2022-23 Edition

Graduate Program in Visual Studies

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Matthew Canepa
2000 Humanities Gateway
949-824-1124
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/visualstudies/

The graduate program in Visual Studies, administered by the faculty of the Department of Art History, offers students the opportunity to pursue a doctorate in the cultural analysis of visual artifacts and experiences. With a commitment to theoretically rigorous inquiry, Visual Studies synthesizes methodological insights from a wide variety of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields, including art history, archaeology, architectural history, design history, and environmental studies. The program leads to a Ph.D. in Visual Studies. While the program (in certain instances) grants an M.A. to students en route to their Ph.D., it admits only those students intending to complete their doctorate at UCI.

In addition, an emphasis in Visual Studies, described on the Requirements tab, is available to Ph.D. and M.F.A. students in all departments at UCI.

Faculty

Catherine Benamou, Ph.D. New York University, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies; Culture and Theory; Visual Studies (Hispanophone and Lusophone cinema and television, U.S. Latino media, Orson Welles and maverick cinema, transnational flows, spectatorship, cinematic memory and cultures of preservation)
Roland Betancourt, Ph.D. Yale University, Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Art History; Religious Studies; Visual Studies (Byzantine and Medieval art, critical and queer theory; histories of race, gender, and sexuality)
Matthew P. Canepa, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Elahe Omidyar Mir-Djali Presidential Chair and Director of the Graduate Program in Visual Studies and Professor of Art History; Religious Studies; Visual Studies (Achaemenid, Seleucid, Parthian, and Sasanian art and archaeology; Iranian visual cultures and Afro-Eurasian exchange; critical approaches to space, place, landscape, urbanism, and memory)
Bridget R. Cooks Cumbo, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Associate Professor of African American Studies; Art History; Culture and Theory; Visual Studies (African American art, museum studies, feminist and post-colonial theory)
Sohail Daulatzai, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Film and Media Studies; African American Studies; Visual Studies (decolonization, empire, race, Muslim studies, Black studies)
Bambi Haggins, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies; African American Studies; Visual Studies (Black [African American] comedy in film, television, digital media and performance, television history, comedy as social and political discourse, African-American studies, American studies)
Kristen L. Hatch, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (classical Hollywood, stardom, melodrama, histories of gender, race and sexuality, girlhood studies)
Lucas Hilderbrand, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (Queer cultures and media, cultural studies, documentary, pornography, popular music, video art, histories of technology)
Victoria E. Johnson, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Film and Media Studies; African American Studies; Culture and Theory; Visual Studies (U.S. television, history, media industry studies, critical race theory, cultural geography, sound and music in popular media, media law and policy)
Meryem Kamil, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (new media studies, postcolonial studies, Palestine/Palestnian social movements, ethnic studies, American studies)
Peter O. Krapp, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Film and Media Studies; English; European Languages and Studies; Informatics; Music; Visual Studies (digital culture, media history, cultural memory)
Keiji Kunigami, Ph.D. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (Brazilian cinema, Japanese cinema, critical race studies, critical theory, decolonial theory, black feminist film theory, cinematic/photographic temporality, Asian-Latin American studies)
Felicidad (Bliss) Lim, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (Philippine cinema, temporality, postcolonial and feminist film theory, transnational horror and the fantastic, film archives)
Catherine Liu, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (Hou Hsiao-hsien, culture wars, Frankfurt School, historiography of critical theory/cultural studies, surveillance, cold war culture and neoliberalism)
Lyle Massey, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (Italian Renaissance and early modern European art, gender theory, science studies)
Tyrus Miller, Ph.D. Stanford University, Dean of the School of Humanities and Professor of English; Art History; Comparative Literature; Visual Studies (modernist and avant-garde studies in literature and visual arts; critical theory and aesthetics; modern architecture and urbanism; East-Central European studies; culture of socialism and post-socialism; Frankfurt School theory)
Glen M. Mimura, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (minoritarian and political film; media and race; popular culture and social movements)
James P. Nisbet, Ph.D. Stanford University, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (modern and contemporary art)
Alka Patel, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of Art History; History; Religious Studies; Visual Studies (South Asian and Islamic art and architecture, historiographies, Islamic diasporas in Cuba)
Allison J. Perlman, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Associate Professor of History; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (history of broadcasting, American social movements, media law and policy, media activism, popular memory)
Fatimah Tobing Rony, Ph.D. Yale University, Department Chair and Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (ethnographic film, race and representation, film production)
Bonnie Ruberg, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies; Informatics; Visual Studies (video games, digital media, digital cultures, queer studies, gender and sexuality)
Braxton Soderman, Ph.D. Brown University, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (digital and new media studies, video games, networks, digital art and electronic literature)
Aaron Trammell, Ph.D. Rutgers University, Assistant Professor of Visual Studies (analog games and video games, sound, fan studies, digital subjectivity)
Bert Winther-Tamaki, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Art History; Asian American Studies; East Asian Studies; Visual Studies (modern Japanese art and visual culture, Asian American art, art and globalization)
Roberta Wue, Ph.D. New York University, Associate Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (modern Chinese art, photography, print culture)

Affiliate Faculty

Kyung Hyun Kim, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Korean Culture; Asian American Studies; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (East Asian cinema, modern Korea, critical theory)
Jared Charles Sexton, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of African American Studies; Culture and Theory; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (race and sexuality, policing and imprisonment, contemporary U.S. cinema and political culture, multiracial coalition, critical theory)
Michael F. Szalay, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor of English; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (contemporary television and literature)
Roxanne Varzi, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Anthropology; Culture and Theory; Film and Media Studies; Religious Studies; Visual Studies (Iran, media, war, visual anthropology, film studies, ethnographic and fiction writing)

Courses

VIS STD 290A. Art History:Theories and Methods. 4 Units.

Examines canonical texts and explores current directions in Art History.

VIS STD 290B. Film & Media Studies: Theories and Methods. 4 Units.

Examines canonical texts and explores current directions in Film and Media Studies.

VIS STD 290C. Visual Studies: Theories and Methods. 4 Units.

Examines canonical texts and explores current directions in Visual Studies.

VIS STD 294. Getty Consortium Seminar. 4 Units.

Special graduate seminar offered at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, involving faculty and graduate students from the five graduate programs in Art History or Visual Studies located in southern California (UCI, UCLA, UCR, UCSB, and USC).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

VIS STD 295. Graduate Seminar in Visual Studies. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Visual Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

VIS STD 296. Directed Reading. 4 Units.

Directed reading on a specific topic agreed upon by student and instructor.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

VIS STD 297. Writing Practicum. 4 Units.

Offered winter quarter each year and taught in a workshop format. Assists students with the preparation and revision of the dissertation prospectus so that they may advance to candidacy.

Prerequisite: VIS STD 290A and VIS STD 290B and VIS STD 290C

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

VIS STD 298A. Reading for the Preliminary Examination. 4-12 Units.

Directed reading in preparation for the preliminary examination. Formerly Visual Studies 298.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

VIS STD 298B. Prospectus Research. 4-12 Units.

Research and writing of the dissertation prospectus.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

VIS STD 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

Research and writing of the dissertation.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.