2022-23 Edition

Department of European Languages and Studies

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John H. Smith, Department Chair
243 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-6406
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/els/

The Department of European Languages and Studies provides undergraduates with the opportunity to study Europe in its geographical, linguistic, historical, literary, artistic, and cultural diversity. The literatures, histories, and cultures of European nation-states have always been closely interconnected, even before the individual regions became nation-states. It is nearly impossible to study any era—the Renaissance, the Early Modern period, the Enlightenment, the Romantic period, or the Modern period—without taking into account the influence of one European nation on other European nations. Almost all significant European literary and artistic movements have been cross-cultural and transnational. The current configuration of Europe—the European Union—is merely the most recent socio-political and economic realization of the intense cross-pollination of ideas and institutions that defines—and has always defined—the continent. Immigration and the displacement of populations throughout the continent are constants of European history and have long inflected literary and artistic production in ways scholars continually explore. The history of European colonial enterprises and their afterlives have had a profound impact on the shape of the world in which we live; the Department is committed to a critical engagement with these legacies.

The Department offers majors in European Studies, French, and German Studies; minors in European Studies, French, German Studies, Italian Studies, and Russian Studies; as well as a graduate program (M.A., Ph.D.) in German. The Department also offers language training in French, German, Italian, and Russian with emphasis on the communicative and interpretive aspects of language learning. The goal is the achievement of translingual and transcultural competency. University language study is the critical investigation of a foreign linguistic system and the cultures defined by it. It is also an investigation of one’s own native language(s): it is nearly impossible for us to scrutinize and analyze something we know as intimately as our native language and yet this is the order by which we formulate our thoughts and the order which may sometimes formulate our thoughts for us. The “foreignness” of a foreign language allows us to objectify an entire linguistic system, to observe its structure and its usage, and then to make comparisons with our own linguistic situation. This kind of knowledge of one’s own languages is the foundation of critical reflection on texts of any nature—historical, philosophical, literary, political, legal, journalistic, and others. Thus serious study of a language other than English is crucial to a university education. The Department teaches its language courses with this principle in mind and seeks to provide its students with a framework for critical linguistic and cultural learning.

UCI Division of Career Pathways

The UCI Division of Career Pathways Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on résumé preparation, job search, and interview techniques.

Faculty

Etienne Balibar, Ph.D. Catholic University of Nijmegen, Professor Emeritus of French (political philosophy, critical theory, epistemology of the social sciences, ethics)
Anke Biendarra, Ph.D. University of Washington, Associate Professor of German (20th- and 21st-century German literature, culture, and film, cultural studies)
David Carroll, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emeritus of French (critical theory and twentieth-century French literature)
James T. Chiampi, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Italian; Religious Studies (Dante and Italian Renaissance)
Fabrizio Di Maio, Ph.D. University of Rome II Tor Vergata, Lecturer of Italian (didactics of Italian as a foreign language, Italian historical novels, politically engaged literature)
Kai Evers, Ph.D. Duke University, Associate Professor of German (20th-century German literature and film, modernism and Holocaust literature, theories of violence and catastrophic imagination)
Suzanne Gearhart, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emerita of French (seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French literature, philosophy and literature)
Elizabeth Guthrie, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Professor of Teaching Emerita of French (second-language acquisition and teaching)
Gail K. Hart, Ph.D. University of Virginia, Professor Emerita of German (18th- and early-19th-century German drama and fiction, Schiller, history of punishment)
Laura Klein, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of French
Meredith A. Lee, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emerita of German (lyric poetry, eighteenth-century literature, Goethe, music and literature)
Herbert H. Lehnert, Ph.D. University of Kiel, Professor Emeritus of German (Thomas Mann)
Glenn S. Levine, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, German Language Program Director and Professor of German; Education; Language Science (applied linguistics, foreign language pedagogy, German-Jewish culture and history, Yiddish language and culture, European culinary history)
Christophe Litwin, Ph.D. New York University, Associate Professor of French; German (early modern French literature, early modern European moral and political philosophy)
Catherine Malabou, Ph.D. Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, UCI Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature; French; German (German idealism, contemporary French philosophy, cultural theory, neurobiology, epigenetics)
Maryse J. Mijalski, Ed.D. University of Southern California, Lecturer of French (Second-language pedagogy and teaching)
Lora D. Mjolsness, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Lecturer of Russian (Soviet and Russian Animation; 19th century, 20th century and Contemporary Children's Literature; Russian Folklore.)
Carrie J. Noland, Ph.D. Harvard University, Director of the International Center for Writing and Translation and Professor of French; Comparative Literature (20th-century poetry and poetics, avant-garde movements in art and literature, critical theory, performance studies)
David T. Pan, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of German (18th-, 19th-, and early 20th-century German literature and intellectual history)
Zlatina Sandalska, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Lecturer of Russian
Deanna Shemek, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor of Italian (Italian literature and cultural history; Renaissance studies; early modern popular culture; early modern to contemporary narrative; women’s and gender studies; literary theory; digital humanities; textual scholarship)
John H. Smith, Ph.D. Princeton University, Department Chair and Professor of German; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; Religious Studies (18th- and 19th-century literature and intellectual history, literary theory)
Georges Y. Van Den Abbeele, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies; French (French and European philosophical literature, travel narrative and tourism/migration studies, critical theory and aesthetics, francophone literature, history of cartography, media history and theory)
Giulia Vittori, Ph.D. Stanford University, Lecturer of Italian (Italian teatro di ricerca; theatre by Carmelo Bene; image embodiment across dance, theatre, visual arts; performance as research)

Affiliate Faculty

Elizabeth G. Allen, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (Chaucer, Gower, 15th century poetry; exemplary literature, romance, chronicle, episodic form; intersections between ethics and politics, politics and religion; hospitality, sovereignty, legal and constitutional history of England)
David Brodbeck, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor of Music; European Languages and Studies
Daniel R. Brunstetter, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Associate Professor of Political Science; European Languages and Studies (political theory, international relations, French political thought)
Nahum D. Chandler, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of African American Studies; Asian American Studies; Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies (modern philosophy, intellectual history, history of the human sciences)
Vinayak Chaturvedi, Ph.D. University of Cambridge, Associate Professor of History; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (modern South Asia, social and intellectual history)
Ian Coller, Ph.D. University of Melbourne, Professor of History; European Languages and Studies (Europe and the Muslim world, the French Revolution and the global history of the Revolutionary age)
Herschel Farbman, Ph.D. Yale University, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; French (modernism, critical theory)
Zina Giannopoulou, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Associate Professor of Classics; European Languages and Studies (Plato, philosophy and literature, Greek tragedy and epic, film, and reception of classics)
Sara Goodman, Ph.D. Georgetown University, Associate Professor of Political Science; European Languages and Studies (citizenship policy, immigration, immigrant integration, ethnic diversity in democracies, diaspora)
Sean Greenberg, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Philosophy; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies
Nicole Grimes, Ph.D. University of Dublin, Robert and Marjorie Rawlins Chair in Music and Associate Professor of Music; European Languages and Studies
Rebeca Louise Helfer, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of English; European Languages and Studies (Renaissance literature and culture, memory, Spenser)
Andromache Karanika, Ph.D. Princeton University, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Classics; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (Greek epic poetry, Greek lyric, ritual, gender and performance, reception of antiquity in Byzantium)
Peter O. Krapp, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Film and Media Studies; English; European Languages and Studies; Informatics; Music; Visual Studies (digital culture, media history, cultural memory)
Horacio Legras, Ph.D. Duke University, Department Chair and Professor of Spanish and Portuguese; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (Latin American literature and culture, Latin American film, visual arts in Latin America, psychoanalysis, and photography)
Jayne Elizabeth Lewis, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of English; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (literature and medicine, restoration and 18th century British literature, literature of the supernatural and gothic fiction, history and/of fiction, atmosphere as literary concept and construct within natural philosophy)
Nancy Ann McLoughlin, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Associate Professor of History; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (late Medieval Europe, intellectual history, gender)
Santiago Morales-Rivera, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese; European Languages and Studies (Modern Peninsular literature and culture, critical theory, literary history, narrative, music)
Susan Katharine Morrissey, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of History; European Languages and Studies (Russia, terrorism and political violence, suicide)
Jane O. Newman, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (comparative Renaissance and early modern literature and culture [English, French, German, Italian, neo-Latin], Mediterranean Renaissance studies, Baroque, afterlives of antiquity, Walter Benjamin, Erich Auerbach, pre-modern lessons for the modern and post-modern)
Kevin E. Olson, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Political Science; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (political theory, history of political thought, legal theory, philosophy of the social sciences)
Nasrin Rahimieh, Ph.D. University of Alberta, Howard Baskerville Professor of Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies (Modern Persian literature and culture, diaspora studies, women's writing.)
Renee J. Raphael, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of History; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (early modern Europe, history of science, intellectual history)
Gabriele M. Schwab, Ph.D. University of Konstanz, Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature; Anthropology; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies; German (modern literature, critical theory, psychoanalysis, comparative literature)
James Steintrager, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century comparative literature, ethical philosophy and literature, systems theory, amatory and erotic fiction)
Paul Andrew Zissos, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Classics; European Languages and Studies (Latin epic, medieval Latin, Roman history and culture, Classical reception)

European Languages and Studies Courses

EURO ST 9. Topics in Europe in the Middle Ages. 4 Units.

Explores the literature, history, and thought of the European Middle Ages. Topics may include understandings of self and community, aristocratic power and courtly life, colonialism, crusading, religious beliefs and persecution, monasticism and reform, university culture, epic literature, and Arthurian romance.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV and VIII ).

EURO ST 10. Topics in Historical Foundations (1500-1800). 4 Units.

Offers an overview of the European experience from its social, political, and cultural foundations to modern European issues and institutions in a globalized world. Topics include social, political, and cultural history up to the French Revolution.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Overlaps with EURO ST S10.

((III or IV) and VIII ).

EURO ST S10. Historical Foundations: Europe and the Foundations of the Modern World. 4 Units.

Encompasses a variety of perspectives in the social sciences and the humanities involving crucial developments coming out of Europe from roughly 1500 to 1800, (the Protestant Reformation through the French Revolution), that helped shape the modern (western) world.

Overlaps with EURO ST 10.

((III or IV) and VIII ).

EURO ST 11. Issues and Institutions in Modern Europe (1789-1945). 4 Units.

Offers an overview of modern European societies in social, political, and cultural terms. Topics include shifting geopolitical borders, social movements, and various forms of cultural expression (film, art, literature) as they intersect with and shape issues and events after 1800.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

((III or IV) and VIII ).

EURO ST S11. Europe's Futures: 1755-Present. 4 Units.

Introduces students to competing approaches from humanities and social sciences to conceptualizing the future in politics, art, and literature. From the enlightenment to today, investigates the cultural and political context of moments when new ideas emerged to secure Europe's futures.

Overlaps with EURO ST 11.

((III or IV) and VIII ).

EURO ST 12. What is the Origin of Language?. 4 Units.

Teaches symbol-based logic and universal grammar in human language as tools to investigate the origin of language. Does language originate with reason? Is language inherently universal or diverse? Does it begin as something literal or figurative.

((III or IV) and Vb ).

EURO ST 13. Topics in Contemporary Europe (1945 – Today). 4 Units.

Offers a perspective on contemporary politics and social and cultural life of today’s Europe. Introduces students to literature, film, and social theory crises of the contemporary world as they emanated from World War II, such as nationalism and populism.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV and VIII ).

EURO ST 101A. European Studies Core I - Early Europe (Pre-1789). 4 Units.

Introduction to multidisciplinary approaches to important themes in European society, culture, art, literature, and politics; encourages students to explore intersections among disciplines. Possible themes: Concept of Europe in Renaissance, Self and Other: Europe and Islam, Hybrid Cultures in Medieval Europe.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 101B. European Studies Core II: Modern Europe (Post-1789). 4 Units.

Multidisciplinary approaches to important themes in modern European society, culture, art, literature, and politics, encouraging students to see points of intersection among disciplines. Possible themes: Subjects, Citizens, and Representation; Europe in the World; European Revolutions in Art and Society.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 102. Topics in Early European History and Culture: Pre-1789. 4 Units.

Addresses historical and cultural events, issues, and texts (art, literature, music, political theory) from the pre-1789 period in more than one European country.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 103. Topics in Modern European History and Culture: Post-1789. 4 Units.

Addresses historical and cultural events, issues, and texts (art, literature, music, political theory) from 1789 to present in more than one European country.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 190W. Senior Seminar in European Studies. 4 Units.

Capstone research seminar. Students engage in rigorous, in-depth, interdisciplinary exploration of specific topics, periods, or themes, investigating and analyzing the intersection of material and discursive culture in different historical periods and geographical locations.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: School of Humanities students only.

(Ib)

EURO ST 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed reading and research in consultation with a faculty advisor. Substantial written work required.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

EURO ST 200A. Core Seminar I: Foundations of European Thought and Culture. 4 Units.

Provides a historical, geographical, and methodological overview of foundational texts and issues in European thought and culture. Covering several historical periods between the Middle Ages and the present, students will see how ideas and institutions change over time.

EURO ST 200B. Core Seminar II: Theorizing Periods and Movements in European Thought and Culture. 4 Units.

Periods and movements still form basic units for organizing European thought and theory, even as such categories are problematized. This course will allow for greater focus on a specific time period or constellation of issues around a period or movement.

EURO ST 200C. Core Seminar III: European Thought and Culture Beyond Europe. 4 Units.

Studies the intersection and afterlives of European thought and culture with and in non-European contexts, the way European thought and culture has been translated and transformed, taken up and challenged, in colonial, postcolonial, and other global situations.

EURO ST 201. Topics in European Studies. 4 Units.

Seminars on various topics related to European Studies.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

EURO ST 299. Independent Research. 4 Units.

For students to do independent research with advisors on their master's thesis or master's examination reading lists.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities students only.

French Courses

FRENCH 1A. Fundamentals of French. 5 Units.

First quarter of first-year French in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Overlaps with FRENCH S1AB, FRENCH 1AB, FRENCH 1ABSP.

FRENCH 1AB. Intensive Fundamentals of French. 7.5 Units.

Intensive first half of first-year French. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, viewing, and discussion.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1A, FRENCH 1B, FRENCH S1AB.

FRENCH 1ABSP. Accelerated Fundamentals of French for Spanish Speakers. 5 Units.

Accelerated first half of first-year French for Hispanophone students. Teaches conceptualizing in French while learning to read, write, and speak using knowledge of Spanish. Develops awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, viewing, discussing.

Prerequisite: Two years of high school Spanish, one semester of college Spanish, or heritage speaker of Spanish.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1A, FRENCH 1AB, FRENCH S1AB, FRENCH 1B.

FRENCH 1B. Fundamentals of French. 5 Units.

First quarter of first-year French in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1A. FRENCH 1A with a grade of C or better

Overlaps with FRENCH S1AB, FRENCH S1BC, FRENCH 1AB, FRENCH 1BC, FRENCH 1ABSP, FRENCH 1BCSP.

FRENCH 1BC. Intensive Fundamentals of French. 7.5 Units.

Intensive second half of first-year French. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to read, write, and speak. Students develop an awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, viewing, and discussion.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1AB or FRENCH 1B or FRENCH S1AB. FRENCH 1AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1B with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S1AB with a grade of C or better. Placement into FRENCH 1BC is also accepted.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1B, FRENCH 1C, FRENCH S1BC.

(VI)

FRENCH 1BCSP. Accelerated Fundamentals of French for Spanish Speakers. 5 Units.

Accelerated second half of first-year French for Hispanophone students. Teaches conceptualizing in French while learning to read, write, and speak using knowledge of Spanish. Develops awareness of and sensibility to French and Francophone life and culture through reading, viewing, discussing.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1ABSP or FRENCH 1AB or FRENCH S1AB or FRENCH 1B. FRENCH 1ABSP with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S1AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1B with a grade of C or better. Two years of high school Spanish, one semester of college Spanish, or heritage speaker of Spanish.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1B, FRENCH 1BC, FRENCH S1BC, FRENCH 1C.

(VI)

FRENCH 1C. Fundamentals of French. 5 Units.

First quarter of first-year French in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1B. FRENCH 1B with a grade of C or better

Overlaps with FRENCH S1BC, FRENCH 1BC, FRENCH 1BCSP.

(VI)

FRENCH S1AB. Intensive Fundamentals of French. 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year French in an intensified form. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Overlaps with FRENCH 1A, FRENCH 1B, FRENCH 1AB, FRENCH 1ABSP.

FRENCH S1BC. Intensive Fundamentals of French. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first-year French in an intensified form. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH S1AB or FRENCH 1B or FRENCH 1AB or FRENCH 1ABSP. FRENCH S1AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1B with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1ABSP with a grade of C or better

Overlaps with FRENCH 1B, FRENCH 1C, FRENCH 1BC, FRENCH 1BCSP.

(VI)

FRENCH 2A. Intermediate French. 4 Units.

Second-year French in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1C or FRENCH 1BC or FRENCH S1BC or FRENCH 1BCSP. FRENCH 1C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S1BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1BCSP with a grade of C or better. Placement into FRENCH 2A is also accepted.

Overlaps with FRENCH S2AB.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

FRENCH 2AB. Intensive Intermediate French . 6 Units.

Intensive first half of second-year French. Texts and films of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1C or FRENCH 1BC or FRENCH S1BC. FRENCH 1C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S1BC with a grade of C or better. Prior high school or college French is recommended. Placement into French 2AB is also accepted.

Overlaps with FRENCH 2A, FRENCH 2B, FRENCH S2AB.

(VIII)

FRENCH 2B. Intermediate French. 4 Units.

Second-year French in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2A. FRENCH 2A with a grade of C or better

Overlaps with FRENCH S2AB, FRENCH S2BC.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

FRENCH 2BC. Intensive Intermediate French . 6 Units.

Intensive second half of second-year French. Texts and films of contemporary literary or social interest provide the focus for more advanced conversation, reading, and composition. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH S2AB or FRENCH 2AB. FRENCH S2AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2AB with a grade of C or better. Prior high school or college French is recommended. Placement into French 2BC is also accepted.

Overlaps with FRENCH S2BC, FRENCH 2B, FRENCH 2C.

(VIII)

FRENCH 2C. Intermediate French. 4 Units.

Second-year French in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2B. FRENCH 2B with a grade of C or better

Overlaps with FRENCH S2BC.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

FRENCH S2AB. Intermediate French. 6 Units.

First half/second half of second-year French in an intensified form. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1C or FRENCH 1BC or FRENCH S1BC. FRENCH 1C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 1BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S1BC with a grade of C or better. Placement into FRENCH S2AB is also accepted.

Overlaps with FRENCH 2A, FRENCH 2B.

(VIII)

FRENCH S2BC. Intermediate French. 6 Units.

First half/second half of second-year French in an intensified form. Students are taught to conceptualize in French as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite: FRENCH S2AB or FRENCH 2B. FRENCH S2AB with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2B with a grade of C or better

Overlaps with FRENCH 2C, FRENCH 2B.

(VIII)

FRENCH 10. French Peer Tutoring. 1 Unit.

Tutoring Program in which advanced French students provide assistance to students at a lower level. One hour of tutoring per week.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

FRENCH 50. Topics in French Culture and the Modern World. 4 Units.

Introductory course for non-majors. Focuses on France's role in the modern world and its cultural connections to Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Taught in English.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

(IV and VIII ).

FRENCH 97. Fundamentals of French (with Emphasis on Reading). 4 Units.

Designed primarily for students interested in acquiring a solid reading knowledge of French, and to facilitate the understanding and translating of French texts dealing with a variety of disciplines.

Restriction: No French Majors.

FRENCH 101A. Introduction to 19th-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry of the 19th century studied in relationship to a specific literary or historical problem.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC

FRENCH 101B. Introduction to 18th-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Literature and philosophy of the 18th century studied in relationship to a specific literary or historical problem.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC

FRENCH 101C. Introduction to 20th-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Literatures of the French-speaking world studied in relationship to a specific literary or historical problem.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH S2BC

FRENCH 102A. Grammar and Composition. 4 Units.

Review of grammar taught in FRENCH 2A-B-C. Students gain facility in writing French and increase reading comprehension. Short texts and films are introduced to generate substantive discussion, and multiple short writing exercises are assigned to solidify skills. Formerly FRENCH 60.

Prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

FRENCH 102B. Topics in Issues in French and Francophone Culture. 4 Units.

Investigation of an issue of cultural significance in the francophone world through historical documents, literary works, and newspaper articles. Supplemented with films and/or other elements of popular culture. Multiple short writing assignments to solidify writing skills. Formerly FRENCH 61.

Prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 102C. Translation. 4 Units.

Introduction to the theory and practice of translation from French to English and English to French. Many opportunities provided to improve skills in writing and comprehension. Formerly FRENCH 62.

Prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

FRENCH 102D. Topics in the Work World in French. 4 Units.

A view into the world of work in French. Areas of study include international relations; French administration; and tensions between management and workers. Attention given to vocabulary and grammar of professional interactions in French. Formerly FRENCH 63.

Prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 102E. Advanced French Language and Style. 4 Units.

Intended for advanced students who wish to improve their expressive capabilities in French. Review of more nuanced grammar points. Emphasis placed on rhetoric, syntax, and precision. Advanced readings increase comprehension. Formerly FRENCH 64.

Prerequisite or corequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

FRENCH 116. Topics in 16th-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the diverse literature of the Renaissance and the Age of Exploration.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 117. Topics in 17th-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the age of drama and other vibrant forms in French literature of the period.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 118. Topics in 18th-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the literature and philosophy of the Enlightenment, the Ancient Régime, Classicism, and/or Revolution.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 119. Topics in 19th-Century French Literature. 4 Units.

Focuses on the literature of an era that experienced many modernist transformations.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 120. Topics in 20th-Century French and Francophone Literature. 4 Units.

A study of modern and contemporary literature and culture.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 127. Topics in Francophone Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Literature and cultures of the francophone world.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 139W. Literature and Society. 4 Units.

In English. Readings of masterpieces of French literature in their social, political, and historical contexts. Requires at least 4,000 words of assigned composition based on French works. Several essays required.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. French Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

FRENCH 140. Topics in French Literary Genre. 4 Units.

Examines the development and transformation of a single genre, such as the poem or the novel.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 2C or FRENCH 2BC or FRENCH S2BC. FRENCH 2C with a grade of C or better. FRENCH 2BC with a grade of C or better. FRENCH S2BC with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 150. Topics in French Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Study of a theme, movement, or problem crucial to understanding French Literature and Culture.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 160. French Cinema. 4 Units.

Study of a period, movement, or theme in French or Francophone cinema.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

FRENCH 170. Topics in History and Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the dialogue between historical events and literary texts.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 171. Politics and Literature. 4 Units.

Examines the role played by politics and ethics in French literature, film, and culture.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 180. Topics in Theory and Criticism. 4 Units.

Advanced study of theoretical and critical texts.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 199. Special Studies in French. 1-4 Units.

A project proposal is prepared by the student and approved by the faculty member who directs the project. Procedure must be completed by the end of the first week of classes.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Repeatability: once for M.A. candidates; twice for Ph.D. candidates.

FRENCH 216. Studies in Renaissance Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the Renaissance period.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 217. Studies in Seventeenth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the 17th century.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 218. Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the 18th century.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 219. Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the 19th century.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 220. Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in the 20th and 21st century.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 9 times as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 225. Francophone Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Studies in different francophone literatures and cultures (of Canada, the Caribbean, West and North Africa, and Southeast Asia).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 231. Studies in Fiction . 4 Units.

Examines the art of fiction.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 232. Studies in Nonfictional Prose. 4 Units.

Examines non-fictional genres such as the essay and the memoir.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 233. Studies in Poetry and Poetics. 4 Units.

Examines the genre of poetry and theories of poetry.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 240. Studies on a Major Writer. 4 Units.

Focused study of one author.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

FRENCH 250. Studies in Theory and Criticism. 4 Units.

Advanced study of a topic in theory and/or criticism.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 254. History and Literature. 4 Units.

Advanced study of literary works in their historical context.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 272. Cultural Studies . 4 Units.

Examines the theoretical paradigm of cultural studies.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

FRENCH 290. Research in French Language and Literature. 4 Units.

A project proposal is prepared by the student and approved by the faculty member who directs the project. Procedure must be completed by the end of the first week of classes. Limit: Once for M.A. candidates; twice for Ph.D. candidates.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. French Majors only.

FRENCH 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

For graduate students writing a dissertation with a faculty member in French.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities students only.

FRENCH 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

For graduate students completing a course on foreign language pedagogy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities students only.

German Courses

GERMAN 1A. Fundamentals of German. 5 Units.

Emphasizes the development of meaningful communicative skills in German for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. With a learner-centered approach, the courses help students develop speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Overlaps with GERMAN S1AB, GERMAN 1AB.

GERMAN 1AB. Intensive German Fundamentals . 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year German in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge. Materials fee.

Prerequisite: Placement into GERMAN 1AB.

Overlaps with GERMAN S1AB, GERMAN 1A, GERMAN 1B.

Restriction: GERMAN 1AB and GERMAN 1A and GERMAN 1B and GERMAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

GERMAN 1B. Fundamentals of German. 5 Units.

Emphasizes the development of meaningful communicative skills in German for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. With a learner-centered approach, students develop speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1A. GERMAN 1A with a grade of C or better. Placement into GERMAN 1B is also accepted.

Overlaps with GERMAN S1AB, GERMAN S1BC, GERMAN 1AB, GERMAN 1BC.

GERMAN 1BC. Intensive German Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first-year German in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge. Materials fee.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1AB or GERMAN 1B or GERMAN S1AB. GERMAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. GERMAN 1B with a grade of C or better. GERMAN S1AB with a grade of C or better. Placement into GERMAN 1BC is also accepted.

Overlaps with GERMAN 1B, GERMAN 1C, GERMAN S1BC.

Restriction: GERMAN 1BC and GERMAN 1B and GERMAN 1C and GERMAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

GERMAN 1C. Fundamentals of German. 5 Units.

Emphasizes the development of meaningful communicative skills in German for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. With a learner-centered approach, students develop speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1B. GERMAN 1B with a grade of C or better. Placement into GERMAN 1C is also accepted.

Overlaps with GERMAN 1BC, GERMAN S1BC.

(VI)

GERMAN S1AB. Fundamentals of German. 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year German in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Overlaps with GERMAN 1A, GERMAN 1B, GERMAN 1AB.

GERMAN S1BC. Fundamentals of German. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first-year German in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and beginning study of German. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1AB or GERMAN 1B or GERMAN S1AB. GERMAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. GERMAN 1B with a grade of C or better. GERMAN S1AB with a grade of C or better. Placement into GERMAN S1BC is also accepted.

Overlaps with GERMAN 1B, GERMAN 1C, GERMAN 1BC.

(VI)

GERMAN 2A. Intermediate German. 4 Units.

Emphasizes communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and intermediate study of German. With a learner-centered approach, helps students develop reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammatical, and cultural skills and knowledge. First-year grammar is reviewed and expanded.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 1BC or GERMAN 1C or GERMAN S1BC. GERMAN 1BC with a grade of C or better. GERMAN 1C with a grade of C or better. GERMAN S1BC with a grade of C or better. Placement into GERMAN 2A is also accepted.

Overlaps with GERMAN S2AB.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

GERMAN 2B. Intermediate German. 4 Units.

Emphasizes communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and intermediate study of German. With a learner-centered approach, helps students develop reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammatical, and cultural skills and knowledge. First-year grammar is reviewed and expanded.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2A. GERMAN 2A with a grade of C or better. Placement into GERMAN 2B is also accepted.

Overlaps with GERMAN S2AB, GERMAN S2BC.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

GERMAN 2C. Intermediate German. 4 Units.

Emphasizes communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with German speakers and intermediate study of German. With a learner-centered approach, helps students develop reading, writing, speaking, listening, grammatical, and cultural skills and knowledge. First-year grammar is reviewed and expanded.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2B. GERMAN 2B with a grade of C or better. Placement into GERMAN 2C is also accepted.

Overlaps with GERMAN S2BC.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

GERMAN 53. Advanced Conversation. 2 Units.

Includes reading of political and cultural material. Conducted in German.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 2C

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

GERMAN 97. Fundamentals of German (with Emphasis on Reading). 4 Units.

Primarily for students interested in acquiring a solid reading knowledge of German. Facilitates comprehension and translation of texts in various disciplines. Does not serve as prerequisite for any higher-level German courses or fulfill any undergraduate foreign language requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: No German Studies Majors.

GERMAN 101. Topics in Introduction to German Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Sample interpretations of texts in their cultural and historical contexts. Introduction to critical language in German.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 102. Topics in German Culture and Society. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary introduction to German culture from the perspective of its aesthetic, social, and political aspects. Methodological problems arising from an analysis of culture in its historical context.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 103. Topics in German Film. 4 Units.

Introduction to the history and interpretation of German film within its cultural and social contexts. Enhances German grammar knowledge and vocabulary and develops sophisticated speaking, writing, and reading skills.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 104. Topics in German Linguistics. 4 Units.

Introduces German or other Germanic-language linguistic, sociolinguistic, or ethnography-of-communication topics. Taught in German.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 105. German for Professions . 4 Units.

Explores the structure of German business practices, including in scientific fields and engineering, while developing verbal and written skills important for professional life in Germany. Taught in German.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 2C. GERMAN 2C with a grade of C or better

GERMAN 115. Topics in Advanced German for Business and Economics. 4 Units.

Explores the structure of the German economy and business practices while developing advanced verbal and written skills important for professional life in Germany. Taught in German.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 101 or GERMAN 102 or GERMAN 103 or GERMAN 104 or GERMAN 105

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 120. Topics in 20th Century German Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Individual authors such as Thomas Mann, Brecht, and Kafka, or topics addressing questions of genre and/or social-literary problems.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GERMAN 101 or GERMAN 102 or GERMAN 103 or GERMAN 104 or GERMAN 105

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 140W. Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism. 4 Units.

In English. Theoretical dimensions of literary criticism and the German philosophical tradition. Topics have included Marxism, Freudian thought, German Idealist aesthetics, Historicism, twentieth-century hermeneutics, Frankfurt School, and Rezeptionsaesthetik.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

GERMAN 150. German Literature and Culture in Translation. 4 Units.

In English. Major works in Germanic literature and culture in context.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 160. German Cinema.

Historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives on German cinema.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 160W. German Cinema. 4 Units.

Historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives on German cinema.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

GERMAN 170. Topics in German Linguistics. 4 Units.

Explores linguistic, sociolinguistic, or ethnography-of-communication topics of German or other Germanic languages (Swedish, Icelandic, Yiddish, and others). Taught in English.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GERMAN 170W. Topics in German Linguistics. 4 Units.

Explores linguistic, sociolinguistic, or ethnography-of-communication topics of German or other Germanic languages (Swedish, Icelandic, Yiddish, and others). Taught in English.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

GERMAN 197. German Internship . 4 Units.

In this internship course, students will engage in professional practice (e.g., Engineering, Business Administration, government) in a German setting and thereby increase their knowledge of German language and culture in a setting beyond the academic classroom.

Prerequisite: GERMAN 2C

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

GERMAN 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with German faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

GERMAN 200. Literary Criticism . 4 Units.

Topics in literary criticism.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 210. Literary Theory . 4 Units.

Topics in literary theory.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 220. Selected Topics in German Linguistics . 4 Units.

Topics in German linguistics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 230. Literary and Cultural History. 4 Units.

Topics in literary and cultural history.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 290. Independent Study. 4 Units.

Counted toward course requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. A term paper or project is required.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities students only.

GERMAN 298. Independent Directed Reading. 4-12 Units.

For students preparing for doctoral examination.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

GERMAN 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

For students who have been admitted to doctoral candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. School of Humanities students only.

GERMAN 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Italian Courses

ITALIAN 1A. Fundamentals of Italian. 5 Units.

First quarter of first-year Italian in a hybrid or online format. Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1AB.

ITALIAN 1ABSP. Accelerated Fundamentals of Italian for Spanish Speakers. 5 Units.

Accelerated first half of first-year Italian for Hispanophone students. Teaches conceptualizing in Italian while learning to read, write, and speak using knowledge of Spanish. Develops awareness of and sensibility to Italian life and culture through reading, viewing, and discussing.

Prerequisite: Two years of high school Spanish, one semester of college Spanish, or heritage speaker of Spanish.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1A, ITALIAN 1B, ITALIAN S1AB, ITALIAN 1AB.

(VI)

ITALIAN 1B. Fundamentals of Italian. 5 Units.

Second quarter of first-year Italian in a hybrid or online format. Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 1A. ITALIAN 1A with a grade of C or better. Placement into ITALIAN 1B is also accepted.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1AB, ITALIAN 1BC.

ITALIAN 1BC. Intensive Italian Fundamentals. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first-year Italian in a time-intensive form. Development of meaningful communicative skills for the purposes of interaction with Italian speakers and beginning study of Italian. Learner-centered approach develops speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural skills and knowledge.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 1AB or ITALIAN S1AB or ITALIAN 1B. ITALIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN S1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1B with a grade of C or better. Placement into ITALIAN 1BC is also accepted.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1B, ITALIAN 1C, ITALIAN S1BC.

Restriction: ITALIAN 1AB and ITALIAN 1A and ITALIAN 1B and ITALIAN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

ITALIAN 1BCSP. Accelerated Fundamentals of Italian for Spanish Speakers. 5 Units.

Accelerated second half of first-year Italian for Hispanophone students. Teaches conceptualizing in Italian while learning to read, write, and speak using knowledge of Spanish. Develops awareness of and sensibility to Italian life and culture through reading, viewing, and discussing.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 1ABSP or ITALIAN 1AB or ITALIAN S1AB or ITALIAN 1B. ITALIAN 1ABSP with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN S1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1B with a grade of C or better. Two years of high school Spanish, one semester of college Spanish, or heritage speaker of Spanish.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1B, ITALIAN 1C, ITALIAN 1BC, ITALIAN S1BC.

(VI)

ITALIAN 1C. Fundamentals of Italian. 5 Units.

Third quarter of first-year Italian in a hybrid or online format. Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 1B or ITALIAN 1AB or ITALIAN S1AB. ITALIAN 1B with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN S1AB with a grade of C or better. Placement into ITALIAN 1C is also accepted.

Overlaps with ITALIAN 1BC.

(VI)

ITALIAN 2A. Intermediate Italian. 4 Units.

First quarter of second-year Italian in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 1C or ITALIAN 1BC or ITALIAN S1BC or ITALIAN 1BCSP. ITALIAN 1C with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1BC with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN S1BC with a grade of C or better. ITALIAN 1BCSP with a grade of C or better. Placement into ITALIAN 2A is also accepted.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

ITALIAN 2B. Intermediate Italian. 4 Units.

Second quarter of second-year Italian in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 2A. ITALIAN 2A with a grade of C or better. Placement into ITALIAN 2B is also accepted.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

ITALIAN 2C. Intermediate Italian. 4 Units.

Third quarter of second-year Italian in a hybrid format. Students are taught to conceptualize in Italian as they learn to understand, read, write, and speak. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian.

Prerequisite: ITALIAN 2B. ITALIAN 2B with a grade of C or better. Placement into 2C is also accepted.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

ITALIAN 50. Topics in Italian Culture. 4 Units.

Examines Italian culture at home and from abroad, in cinema, literature, and popular culture.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV and VIII ).

ITALIAN 99. Special Studies in Italian. 4 Units.

Both student and instructor arrive at the theme of the course and the critical approach to be followed in consultation. Intended to offer courses in Italian otherwise unavailable.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ITALIAN 150. Topics in Italian Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Major themes, periods, and/or movements in Italian literature and culture. Taught in English.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ITALIAN 199. Tutorial in Italian Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

The student must submit a written description of the proposed course to the instructor and the Chair prior to the beginning of the course.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Russian Courses

RUSSIAN 1A. Fundamentals of Russian. 5 Units.

Focuses on reading, comprehension, basic composition, and conversation skills, and gives the student an initial exposure to the Russian cultural scene.

Prerequisite: Placement into RUSSIAN 1A.

RUSSIAN 1B. Fundamentals of Russian. 5 Units.

Focuses on reading, comprehension, basic composition, and conversation skills, and gives the student an initial exposure to the Russian cultural scene.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 1A. RUSSIAN 1A with a grade of C or better. Placement into RUSSIAN 1B is also accepted.

RUSSIAN 1C. Fundamentals of Russian. 5 Units.

Focuses on reading, comprehension, basic composition, and conversation skills, and gives the student an initial exposure to the Russian cultural scene.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 1AB or RUSSIAN 1B. RUSSIAN 1AB with a grade of C or better. RUSSIAN 1B with a grade of C or better. Placement into RUSSIAN 1C is also accepted.

(VI)

RUSSIAN 2A. Intermediate Russian. 4 Units.

Students read simple passages from contemporary Russian literary texts and newspapers. Development of oral skills and exposure to Russian culture continue.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 1BC or RUSSIAN 1C. RUSSIAN 1BC with a grade of C or better. RUSSIAN 1C with a grade of C or better. Placement into RUSSIAN 2A is also accepted.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

RUSSIAN 2B. Intermediate Russian. 4 Units.

Students read simple passages from contemporary Russian literary texts and newspapers. Development of oral skills and exposure to Russian culture continue.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 2A. RUSSIAN 2A with a grade of C or better. Placement into RUSSIAN 2B is also accepted.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

RUSSIAN 2C. Intermediate Russian. 4 Units.

Students read simple passages from contemporary Russian literary texts and newspapers. Development of oral skills and exposure to Russian culture continue.

Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 2B. RUSSIAN 2B with a grade of C or better. Placement into RUSSIAN 2C is also accepted.

Restriction: School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

RUSSIAN 50. Topics in Russian Culture . 4 Units.

Study of varied topics in Russian culture, area studies, and society, both in the present and in historical perspective.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times as topics vary.

(IV and VIII ).

RUSSIAN 99. Special Studies Russian. 1-5 Units.

Special studies under faculty supervision.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

RUSSIAN 150. Topics in Russian Literature. 4 Units.

Examines major themes in Russian literature, film, and other media from the eighteenth to twenty-first centuries. Taught in English.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

RUSSIAN 190. Topics in Russian Language Through Film. 4 Units.

Uses Russian films of the late 20th century to enhance students' language skills and deepen their cultural knowledge. Work involves intensive conversation, reading and listening comprehension, and the acquisition of written skills and grammatical accuracy. Conducted primarily in Russian.

Prerequisite or corequisite: RUSSIAN 2C

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

RUSSIAN 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent study under direct faculty supervision.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.