2021-22 Edition

Anthropology (ANTHRO)

Courses

ANTHRO 2A. Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology. 4 Units.

Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

(III and VIII ).

ANTHRO 2B. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 4 Units.

Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

(III)

ANTHRO 2C. Introduction to Archaeology. 4 Units.

Archaeological theory and cultural processes with emphasis on the American Southwest, Mesoamerica, and Mesopotamia.

(III)

ANTHRO 2D. Introduction to Language and Culture. 4 Units.

Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world.

Same as LSCI 68.

(III)

ANTHRO 10A. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

Same as SOCIOL 10A.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10A, POL SCI 10A.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Sociology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

ANTHRO 10B. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 10A or ANTHRO 10A

Same as SOCIOL 10B.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10B, POL SCI 10B.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Sociology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

ANTHRO 10C. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 10B or ANTHRO 10B

Same as SOCIOL 10C.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10C, POL SCI 10C.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Sociology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Vb)

ANTHRO 20A. People, Cultures, and Environmental Sustainability. 4 Units.

Anthropological consideration of global environmental sustainability from the perspective of human cultures and communities. Causes and consequences of population growth, natural resource management, environmental law, environmental ethics. Case studies emphasize tropical rain forests, arid lands of Africa and North America.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 25A. Environmental Injustice. 4 Units.

Explores how pollution, climate change, and other environmental problems impact people around the world, often worsening social inequality. Students use social science frameworks to understand environmental problems, different interpretations of these problems, and how people have organized for political change.

(III and VII ).

ANTHRO 30A. Global Issues in Anthropological Perspective. 4 Units.

Explores anthropological perspectives on issues of importance in an increasingly global society. Topics include emphases on ethnic conflict; identity; immigration and citizenship; religion and religious diversity; medical anthropology; legal anthropology; development and economic change; gender.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 30C. Visual Anthropology . 4 Units.

Focusing on the construction of culture through visuality, this course engages traditional ethnographic films, popular media and anthropological texts to analyze ethics, “reality” and fiction; propaganda and documentary, construction of a frame, the responsibility of the filmmaker, photographer, and anthropologist.

ANTHRO 41A. Global Cultures and Society. 4 Units.

Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

Same as INTL ST 11.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III and VIII ).

ANTHRO 45A. Science, Culture, Power. 4 Units.

Examines science in historical and cultural context (Scientific and Darwinian Revolutions, Manhattan Project, contemporary biosciences) to understand scientific truths and their limits, scientists as social actors, and vital intersections of sciences with religion, politics, gender, and other forms of culture.

(III)

ANTHRO 48. Archaeology or Aliens?: Conspiracy, Pseudoscience, and the Emergence of Civilizations. 4 Units.

Archaeology has inspired (and sometimes actively encouraged) various theories about aliens, lost civilizations, dark conspiracies, and mysterious technologies. Does such an intimate relationship with these fantastic notions undermine archaeology and its claims of authoritative knowledge about past cultures.

(III and VIII ).

ANTHRO 100A. Ethnography and Anthropological Methods. 4 Units.

Anthropological research, learning ethnographic methods, and how to choose a research topic, construct research questions, explore library resources, collect data, and write an analytical paper on research findings.

Prerequisite or corequisite: ANTHRO 2A

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment. Medical Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 100B. Anthropology Careers. 4 Units.

Gives students the skills and perspective needed to leverage undergraduate anthropology education in diverse career domains. Students explore different career domains (health care, tech development, environmental governance, etc.) and learn to represent themselves professionally.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors only. Anthropology Minors only. Medical Anthropology Minors only.

ANTHRO 121AW. Kinship and Social Organization. 4 Units.

Organization of social life primarily in preindustrial societies. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, sexual behavior, and social roles. Comparisons of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic explanations of social organization.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

ANTHRO 121D. Cross-Cultural Studies of Gender. 4 Units.

Explores the construction of gender in national and transnational contexts. Special attention is given to how race, sexuality, class, and global inequalities shape different experiences of gender, and how gender structures political, institutional, and social life across the world.

(VII)

ANTHRO 121J. Urban Anthropology. 4 Units.

Cultural roles of cities and the processes of urbanization in a comparative perspective. Focus includes nonwestern, nonindustrial societies of past and present; the relationship between modern urban centers across different world regions. Themes covered include: inequality, race, migration, poverty, capitalism.

ANTHRO 124. Gold: The Alchemy of Socio-Economic Practice. 4 Units.

Before bitcoin, before derivatives and mortgage-backed securities, before even writing itself, there was gold. Explore gold’s role in the development of culture, politics, and power. From Pharaohs to modern financial wizards, gold has impacted and mediated social life.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment. Archaeology Minors have first consideration for enrollment. Economics Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Economics Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 125. Anthropology of Debt. 4 Units.

Explores how debt has shaped culture across varied contexts geographically and historically. In what ways have societies naturalized indebtedness, taken it for granted as a fact of life, and used it for organizing social relations.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment. Archaeology Minors have first consideration for enrollment. Economics Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Economics Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 125A. Economic Anthropology. 4 Units.

Economic systems in comparative perspective: production, distribution, and consumption in market and non-market societies; agricultural development in the third world.

Prerequisite: One course in general science, anthropology, economics, geography, or sociology.

Same as ECON 152A.

Restriction: Economics Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Quantitative Economics Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Business Economics Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 125B. Ecological Anthropology. 4 Units.

Studies relationships between human communities and their natural environments. The role of environment in shaping culture; effects of extreme environments on human biology and social organization; anthropologist's role in studying global environmental problems, e.g., African famine, tropical rain forests destruction.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2C

ANTHRO 125C. Environmental Anthropology. 4 Units.

Introduces students to anthropological and qualitative research on the relationship of humans, non-humans, and environments. Focuses on how to analyze and evaluate social and cultural differences in environmental perception, relations, justice, governance, sustainability, and cosmology.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2C or ANTHRO 2D

(III)

ANTHRO 125F. Humans and Other Animals. 4 Units.

Explores peoples' relationships with other animals, a topic that continues to shape anthropological understandings of humanness, culture, and the social. Subthemes: symbol and matter, nature/culture, ontologies, relations, moralities, ecologies, futures.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2D

ANTHRO 125U. Immigration, Nation, and Media. 4 Units.

Examines media shapes and reflects public opinion on immigration and its representation of immigrants, citizens, and ideas about the nation, and who belongs and who is a potential threat; as well as the relationship between scholars and journalists.

Same as CHC/LAT 123, SPPS 101A.

ANTHRO 125X. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines the movement of people across national borders, governmentality and the role of state practices to control populations, and issues of citizenship, belonging, and identity. Examples are drawn from the United States, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

Same as CHC/LAT 161.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 125Z. Islam in America. 4 Units.

Offers a critical academic study of Islam in America, focusing on the core tenets of belief, the diversity of practices, and historical transformations that have taken place since the arrival of Muslims in the United States.

Same as ASIANAM 142.

ANTHRO 126. Cultures of the Middle East. 4 Units.

The diversity of cultures and peoples who constitute the Middle East demonstrates the failure of much contemporary media and discourse to understand this region. Students learn about the broad scope of the contemporary Middle East through an ethnographic lens.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 126A. Elite Cultures. 4 Units.

The distinctive contribution that ethnographic studies have made to the understanding of elites past and present, in particular societies and globally.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 127. Controversies, Courts, Cultures: The Anthropology of Law. 4 Units.

Assesses the contributions anthropology has made to legal scholarship, reviewing historical and contemporary themes. Considers both comparative questions of law’s norms, structures, and practices around the globe, and the specific insights anthropology offers about contemporary U.S. law.

Same as CRM/LAW C183.

(III)

ANTHRO 127A. Law and Modernity. 4 Units.

The rise and spread of Enlightenment legal traditions, social contract theory, individual rights, ideologies of "liberty, equality, fraternity"; contradictions of liberal law, its understandings of "primitive" and "civilized"; pervasive myths of property, difference, race, and rights. Reading- and writing-intensive.

Same as CRM/LAW C191.

ANTHRO 127D. Anthropology of Law . 4 Units.

Introduces the anthropological study of law through a focus on the foundations of this subfield, its primary methodologies, and several important topics of inquiry, including policing, immigration, and structural inequalities. Provides an international perspective on law and society.

Same as CRM/LAW C141.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 128A. Science, Technology, Controversy. 4 Units.

Explores ways in which the social sciences conceive of science as a sociocultural practice. Emphasis on literature in Science and Technology Studies (STS), especially writings that concern the relationship of science to space and place, power, and politics.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors only.

ANTHRO 128B. Race, Gender, and Science. 4 Units.

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences.

Same as CHC/LAT 176.

(VII)

ANTHRO 128C. Digital Cultures . 4 Units.

Explores cultural and political implications of the infotech revolution and the ways new media are used around the world, new cultural practices and spaces (e.g., cybercafes), debates surrounding the meanings of these new technologies, and their implications for transforming society.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A and (ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2C or ANTHRO 2D)

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 129. Special Topics: Social and Economic Anthropology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Social and Economic Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 132A. Psychological Anthropology. 4 Units.

Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or PSYCH 7A or (PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)

Same as PSYCH 173A.

Restriction: Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 134A. Medical Anthropology. 4 Units.

Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

Same as CHC/LAT 178A.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 134B. Cultures of Biomedicine. 4 Units.

An introduction to the anthropolobical study of biomedicine and biotechnology. Topics include medicalization, experimentation and discovery, diagnosis, expertise, health activism, and biotechnology.

ANTHRO 134C. Medicine, Food, and Health. 4 Units.

With anthropological studies of edible things as its foundation, this course explores topics related to the relationship between medical knowledge, eating, and health from a medical anthropological perspective.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2D

ANTHRO 134F. Anthropology of the Body. 4 Units.

Examines human bodies as both biological and sociocultural entities and explores the relationship among mind, body, and society cross-culturally. Topics include embodiment; race, sex, gender, and the body; somatization; control of the body; commodified bodies; and hybrid/cyborg bodies.

ANTHRO 134G. HIV/AIDS in a Global Context. 4 Units.

Examines issues concerning cultural conceptions of HIV infection and disease worldwide. Topics include treatment and prevention, identity and behavior, risk, ethnicity, gender, youth, sexuality, activism, drug use, illness, religion, the clinical encounter, national belonging, and the pharmaceutical industry.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 134H. Anthropology of Food. 4 Units.

Examines how food communicates ideas about ethnocentrism, disgust, privilege, gender, race, labor, social identities and hierarchies, globalization, power, and the "Western diet" and its health consequences.

Same as CHC/LAT 118.

ANTHRO 134N. Disease, Health, and Inequality. 4 Units.

Examines the relationships among disease, health, and social inequality in the U.S. and globally. Topics include infectious and chronic disease case studies, health policy, and strategies for promoting health equity.

ANTHRO 136A. Nationalism and Ethnicity in the Contemporary World. 4 Units.

An exploration of the concepts of identity, culture, ethnicity, race, and nation through ethnographic cases, with a view to asking larger questions: how do people create nativeness and foreignness? How does "culture" get worked into contemporary racisms and nationalisms.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 136B. History of Anthropological Theory. 4 Units.

Provides foundational knowledge in the discipline of anthropology by reviewing competing approaches in anthropological theory, from the nineteenth century to the present. Covers historically fundamental approaches—social evolutionism, functionalism—and recent movements such as feminism, cultural studies, poststructuralism, and postmodernism.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 136D. Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Units.

Examines theories of conflict management. Analyzes how conflict is mitigated in diverse cultures: at the interpersonal level, between groups, and on the international scale. Students discuss readings, hear from conflict management practitioners, and simulate negotiations.

Same as POL SCI 154G, SOC SCI 183E, INTL ST 183E.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 136G. Colonialism and Gender. 4 Units.

An anthropological enquiry into the ways colonial relations of power have been structured and gendered throughout the world, and to what effect. Examines the social locations of men and women in the everyday exercise of colonial and imperial power.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 136K. The Woman and the Body. 4 Units.

Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.

(VII)

ANTHRO 138. Prisons and Public Education. 4 Units.

Looks at the connections between schools and prisons in the United States. Students learn about ideas that push beyond common trope of the “school to prison pipeline.”.

Same as AFAM 159.

ANTHRO 139. Special Topics in Cultural and Psychological Anthropology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Cultural and Psychological Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 140. Sex and Conquest in Latin America. 4 Units.

Competing ideas of masculinity and femininity, sexual violence, sexual identities, and gendered hierarchies informed how the Spanish engaged in military and religious domination of Mexican and Andean communities, as well as the forms of native resistance throughout colonial Latin America.

Same as HISTORY 160, CHC/LAT 150A, GEN&SEX 171A.

ANTHRO 141A. Ancient Civilization of Mexico and the Southwest. 4 Units.

The prehistory and cultural evolution of the civilization which originated in Mexico, including the Olmecs, Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and Zapotec, as well as the Pueblos of the Southwestern U.S. Topics include the origins of food production and of the state.

Same as INTL ST 177I.

ANTHRO 146. Consumption and Culture. 4 Units.

Our modern "society of the spectacle" often equates your consumption to your very humanity. Explores the ways in which our desire for things expresses our identity, politics, place within society, and how what we consume dominates social life.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 147. Egyptomania. 4 Units.

An exploration into the archaeological heritage and cultures of ancient Egypt. Also examines how ancient Egypt became appropriated as a popular cultural phenomenon and site of scholarship in the centuries after the Pharaohs.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment. Archaeology Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 147A. Archaeology of the Islamic World. 4 Units.

The archaeological record connected with the Islamic tradition spans nearly 1,500 years and stretches from Spain to South East Asia. Working with artifacts and other materials, students learn about the sites and historical transformations associated with Islam and Muslim societies.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment. Archaeology Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 147B. Archaeology, Politics, and Identity. 4 Units.

Archaeologists don’t excavate in a political vacuum. Their research has profound consequences for the ways in which people identify with and claim their cultural heritage. Examines archaeology’s role in constructing such identities through the traces of the past.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Anthropology Minors have first consideration for enrollment. Archaeology Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 148. I Dig UCI. 4 Units.

An introduction to archaeological fieldwork through participation in an active excavation on campus. Students engage with research design and learn the foundational methods of archaeological recovery: survey, mapping, sampling strategies, documentation, excavation, artifact identification, and interpretation.

ANTHRO 149. Special Topics in Archaeology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Archaeology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 150A. Language and Social Cognition. 4 Units.

Explores the relationship between language and cognition in social and cultural contexts. The overall goal is to think through how language structure and use impact how individuals perceive, think about, and understand the world around them.

Same as LSCI 168S.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 151A. Improvisation, Language, and Culture. 4 Units.

Addresses improvisation, both in performance and in everyday life. Examines improvisation as the "flexible regulation" of everyday behavior by exploring different scholarly treatments of language and interaction, and working on developing actual theatrical improvisation skills.

Same as LSCI 168J.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

ANTHRO 152A. Language Origins: Evolution, Genetics, and the Brain. 4 Units.

Examines how human language(s) may have originated. Studies pertinent techniques (reconstruction) and addresses related questions, including is our language faculty inborn (i.e., genetically encoded)? Can brain imaging and population genetics research help to unlock this mystery of human evolution?.

Same as LSCI 175, GLBLCLT 105, HISTORY 135G.

ANTHRO 162A. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America. 4 Units.

Surveys the prehistory of Latin America and its indigenous cultures, emphasizing the impact of colonial rule, capitalism, and 20th-century transformations. Emphasis on communities from several countries. In some years, emphasis on comparisons between the Latin American and Caribbean experiences.

Same as CHC/LAT 120.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 162B. Indian North America. 4 Units.

A survey of indigenous peoples in North America: American Indians, Alaska Natives, First Nations, Native Americans. Tribal populations and geographic distributions, political and social organization, sovereignty, self-determination, intergovernmental relations; cultural continuity and change; management, preservation, development of environments/resources.

(VII)

ANTHRO 162C. Race and Empire in Colonial Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores how native people of Latin America with enslaved and free African incorporated and defied Spanish and Portuguese colonization. Focuses on religious adaptions, resistance movements, legal systems, and the emergence of multicultural communities to explain how race shaped European empires.

Same as HISTORY 165.

ANTHRO 162D. Anthropology of the United States. 4 Units.

Examines anthropological research in and of the United States. Topics include race, class, identity, politics, law, and media.

ANTHRO 163A. Peoples of the Pacific. 4 Units.

The cultural history and recent developments among the Pacific peoples of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia.

Same as INTL ST 158B.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 164A. 21st Century Africa. 4 Units.

Comparative studies of the cultures and societies of Sub-Saharan Africa, with emphasis on critical study of colonialism and postcoloniality, social transformation, and the politics of identity.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ANTHRO 164P. Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia. 4 Units.

Examines the cultures and political conflicts of the more than 130 indigenous ethnic groups in the European and Asian territories of the former U.S.S.R. Emphasis is on the theoretical issues of ethnicity, nationalism, and conflict management.

Same as INTL ST 162B, POL SCI 154F.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 165A. Modern Iran: Cinema and the City. 4 Units.

Exploring modern Iran through film, literature, photography, travel writing, and philosophy and social science texts that introduce students to important concepts in post-colonial studies, social thought, war culture, religion, and media as experienced through the paradigm of a non-Western modernity.

Same as PERSIAN 165A.

ANTHRO 169. Special Topics in Area Studies. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 180AW. Anthropology Majors Writing Seminar. 4 Units.

Anthropological theory designed especially for majors in Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology Majors only.

(Ib)

ANTHRO 190. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Senior thesis with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

ANTHRO H190A. Honors Research Design. 3 Units.

Students design a research project and articulate its goals and significance. Written work consists of a research proposal describing the research questions, the relevant literature, methods of data collection and analysis, and ethical considerations.

Prerequisite or corequisite: ANTHRO 199

Restriction: Anthropology Honors students only.

ANTHRO H190B. Honors Field Research. 3 Units.

Students begin or continue ethnographic field research and gain experience with a variety of data collection methods, including participant-observation, interviews, surveys, and the study of archival and documentary materials.

Prerequisite or corequisite: ANTHRO 199 and ANTHRO H190A

Restriction: Anthropology Honors students only.

ANTHRO H190C. Honors Research Analysis. 3 Units.

Students apply qualitative data analysis techniques to ethnographic data collected as part of their Honors research.

Prerequisite or corequisite: ANTHRO H190B and ANTHRO 199. Anthropology Honors ONLY.

ANTHRO H190W. Honors Thesis Writing. 3 Units.

Students draft a senior honors thesis (typically) with the following sections: problem statement, literature review, ethnographic background, and descriptions of the methods, results, and conclusions.

Prerequisite or corequisite: ANTHRO H190C and ANTHRO 199. Anthropology Honors ONLY. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

ANTHRO 197. Field Study. 1-4 Units.

Field study with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ANTHRO 198. Directed Group Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed study with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ANTHRO 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ANTHRO 202A. Proseminar in Anthropology. 4 Units.

Year-long intensive introduction to the history of anthropological thought and reading in classical and contemporary ethnography for first-year graduate students.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 202B. Proseminar in Anthropology. 4 Units.

Year-long intensive introduction to the history of anthropological thought and reading in classical and contemporary ethnography for first-year graduate students.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 202A

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 202C. Proseminar in Anthropology. 4 Units.

Year-long intensive introduction to the history of anthropological thought and reading in classical and contemporary ethnography for first-year graduate students.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 202B

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 204A. Proseminar in Medicine, Science, and Technology. 4 Units.

Explores the phenomena studied by "medical anthropology" and "science and technology studies" are inextricably linked, and how understanding formations requires moving between disparate fields of inquiry. Required for students pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Anthropoligies of Medicine, Science, and Technology.

Restriction: Students pursuing a Graduate Certification in Anthropoligies of Medicine, Science, and Technology have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 215A. Ethnographic Methods. 4 Units.

Exposes students to diverse methods, both traditional and experimental, used in anthropological ethnographic research. Students gain experience practicing diverse methods, and learn to select methods appropriate to particular study designs and contexts.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 215B. Research Design. 4 Units.

Introduces research design for anthropology, including concept work and mapping, research topic and aims development, research question construction, and fieldwork planning.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 215A

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 215C. Grant and Proposal Writing. 4 Units.

Focuses on production, critique, and revision of student research proposals. A practical seminar designed to improve student proposals, help students through the application processes, and increase students' chances of obtaining support for their research.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 215B

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 230D. Ethnography and its Collaborative Futures. 4 Units.

Structured readings of selected career-making ethnographic works, past and present, with an emphasis on how ethnographic projects evolve into diverse, collaborative projects.

ANTHRO 230F. Ethnography. 4 Units.

Explores the theory and practice of ethnography with a focus on anthropology, the discipline most associated with ethnography. Students are exposed to the theoretical underpinnings of ethnographic work, traditional and innovative practices, and sample ethnographies.

Same as CRM/LAW C222, CHC/LAT 217.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 235A. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines borders and boundaries as material and semiotic constructs. Drawing upon an array of literatures, but loosely situated in U.S. geo/biopolitics, explores transformative troublings of places, spaces, borders, and bodies of all sorts.

Same as SOC SCI 254A, CHC/LAT 215.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 240A. Economic Anthropology. 4 Units.

Classic and contemporary theory in economic anthropology. Case studies: Latin America (primarily Mexico and the Andes), Africa, and the Pacific. Substantive topics: non-market exchange, markets and marketplaces, households, gender, management of common property (fisheries, pastoral lands, forests), labor, and development.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 245A. Seminar in Political Anthropology. 4 Units.

Explores anthropological approaches to politics. Covers a range of issues and topics, including: theories of culture, power, and hegemony; approaches to colonial and post-colonial relations of global inequality; and ethnographic approaches to the modern state.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 246. Feminist Anthropology. 4 Units.

Examines feminist anthropology’s rise as an interdisciplinary field. Paying special attention to issues of power, subjectivity, and authority in the research encounter, feminist anthropologists’ major contributions to ethnography, gender studies, queer studies, and cultural anthropology are surveyed.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 246E. Capital and Empire. 4 Units.

Examines theories of capital and empire via anthropological theory, post/colonial critique, feminist theory, and Black political thought. Moreover, it examines social movements, geo/political trajectories and formations, and political economic trends that have emerged after the 2008 financial crisis.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 247A. Structuralism and Post-Structuralism. 4 Units.

Traces recent theoretical discussions and arguments over the philosophical and historical "subject" from structuralist decenterings toward the characteristically "post-structuralist" contemporary concern with the historical and political constitution of subjectivities and subject positions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 249A. Humanism and Posthumanism. 4 Units.

Examines alternative forms of human, humanisms, and posthumanisms to explore the inherent ambiguities and shifting boundaries of knowing and being human, and to venture into modes of analysis that problematize the universality and globality of liberal humanism.

ANTHRO 250A. The Cultural Politics of Visual Representation. 4 Units.

Develops a theoretical framework for analyzing and reading visual images. Images, as cultural productions, are steeped in the values, ideologies, and taken-for-granted beliefs of the culture which produced them and a political economy that is class, race, and gender inflected.

ANTHRO 252A. Queer Anthropology. 4 Units.

Explores historical and contemporary scholarship that employs ethnographic approaches to address the discursive construction of sexuality. Also examines how the discipline of anthropology has been shaped by the study of sexuality.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 253A. Design, Aesthetics, and Social Life. 4 Units.

Anthropology has only recently recognized that design demands consideration as a cultural form linked to, yet nonetheless distinct from, other aesthetic endeavors. Course is largely oriented toward collaboratively working out a conceptual basis for a distinctly anthropological approach to design.

ANTHRO 254. Digital Anthropology. 4 Units.

Examines “the digital” from an anthropological perspective by exploring ethnographic research on digital culture and using anthropological frameworks to approach the digital and the human. Readings are interdisciplinary, including work from history and communications.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 255A. Disability Worlds. 4 Units.

Explores disability from a range of methodological and theoretical perspectives. Examines the genealogy of disability in anthropology and related disciplines, with an emphasis on ethnographic work. Topics addressed include access, embodiment, politics, selfhood, and sexuality.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 256B. Secrecy, Security, and Surveillance. 4 Units.

Explores secrecy and security as fundamental to constructions of public and private domains, relations of citizenship and sovereignty, the militarization of everyday life, and the ways that the fabrics of societies are woven of both trust and deceit.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 257A. Natures and Environments. 4 Units.

Examines social scientific understandings of natural contexts and human milieus via a survey of key analytic categories. Begins by examining historical and ongoing definitions and problems organized around “nature” and “environment” as separate but imbricated concepts.

ANTHRO 259A. Dissertation Writing Seminar. 4 Units.

Intended for advanced, post-fieldwork Anthropology graduate students. Emphasis on the presentation of research design and results, problems of ethnographic writing, and qualitative and quantitative data and analysis. Prerequisites: post-fieldwork; graduate standing in Anthropology or consent of instructor.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 289. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 290. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 299. Independent Study. 4-12 Units.

Independent research with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.