analysis of a wide range of judicial decisions illustrates the political importance of courts in the U.S. and elsewhere.

(III)

POL SCI 79. Lower-Division Special Topics in Law. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of law. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI H80. Globalization and Human Security. 4 Units.

Emerging issues of human security in the globalized world, including personal human security, physical integrity, human trafficking, global climate change, food. Challenges of these complex human security problems for a multi-scalar system (international, national, local).

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III, VIII)

POL SCI 120. Public Opinion. 4 Units.

Theories concerning sources of public opinion, processes by which it is altered, organization of citizens’ belief systems, and role of public opinion in government policy. Students analyze survey data as a research project.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 120W. Public Opinion. 4 Units.

Theories concerning sources of public opinion, processes by which it is altered, organization of citizens’ belief systems, and role of public opinion in government policy. Students analyze survey data as a research project.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 121A. The American Presidency. 4 Units.

Presents a comprehensive survey of the American presidency and considers the question of political power.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 121C. U.S. Elections and Voting Behavior. 4 Units.

Examines how voters evaluate political parties, candidates, and issues in electoral campaigns to reach their decisions. Numerous controversies concerning the degree of issue voting, sophistication of candidate evaluations, and the decline of political parties are discussed.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 121E. Public Policy Analysis. 4 Units.

Examines different approaches to the analysis of public policy, what constitutes good policy, the role of government, and citizen participation in policy-making. Suggests a policy-design perspective which builds upon other frameworks but concentrates on goals, implementation structures, tools, and rationales.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL E8 and (PP&D 4 or PP&D 166).

Same as PP&D 169.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 121F. Presidents Since World War II. 4 Units.

Reviews the actions and character of presidents from Harry Truman through Bill Clinton. Each week a different president is examined from a variety of perspectives. Students are expected to write a substantial original research paper.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 21A.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 121G. American Public Policy. 4 Units.

Focuses on the development and implementation of public policy in the United States. Lectures cover theoretical models of the policy process as well as significant problems facing contemporary American decision-makers.

Same as PP&D 129, PUBHLTH 132, SOC SCI 152C.

POL SCI 122A. American Metropolitan Politics. 4 Units.

Explores the politics of urban and suburban America, including the policy making process; the exercise of political power; local politics, federalism and the problems of metropolitanism; and major policy problems facing urban areas.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 122B. California Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the structure and function of California government, traces historical development of political power, with constantly changing casts of power-brokers and seekers. Explores California exceptionalism and the roles played by the electorate, legislature, executive, and organized interests in policy making.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 122BW. California Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the structure and function of California government, traces historical development of political power, with constantly changing casts of power-brokers and seekers. Explores California exceptionalism and the roles played by the electorate, legislature, executive, and organized interests in policy making.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 123B. Representation and Redistricting. 4 Units.

Deals with classical theories of representation: issues of racial and political representation in U.S. legislatures and city councils; proportional representation models; and comparative election systems.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 3A or SOC SCI 10A or SOC SCI 10B.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 124A. The Politics of Protest. 4 Units.

Examines the Civil Rights, Black Power, and women’s movements in relationship to the Asian American movement. Uses social movement theories to illuminate the cases, and the cases to critique and revise the theories.

Same as ASIANAM 144.

(VII)

POL SCI 124B. Latinos in U.S. Politics. 4 Units.

Comparing the political issues facing Latino groups by examining their migration histories, voting behavior, nonelectoral participation, and policy issues. Latino issues are examined on the national, state, and local levels, including formal representation, immigration, affirmative action, and language policy.

Same as CHC/LAT 151.

(VII)

POL SCI 124C. Comparative Minority Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the political experiences of Blacks, Latinos, and Asian Americans in the United States from roughly 1950 to the present. Focuses on how each group has pursued political empowerment via both conventional political channels and social movements.

Same as AFAM 151, CHC/LAT 147, ASIANAM 132.

POL SCI 124E. African American Politics. 4 Units.

Examines politics of African Americans in order to gain a broader perspective of the American political process. Major developments in African American politics (including the civil rights movement, Black presidential bids), continuing problem of racism, responsiveness of key governing institutions.

Same as AFAM 152.

POL SCI 125A. The United States Congress. 4 Units.

Does the Congress do a good job of representing the American citizenry? Is it the most appropriate mechanism for the creation, resolution, and implementation of public policy.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 125AW. The United States Congress. 4 Units.

Does the Congress do a good job of representing the American citizenry? Is it the most appropriate mechanism for the creation, resolution, and implementation of public policy.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 125B. Congress:The New Institutionalist Approach. 4 Units.

Study of the U.S. Congress emphasizing how rules and institutions (filibuster, veto, the committee system, party caucuses) structure how the Congressional game is played. Combines theoretical study of procedures with the practical study of actual bills.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 125CW. Constitutional Convention. 4 Units.

Analyzes the Constitution, its amendments, and periods of Constitutional reform as a foundation for a critical evaluation of the Constitution with an eye both to necessary reforms and to elements of the Constitution that should be maintained.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 21A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

POL SCI 126C. U.S. Immigration Policy. 4 Units.

Examines selected immigration policy debates since the nineteenth century, rationale and consequences of immigration law since 1965, problems of administration, implementation and enforcement, impact of immigration policy on foreign relations, and contemporary debate regarding the future of U.S. policy.

Same as CHC/LAT 163.

(VII)

POL SCI 126D. Urban Politics and Policy. 4 Units.

Examines economic limits of cities and welfare policy. Addresses such issues as why are the poor concentrated in the central cities? Which anti-poverty programs will work best in cities? Which level of government can best combat poverty in the U.S.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 126F. Politics of Animal Rights. 4 Units.

Examines animal rights/welfare movement’s efforts to transform moral, practical, and legal standing of nonhuman animals in contemporary U.S. Explores intersection of racism, sexism, and speciesism informed by theories of race and ethnicity, including Asian American Studies.

Same as ASIANAM 168.

Restriction: Political Science majors and Asian American Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 128C. Political Psychology. 4 Units.

Examination of how psychological theory and research may be used to better understand political thought and behavior. Drawing on theories of learning, cognition, and personality, discusses such topics as the formation of political attitudes, and the process of political decision-making.

Same as PSYCH 176A.

Restriction: Majors only. POL SCI 128C may not be taken for credit if taken after POL SCI 137C.

POL SCI 129. Special Topics in American Politics and Society. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of American politics and society. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 130A. Game Theory and Politics I. 4 Units.

Introduction to game theory and a survey of its political applications. Examples of topics covered include voting in small committees, legislatures, and mass elections; interest group activities and environmental issues; institutional design, and the evolution of cooperative behavior.

Same as INTL ST 105A, SOC SCI 103A, SOCIOL 134.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, Sociology, Political Science, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 130B. Game Theory and Politics II. 4 Units.

More advanced game theory and its political applications, beginning where Game Theory and Politics I ends. Examples of topics covered include revolutions; arms race; spatial models of party competition; political manipulation; political coalitions and their power.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 130A or ECON 116A.

Same as INTL ST 105B, SOC SCI 103B.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, International Studies, and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 131C. Modern Political Theory. 4 Units.

Examines major thinkers and intellectual movements in the political thought of the 17th and 18th centuries.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 131F. Twentieth Century Political Theory. 4 Units.

Examines major thinkers and intellectual movements in the political thought of the 20th Century.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 31A.

POL SCI 134F. Social and Political Theory. 4 Units.

Focus is on recent major work in social and political theory. An in-depth analysis of a relatively small body of writing. Authors discussed include Jurgen Habermas, Anthony Giddens, and Richard Rorty.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 135A. Origins of Liberalism. 4 Units.

Examines the ideals, social forces, and historical events that gave rise to liberal political theory. Topics include patriarchal authority, the divine right of kings, religious toleration, slavery, colonialism, political economy, the evolution of law, and tensions between liberty and equality.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 31A

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 135B. Just War Revisited. 4 Units.

Examines the evolution of the doctrine of the just war across the history of Western political thought, the importance of changes in the doctrine and whether it applies today; examines international relations case studies to determine today's relevancy.

Same as INTL ST 131A.

POL SCI 136A. Logical Models in Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Science asks two questions. "How things are?" leads to measurement and statistical analysis. But we see only what we look for. "How things should be, on logical grounds?" leads to quantitative logical models which tell us what to look for.

Same as SOCIOL 112.

POL SCI 136B. Cannibals and Conquistadores: The Philosophy of the Other. 4 Units.

Examines critically the notion of the "other" by looking at the philosophical challenges difference poses in the context of the European discovery of the New World. Seeks to understand the naissance of the concept of human rights and tolerance.

POL SCI 136D. Middle East Narratives. 4 Units.

Explores various narratives of peoples living in the Middle East: Bedouins, Jews, Muslims, Christians, Druze, Baha’i; looks at how their identities were formed and altered over time through empire, religion, exodus, war, democracy, diasporas; focus is philosophical and historical.

Same as INTL ST 174.

POL SCI 137B. Types of Political Representation. 4 Units.

Political representation plays an important role in democratic systems, but is elusive once examined closely. Students delve into the concept and relate different views to political life. Half of the course is spent on writing instruction.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-Division students. Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 137BW. Types of Political Representation. 4 Units.

Political representation plays an important role in democratic systems, but is elusive once examined closely. Students delve into the concept and relate different views to political life. Half of the course is spent on writing instruction.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-Division students. Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 138A. The Moral of the Story: Introductory Seminar in Ethics. 4 Units.

Introduces major theories and classic texts in ethics, from Plato and Aristotelian virtue ethics to utilitarianism and Kant and contemporary moral psychology.

POL SCI 138C. Ethics of Difference. 4 Units.

Examines differences traditionally judged politically salient—race, ethnicity, religion, gender. Personal interviews with an elderly person encourage students to understand the social construction of difference and to reexamine their own attitudes by putting themselves in the place of another.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 138CW. Ethics of Difference. 4 Units.

Examines differences traditionally judged politically salient—race, ethnicity, religion, gender. Personal interviews with an elderly person encourage students to understand the social construction of difference and to reexamine their own attitudes by putting themselves in the place of another.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 139. Special Topics in Political Theory and Methods. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of political theory and methods. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 141B. International Political Economy. 4 Units.

Examination of problems in global political-economic relations through competing conceptual lenses or grand theories: mercantilism, liberalism, and Marxism. Surveys North-North and North-South issues relating power and wealth.

Same as INTL ST 114A.

(VIII)

POL SCI 141C. International Political Economy of East Asia. 4 Units.

Integration of theoretical perspectives in international political economy with the study of economic development in East Asia, with special emphasis on regional integration.

(VIII)

POL SCI 141E. U.S. Foreign Policy Toward Asia. 4 Units.

U.S. policy toward the countries of East Asia: bilateral and regional security relationships, U.S. economic relations with the major Asian countries, the development of regional institutions, and human rights.

Same as INTL ST 142G.

POL SCI 142B. The International Relations of East Asia. 4 Units.

Surveys various aspects of relations between the nations of East Asia. Topics include the historical development of the region; current political and security relations, including the impact of the American military presence.

Same as INTL ST 142D.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142D. U.S. Foreign Policy I: Globalism and Cold War. 4 Units.

Looks at changing international perspectives, policy responses, and military strategies of presidential administrations from Truman to Reagan. In assessing the motives and objectives of U.S. foreign policy leaders during the “Cold War” era, the concept of “national interest” is examined.

Same as INTL ST 142A.

Restriction: International Studies and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142E. U.S. Foreign Policy II: Cold War Decline & After. 4 Units.

Deals with U.S. foreign policy from the post-Vietnam War era through the collapse of the Cold War and into the emergence of the post-Cold War era, roughly from 1972 to the present.

Same as INTL ST 142B.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142F. U.S. Foreign Policy III: National Security Decision-Making. 4 Units.

Concept of "national security" from 1947-1990s is reviewed. Organizational and psychological factors that influence decision-making, the dangers of "groupthink," and the issue of accountability are analyzed. National security agenda (military, economic, environmental, and social) for the 1990s is discussed.

Same as INTL ST 142C.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142G. U.S. Coercive Diplomacy. 4 Units.

Examines the theory of compellence and the U.S. practice of coercive diplomacy--the power to change behavior of other governments. Specific case examples: the Cuban missile crisis, bombing of North Vietnam, the Nicaraguan Contras, Desert Shield/Desert Storm, and Libya.

Same as INTL ST 142E.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142J. U.S. Intervention in Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores political, economic, social, and cultural ties that bind Latin America to the United States. Focuses on U.S. intervention and Latin American response from early nineteenth century to present day. Case studies include Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, and Central America.

Same as HISTORY 166, INTL ST 177D, CHC/LAT 150.

POL SCI 143F. Intelligence in International Politics. 4 Units.

Intelligence agencies, activities, and functions—their impact on international politics; how governments and societies seek to control intelligence agencies and activities; and how intelligence agencies work—their techniques, resources, technology, problems, successes, and failures.

Same as INTL ST 141A.

Restriction: Political Science and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 143G. Homeland Security . 4 Units.

Examines the 9/11 origins of the concept of homeland security; assess the evolution, structure, and operations of the Department of Homeland Security; critically examines the evolution of threat assessment to the U.S. and the utilization of risk management methodologies.

Same as INTL ST 141B.

POL SCI 144A. Approaches to International Relations. 4 Units.

Reviews theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of international relations using contending perspectives to analyze power and influence, capabilities, interdependence, reciprocity, international regimes, anarchy, cooperation, imperialism, and hegemony.

Same as INTL ST 140A.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 145A. Ethics in an Age of Terror and Genocide. 4 Units.

Original sources document personal impact of wars on genocides, from World War II to the Bosnian and Rwandan genocides and current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Students train for and conduct personal interviews with someone who lived through a war.

Same as INTL ST 154C.

POL SCI 146B. Religion and World Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the relationship between religion and world politics historically and today, focusing on connections with peace/war, democracy, human rights, secularism(s), and globalization. Covers major debates, scholarship, concepts, and theories through class exercises, exams, and essays.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 41A or INTL ST 11 or INTL ST 12 or REL STD 5A or REL STD 5B or REL STD 5C.

Same as REL STD 115, INTL ST 151B.

POL SCI 149. Special Topics in International Relations. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of international relations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151A. East Asian Politics. 4 Units.

Explores the recent history and political systems of China, Japan, and Korea, comparing the three countries with each other and with occasional reference to the United States, British, and French systems.

Same as INTL ST 176B.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151B. Introduction to Chinese Politics. 4 Units.

Background to the Chinese revolution, rise of the communist party; and institutions, ideology, and structure of Communist party rule from 1949-present.

Same as INTL ST 176C.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151C. Chinese Politics: Policy, Leadership, and Change. 4 Units.

Examines major policies from 1949 to the present, and considers the changing role of the Communist Party and its shifting treatment of various social groups; the era of Mao Zedong, reforms under Deng, and post-Deng politics.

Same as INTL ST 176D.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151E. Are Chinese Politics Changing?. 4 Units.

There’s been speculation about whether the Chinese political system is fundamentally changing. This upper-division writing seminar reviews new books on this topic and considers the question from a range of angles. Four two-page papers and one 8–10-page paper required.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151EW. Are Chinese Politics Changing?. 4 Units.

There’s been speculation about whether the Chinese political system is fundamentally changing. This upper-division writing seminar reviews new books on this topic and considers the question from a range of angles. Four two-page papers and one 8–10-page paper required.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 151H. Voting and Political Manipulation. 4 Units.

Introduction to social choice and cooperative games. Topics include majority rule, types of voting methods, apportionment and proportional representation, agenda manipulation, coalition formation, voting power, political consequences of electoral laws.

Same as INTL ST 156A, SOC SCI 121T, ECON 154.

Restriction: International Studies, Political Science, Social Science and Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 152C. German Politics and Society. 4 Units.

Concentrates on twentieth-century German politics and society, focusing on the contemporary political system of democratic West Germany. Study of the historical legacies of Weimar and the Nazi period, the postwar division between the two states and their reunification.

Same as INTL ST 176G.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 152F. West European Politics. 4 Units.

Explores four main themes: (1) thinking scientifically about politics; (2) understanding the linkages between different political structures and spheres of activity; (3) evaluating some theories about politics; (4) learning about three countries: Britain, France, and Germany.

Same as INTL ST 176I.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 152K. Immigration Politics in Western Europe. 4 Units.

Examines immigration politics in Western Europe, analyzing trends and policy from the postwar period through to today. Topics include citizenship, immigrant integration, asylum, the far-right, and a rotating focus on contemporary issues, e.g., terrorism, Islamophobia.

Same as INTL ST 178A.
Overlaps with POL SCI 141D.

POL SCI 153A. Latin American Politics. 4 Units.

Introduces the main concepts and theoretical approaches underlying the study of Latin American politics, examines recent political dynamics, and explores the challenges the region faces in the twenty-first century and how countries will attempt to address them.

Same as INTL ST 176K, CHC/LAT 151A.

Restriction: Political Science majors, Chicano/Latino Studies majors, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 153B. Canadian Politics. 4 Units.

Addresses the basic structures and processes of contemporary Canadian government and politics. Additional topics may include regionalism, federalism, western alienation and oil, Canadian solutions to social welfare policy questions, developments in Quebec, and other issues associated with French-English relations.

Same as INTL ST 176L.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 153E. Human Rights. 4 Units.

Examines the causes and consequences of human rights violations with a focus on Latin America. What are human rights? When and where are they violated? What political mechanisms are available to deal with human rights problems? How effective are they.

Same as INTL ST 154B.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 153G. Cuban Society and Revolution. 4 Units.

Explores the causes, development, and legacy of the 1959 Revolution. Themes include economic dependency, democracy, race, gender, culture, and the always volatile relations between Cuba and the United States.

Same as INTL ST 177E, HISTORY 166C, CHC/LAT 157.

POL SCI 154C. Comparative Politics: Four Nations, Three Continents. 4 Units.

Studies four countries in a comparative fashion: their respective political histories and cultural traditions; actual differences among their superficially similar party, parliamentary, and executive institutions; contemporary economic policy. The countries represent three continents and varying levels of economic development.

Same as INTL ST 144A.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 154F. Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia. 4 Units.

Examines the cultures and political conflicts of the more than 130 indigenous ethnic groups in the European and Asian territories of the former U.S.S.R. Emphasis is on the theoretical issues of ethnicity, nationalism, and conflict management.

Same as INTL ST 162B, ANTHRO 164P.

(VIII)

POL SCI 154G. Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Units.

Examines theories of conflict management. Analyzes how conflict is mitigated in diverse cultures: at the interpersonal level, between groups, and on the international scale. Students discuss readings, hear from conflict management practitioners, and simulate negotiations.

Same as ANTHRO 136D, SOC SCI 183E, INTL ST 183E.

(VIII)

POL SCI 155A. New Democracies. 4 Units.

Examines what democracy is; considers competing theories about its causes; explores multiple democratic institutions; discusses several types of democracy; and analyzes various aspects of democratic quality and stability, focusing on Eastern Europe, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Same as INTL ST 124B.

POL SCI 155C. Organizations. 4 Units.

How bureaucracies, formal organizations, and voluntary associations work, how/why they grow, and where they are going. History and structure of organizational rationality; dynamics of organized groups; behavior in organizations; limits of bureaucratization and attempts to overcome these limits through decentralization.

Same as SOCIOL 141.

Restriction: Sociology and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 155F. Political Economy of Japan. 4 Units.

Surveys postwar developments in the politics and political economy of Japan. Topics include the political and institutional context of policy making; pressures for change which Japan's political economy has faced in the last decade; Japan's past and present foreign policies.

Same as INTL ST 114D.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 156A. Political Participation. 4 Units.

The ways in which people in various political systems take part in politics, especially in activities directed toward affecting outcomes. Who is active, what they do, why they do it, and what difference it makes.

POL SCI 156C. Citizen Politics. 4 Units.

Study of the role of public opinion in the political process. Reviews some key research approaches and findings on which our current understanding of public opinion is based. Provides an opportunity to conduct research and to analyze public opinion surveys.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 156D. Protests, Movements, and Revolutions. 4 Units.

A survey of models of collective action drawn from sociology, economics, psychology, and political science. Focus on areas such as social movements, strikes, crowd psychology, cults, fads, fashions, public opinion, and symbolic and mythical elements in collective culture.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 1 or POL SCI 6A or ECON 1.

Same as SOCIOL 174.

Restriction: Political Science and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 157B. International Divided Cities. 4 Units.

Investigates urban divisions in international cities where deep-seated nationalistic ethnic differences create pressures for intergroup conflicts, autonomy, or territorial separation, and can incite violence. Urban political polarization as it is manifest in the urban setting.

Same as SOCIOL 176, PP&D 178.

POL SCI 158C. Afghanistan. 4 Units.

Provides an examination of Afghanistan's traditional social organization, economy, political organization, and relationship among ethnic groups as a basis for discussing the consequences of domestic political turmoil and foreign interventions over the last 20 years. Current situation and future addressed.

Same as SOC SCI 188I, INTL ST 162.

POL SCI 158D. Introduction to Contemporary Middle East Politics. 4 Units.

An overview of basic issues that shape the politics of the Middle East and North Africa. Themes include implication of the colonization era, nation-state formation, inter-Arab relations, nationalism, Arab-Israel conflict, Islamic resurgence, and more.

Same as SOC SCI 188A, INTL ST 165.

POL SCI 159. Special Topics in Comparative Politics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of comparative politics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 169. Conflict Management. 4 Units.

Special Instance.

POL SCI 171A. Law and Society. 4 Units.

Law and its various roles in society. The nature and meaning of law; legality and power in the American system; law as a mechanism for social change; the role of law in dispute processing, social control, compliance with judicial decisions.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 171AW. Law and Society. 4 Units.

Law and its various roles in society. The nature and meaning of law; legality and power in the American system; law as a mechanism for social change; the role of law in dispute processing, social control, compliance with judicial decisions.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 171B. Jurisprudence. 4 Units.

A survey of legal philosophies. Explores jurisprudence from the ancient Greeks to the present, including natural law philosophy; legal positivism and realism; sociological jurisprudence; and liberal, radical, and conservative thought.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 171CW. Comparative Constitutional Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the impact of constitutional courts on politics and policy-making in Canada, France, Germany, and the United States. Cases may focus on the constitutional politics of free speech, abortion, rights to property, and the conduct of foreign relations.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 171D. American Constitutional Law. 4 Units.

American constitutional interpretation of cases involving separation of powers, federal-state relations, rights of property, free expression, privacy, criminal due process, political participation, and equality. Includes legal research methods, development of judicial review, legal reasoning, and impact of Supreme Court decisions.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Overlaps with CRM/LAW C122.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 171F. Law in the Twenty-First Century. 4 Units.

Examines the complex relationship between law, the social sciences, and modern society. Lectures explore such issues as the interplay between technology and constitutional rights, the impact of science on law, and the evolving roles of attorneys and judges.

Same as SOC SCI 172D.

Restriction: Political Science and Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 171G. Legal Implications of the Drug Trade. 4 Units.

Examines United States policy to combat domestic and international narcotics trafficking. Analyzes the national drug policy and program implementation by federal and state agencies. Considers the effects of these policies on our individual constitutional rights and the criminal justice system.

POL SCI 172A. International Law. 4 Units.

Examination of the origin, changing structure, application of international law, and the role of legal norms in regulating the behavior of states and maintaining international order.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as INTL ST 145A.

(VIII)

POL SCI 172C. Constitution and Rights. 4 Units.

How are constitutions crafted, maintained, and changed? Does constitutionalism support or undermine democracy? What difference do rights and constitutional courts make? Explores these questions through a comparative examination of the theory and practice of constitutionalism in developing democracies.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as INTL ST 145C.

POL SCI 172D. Courts in New Democracies . 4 Units.

Examines the conceptual, theoretical, and empirical foundations of the study of courts and politics in new democracies, introducing students to a variety of contemporary debates about how political dynamics shape courts, and how courts shape politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as INTL ST 145D.

POL SCI 174A. Civil Liberties. 4 Units.

Political analysis of selected Supreme Court cases involving claims under the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Topics include: race, sex, and other forms of discrimination; criminal justice; privacy; freedom of speech and related claims.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Overlaps with CRM/LAW C122.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 174C. U.S. Supreme Court. 4 Units.

Overview and analysis of the role played by the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. Judicial review, appointment of justices, judicial activism and judicial restraint, process of case selection, court deliberation, land decision-making, impact of Supreme Court decisions.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 174CW. U.S. Supreme Court. 4 Units.

Overview and analysis of the role played by the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. Judicial review, appointment of justices, judicial activism and judicial restraint, process of case selection, court deliberation, land decision-making, impact of Supreme Court decisions.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 175. The Bill of Rights in Film. 4 Units.

Focuses on ways American cinema has portrayed, represented, and analyzed U.S. Bills of Rights. Juxtaposes cinematic presentations on specific Bill of Rights clauses, treating films as cultural texts, with pertinent judicial decisions and more scholarly appraisals of those same provisions.

POL SCI 179. Special Topics in Public Law. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of public law. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI H180D. Honors Seminar in Political Science. 2-4 Units.

Course for students enrolled in the Honors Program in Political Science.

Prerequisite: Only open to students in the Political Science Honors Program.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

POL SCI H182A. Honors Thesis Workshop. 4 Units.

A weekly seminar/workshop to facilitate the exchange of ideas and research strategies among students and to review their progress in writing the thesis.

Restriction: Open only to students in the Political Science Senior Thesis program.

POL SCI 190. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Thesis research with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

POL SCI 190W. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Thesis research with Political Science faculty.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

(Ib)

POL SCI 197. Field Study. 1-4 Units.

Field study with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 198. Directed Group Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed group study with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent study or research with a Political Science faculty member.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

POL SCI 209A. Study of Democracy Colloquium. 1.33 Unit.

Skills critical to professional success. Students learn and practice professional presentation skills, develop substantive knowledge in the field by attending talks and panels, and interact with scholars and professionals in the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only. POL SCI 209A may not be taken for credit if taken after SOCIOL 229.

POL SCI 209B. Study of Democracy Colloquium. 1.33 Unit.

This colloquium teaches students skills critical to professional success. Students learn and practice professional presentation skills and develop substantive knowledge in the field by attending talks and panels and interacting with scholars and professionals in the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only. POL SCI 209B may not be taken for credit if taken after SOCIOL 229 Democracy.

POL SCI 209C. Study of Democracy Colloquium . 1.34 Unit.

This colloquium teaches students skills critical to professional success. Students learn and practice professional presentation skills and develop substantive knowledge in the field by attending talks and panels and interacting with scholars and professionals in the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only. POL SCI 209C may not be taken for credit if taken after SOCIOL 229 Democracy.

POL SCI 210A. Colloquium. 1.3 Unit.

Doctoral training requires more than learning substantive debates and research methods; it also requires students learn professional practices, routines, and expectations. This year-long workshop offers students a mix of professional development, outside speakers, and casual conversations with departmental faculty.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 210B. Colloquium. 1.3 Unit.

Doctoral training requires more than learning substantive debates and research methods; it also requires students learn professional practices, routines, and expectations. This year-long workshop offers students a mix of professional development, outside speakers, and casual conversations with departmental faculty.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 210A.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 210C. Colloquium. 1.4 Unit.

Doctoral training requires more than learning substantive debates and research methods; it also requires students learn professional practices, routines, and expectations. This year-long workshop offers students a mix of professional development, outside speakers, and casual conversations with departmental faculty.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 210B.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 212A. Public Opinion. 4 Units.

Introduction to the study of U.S. public opinion. Provides an overview of the theories regarding opinion formation, the methodologies employed, and the role of public opinion in democratic governments.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 212B. Ethics Workshop. 4 Units.

Students find an important question in ethics, search literature to assess topic's importance, post question to be researched, propose method of analysis and type of data, analyze data, and note how their works contribute to knowledge in the field.

POL SCI 219. Special Topics in Politics and Society. 4 Units.

Current research in politics and society.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 221A. Public Policy . 4 Units.

Explores different approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PUB POL 221.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy graduate students have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 222A. Collaborative Governance and Public Management. 4 Units.

Introduction to inclusive management. To make effective use of public resources, public managers are inventing ways of managing that alter relationships within organizations, between organizations, between sectors, and with the public. Requires rethinking fundamentals such as leadership and motivation.

Same as PP&D 283.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 223A. Theories of Power and Empowerment. 4 Units.

Studies different ways of thinking about power and its uses. Explores theories of power that inform various notions of empowerment, including resistance, participatory democracy, and workplace empowerment.

Same as PP&D 279, MGMTPHD 297R.

Restriction: Ph.D. students only.

POL SCI 229. Advanced Research Methods: Varied Topics. 4 Units.

Topics in advanced research methods. Topics will vary.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 231A. Political Epistemology. 4 Units.

Focuses on fundamental issues of knowledge in the study of politics, especially interconnections and tensions between politics and knowledge. Counts as the Field Seminar in Political Theory.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 232A. Introduction to Voting Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to voting modules. Substantive topics include majority rule, voting methods and their properties, apportionment and proportional representation, agenda manipulation, coalition formation, voting power, political consequences of electoral laws.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 234A. Research Logic and Design in Political Science. 4 Units.

An introduction to standard research techniques in political science. Issues of epistemology, research design, and approaches to empirical analysis.

Prerequisite: Upper-division or graduate-level statistics.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 239. Special Topics in Political Theory. 4 Units.

Current research in political theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 241B. Seminar in International Relations Theory. 4 Units.

Overview of the major theories guiding research and scholarship in international relations. Focus on major conceptual approaches (realism, neoliberalism, marxism) and levels of analysis (systemic, state, and subnational), as well as on methodological/epistemological debates engulfing the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 241E. Research Design in International Relations. 4 Units.

Surveys research design primarily through substantive readings in international relations. The purpose is to familiarize students with choices/dilemmas relevant to IR-specific research. Students at various stages in the graduate program and with different methodological orientations are welcome.

POL SCI 252A. The State in Comparative Perspective. 4 Units.

Seminar examining the state from theoretical, empirical, comparative perspectives. How the state came into being, the state’s role in the economy, toward society and internationally, and in policy-making in Western Europe, East Asian newly industrialized countries, the Third World.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 252F. Political Culture and Democracy. 4 Units.

Examines the political culture literature and its relationship to democratic development. What are the cultural prerequisites of democracy, what aspects of political culture facilitate democratic politics and governmental performance, and what forms and reforms a political culture.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 252G. Theories and Practice of Migration and Citizenship. 4 Units.

Examines theories of migration and citizenship. In examining these themes, the course includes discussion of theory development, multi-method testing, and case study comparison with a focus on Western Europe and other advanced democratic receiving states.

POL SCI 253B. Regime Change in East Asia. 4 Units.

Regime change from authoritarianism to democracies (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan); gradual political change (China). Uses theories from comparative literature on regime transition; combines theory with historical institutions, political culture, prior regimes, elements in the transition process in the four countries.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 254A. Introduction to Game Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to non-cooperative games. The prisoner's dilemma, Nash equilibrium, sequential games, subgame perfection. Applications include collective action, agenda-setter models, spatial competition of political parties, models of revolution and arms race.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 260B. Political Participation. 4 Units.

Examines theoretical approaches to the explanation of the pattern of participation and consideration of the results of empirical studies of such activity by mass publics (mainly in Europe and North America). Addresses issues in both comparative politics and political behavior.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 270A. Political Economy I. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Same as ECON 270A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 270B. Political Economy II. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 270A.

Same as ECON 270B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 270C. Political Economy III. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 270B.

Same as ECON 270C.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 273A. Advanced Qualitative Methods: Analyzing Qualitative Data. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the theory and practice of analyzing qualitative data. Student must have already learned about data collection and research design for qualitative research and they must have qualitative data they can analyze.

Same as MGMTPHD 297K, PP&D 213.

Restriction: Grad students only

POL SCI 276. Predictive Models in Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Basic numeracy (logarithms, fixed-exponent and exponential formats, graphing). Models based on ignorance and logical constraints. Logical quantitative models (how things should be) to complement and guide statistical analysis (how things are).

POL SCI 285A. Introduction to Political Psychology I. 4 Units.

Reviews theoretical questions regarding the relationship between the analytical and normative and the polity. Considers relationships between the analytical and normative concerns of psychology and political science, addressing empirical literatures on political socialization, ideology and public opinion, identity and nationality.

POL SCI 290. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 299. Independent Study. 1-12 Units.

Independent research with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Faculty

Edwin Amenta, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Sociology; Political Science (political sociology, historical and comparative sociology, social movements, social policy)
Matthew N. Beckmann, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Political Science
Graeme T. Boushey, Ph.D. University of Washington, Assistant Professor of Political Science; Planning, Policy, and Design
Daniel R. Brunstetter, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Associate Professor of Political Science; European Languages and Studies (political theory, international relations, French political thought)
Alejandro E. Camacho, J.D., LL.M. Harvard University, Georgetown University, Professor of School of Law; Political Science
David O. Carter, J.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Lecturer of Political Science
Simone Chambers, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Political Science
Erwin Chemerinsky, J.D. Harvard University, Dean of the School of Law, Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law and Distinguished Professor of School of Law; Political Science
James N. Danziger, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Louis Desipio, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; Political Science (ethnic politics, Latino politics, immigration, naturalization, U.S. electoral politics)
David Feldman, Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science
Martha S. Feldman, Ph.D. Stanford University, Roger W. and Janice M. Johnson Chair in Civic Governance and Public Management and Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Paul Merage School of Business; Political Science; Sociology (organization theory and behavior, stability and change in organizations, decision-making and information processing, public management, qualitative research methods)
Mark J. Fisher, M.D. University of Cincinnati, Professor of Neurology; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Political Science
David John Frank, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Sociology; Education; Political Science (globalization, sexuality, the natural environment, higher education)
Howard A. Gillman, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Chancellor and Professor of Political Science; Criminology, Law and Society; History
Sara Goodman, Ph.D. Georgetown University, Associate Professor of Political Science
Bernard N. Grofman, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Political Science; Economics
Heidi Hardt, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Richard L. Hasen, J.D. University of California, Los Angeles, UCI Chancellor's Professor of School of Law; Political Science
Marek Kaminski, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Associate Professor of Political Science; Economics
Pamela A. Kelley, J.D. Yale University, Lecturer of Political Science
Claire J. Kim, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Asian American Studies; Culture and Theory; Political Science
Jeffrey Kopstein, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Department Chair and Professor of Political Science
Cecelia M. Lynch, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Political Science
Richard Matthew, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science
Carrie Menkel-Meadow, J.D. University of Pennsylvania, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Political Science; School of Law
David S. Meyer, Ph.D. Boston University, Professor of Sociology; Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science (social movements, public policy, peace and war, social justice)
Kristen R. Monroe, Ph.D. University of Chicago, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Political Science
Patrick M. Morgan, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Kevin E. Olson, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Associate Professor of Political Science; Culture and Theory (contemporary European political theory, cultural politics, politics of diversity, popular sovereignty, citizenship, nineteenth- and twentieth-century political theory)
Mark P. Petracca, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Political Science; Planning, Policy, and Design
Davin Phoenix, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Shawn W. Rosenberg, M.S. Oxford University, Professor of Political Science (political psychology, deliberative democracy, ideology, social theory, social and development psychology)
Kamal Sadiq, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Political Science
William R. Schonfeld, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Carl E. Schwarz, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Lecturer of Political Science
Sherilyn K. Sellgren, MB.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Political Science
Caesar D. Sereseres, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Associate Professor of Political Science
Charles Smith, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Associate Professor of Political Science
Etel Solingen, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Thomas T. and Elizabeth C. Tierney Chair in Global Peace and Conflict Studies and Professor of Political Science
Dorothy J. Solinger, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Rein Taagepera, Ph.D. University of Delaware, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Michael Tesler, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Keith Topper, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Political Science; Culture and Theory (political theory, critical theory, poststructuralism, theories of power, language and politics, theory and politics of interpretation, politics of culture, philosophy of the social sciences)
Rodolfo D. Torres, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Culture and Theory; Political Science
Carole J. Uhlaner, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Political Science
Robert M. Uriu, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of Political Science
Martin P. Wattenberg, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Political Science
Christopher A. Whytock, J.D. Georgetown University, Professor of School of Law; Political Science
Back to Top