2022-23 Edition

Undergraduate Program in Global Cultures

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Andrew Zissos, Director 
pzissos@uci.edu
322 Humanities Hall
949-824-6901
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/global_cultures/

Global Cultures is an innovative undergraduate major and minor in the School of Humanities with an exciting mission: to explore the problems and processes of globalization from a humanistic perspective. The major provides students with 21st century analytical skills and knowledge that is critical to understanding the complexities of the diverse world in which we live. In the process, Global Cultures equips students with the knowledge and tools that lead to successful careers in a wide range of professions and fields.

Global Cultures faculty offer high-quality lectures and, in advanced courses, interactive small group seminars. The major favors a multidisciplinary approach that draws on multiple departments and programs, housed in both the Humanities (including Art History, English, Film and Media Studies, History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Spanish and Portuguese, and many more) and the Social Sciences (Anthropology, Chicano/Latino Studies, Political Science, Sociology, among others).

Up-to-date examples of the highly diverse courses taught in the major may be found at the Global Cultures website. The curricular offerings of Global Cultures are extraordinarily broad. With this intellectually stimulating learning environment, the major attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds. Global Cultures faculty provide these students with a critical understanding and a strong foundation for practice in a variety of occupations, both domestic and international.

Students majoring or minoring in Global Cultures must choose a primary emphasis and a secondary emphasis from the list that can be found by clicking the major tab. Each emphasis essentially consists of a geographic focus. Students may also design their own emphasis in consultation with a program advisor and with the approval of the Global Cultures Committee. All emphases are chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor and/or the approval of the Global Cultures Committee. Examples of how current students are combining their primary and secondary emphases are available at the Global Cultures website.

Courses

GLBLCLT 103A. Global Cultures I . 4 Units.

Introduction to the processes by which economies, cultural practices, national entities, groups, individuals, and personal identities have undergone globalization. General background and methodological tools for understanding problems and processes of globalization.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GLBLCLT 103B. Global Cultures II . 4 Units.

Introduction to the processes by which economies, cultural practices, national entities, groups, individuals, and personal identities have undergone globalization. Explores how globalization has manifested itself in specific topics, periods, or societies.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GLBLCLT 105. Language Origins: Evolution, Genetics, and the Brain. 4 Units.

Examines how human language(s) may have originated. Studies pertinent techniques (reconstruction) and addresses related questions, including is our language faculty inborn (i.e., genetically encoded)? Can brain imaging and population genetics research help to unlock this mystery of human evolution?.

Same as ANTHRO 152A, LSCI 175, HISTORY 135G.

GLBLCLT 191. Senior Seminar:Topics in Global Cultures. 4 Units.

Students explore a topic(s) concerning processes and/or problems of globalization from an interdisciplinary perspective and build on their critical and analytical skills when investigating cultural and other phenomena that cut across national borders. Research assignments, class presentations, final seminar paper.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

GLBLCLT 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed reading and research in consultation with a faculty advisor. Substantial written work required.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Core Faculty 

Sharon B. Block, Department of History

Yong Chen, Department of History

James Fujii, Departments of East Asian Studies and of Comparative Literature

David Theo Goldberg, Departments of Comparative Literature and of Criminology, Law and Society

Douglas M. Haynes, Department of History

Laura H. Y. Kang, Departments of Gender and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Literature

Ketu H. Katrak, Departments of Drama, Comparative Literature, and English

Rodrigo Lazo, Department of English

Liron Mor, Department of Comparative Literature

Keith L. Nelson, Department of History

Jane O. Newman, Departments of Comparative Literature and English

Rachel O’Toole, Department of History

Brook Thomas, Department of English

Armin Schwegler, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Jacobo Sefamí, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Bert Winther-Tamaki, Department of Art History

Andrew Zissos, Department of Classics