The Undergraduate Major in Social Policy and Public Service

http://www.spps.socsci.uci.edu/

Overview

The major in Social Policy and Public Service (SPPS) provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the study of society, both at the individual and group level. Using the knowledge and methods of all social science disciplines, a student majoring in Social Policy and Public Service develops the skills to think clearly about social concepts and issues. Majors have an opportunity to use their classroom knowledge in applied and individual learning experiences, such as internships, field studies, or research with a faculty advisor.

The curriculum for the major exposes students to various social science methods and topics, teaching applied computer-based research and statistical analyses; internship experiences in community, public, and educational organizations; and a more in-depth understanding of social science research and methodology. To ensure competency in a specific area of interest, students choose one of three focus areas: (1) Education, (2) Governance, or (3) Health.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Social Policy and Public Service

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Requirements for the Major

School requirements must be met and must include 15 courses (60 units) as specified below. Students must take all required courses for the major for a letter grade.

A. An understanding of the fundamental concepts, analytical tools, and methods of social science:
Principles in the Social Sciences
Introduction to Social Science Analysis
Computer-Based Research in the Social Sciences
B. One course in Introduction to Social Policy and Public Service:
Social Policy and Public Service
C. One course in Cultural Competency:
Comparing Cultures
Race and Ethnicity
D. One course in Leadership:
Ethical Leadership
E. Two courses in Research Methods:
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Research Methods in the Social Sciences
F. Three quarters of Field Studies:
Field Studies in Public and Community Service
and Field Studies in Public and Community Service
and Field Studies in Public and Community Service (must be taken consecutively)
G. One quarter of off-campus internship experience:
Public Service Internship
H. Functional Focus: Three courses in one of the following areas:
Education:
Multicultural Education in K-12 Schools
Ethics and Education
Reading and Writing Enrichment for After-School Programs
Changing the High School Experience
Educational Research and Evaluation
Foundations of Education
Interdisciplinary Topics in Education
Special Topics in Educational Policy and Issues
Economics of Education
Jumpstart I: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development
and Jumpstart I: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development
and Jumpstart I: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development
Global Connect
Governance:
Political Anthropology
Urban Anthropology
Political Islam
Afghanistan
Introduction to Contemporary Middle East Politics
Revolution in Latin America
Cuban Society and Revolution
American Metropolitan Politics
California Politics
The Politics of Protest
Latinos in U.S. Politics
Comparative Minority Politics
African American Politics
The United States Congress
Congress:The New Institutionalist Approach
U.S. Immigration Policy
Urban Politics and Policy
Game Theory and Politics I
Game Theory and Politics II
Types of Political Representation
U.S. Foreign Policy I: Globalism and Cold War
U.S. Foreign Policy II: Cold War Decline & After
U.S. Foreign Policy III: National Security Decision-Making
Voting and Political Manipulation
Law and Society
Jurisprudence
American Constitutional Law
Law in the Twenty-First Century
International Law
Civil Liberties
U.S. Supreme Court
Special Topics in Public Law
Non-Government Organization (NGO) Fundamentals
Perspectives on the U.S. - Mexican Border
Introduction to Contemporary Middle East Politics
Community Internship
Business Decisions
Organizations
Politics, Power, and Society
Immigration and Social Policy
Health:
Race, Gender, and Science
Psychological Anthropology
Medical Anthropology
HIV/AIDS in a Global Context
Chicano/Latino Social Psychology
Health and the Latino Paradox
Special Topics in Health, Medicine, and Psychosocial Dynamics
Abnormal Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Psychology of Sleep and Consciousness
Asian American Psychology
African American Psychology
Chicano/Latino Psychology
Social Psychology of Networks
Medical Sociology

NOTE: Certain special topics courses may be applicable to this major; students should see their undergraduate advisor prior to enrolling in a special topics course to ensure that it meets the requirements. SOC SCI 184A Sage Leader Research I-SOC SCI 184B Sage Leader Research II may not be used to satisfy school requirements.

Honors Program

The honors program allows majors to engage in research leading to the completion of an honors thesis. The topic for the honors thesis, reflecting a social science theme, is determined by the student in consultation with a faculty advisor. In addition to satisfying the requirements for the major, honors program participants must complete additional course work as specified below.

The honors program is composed of three four-unit courses: SOC SCI H190A Honors Research Workshop, SOC SCI H190B Honors Thesis Research, and SOC SCI H190C Honors Thesis. Satisfactory completion of the honors thesis course also satisfies the upper-division writing requirement. The honors program is open to all junior and senior Social Policy and Public Service majors with an overall GPA of 3.0 and a 3.30 GPA in at least five Social Science courses.

The schedule of courses for the honors program is as follows:

  1. During the spring quarter of the junior year or the summer prior to the senior year, students formally apply to the honors program through the School of Social Sciences Undergraduate Student Affairs Office.
  2. In the fall quarter of the senior year, students enroll in SOC SCI H190A. This course ends with each student having formulated a written research plan for the honors thesis. Students also select a faculty mentor who has agreed to supervise the research and evaluate the final version of their honors thesis.
  3. In the winter quarter of the senior year, students enroll in SOC SCI H190B, attend class and work with their faculty mentor, who supervises and evaluates data collection and analysis.
  4. In the spring quarter of the senior year, students enroll in SOC SCI H190C, attend class and work with their faculty mentor to complete the final version of their honors thesis.

Pi Gamma Mu: International Honor Society

The International Honor Society in Social Sciences is the oldest and preeminent honor society in the social sciences with over 150 active chapters in the United States and overseas. Its mission is to encourage and recognize superior scholarship in social science disciplines and to foster cooperation and social service among its members. For more information call 949-824-9229.

Social Policy and Public Service Courses

SPPS 40. Social Policy and Public Service. 4 Units.

An introduction to the basic theories and principles of public policy. Students examine various influences on the development of public policy and the principle actors in the process, and learn to identify tools and techniques employed in policy making.

Same as SOC SCI 40.

(III)

SPPS 70A. Race and Ethnicity. 4 Units.

Focuses on racial and ethnic relations in the United States and compares them with those found in other societies. Analyzes the conditions that favor either cooperation and integration or rivalry, tension, and conflict. Appraises strategies for reducing and resolving conflicts.

Same as SOCIOL 63.

(VII)

SPPS 101A. Immigration, Nation, and Media. 4 Units.

Examines media shapes and reflects public opinion on immigration and its representation of immigrants, citizens, and ideas about the nation, and who belongs and who is a potential threat; as well as the relationship between scholars and journalists.

Same as CHC/LAT 123, ANTHRO 125U.

SPPS H190A. Honors Research Workshop. 4 Units.

Student develops a 10–15-page prospectus of research for the honors thesis which includes: the research question, literature review, methods of investigation, and bibliography. Student selects a faculty mentor who will supervise thesis research and writing in winter and spring.

Same as SOC SCI H190A.

Restriction: Honors Program for Social Science majors students and Social Policy and Public Service majors only.

SPPS H190B. Honors Thesis Research. 4 Units.

The student initiates and completes data collection for the honors thesis. A faculty mentor provides supervision and feedback on thesis chapters.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H190A or SPPS H190A.

Same as SOC SCI H190B.

Social Science Courses

SOC SCI 1A. Principles in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Introduction to various disciplines within the social sciences. Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on understanding human behavior and social institutions, including interpersonal, economic, and cultural activities. Course may be offered online.

(III)

SOC SCI H1E. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Same as SOCECOL H20A.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOC SCI H1F. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H1E or SOCECOL H20A.

Same as SOCECOL H20B.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOC SCI H1G. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H1F or SOCECOL H20B.

Same as SOCECOL H20C.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOC SCI 2A. Introduction to Social Science Analysis. 4 Units.

Introduction to social science research and analytical models. Theory construction and use of research methods in an interdisciplinary context. Discussion of the application of social science research to public policy. Computer laboratories develop creative thinking, graphing, and data presentation skills.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

SOC SCI 3A. Computer-Based Research in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Focuses on the data manipulation, data visualization, and information searching techniques. Hands-on experience in hypothesis testing, mapping, graphics, and data arrays. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: School of Social Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 5A. Introduction to Human Geography. 4 Units.

Human behavior in a geographical context. Spatial patterns and organization of the cultural, social, and economic activities of man as imposed on and influenced by the earth's physical setting.

(III)

SOC SCI 5B. Introduction to Physical Geography. 4 Units.

An introduction to the physical world we live in. Distribution and dynamics of the earth's air, water, and solid crust. Concepts and principles from climatology and geology. Selected examples from North America and beyond.

SOC SCI 5D. US & World Geography. 4 Units.

Survey of general geographical principles and facts on a world scale, as well as introduction to the broad regional and resource geography of the U.S., emphasizing in particular the interactions of physical and cultural factors.

(III, VIII)

SOC SCI 9A. General Statistics and Probability I. 4 Units.

Introduction to the variety of statistical applications in many fields, including the humanities, physical and social sciences, business, forensic and health sciences. Descriptive statistics, including percentile ranks, standardization, and normal approximation. Estimation and the measurement of error.

Overlaps with ECON 10A, PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10A, SOCIOL 10A, POL SCI 10A.

Restriction: Non-Social Sciences majors only.

(Va)

SOC SCI 9B. General Statistics and Probability II. 4 Units.

Introduction to statistical inference, sampling distributions, standard error. Hypothesis tests for proportions and means. Inferential techniques for nominal variables including chisquare. Selected applications in fields such as ecology, forensic science, and quantitative stylistics are based on student interests.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 9A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10B, POL SCI 10B, PSYCH 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10B, SOCIOL 10B.

Restriction: Non-Social Sciences majors only.

(Va)

SOC SCI 9C. General Statistics and Probability III. 4 Units.

Focus on correlation and regression. One-way and two-way factorial analysis of variance. Introduction to repeated measures designs and non-parametric statistics. Critiquing the use of statistics in newspapers and popular magazines. Locating, accessing, and evaluating statistical data.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 9B.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10C, POL SCI 10C, PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10C, SOCIOL 10C.

Restriction: Non-Social Sciences majors only.

(Vb)

SOC SCI 10A. Probability and Statistics in Social Sciences I. 4 Units.

Introduction to the variety of statistical applications in the social sciences. Descriptive statistics. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Percentile ranks. Standardization and normal approximation. Basic probability theory focuses on application to statistical inference and binomial distribution. Laboratory required.

Corequisite: SOC SCI 3A.
Prerequisite: SOC SCI 3A.

Overlaps with PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, POL SCI 10A, SOC SCI 9A, SOCIOL 10A, ECON 15A.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment. SOC SCI 10A may not be taken for credit if taken after or concurrently with ECON 15A.

(Va)

SOC SCI 10B. Probability & Statistics in Social Sciences II. 4 Units.

Introduction to statistical inference, sampling distribution, standard error. Hypothesis tests for proportions and means. Inferential techniques for nominal variables including chi-square, study measures of strengths, significance of relationships between variables, assumptions, data requirements, and types of error in significance tests. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 10A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10B, POL SCI 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9B, SOCIOL 10B, PSYCH 10B.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

SOC SCI 10C. Probability & Statistics in Social Sciences III. 4 Units.

Focus on correlation, regression, and control for effects of variables. One-way and two-way factorial analysis of variance. A priori and a posteriori comparisons. Introduction to repeated measures design and non-parametric statistics. Discuss use of statistics in newspapers and popular magazines.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 10B.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10C, POL SCI 10C, PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9C, SOCIOL 10C.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Vb)

SOC SCI 11A. Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money. 4 Units.

Digital money has captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. Course puts this change in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? Course may be offered online.

Same as IN4MATX 12.

(II, III)

SOC SCI 20. Model United Nations. 2 Units.

Focuses on simulations of the foreign policy pursuits of selected countries in the international community. Emphasis placed on understanding the rules of debate, as well as the policy positions of the student's selected country in the United Nations.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 6 times.

SOC SCI 40. Social Policy and Public Service. 4 Units.

An introduction to the basic theories and principles of public policy. Students examine various influences on the development of public policy and the principle actors in the process, and learn to identify tools and techniques employed in policy making.

Same as SPPS 40.

(III)

SOC SCI 66. Introduction to Gangs . 4 Units.

Introduces students to street gang subculture and explores risk factors associated with gang membership. Students develop a working definition for street gang and understand the difference between social and legal definitions. Also explores the connection between prison and street gangs.

SOC SCI 70C. Comparing Cultures. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the scope of cross-cultural comparisons by analyzing the theories, methodologies, and facts utilized by anthropologists, sociologists, social psychologists, political scientists, and historians in comparing cultures.

(III, VII)

SOC SCI 78A. Asian American Histories. 4 Units.

Examines and compares diverse experiences of major Asian American groups since the mid-nineteenth century. Topics include origins of emigration; the formation and transformation of community; gender and family life; changing roles of Asian Americans in American society. Formerly ASIANAM 60A.

Same as ASIANAM 50, HISTORY 15C.

((III or IV) and VII ).

SOC SCI 78B. Asian American Communities. 4 Units.

Examines the renewal of Asian immigration following World War II. Explores contemporary Asian American populations and communities in the U.S., and the impact of contemporary Asian immigration on the U.S. political economy and social order.

Same as ASIANAM 52.

(III, VII)

SOC SCI 78C. Asian Americans and Comparative Race Relations. 4 Units.

Analyzes the Asian American experience in comparative perspective, which includes comparisons of different ethnic and racial groups, and across gender and class. Possible topics include labor, economy, politics, migration, nation, popular culture, gender, family, sexuality, and multiraciality.

Same as ASIANAM 53.

(III, VII)

SOC SCI 89. Special Topics in Social Sciences. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Social Sciences. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 102A. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Hands-on laboratory course introduces students to the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology using social science applications. Students will learn to organize, manipulate, and display spatial data leading to the design of their own GIS research project.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 102B. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Expands Geographic Information Systems (GIS) skills to more advanced theories and concepts in the spatial analysis of social science issues and particularly to analyzing and interpreting spatial data. Students develop and complete a GIS research project of their own choosing.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 102A.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 103A. Game Theory and Politics I. 4 Units.

Introduction to game theory and a survey of its political applications. Examples of topics covered include voting in small committees, legislatures, and mass elections; interest group activities and environmental issues; institutional design, and the evolution of cooperative behavior.

Same as INTL ST 105A, POL SCI 130A, SOCIOL 134.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, Sociology, Political Science, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 103B. Game Theory and Politics II. 4 Units.

More advanced game theory and its political applications, beginning where Game Theory and Politics I ends. Examples of topics covered include revolutions; arms race; spatial models of party competition; political manipulation; political coalitions and their power.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 130A or ECON 116A.

Same as INTL ST 105B, POL SCI 130B.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, International Studies, and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 115D. International Business. 4 Units.

Introduction to conducting business in the international arena, decision making in the organization, and globalization of markets and production. Topics covered range from tax and finance to ethics, marketing, and more. Continuing corporate regulatory scandals discussed.

Same as INTL ST 112A.

SOC SCI 115E. California and Global Economy. 4 Units.

Presents the nature of the State's economy and the current and projected role of California in the world economy.

Same as INTL ST 135.

SOC SCI 118G. Regional Geography of California. 4 Units.

Geographical analysis of selected regions of California, in particular geomorphological, hydrological, and climatic conditions, as well as economic and social strengths and weaknesses. May include some fieldwork in Orange County on environmental, social and residential problems, with legislative background information.

SOC SCI 119. Special Topics in Geography. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of geography. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 120. Transnational Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines the internationalization of U.S. domestic street gangs. The relationship between California gangs Mara Salvatrucha and 18th Street and Mexico/Central American gangs is assessed. Specified topics include: mobilization, migration, territorialism, culture, organization, and use of technology. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Same as INTL ST 130.
Overlaps with SOC SCI XI120, INTL ST XI130.

SOC SCI 121T. Voting and Political Manipulation. 4 Units.

Introduction to social choice and cooperative games. Topics include majority rule, types of voting methods, apportionment and proportional representation, agenda manipulation, coalition formation, voting power, political consequences of electoral laws.

Same as INTL ST 156A, POL SCI 151H, ECON 154.

Restriction: International Studies, Political Science, Social Science and Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 130B. Science and Religion II. 4 Units.

The development of genomics, stem-cell research, robotics, nanotechnology, neuropharmacology raises difficult religious and philosophical questions. Examines interdisciplinary approaches that cut across institutional boundaries, cultural borders, religious traditions. Focuses on relationship between religion and cognitive/affective/social neuroscience. Course may be offered online.

Same as REL STD 112B, PSYCH 172S, LPS 140B.

SOC SCI 152A. Non-Government Organization (NGO) Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Introduction to non-governmental organizations, including their role in U.S. society and the international community. Explores varying definitions of NGOs and the characteristics held in common by all NGOs.

Same as INTL ST 152A.

SOC SCI 152C. American Public Policy. 4 Units.

Focuses on the development and implementation of public policy in the United States. Lectures cover theoretical models of the policy process as well as significant problems facing contemporary American decision-makers.

Same as PP&D 129, PUBHLTH 132, POL SCI 121G.

SOC SCI 163A. Urban America . 4 Units.

Students examine the historical, social, political, and economic factors that contributed to the construction of the American urban context, one that is poverty concentrated and racially/ethnically segregated. Students also critically assess the consequence of growing up in America's urban neighborhoods.

Same as PP&D 104, CHC/LAT 162A.

SOC SCI 164B. Domestic Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines the history and development of California street gangs and the role of historical events in that development. Students will be able to contrast and compare gang cohort behaviors between some of the major gangs in California.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 164C. Prison Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines the growth and spread of prison gangs throughout the country. Relationships between prison and street gangs, and possible relationships with foreign drug trafficking organizations studied. Violence examined as the standard to establish dominance in and out of prison. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 164D. Juvenile Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines risk factors that can be used to predict gang membership. Compares generational with non-generational gangs and develops a working sociological definition that can be used to identify street gangs. Myths about juveniles, street gangs. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 165. Chicano/Latino Families. 4 Units.

Introduction to the research, literature, and issues surrounding the topic of Chicano/Latino families including cultural history, contemporary issues, organization of family, traditions, lifestyles, values, beliefs, generational differences, gender issues, ethnic identity, evolution of demographic patterns, current economic and political standings.

Same as CHC/LAT 170, PSYCH 174H.

SOC SCI 168B. Immigration and Inequality. 4 Units.

Explores immigration, ethnicity, and inequality as interconnected social forces. International migration, propelled by global inequalities, plays a central role in the formation of multinational societies, shapes inter-group relations and patterns of ethnic inequality, and transforms the immigrants themselves.

Same as SOCIOL 166.

SOC SCI 169AZ. Special Topics: Sociology. 4 Units.

No description.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 170A. Research Methods in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Examines how interdisciplinary social science research questions are formulated and studies several research methods including: experimental method, quasi-experimental methods, survey research, field research, evaluation research, and meta-analysis. Parametric and non-parametric statistical methods are illustrated using the SPSS program.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 1A and SOC SCI 3A and SOC SCI 10C and SOC SCI 2A.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 172A. American Culture. 4 Units.

A survey of the historical development of dominant American culture and society; emphasis on a close reading of key cultural texts, with weekly text as a model of writing examining its use of language and rhetoric.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 172AW. American Culture. 4 Units.

A survey of the historical development of dominant American culture and society; emphasis on a close reading of key cultural texts, with weekly text as a model of writing, examining its use of language and rhetoric. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 172D. Law in the Twenty-First Century. 4 Units.

Examines the complex relationship between law, the social sciences, and modern society. Lectures explore such issues as the interplay between technology and constitutional rights, the impact of science on law, and the evolving roles of attorneys and judges.

Same as POL SCI 171F.

Restriction: Political Science and Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 173G. Film Media and the Latino Community. 4 Units.

Uses film as a resource for understanding contemporary issues and problems facing the Chicano/Latino community. (Does not study cinema as a genre.).

Same as CHC/LAT 114.

(VII)

SOC SCI 173I. Perspectives on the U.S. - Mexican Border. 4 Units.

Economic aspects of the historical development of the United States-Mexican border. The current economic situation in the Southwest and border areas as it affects both Mexico and the Latino/Chicano population is also examined.

Same as CHC/LAT 160, INTL ST 177B.

(VII)

SOC SCI 173L. Latinos in a Global Society. 4 Units.

Examines interconnections between diverse Latino groups in the U.S. and the effects of globalization on their social, cultural, and political realities. Topics include immigration, demographics, socioeconomic differentiation, familial relations, political protest/resistance, law and policy, and links to "homeland" issues.

Same as CHC/LAT 167.

(VII)

SOC SCI 173N. Revolution in Latin America. 4 Units.

Presents a comparative analysis of the causes, development, and consequences of selected revolutionary movements, focusing on outbreaks in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, and Grenada. Explores topics of state formation, economic nationalism, social justice, ethnicity, and role of international affairs.

Same as CHC/LAT 151B, HISTORY 166D, INTL ST 177C.

SOC SCI 173Q. Introduction to Cuba: History, Culture, and Society. 4 Units.

Introduction to Cuban history, culture, and society using social science texts, visual and musical materials. Examines major historical moments including the historical relationship between the United States and explores evolution of Cuban music from the earliest times to present.

Same as INTL ST 177F, CHC/LAT 130.

(VIII)

SOC SCI 175B. Ethnic and Racial Communities. 4 Units.

Examines various theoretical analyses of race and ethnicity, particularly as they apply to Asian Americans. Also explores the relationship of Asian Americans to other racialized minorities in the U.S.

Same as ASIANAM 161.

SOC SCI 177B. Asian American Women. 4 Units.

Examines the representations and experiences of Asian American women from diverse perspectives. Explores the commonalities and differences among various groups of Asian American women, with particular focus on history, culture, values, and family roles.

Same as ASIANAM 162.

SOC SCI 178C. The Korean American Experience. 4 Units.

Explores the factors that have distinctly shaped the Korean American experience, including patterns of racial domination, the profile of immigrant flow, immigrant roles in the urban political economy, politics in Korea, and the role of the church.

Same as ASIANAM 151C.

SOC SCI 178D. The Vietnamese American Experience. 4 Units.

Studies the resettlement of Vietnamese in the United States following their exodus from Southeast Asia. Topics discussed include the Vietnam War, the 1975 evacuation, boat and land refugees, the shaping of Vietnamese communities, and Vietnamese American literature.

Same as ASIANAM 151D.

SOC SCI 178E. The Japanese American Experience. 4 Units.

Studies the settlement of Japanese in Hawaii and the continental United States since the late nineteenth century. Topics covered include sugar plantations, development of rural Japanese America, World War II internment, post-War community development, and persistence of Japanese American identity.

Same as ASIANAM 151E.

SOC SCI 178F. South Asian American Experience. 4 Units.

Examines and compares the experiences of South Asian immigrants in the U.S. over time. Looks at the economic, political, and social positions of the immigrants, with special emphasis on religious changes and the changes in the second and later generations.

Same as ASIANAM 151F.

Restriction: Asian American Studies and Social Policy and Public Service majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 178H. Southeast Asian American Experience. 4 Units.

Analyzes experiences of refugees and immigrants from Southeast Asia, which may include those from Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, and the Philippines. Examines political and economic factors for their exodus and how they reconstruct their identities, histories, and communities.

Same as ASIANAM 151H.

SOC SCI 178J. Chinese American Experience. 4 Units.

Analyzes the experiences of Chinese in the United States. Immigration, Chinese exclusion, racial and gender identity. Historical overview and contemporary issues covered.

Same as ASIANAM 151J.

SOC SCI 178K. Filipina/Filipino American Experience. 4 Units.

Explores the experience of Filipina/Filipino Americans from the era of Spanish colonization of the Philippines to present-day community formations in the United States, with special emphasis on the twentieth century. Topics include colonialism, nation, migration, gender, and culture.

Same as ASIANAM 151K.

SOC SCI 179. Special Topics in Asian American Studies. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Asian American Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 180X. Research Methods . 4 Units.

Develops an understanding of major research methods emphasizing quantitative research techniques; identifies techniques for research questions; applies understanding in relation to contemporary issues by way of a written a proposal for a quantitative research project.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: SAEP students only.

SOC SCI 180Y. Statistical Methods . 4 Units.

Covers the following topics: measurement, data screening procedures, descriptive statistics, the chi-square statistic, logistic regression, bivariate correlation and regression, and multiple correlation and regression. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of applied statistics.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: SAEP participants only.

SOC SCI 181A. Ethical Leadership. 4 Units.

Explores historical and contemporary theories of ethical and unethical leadership. Examines models of "good leadership" such as cardinal and monastic virtues; and models of "bad leadership," such as Machiavelli's Prince. Explores the philosophies, styles, and accomplishments of leaders.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 183A. International Studies Forum. 2 Units.

A faculty-student forum featuring lectures from a variety of institutions with discussion issues related to International Studies. Course may be offered online.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

Same as INTL ST 183A, SOCECOL 183A.

SOC SCI 183B. Seminar in Mediation. 4 Units.

Student develop mediation skills and refine knowledge in the practice and theory of conflict resolution. Students who complete this course may serve as mediators in the Campus Mediation Program. Course is a prerequisite to completing Indep Study as an intern.

Same as INTL ST 183B, SOCECOL 183B.

Restriction: School of Humanities, School of Social Ecology, International Studies, and Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 183C. Seminar in Conflict Resolution . 4 Units.

Designed for students pursuing the minor in Conflict Resolution and/or International Studies majors. Provides a forum in which students will refine skills and theory in the study of cooperation and conflict, from local to global arenas. Students write research paper.

Same as SOCECOL 183C, INTL ST 183C.

SOC SCI 183CW. Seminar Conflict Resolution. 4 Units.

Designed for seniors who are pursuing the minor in Conflict Resolution and/or International Studies major. Provides a forum in which students will refine skills and theory in the study of cooperation and conflict, from local to global arenas.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as SOCECOL 183CW, INTL ST 183CW.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 183E. Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Units.

Examines theories of conflict management. Analyzes how conflict is mitigated in diverse cultures: at the interpersonal level, between groups, and on the international scale. Students discuss readings, hear from conflict management practitioners, and simulate negotiations.

Same as ANTHRO 136D, POL SCI 154G, INTL ST 183E.

(VIII)

SOC SCI 184A. Sage Leader Research I. 2 Units.

Participants in the SAGE Scholars Program learn to define leadership concepts, discover various leadership styles, and develop strong leadership and communication skills resulting in strengthened ability to contribute to and interact with UCI and the Orange County community.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: SAGE Scholars Program students only.

SOC SCI 184B. Sage Leader Research II. 4 Units.

Provides a survey of contemporary topics and challenges in the fields of management and leadership. Case studies and text by leading authors are used to analyze key leadership issues in twenty-first century, with particular emphasis on current events.

Restriction: SAGE Scholars Program students only.

SOC SCI 184F. International Journalism. 4 Units.

Studies and critically analyzes how the media covers international issues that have reshaped. American foreign coverage and the implications for Americans and U.S. foreign policy. Focuses on international reporting as a way of developing fundamental skills of journalism.

Same as INTL ST 155A.

SOC SCI 184GW. Media Writing. 4 Units.

Designed to teach reporting and news writing basics. Students learn how to gather and organize information, ask effective questions, develop story ideas, research facts, and write stories on deadline. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as INTL ST 155BW.
Overlaps with INTL ST XI155B, SOC SCI XI184G.

Restriction: International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 185W. People in Society. 4 Units.

Through readings about people in distinctly different societies throughout history, students learn concepts that cross the boundaries of the social science disciplines. Such themes as democracy, elitism, power, social class, and gender as the basis for discussion and writing.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: School of Social Sciences majors only.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 187. Twenty-First-Century Graduate Education. 2 Units.

Graduate and professional education in twenty-first century United States. Examines strategies for admission to postbaccalaureate programs and success in graduate study culture. Introduction to processes including planning and preparation, school selection, entrance examination preparation, submission of applications, writing personal statements.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

SOC SCI 188A. Introduction to Contemporary Middle East Politics. 4 Units.

An overview of basic issues that shape the politics of the Middle East and North Africa. Themes include implication of the colonization era, nation-state formation, inter-Arab relations, nationalism, Arab-Israel conflict, Islamic resurgence, and more.

Same as INTL ST 165, POL SCI 158D.

SOC SCI 188D. Iran: Past and Present. 4 Units.

Pre-revolutionary Iran; and Iran since the revolution. History, oil and politics: domestic and international.

Same as INTL ST 168.

SOC SCI 188E. Israel and the World: An Introduction. 4 Units.

Examines the founding of Israel, its relationship with the Arab world, the role of the international community, and the challenges it faces today.

Same as INTL ST 170.

SOC SCI 188I. Afghanistan. 4 Units.

Provides an examination of Afghanistan's traditional social organization, economy, political organization, and relationship among ethnic groups as a basis for discussing the consequences of domestic political turmoil and foreign interventions over the last 20 years. Current situation and future addressed.

Same as INTL ST 162, POL SCI 158C.

SOC SCI 188K. Political Islam. 4 Units.

Political Islamd is a diverse phenomenon. While noticeable barriers exist to "Islamist democracy," it is the Islamists who will define the political future of much of the Muslim world. Reviews the experience of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Pakistan, Turkey, and Indonesia.

Same as INTL ST 161A.

SOC SCI 188M. Psychology of the Middle East Conflict. 4 Units.

Explores how emotions guide actions; political movements and social identity factors in ethnic, religious, or other group conflicts; psycho-biographies of political leaders and effects on foreign policy making; decisions to go to war; psychological dimensions of conflict and conflict resolution.

Same as INTL ST 166.

SOC SCI 189. Special Topics in Social Sciences. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social sciences. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI H190A. Honors Research Workshop. 4 Units.

Student develops a 10–15-page prospectus of research for the honors thesis which includes: the research question, literature review, methods of investigation, and bibliography. Student selects a faculty mentor who will supervise thesis research and writing in winter and spring.

Same as SPPS H190A.

Restriction: Honors Program for Social Science majors students and Social Policy and Public Service majors only.

SOC SCI H190B. Honors Thesis Research. 4 Units.

The student initiates and completes data collection for the honors thesis. A faculty mentor provides supervision and feedback on thesis chapters.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H190A or SPPS H190A.

Same as SPPS H190B.

SOC SCI H190C. Honors Thesis. 4 Units.

The student completes, with the approval of the faculty mentor, an honors thesis containing: statement of the problem, literature review, research hypotheses, methods of investigation, results, discussion, and bibliography.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H190B. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 191. Graduate-Mentored Study in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Offers a hands-on research experience while increasing awareness of the various disciplines in the social sciences and of the requirements of graduate school. Features graduate-mentored study under the supervision of the Associate Dean.

Prerequisite: Identification of a graduate student (who is in good standing) as a mentor.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

SOC SCI 193A. Field Studies in Public and Community Service. 4 Units.

Advanced training in qualitative and ethnographic research centered on community service. Students pursue field studies at nonprofit agencies (200 hours) to understand current social problems in underrepresented and underserved communities. Through field placement, students apply theory to practice.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 70C or SOCIOL 63. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service majors only.

SOC SCI 193B. Field Studies in Public and Community Service. 4 Units.

Advanced training in qualitative and ethnographic research centered on community service. Students pursue field studies at nonprofit agencies (200 hours) to understand current social problems in underrepresented and underserved communities. Through field placement, students apply theory to practice.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 193A.

SOC SCI 193C. Field Studies in Public and Community Service. 4 Units.

Advanced training in qualitative and ethnographic research centered on community service. Students pursue field studies at nonprofit agencies (200 hours) to understand current social problems in underrepresented and underserved communities. Through field placement, students apply theory to practice.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 193B.

SOC SCI 194A. Public Service Internship. 2-4 Units.

Introduces the role of etiquette and leadership in the professional environment. With a two-unit (50 hours) or four-unit (100 hours) credit option, students intern at a nonprofit agency exploring their roles as community leaders and improving their professional skills. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service majors only.

SOC SCI 194B. Community Internship. 2-4 Units.

Required to complete 50 (two units) or 100 (four units) hours at a nonprofit organization, students engage in lectures related to the formation and maintenance of nonprofit organizations. Grant writing, funding issues, and effective service delivery are addressed.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 194A.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Social Science majors only.

SOC SCI 194C. Management and Leadership Practicum-Social Science . 2-4 Units.

Social Sciences Academic Resource Center (SSARC) Resource Mangers (RMs) report directly to the Director and Associate Director, serving as frontline resource consultants, assisting visitors with resume development, graduate and professional school planning, internship placement, and professional development.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

SOC SCI 195A. Educational Policy Field Studies. 4 Units.

Integrates academic course work with experiential learning; examines the effects of educational policy on urban and suburban schools; explores the relationship between community service and personal academic interests; and develops awareness about the challenges of public education.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

SOC SCI 195B. Educational Policy Field Studies. 4 Units.

Integrates academic course work with experiential learning; examines the effects of educational policy on urban and suburban schools; explores the relationship between community service and personal academic interests; and develops awareness about the challenges of public education.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 195A.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

SOC SCI 195C. Educational Policy Field Studies . 4 Units.

Integrates academic course work with experiential learning; examines the effects of educational policy on urban and suburban schools; explores the relationship between community service and personal academic interests; and develops awareness about the challenges of public education.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 195B.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

SOC SCI 196. Global Connect. 2-4 Units.

Identifies factors of change that influence the twenty-first century. Students serve as mentors at high schools to introduce globalization issues through workshops and lectures. Students must submit an application and have a 3.0 or higher overall GPA.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

SOC SCI 197. Professional Internship. 2-4 Units.

Students apply classroom knowledge through research projects in nonprofit agencies (local, state, and government) and the private sector. They pose solutions to agency-posed questions. Students gain field experience through 50 hours (for 2 units) or 100 (for 4 units). Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

Restriction: School of Social Sciences majors only.

SOC SCI 198. Directed Group Study. 2-4 Units.

Directed study with Social Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

SOC SCI 199. Individual Study. 2-4 Units.

Opportunities to do research and learn new skills outside the normal classroom environment. Students participate in planned research and study activities under a written contract with a supervising UCI instructor. Students may enroll for only one 199 each quarter.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 16 units.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

SOC SCI 209. Special Topics in Mathematical Social Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of mathematical social science. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 211A. Mathematical Behavioral Sciences Colloquium. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOC SCI 211B. Mathematical Behavioral Sciences Colloquium. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOC SCI 211C. Mathematical Behavioral Sciences Colloquium. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOC SCI 249A. Special Topics in Social Networks. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social networks. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253A. Oral History, Life History. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary and comparative work in oral and life history; methods of interviewing.

Same as ANTHRO 221A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253F. Population. 4 Units.

Introduces the interrelationships between population and social organization. Considers measurement and explanation of historical and contemporary trends in birth rates, death rates, migration, and marriage and divorce. Case material is drawn primarily from the U.S. and other industrialized nations.

Same as SOCIOL 262A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253J. Social Movements. 4 Units.

A survey of the field of Social Movements, oriented around critical themes in the major theoretical traditions and contemporary exemplars.

Same as SOCIOL 240A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253N. Classical Social Theory. 4 Units.

Examines the development of classical sociological theory through the writings of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Georg Simmel, and George Herbert Mead.

Same as SOCIOL 210A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253R. Contemporary Social Theory. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with twentieth-century developments in social thought that have influenced sociological research, suggesting "what is living and what is dead" in the "classics" and offering an overview of the main outlines of recent sociological theorizing.

Same as SOCIOL 210B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 254A. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines borders and boundaries as material and semiotic constructs. Drawing upon an array of literatures, but loosely situated in U.S. geo/biopolitics, explores transformative troublings of places, spaces, borders, and bodies of all sorts.

Same as ANTHRO 235A, CHC/LAT 215.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 254J. Global Urbanization. 4 Units.

Examines the spread of cities worldwide in the twentieth century. What are the political and economic causes of this process? What are the social-cultural, political, and economic effects? How is contemporary urbanization linked to global restructuring of other kinds.

Same as PP&D 273, SOCIOL 252A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 254L. Approaches to Globalization. 4 Units.

Historical and contemporary approaches to the world economy, emphasizing anthropological questions of culture, power, identity, inequality. Examines "neo-imperialism," "late capitalism," accumulation, global markets, urban space, the state, business and policy globalization discourse, "local" responses to and instantiations of the "global.".

Same as ANTHRO 248A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 259A. Special Topics in Social Relations. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social relations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 272A. Origin and Evolution of Marxist Social Thought. 4 Units.

Focuses on the genesis and evolution of Marxist social thought The "systemic" method of Marx and Engels to questions of economic production and reproduction is compared and contrasted with modern world-system grand visions, feminist-theoretic approaches, and postmodern critiques.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in political theory or equivalent.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 289. Special Topics in Social Science. 4 Units.

Current research in Social Science.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 290. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Social Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOC SCI 299. Independent Study. 1-12 Units.

Independent research with Social Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Faculty

Nurudeen O. Alao, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Lecturer of Social Sciences; International Studies
Jeanett Castellanos, Ph.D. Washington State University, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Social Sciences
Ricardo Chavira, M.A. California State University, Northridge, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Joanne Christopherson, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Raúl A. Fernández, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, Director of the UC-Cuba Academic Initiative and Professor Emeritus of Chicano/Latino Studies; Culture and Theory; Social Sciences
James J. Flink, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences
Paula Garb, Ph.D. Russian Academy of Sciences, Lecturer of Social Sciences; International Studies; Undergraduate Education
Gilbert G. Gonzalez, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Chicano/Latino Studies; Culture and Theory; Social Sciences
James R. Hull, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Social Sciences; Sociology (social networks and social exchange, monetization, barter, multidimensional poverty measures, migration outcomes at origin, classroom technologies and scaling, student engagement, scholarship of teaching and learning)
Nick R. Noviello, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Bojan M. Petrovic, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Paul R. Shirey, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Sciences; Economics
Alfonso Valdez, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Joseph L. White, Ph.D. Michigan State University, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences
Valerie L. Wright, Ph.D. Fuller Theological Seminary, Lecturer of Social Sciences
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