Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Julie M. Schoenung, Department Chair
916 Engineering Tower
949-824-5802
http://www.eng.uci.edu/dept/mse

Overview

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers the B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering, a minor in Materials Science and Engineering, and the M.S. and Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering.

Undergraduate Major in Materials Science and Engineering

Program Educational Objectives: Graduates of the Materials Science and Engineering program will (1) establish a productive Materials Science and Engineering career in industry, government or academia; (2) apply critical reasoning and the requisite analytical/quantitative skills in seeking solutions to materials science and engineering problems; (3) promote innovation in materials discovery, development and design through effective leadership, skilled communications, and multidisciplinary teamwork; (4) exhibit a commitment to engineering ethics, environmental stewardship, continued learning, and professional development.

(Program educational objectives are those aspects of engineering that help shape the curriculum; achievement of these objectives is a shared responsibility between the student and UCI.)

Since the beginning of history, materials have played a crucial role in the growth, prosperity, security, and quality of human life. In fact, materials have been so intimately related to the emergence of human culture and civilization that anthropologists and historians have identified early cultures by the name of the significant materials dominating those cultures. These include the stone, bronze, and iron ages of the past. At the present time, the scope of materials science and engineering has become very diverse; it is no longer confined to topics related to metals and alloys but includes those relevant to ceramics, composites, polymers, biomaterials, nanostructures, intelligent materials, and electronic devices. In addition, present activities in materials science and engineering cover not only areas whose utility can be identified today, but also areas whose utility may be unforeseen. The services of materials scientists and engineers are required in a variety of engineering operations dealing, for example, with emerging energy systems, design of semiconductors and optoelectronic and nano devices, development of new technologies based on composites and high-temperature super-conductivity, biomedical products, performance (e.g., quality, reliability, safety, energy efficiency) in automobile and aircraft components, improvement in nondestructive testing techniques, corrosion behavior in refineries, radiation damage in nuclear power plants, and fabrication of advanced materials.

The undergraduate major in Material Science and Engineering (MSE) provides students with a thorough knowledge of basic engineering and scientific principles. The undergraduate curriculum in MSE includes (a) a core of Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics; (b) basic Engineering courses; (c) Materials and Engineering core; and (d) technical courses in Materials Science, Engineering, and Sciences.

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of MSE and its intimate relations with other Engineering disciplines (Aerospace, Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering), qualified students will be able to satisfy in a straightforward manner the degree requirements of their Engineering major and the MSE major.

Admissions

High School Students: See School Admissions information.

Transfer Students: Preference will be given to junior-level applicants with the highest grades overall, and who have satisfactorily completed the following required courses: two years of approved calculus, one year of calculus-based physics with laboratories (mechanics, electricity and magnetism), completion of lower-division writing, one year of general chemistry (with laboratory), statics, an introductory Materials Science and Engineering course, and one course in introductory programming. For course equivalency specific to each college, visit assist.org.

Students are encouraged to complete as many of the lower-division degree requirements as possible prior to transfer. Students who enroll at UCI in need of completing lower-division coursework may find that it will take longer than two years to complete their degrees. For further information, contact The Henry Samueli School of Engineering at 949-824-4334.

Requirements for the B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Major Requirements
Mathematics and Basic Science Courses:
Core Courses:
ENGR 1A General Chemistry for Engineers
or CHEM 1A General Chemistry
CHEM 1B- 1C General Chemistry
and General Chemistry
CHEM 1LC General Chemistry Laboratory
MATH 2A- 2B Single-Variable Calculus
and Single-Variable Calculus
MATH 2D Multivariable Calculus
MATH 3A Introduction to Linear Algebra
MATH 3D Elementary Differential Equations
MATH 2E Multivariable Calculus
PHYSICS 7C- 7LC Classical Physics
and Classical Physics Laboratory
PHYSICS 7D- 7E Classical Physics
and Classical Physics
PHYSICS 7LD Classical Physics Laboratory
Basic Engineering or Science Elective Courses:
Select four (4) units from the following:
From DNA to Organisms
Cell and Molecular Engineering
Organic Chemistry
Network Analysis II
Introduction to Engineering I
and Introduction to Engineering II 1
Introduction to Computational Problem Solving
Computer-Aided Design
Dynamics
Dynamics
Modern Physics
Basic Statistics
Engineering Topics Courses:
Students must complete a minimum of 22 units of engineering design.
Core Courses:
ENGRMSE 65A Thermodynamics of Materials
or ENGRMAE 91 Introduction to Thermodynamics
ENGRMSE 65B Diffusion in Materials
ENGRMSE 154 Polymer Science and Engineering
ENGRMSE 155 Mechanical Behavior and Design Principles
ENGRMSE 155L Mechanical Behavior Laboratory
ENGRMSE 160 Advanced Lab in Synthesis of Materials
ENGRMSE 164 X-ray Diffraction, Electron Microscopy, and Microanalysis
ENGRMSE 164L X-ray Diffraction, Electron Microscopy, and Microanalysis Lab
ENGRMSE 165 Materials Kinetics and Phase Transformations
ENGRMSE 169 Electronic and Optical Properties in Materials
ENGRMSE 175 Design Failure Investigation
ENGRMSE 189A- 189B- 189C Senior Design Project I
and Senior Design Project II
and Senior Design Project III
EECS 70A Network Analysis I
or ENGRMAE 60 Electric Circuits
ENGR 54 Principles of Materials Science and Engineering
ENGR 150 Mechanics of Structures
ENGRMAE 10 Introduction to Engineering Computations
ENGRMAE 30 Statics
or ENGR 30 Statics
or ENGRCEE 30 Statics
ENGRMAE 150L Mechanics of Structures Laboratory
Engineering Electives:
Students must complete a minimum of five courses from:
Cell and Molecular Engineering
Biomechanics I
and Biomechanics II
Design of Biomaterials
Sensory Motor Systems
Reaction Kinetics and Reactor Design
Separation Processes
Nano-Scale Materials and Applications
Ceramic Materials for Sustainable Energy
Computer Techniques in Experimental Research
Semiconductor Device Packaging
Surface and Adhesion Science
Materials Outreach
Individual Study
Network Analysis II
Electronics I Laboratory
Electronics II
Semiconductor Devices
Fundamentals of Solid-State Electronics and Materials
Engineering Electromagnetics I
Advanced Manufacturing
Mechanical Systems Laboratory
Theory of Machines and Mechanisms
Vibrations
Mechanical Engineering Design
Introduction to Computer-Aided Engineering
Composite Materials and Structures
Lightweight Structures
Introduction to Control Systems
Students select, with the approval of a faculty advisor, any additional engineering topics courses needed to satisfy school and department requirements.
Engineering Professional Topics Course:
ENGR 190W Communications in the Professional World
(The nominal Materials Science and Engineering program will require 184 units of courses to satisfy all university and major requirements. Because each student comes to UCI with a different level of preparation, the actual number of units will vary. Dual engineering majors are reminded that they are required to satisfy all requirements of both majors individually. Students should not assume that courses for one, such as senior design, will satisfy the requirements of the other, without prior approval.)

Students majoring in MSE may elect, with approval of their faculty advisor, to use available engineering electives to complete one of the following specializations.

Specialization in Biomaterials:
Requires a minimum of 14 units from:
Cell and Molecular Engineering
Biomechanics I
and Biomechanics II
Design of Biomaterials
Sensory Motor Systems
Polymer Science and Engineering
Individual Study
Specialization in Electronics Processing and Materials:
Requires a minimum of 14 units from:
Semiconductor Device Packaging
Individual Study (up to 3 units)
or ENGR H199 (up to 3 units)
Network Analysis II
Electronics I Laboratory
Semiconductor Devices
Advanced Manufacturing
Specialization in Materials and Mechanical Design:
Requires a minimum of 14 units from:
Individual Study (up to 3 units)
or ENGR H199 (up to 3 units)
Mechanical Systems Laboratory
Theory of Machines and Mechanisms
Vibrations
Mechanical Engineering Design
Introduction to Computer-Aided Engineering
Composite Materials and Structures
Lightweight Structures
Introduction to Control Systems

Planning a Program of Study

A sample program of study chart for the major in Materials Science and Engineering is available in the Undergraduate Student Affairs Office. Students should keep in mind that this program is based upon a sequence of prerequisites, beginning with adequate preparation in high school mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Students who are not adequately prepared, or who wish to make changes in the sequence for other reasons, must have their program approved by their faculty advisor. Materials Science and Engineering majors are encouraged to consult with academic counselors as needed, and students who are academically at risk are mandated to see a counselor as frequently as deemed necessary by the advising staff.

Sample Program of Study — Materials Science and Engineering

Freshman
Fall Winter Spring
MATH 2AMATH 2BMATH 2D
ENGR 1ACHEM 1BCHEM 1C
ENGRMAE 10PHYSICS 7CCHEM 1LC
General EducationPHYSICS 7LCPHYSICS 7D
 General EducationPHYSICS 7LD
Sophomore
Fall Winter Spring
MATH 3AMATH 3DMATH 2E
ENGR 30ENGRMSE 65AEECS 70A
ENGR 54General EducationENGRMSE 65B
PHYSICS 7EGeneral EducationBasic Engineering/Science Elective
Junior
Fall Winter Spring
ENGRMSE 165ENGRMSE 155ENGRMSE 175
ENGR 150ENGRMSE 155LEngineering Elective
ENGRMAE 150LENGRMSE 164Engineering Elective
Engineering ElectiveENGRMSE 164LGeneral Education
 General Education 
Senior
Fall Winter Spring
ENGRMSE 154ENGRMSE 169ENGRMSE 160
ENGRMSE 189AENGRMSE 189BENGRMSE 189C
ENGR 190WEngineering ElectiveEngineering Elective
General EducationGeneral EducationGeneral Education

Minor in Materials Science and Engineering

The interdisciplinary field of materials science and engineering has become critical to many emerging areas of advanced technology and their applications. As a result, there are needs and opportunities for engineers and scientists with education and training in materials science and engineering. The goal of the minor in Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) is to provide students at UCI with such education and training that will enable them, upon graduation, to not only participate in projects or programs of an interdisciplinary nature but also address challenging societal needs and complex technological advances.

Admission

Admission in the MSE minor requires a minimum 2.5 overall UCI GPA. Students are required to complete all prerequisites for required courses and selected electives. In particular, students need to complete the following courses before applying:

CHEM 1A General Chemistry
CHEM 1LE Accelerated General Chemistry Lab
MATH 2D Multivariable Calculus
MATH 2E Multivariable Calculus
MATH 3A Introduction to Linear Algebra
MATH 3D Elementary Differential Equations
PHYSICS 7C Classical Physics
PHYSICS 7LC Classical Physics Laboratory
PHYSICS 7D Classical Physics
PHYSICS 7LD Classical Physics Laboratory

Requirements for the Minor in Materials Science and Engineering

The minor in Materials Science and Engineering requires a total of seven courses—five required courses and two electives:

Required courses:
ENGRMSE 155 Mechanical Behavior and Design Principles
ENGR 54 Principles of Materials Science and Engineering
Select three of the following:
Materials Kinetics and Phase Transformations
Electronic and Optical Properties in Materials
Design Failure Investigation
Individual Study
Electives:
Select two of the following:
Biomechanics I
and Biomechanics II
Design of Biomaterials
Sensory Motor Systems
Nano-Scale Materials and Applications
Polymer Science and Engineering
Ceramic Materials for Sustainable Energy
Computer Techniques in Experimental Research
Semiconductor Device Packaging
Materials Outreach
Polymer Chemistry: Synthesis and Characterization of Polymers
Electronics I
and Electronics II
Mechanics of Structures
Advanced Manufacturing
Mechanical Engineering Design
Composite Materials and Structures
Lightweight Structures
Introduction to Partial Differential Equations and Applications
Electromagnetic Theory
Introduction to Condensed Matter Physics
Plasma Physics

Graduate Study in Materials Science and Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering focuses on the discovery of new materials, the tailoring of materials systems for optimum performance in a given technological application, and the design of novel materials solutions for emerging technologies. MSE is an interdisciplinary field incorporating elements of chemistry, physics, biology and/or engineering to derive and control the connections between structure (at length scales ranging from sub-atomic to macroscale), the processing necessary to achieve that structure, the fundamental properties (electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, etc.), and their performance. These correlations are investigated using advanced materials characterization techniques and theoretical/computational analysis. Many of the most pressing scientific and technological challenges faced by humanity are constrained by the limits of currently available materials. The discovery, design and development of enabling materials is at the core of solving current and future scientific and engineering grand challenges, and benefit industries involved in electronics, advanced sensors, communications, human health, transportation, manufacturing recreation, energy conversion and storage, and environmental sustainability.

Current research programs include nanomaterials, nanostructures, nanoelectronics, nanodevices, nanocharacterization, device/system packaging materials, materials for fuel cells and related alternative energy systems, biocompatible materials, soft materials such as biological materials and polymeric materials, electronic and photonic materials, hybrid materials, interfacial engineering of materials, and multifunctional materials. Faculty with relevant research are affiliated with the Integrated Nanofabrication Research Facility (INRF), the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC), the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), the Advanced Power and Energy Program (APEP), the Laboratory for Electron and X-ray Instrumentation (LEXI), and the Irvine Materials Research Institute (IMRI), among others.

The MSE graduate degree program is hosted by the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Faculty who may serve as advisors are listed as affiliated with the MSE Department and include faculty with strong materials science and engineering research programs from other departments. The formal degree that is awarded upon successful completion of the program is either the M.S. or Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering.

Recommended Background

Given the nature of Materials Science and Engineering as a cross-disciplinary program, students having a background and suitable training, in Materials, Engineering (Mechanical, Electrical, Civil, Chemical, Aerospace), and the Physical Sciences (Physics, Chemistry, Geology) are encouraged to participate. A student with an insufficient background may be required to take remedial undergraduate courses. Recommended background courses include an introduction to materials, thermodynamics, mechanical behavior, and electrical/optical/magnetic behavior.

Specific Fields of Emphasis

The Materials faculty at UCI have special interest and expertise in all areas of modern materials and technologies, including biomaterials, energy materials, advanced ceramics, polymers and nanocomposite materials, structural and nanostructured metallic materials, micro/nano-device materials, device/system packaging materials, and multifunctional materials.

Required Courses 

Students are required to take one course from each area for the M.S. and as a basis for the Ph.D. preliminary examination.

Crystal Structure and Defects:
Crystalline Solids: Structure, Imperfections, and Properties
Electrical and Optical Behavior:
Materials Physics
Mechanical Behavior:
Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials
Thermodynamics and Kinetics:
Phase Transformations

Electives

Faculty advisors should be consulted on the selection of elective courses. All graduate courses offered in ENGRMSE are potential electives. Graduate-level courses offered in other Engineering departments and relevant graduate courses from other schools may also be taken as electives.

 

Master of Science Degree

The M.S. reflects achievement of an advanced level of competence for professional practice of materials science and engineering. Two options are available: a thesis option and a comprehensive examination option.

Plan I: Thesis Option 

For the M.S. thesis option, students are required to complete a research study of great depth and originality and obtain approval for a complete program of study. A committee of three full-time faculty members is appointed to guide development of the thesis. A minimum of 36 units is required for the M.S.

For the thesis option, the following are required: four required core courses; three quarters of ENGRMSE 298 (Department Seminar); five additional graduate elective courses numbered 200–289 (or 200-295 if offered by other departments) for 3 or more units each, related to their field of graduate studies, and approved by the graduate advisor. Up to two of these elective courses can be substituted by up to eight units of ENGRMSE 296 (M.S. Thesis Research), and one of these elective courses may be substituted by an upper-division undergraduate elective course if the course is not a part of the required MSE undergraduate core curriculum and is approved by the MSE graduate advisor.

Full-time graduate students must enroll in the departmental seminar each quarter during their first year unless exempt by petition.

Plan II: Comprehensive Examination Option

For the comprehensive examination option, students are required to complete 36 units of study and a comprehensive examination.

The following are required: four required core courses; three quarters of ENGRMSE 298 (Department Seminar); and a minimum of five additional graduate elective courses for 3 or more units numbered 200–289 (or 200-295 if offered by other departments), related to their field of graduate studies, and approved by the graduate advisor. One of these elective courses may be substituted by an upper-division undergraduate elective course if the course is not a part of the required MSE undergraduate core curriculum and is approved by the MSE graduate advisor.

Research units (ENGRMSE 296/ENGRMSE 299) do not count towards the degree requirements of the Comprehensive Exam Option. Full-time graduate students must enroll in the departmental seminar each quarter during their first year unless exempt by petition.

In addition to fulfilling the course requirements outlined above, it is a University requirement for the Master of Science degree that students fulfill a minimum of 36 units of study.

 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering requires a commitment on the part of the student to dedicated study and collaboration with the faculty. Ph.D. students are selected on the basis of outstanding demonstrated potential and scholarship. Applicants must hold the appropriate prerequisite degrees from recognized institutions of high standing. After substantial preparation, Ph.D. candidates work under the supervision of faculty advisors. The process involves extended immersion in a research atmosphere and culminates in the production of original research results presented in a dissertation. Milestones to be passed in the Ph.D. program in order to remain in good standing include the following: acceptance into a research group by the faculty advisor at the end of the student’s first year of study; successful completion of the Ph.D. preliminary examination by the end of the second year; preparation for pursuing research and the development of a research proposal culminating in passing the Qualifying Examination by the end of the third year of the Ph.D. program. The Qualifying Examination includes faculty evaluation of a written research dossier and an oral presentation. Students must advance to candidacy in their third year (second year for students who entered with a master’s degree).

The core course requirements for the Ph.D. are listed under "Required Courses" above. Students must also enroll in ENGRMSE 298 (Department Seminar) each quarter during their first year unless exempt by petition. Ph.D. students must take two additional elective courses each for 3-4 units or a combination approved by the graduate advisor beyond the M.S. requirements. These courses are to be taken after the first year of graduate work, should be relevant to the Ph.D. dissertation topic, and must be selected in consultation with the research advisor and approved by the MSE graduate advisor. The preliminary examination is based on the four required core courses for the M.S. Students who have completed an MSE M.S. elsewhere must have a written approval by the graduate advisor to waive required MSE core courses, if they have taken the equivalent courses elsewhere.

Final examination involves the oral presentation and defense of an acceptable dissertation in a seminar attended by students and faculty. The Ph.D. is granted upon the recommendation of the Doctoral Committee and the Dean of the Graduate Division. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years (four years for students who entered with a master’s degree). The maximum time permitted is seven years.

Expectations for the Ph.D. Dissertation

The Ph.D. dissertation is written documentation of original research that has impact on the field of study for the Ph.D. Impact in the field is measured by accepted or published peer-reviewed journal articles, peer-reviewed conference proceedings, patents, or analogous original documented adoption of innovative technology. Faculty research advisors are to provide in writing their specific expectations consistent with the above criteria.

Relationship of M.S. and Ph.D. Programs

Students applying with the objective of a Ph.D. are admitted to the M.S./Ph.D. program only if they are likely to successfully complete a Ph.D. program. These students do not formally re-apply to the Ph.D. program after completing the M.S. Students who apply to the M.S.-only program must petition for the Ph.D. program if they desire to continue on for a Ph.D. Financial support is usually reserved for those students who plan to complete the Ph.D. The normative time to complete M.S. and Ph.D. degrees is two and five years, respectively.

Courses

ENGRMSE 50L. Principles of Materials Science and Engineering. 2 Units.

Introduction to the experimental techniques to characterize the properties of engineering materials. Emphasis on understanding the influence of microstructure on elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior. Topics include microstructure characterization, heat treatment, grain size effect, precipitation hardening, and impact loading. Materials fee.

Corequisite: ENGR 54

ENGRMSE 65A. Thermodynamics of Materials. 4 Units.

Treatment of the laws of thermodynamics and their application in understanding properties and equilibrium states of engineering materials. Develops relationships pertaining to multiphase equilibrium and presents graphical constructions for interpretation of phase diagrams. Statistical thermodynamics in relation to materials phenomena.

Prerequisite: (ENGR 1A or CHEM 1A or CHEM H2A) and PHYSICS 7C

Overlaps with ENGRMAE 91, CBE 40C.

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 65B. Diffusion in Materials. 4 Units.

Mass transfer in solids. Models of diffusion and the treatment of steady-state and non-steady state diffusion phenomena and ion-migration. Mechanisms controlling kinetics of diffusion and the role of material structure and point defects. Diffusion in binary systems and Kirkendall effect.

Prerequisite: ENGRMSE 65A. ENGRMSE 65A with a grade of C- or better

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 141. Nano-Scale Materials and Applications. 4 Units.

Overview of the chemistry, physics, and applications of nanometer-scale materials. Explore the effects of composition, bonding, and confinement on physical properties of nanomaterials, their chemical syntheses, and their device physics in electronic, optoelectronic, and energy technologies.

Prerequisite: (ENGR 1A or CHEM 1A or CHEM H2A) and ENGR 54 and ENGRMSE 169

Restriction: Biomedical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Chemical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Concurrent with ENGRMSE 241.

ENGRMSE 154. Polymer Science and Engineering. 4 Units.

An introduction to physical aspects of polymers, including configuration and conformation of polymer chains and characterization techniques; crystallinity, viscoelasticity, mechanical properties, polymer alloys, processing, and application.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54 and (CBE 110 or ENGRMSE 165)

Same as CBE 181.

Restriction: Chemical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Concurrent with ENGRMSE 254 and CBE 281.

ENGRMSE 155. Mechanical Behavior and Design Principles. 4 Units.

Principles governing structure and mechanical behavior of materials, relationship relating microstructure and mechanical response with application to elasticity, plasticity, yielding, necking, creep, and fracture of materials. Introduction to experimental techniques to characterize the properties of materials. Design parameters.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Same as ENGRMAE 156.

Restriction: Mechanical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Chemical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 155L. Mechanical Behavior Laboratory. 1 Unit.

Introduction to experimental techniques to characterize mechanical properties of materials. Emphasis on correlations between property and microstructure. Experiments include: plastic stability in tension, effect of grain size on flow stress, microstructural engineering. Materials fee.

Corequisite: ENGRMSE 155
Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 158. Ceramic Materials for Sustainable Energy. 3 Units.

A technical elective for students interested in materials. Topics covered include structure and properties of ceramic materials, and design for sustainable energy applications.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Restriction: Chemical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 160. Advanced Lab in Synthesis of Materials. 4 Units.

Synthesis and characterization of organic and inorganic materials including polymers and oxides. Techniques include electron and scanning probe microscopy, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray diffraction, porosimetry, and thermal analysis. Materials fee.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 163. Computer Techniques in Experimental Research. 4 Units.

Principles and practical guidelines of automated materials testing. Computer fundamentals, programming languages, data acquisition and control hardware, interfacint techniques, programming strategies, data analysis, data storage, safeguard procedures.

Restriction: Chemical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 164. X-ray Diffraction, Electron Microscopy, and Microanalysis. 3 Units.

Material characterization using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Topics include X-ray diffraction and analysis; SEM imaging and microanalysis. Materials fee.

Corequisite: ENGRMSE 164L
Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 164L. X-ray Diffraction, Electron Microscopy, and Microanalysis Lab. 2 Units.

Material characterization using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Topics include X-ray diffraction and analysis; SEM imaging and microanalysis.

Corequisite: ENGRMSE 164
Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 165. Materials Kinetics and Phase Transformations. 3 Units.

Treatment of the kinetics of solid-state reactions and reactions at interfaces. Thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations, including solidification processes, diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54 and ENGRMSE 65B. ENGRMSE 65B with a grade of C- or better

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 169. Electronic and Optical Properties in Materials. 4 Units.

Covers the electronic, optical, and dielectric properties of crystalline and amorphous materials to provide a foundation of the underlying physical principles governing the properties of existing and emerging electronic and photonic materials.

Prerequisite: PHYSICS 7D and PHYSICS 7E and (MATH 3A or I&C SCI 6N) and MATH 3D

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 171. Green Engineering: Theory and Practice. 4 Units.

Methods and impacts of selecting alternative technologies, processes, materials, chemicals, to reduce pollution, waste, and use of toxic substances, thereby creating “green,” environmentally responsible, sustainable solutions. Topics include environmental regulations, recycling, life-cycle assessment, economic analysis, design, green chemistry, and toxicology.

Restriction: Seniors only. Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 174. Composite Materials Design. 3 Units.

Introduction to fiber-reinforced composites for mechanical applications. Properties of reinforcing fibers. Manufacture of fibers and composites. Micromechanics of fiber composites. Strength criteria and failure modes. Macromechanics in design of laminated composite structures.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54 and ENGR 150

ENGRMSE 175. Design Failure Investigation. 4 Units.

Survey of mechanisms by which devices fail, including overload, fatigue, corrosion, and wear. Use of fractography and other evidence to interpret failure modes and specify design/manufacturing changes. Students redesign failed parts or structures based on actual parts and/or case histories.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Restriction: Chemical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 176. Surface and Adhesion Science. 4 Units.

Structure, thermodynamics of, kinetics, and reactions on surfaces. Surface electronic and mechanical properties and characterization of all classes of materials including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, and soft materials. Adhesion between different materials is also addressed.

Prerequisite: (CBE 110 or ENGRMSE 165) and (ENGRMSE 141 or ENGRMSE 169)

Same as CBE 183.

Restriction: Chemical Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Concurrent with ENGRMSE 276 and CBE 283.

ENGRMSE 189A. Senior Design Project I. 3 Units.

Group supervised senior design projects that deal with materials selection in engineering design and that involve case studies in ethics, safety, design, failure modes, new products, and patents. Activities conclude with a presentation of the projects. Materials fee.

Grading Option: In Progress (Letter Grade with P/NP).

Restriction: Seniors only. Materials Science Engineering Majors only. MSE 189A, MSE 189B, and MSE 189C must be taken in the same academic year.

ENGRMSE 189B. Senior Design Project II. 3 Units.

Group supervised senior design projects that deal with materials selection in engineering design and that involve case studies in ethics, safety, design, failure modes, new products, and patents. Activities conclude with a presentation of the projects. Materials fee.

Prerequisite: ENGRMSE 189A

Grading Option: In Progress (Letter Grade with P/NP).

Restriction: Seniors only. Materials Science Engineering Majors only. MSE 189A, MSE 189B, and MSE 189C must be taken in the same academic year.

ENGRMSE 189C. Senior Design Project III. 3 Units.

Group supervised senior design projects that deal with materials selection in engineering design and that involve case studies in ethics, safety, design, failure modes, new products, and patents. Activities conclude with a presentation of the projects. Materials fee.

Prerequisite: ENGRMSE 189B

Restriction: Seniors only. Materials Science Engineering Majors only. MSE 189A, MSE 189B, and MSE 189C must be taken in the same academic year.

ENGRMSE 190. Materials Selection and Design. 4 Units.

Meaning and phases of design; design considerations; properties of engineering materials; materials property charts; materials selection; process selection; multi-constraint and multi-objective design. Selection of shape in mechanical components. Designing with hybrid materials: challenges and opportunities. Environmental considerations; case studies.

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 191. Materials Outreach. 3 Units.

Demonstrates major concepts in Materials Science and Engineering. Concepts of materials engineering covered include deformation in crystalline solids, effects of heat treatment on mechanical properties, thermal barrier materials, composites design, mechanical behavior of polymers, superconductivity in ceramics.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGRMSE 195. Special Topics in Materials Science and Engineering. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Materials Science and Engineering. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ENGRMSE 198. Group Study. 1-4 Units.

Group study of selected topics in engineering.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

ENGRMSE 199. Individual Study. 1-4 Units.

Supervised independent reading, research, or design for undergraduate Engineering majors. Students taking individual study for design credit are to submit a written paper to the instructor and to the Undergraduate Student Affairs Office in the School of Engineering.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

Restriction: Materials Science Engineering Majors only.

ENGRMSE 199P. Individual Study. 1-4 Units.

Supervised independent reading, research, or design for undergraduate Engineering majors. Students taking individual study for design credit are to submit a written paper to the instructor and to the Undergraduate Student Affairs Office in the School of Engineering.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ENGRMSE 200. Crystalline Solids: Structure, Imperfections, and Properties. 4 Units.

Principles and concepts underlying the study of advanced materials including alloys, composites, ceramics, semiconductors, polymers, ferroelectrics, and magnetics. Crystal structure and defects, surface and interface properties, thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations, and material processing, related to fundamental material properties.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 205. Materials Physics. 4 Units.

Covers the electronic, optical, and dielectric properties of crystalline materials to provide a foundation of the underlying physical principles of governing the properties of existing and emerging electronic and photonic materials.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 241. Nano-Scale Materials and Applications. 4 Units.

Overview of the chemistry, physics, and applications of nanometer-scale materials. Explore the effects of composition, bonding, and confinement on physical properties of nanomaterials, their chemical syntheses, and their device physics in electronic, optoelectronic, and energy technologies.

Prerequisite: ENGRMSE 200 and ENGRMSE 205

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with ENGRMSE 141.

ENGRMSE 249. Special Topics in Materials Science and Engineering. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Materials Science and Engineering. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 254. Polymer Science and Engineering. 4 Units.

An introduction to physical aspects of polymers, including configuration and conformation of polymer chains and characterization techniques; crystallinity visoelasticity, rheology, and processing.

Same as CBE 281.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with CBE 181 and ENGRMSE 154.

ENGRMSE 255A. Design with Ceramic Materials. 4 Units.

Dependence of ceramic properties on bonding, crystal structure, defects, and microstructure. Ceramic manufacturing technology. Survey of physical properties. Strength, deformation, and fracture of ceramics. Mechanical design with brittle, environment-sensitive materials exhibiting time-dependent strengths.

Prerequisite: ENGR 54

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 256A. Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials. 4 Units.

Principles governing structure and mechanical behavior of materials, relationship relating microstructure and mechanical response with application to elasticity, plasticity, creep, and fatigue, study of rate-controlling mechanisms and failure modes, fracture of materials.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 259. Transmission Electron Microscopy. 4 Units.

The theory and operation of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), including the basic construction, electron optics, electron diffraction and reciprocal space, formation of image and electron diffraction information, microanalysis, and specimen preparation.

Prerequisite: ENGRMSE 200

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 261. High Temperature Deformation of Engineering Materials. 4 Units.

Theoretical and practical aspects of creep and superplasticity in metallic and non-metallic systems are presented. Topics include: creep testing methods, diffusional creep, deformation mechanism maps, and superplasticity in non-metallics.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 264. Scanning Electron Microscopy. 4 Units.

The theory and operation of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis. Topics covered include the basic design and electron optics, electron beam - specimen interactions, image formation and interpretation, X-ray spectrometry, and other related topics and techniques.

Prerequisite: ENGRMSE 200

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 265. Phase Transformations. 4 Units.

Advanced thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations and phase transitions.

Prerequisite: CBEMS 240

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 267. Seminar in Systems Microbiology Research. 1 Unit.

A research and journal club seminar that covers topics on bacteria and phage using approaches and principles from biology, engineering, and physics.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Same as MOL BIO 268, PHYSICS 268.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 271. Green Engineering: Theory and Practice. 4 Units.

Methods and impacts of selecting alternative technologies, processes, materials, chemicals, to reduce pollution, waste, and use of toxic substances, thereby creating “green,” environmentally responsible, sustainable solutions. Topics include environmental regulations, recycling, life-cycle assessment, economic analysis, design, green chemistry, and toxicology.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 273. Electroceramics & Solid State Electrochemical Systems. 4 Units.

Theory, underlying principles, experimental techniques, and applications of electroceramics and solid-state electrochemical systems. Links solid state physics, atomic structure, thermodynamics, defect chemistry, and transport processes to electrical properties of ceramics - spanning from insulators to fast-ion conductors and HT superconductors.

Prerequisite: ENGRMSE 200

ENGRMSE 276. Surface and Adhesion Science. 4 Units.

Structure, thermodynamics of, kinetics, and reactions on surfaces. Surface electronic and mechanical properties and characterization of all classes of materials including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, and soft materials. Adhesion between different materials is also addressed.

Same as CBE 283.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with ENGRMSE 176 and CBE 183.

ENGRMSE 295. Seminar in Engineering. 1-4 Units.

Seminars by individual faculty in major fields of interest.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 296. Master of Science Thesis Research. 1-16 Units.

Individual research or investigation conducted in preparation for the thesis required for the M.S. degree in Engineering.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 297. Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation Research. 1-16 Units.

Individual research or investigation conducted in preparation for the dissertation required for the Ph.D. degree in Engineering.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 298. Seminars in Materials Science Engineering. 2 Units.

Presentation of advanced topics and reports of current research efforts in Materials Science Engineering.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGRMSE 299. Individual Research. 1-16 Units.

Individual research or investigation under the direction of an individual faculty member.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

William Bowman, Ph.D. Arizona State University, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering (materials for energy conversion and storage, advanced transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy, correlating multiscale properties, electrical properties of ceramics, electrochemistry and defect chemistry, interfaces, grain boundaries and surfaces, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, ceramic processing and thin-film growth)
James Earthman, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Biomedical Engineering (biomaterials, compositionally complex materials, nanocrystalline alloys, quantitative percussion diagnostics, deformation and damage processes)
Allon I. Hochbaum, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Chemistry (nanoscale materials and hybrid bio-inorganic devices for applications in clean energy)
Enrique Lavernia, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, UCI Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor and Distinguished Professor of Materials Science and Engineering (nanostructured materials, additive manufacturing, powder metallurgy, mechanical behavior)
Martha L. Mecartney, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (ceramics for energy applications and for use in extreme environments, flash sintering, interfacial design of thermal conductivity, transmission electron microscopy)
Farghalli A. Mohamed, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering (mechanical behavior of engineering materials such as metals, composites and ceramics, the correlation between behavior and microstructure, creep and superplasticity, mechanisms responsible for strengthening and fracture)
Daniel Mumm, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering (development of materials for power generation systems, propulsion, integrated sensing, advanced vehicle concepts and platform protection)
Xiaoqing Pan, Ph.D. Saarlandes University, Henry Samueli Endowed Chair and Director of Irvine Materials Research Institute and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Physics and Astronomy (atomic-scale structure, properties and dynamic behaviors of advanced materials including thin films and nanostructures for memories, catalysts, and energy conversion and storage devices)
Regina Ragan, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (exploration and development of novel material systems for nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices)
Timothy Rupert, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (mechanical behavior, nanomaterials, structure property relationships, microstructural stability, grain boundaries and interfaces, materials characterization)
Julie Schoenung, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department Chair and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering (materials selection, green engineering, materials processing and characterization, nanostructured materials, structure-property relationships)
Lorenzo Valdevit, Ph.D. Princeton University, Director of Institute for Design and Manufacturing Innovation (IDMI) and Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (architected materials, mechanical metamaterials, additive manufacturing, optimal design)

Affiliate Faculty

Shane Ardo, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Assistant Professor of Chemistry; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (inorganic and organometallic, physical chemistry and chemical physics, polymer, materials, nanoscience)
Plamen Atanassov, Ph.D. Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Chemistry; Materials Science and Engineering (electrocatalysis and electrocatalysts for energy conversion processes; bio-electrocatalysis and energy harvesting systems)
Elliot L. Botvinick, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Surgery; Biomedical Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering
Peter J. Burke, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Biomedical Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (nano-electronics, bio-nanotechnology)
Alon A. Gorodetsky, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Chemistry; Materials Science and Engineering (cephalopods, adaptive materials, camouflage, bioelectronics)
Zhibin Guan, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professor of Chemistry; Biomedical Engineering; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (chemical biology, organic and synthetic, polymer, materials, nanoscience)
Jered Haun, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (nanotechnology, molecular engineering, computational simulations, targeted drug delivery, clinical cancer detection)
Michelle Khine, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (development of novel nano- and micro-fabrication technologies and systems for single cell analysis, stem cell research, in-vitro diagnostics)
Matthew Law, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Chemistry; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (inorganic and organometallic, physical chemistry and chemical physics, polymer, materials, nanoscience)
Mo Li, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (responsive materials, multifunctional materials and structures, fracture mechanics, cement chemistry, industrial ecology, materials-structure-environment interaction)
Ali Mohraz, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (colloid science, soft matter engineering with applications in health care and energy materials)
Mikael Nilsson, Ph.D. Chalmers University of Technology, Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Chemistry; Materials Science and Engineering (actinide chemistry, solvent extraction fundamental chemistry and process development, extraction and detection equipment development, radiolysis and phase composition of organic solvent)
Joseph Patterson, Ph.D. University of Warwick, Assistant Professor of Chemistry; Materials Science and Engineering (polymer, materials, nanoscience)
Frank G. Shi, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (optoelectronic devices and materials, optoelectronic device packaging materials, optoelectronic medical devices and packaging, white LED technologies, high power LED packaging)
Vasan Venugopalan, ScD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department Chair and Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Biomedical Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Surgery (laser-induced thermal, mechanical and radiative transport processes for application in medical diagnostics, therapeutics, biotechnology, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS))
Huolin Xin, Ph.D. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy; Materials Science and Engineering
Iryna Zenyuk, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University, Associate Director of National Fuel Cell Research Center and Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (renewable energy, fuel cells, electrolyzers, batteries, X-ray imaging techniques, multi-scale modeling, transport phenomena)
Weian Zhao, Ph.D. McMaster University, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Biomedical Engineering; Materials Science and Engineering (stem cell therapy, diagnostics, biosensors, nano- and microtechnology, aptamers)
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