2022-23 Edition

Department of English

undefined

Elizabeth Allen, Department Chair
435 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-6712
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/english/

The Department of English comprises undergraduate and graduate programs in literature in English; the M.F.A. Program in Writing; The Master of English Program; Literary Journalism; and Composition. Among our faculty members are theorists and literary historians, scholars of rhetoric and experts in composition, journalists, writers of fiction, and poets.

Students in the Department explore a variety of models for literary analysis. They write stories and poems. They produce journalism. In every case, our students read and think about writing: its history, its changing functions, and its place in today’s culture. The major prepares students for a world in which informed analysis of language and forceful writing continue to be crucial.

Faculty

Jonathan Alexander, Ph.D. Louisiana State University, Chancellor's Professor of English; Culture and Theory; Education; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Informatics (writing studies, sexuality studies, queer theory, new media studies)
Elizabeth G. Allen, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (Chaucer, Gower, 15th century poetry; exemplary literature, romance, chronicle, episodic form; intersections between ethics and politics, politics and religion; hospitality, sovereignty, legal and constitutional history of England)
Michael Andreasen, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Stephen A. Barney, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of English
Jami Bartlett, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English (The 19th-Century Novel, literature and philosophy, narrative theory)
Srimayee Basu, Ph.D. University of Florida, Assistant Professor of English; Culture and Theory (early and 19th-century American literature, African American literature, critical theory)
Emily M. Brauer, M.A. University of Southern California, Lecturer of English
Carol M. Burke, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Professor Emerita of English; Religious Studies
Ellen S. Burt, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emerita of English
James L. Calderwood, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of English
Ronald Carlson, M.A. University of Utah, Professor Emeritus of English
Alicia Carroll, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature; English (19th-century American literature; Native American and Indigenous literature and cultural studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer Indigenous studies; Indigenous feminisms; autobiography; American Indian boarding school studies; settler colonialism)
Nahum D. Chandler, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of African American Studies; Asian American Studies; Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies (modern philosophy, intellectual history, history of the human sciences)
Chieh L. Chieng, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Jerome C. Christensen, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor Emeritus of English
Michael P. Clark, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emeritus of English
Rachael L. Collins, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Miles Corwin, M.A. University of Missouri-Columbia, Professor of English (law enforcement, the criminal justice system, homicide, inner-city education, affirmative action)
Keith Danner, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Lecturer of English
Rebecca Davis, Ph.D. University of Notre Dame, Associate Professor of English; Religious Studies (Old and Middle English literature, Piers Plowman, medieval religious culture, women’s writing, medieval philosophy)
Lorene D. Delany-Ullman, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Amy Depaul, B.A. Boston University, Lecturer of English
Jaya Dubey, M.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Kathryn Eason, M.A. University of Colorado Boulder, Lecturer of English
Loren P. Eason, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Christopher Fan, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of English; Asian American Studies; East Asian Studies (transnational Asia American, 20th, and 21st century literature, speculative fiction, political economy)
Anita W. Fischer, M.A. Loyola Marymount University, Lecturer of English
Linda M. Georgianna, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emerita of English
Amy Gerstler, M.F.A. Bennington College, Professor Emerita of English
Richard Godden, Ph.D. University of Kent, Professor Emeritus of English
Kyle Grady, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of English (early modern literature and culture, African American literature and culture, critical race theory)
Daniel Gross, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Campus Writing Coordinator, Director for the Center of Excellence in Writing & Communication and Professor of English (emotion studies, history and theory of rhetoric, early modern literature and culture, Heidegger and rhetoric)
Alberto D. Gullaba, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Linda G. Haas, Ph.D. University of South Florida, Lecturer of English
Martin Harries, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of English (20th century theater, critical theory)
Erika Hayasaki, B.A. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Associate Professor of English (literary journalism in the digital age, narrative nonfiction, immersion journalism, youth, culture, crime, poverty, health, science, education, urban affairs, death)
Rebeca Louise Helfer, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of English; European Languages and Studies (Renaissance literature and culture, memory, Spenser)
Andrea K. Henderson, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor of English (19th century literature, literature and visual arts, literature and science)
John W. Hollowell, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Teaching Emeritus of English
Oren J. Izenberg, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Associate Professor of English (poetics, modern and contemporary poetry, 20th century literature and culture, philosophy and literature)
Virginia W. Jackson, Ph.D. Princeton University, Chair in Rhetoric and Communication and Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (poetics, 19th, 20th and 21st century American poetry, 19th century American literature and culture, the history of literary theory)
Joseph Jonghyun Jeon, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of English; Asian American Studies; Culture and Theory (Asian-American literature, film modernism)
Ketu H. Katrak, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr College, Professor Emerita of Drama; Comparative Literature; English (drama and performance, African drama and Ancient Sanskrit drama [from India], postcolonial literature and theory, women writers and feminist theory)
Charlene J. Keeler, M.A. California State University, Fullerton, Lecturer of English
Jonathan I. Keeperman, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Tarah M. Keeperman, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Douglas V. Kiklowicz, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Erik Kongshaug, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Peter O. Krapp, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Film and Media Studies; English; European Languages and Studies; Informatics; Music; Visual Studies (digital culture, media history, cultural memory)
P. Michelle Latiolais, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Professor of English (creative writing, fiction, contemporary literature)
Karen R. Lawrence, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emerita of English
Rodrigo Lazo, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Associate Professor of English; Culture and Theory (hemispheric American studies, nineteenth century, Latino studies and the Americas, Cuba, immigrant literature)
James K. Lee, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies; Culture and Theory; English; Religious Studies (Asian American literature and culture, contemporary U.S. literature, race and ethnic studies, urban studies, religious studies)
Jerry Won Lee, Ph.D. University of Arizona, Associate Professor of English; Anthropology; Asian American Studies; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; East Asian Studies
Julia Hyoun Joo Lee, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Asian American Studies; Culture and Theory; English (Asian American literature and culture, African American literature and culture, ethnic literature, twentieth-century American literature.)
Justin Lee, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Katrina Lewin, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Jayne Elizabeth Lewis, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of English; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (literature and medicine, restoration and 18th century British literature, literature of the supernatural and gothic fiction, history and/of fiction, atmosphere as literary concept and construct within natural philosophy)
Julia R. Lupton, Ph.D. Yale University, Director of Illuminations and Distinguished Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Education; Religious Studies (Renaissance literature, literature and psychology)
Juliet F. MacCannell, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor Emerita of English
Steven J. Mailloux, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor Emeritus of English; Comparative Literature
Theodore Martin, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English; Culture and Theory (Contemporary literature, genre fiction, literary history, crime, and the novel)
Annie McClanahan, Ph.D. University of California, Berkely, Associate Professor of English; Culture and Theory (U.S. culture, the novel, political and economic theory)
Gregory J. McClure, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Lowell B. McKay, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
James L. McMichael, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of English
John Miles, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of English; Religious Studies
Tyrus Miller, Ph.D. Stanford University, Dean of the School of Humanities and Professor of English; Art History; Comparative Literature; Visual Studies (modernist and avant-garde studies in literature and visual arts; critical theory and aesthetics; modern architecture and urbanism; East-Central European studies; culture of socialism and post-socialism; Frankfurt School theory)
Valentina Montero Román, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of English (20th century multi-ethnic U.S. literature, Latinx literature and media, feminist and critical race theory)
Cole Morgan, Ph.D. Brown University, Assistant Professor of English; Culture and Theory (African American literature and culture, narrative theory, visual culture, critical race theory)
Ian Andrew Munro, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Drama; English (European drama and performance, early modern popular culture, theatrical performance of wit)
Jane O. Newman, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (comparative Renaissance and early modern literature and culture [English, French, German, Italian, neo-Latin], Mediterranean Renaissance studies, Baroque, afterlives of antiquity, Walter Benjamin, Erich Auerbach, pre-modern lessons for the modern and post-modern)
Robert W. Newsom, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emeritus of English
Margot Norris, Ph.D. State University of New York College at Buffalo, Professor Emerita of English; Comparative Literature
Laura B. O'Connor, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (Irish literature, twentieth-century poetry, Anglo-American modernism)
Robert L. Peters, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor Emeritus of English
Bradley A. Queen, Ph.D. Boston University, Associate Professor of Teaching of English
Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan, Ph.D. Binghamton University, State University of New York, Distinguished Professor of English; African American Studies; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory (critical theory, postcoloniality, nationalisms and diasporas, poststructuralism, postmodernism, democracy and minority discourse, cultural studies, globalization and transnationalism)
Barbara L. Reed, Ph.D. Indiana University, Associate Professor of Teaching Emerita of English
Hugh J. Roberts, Ph.D. McGill University, Associate Professor of English (romantic literature, Shelley, literature and science, chaos theory and literature, politics and literature)
John C. Rowe, Ph.D. State University of New York College at Buffalo, Professor Emeritus of English; Comparative Literature
Michael Ryan, Ph.D. University of Iowa, Professor Emeritus of English; Religious Studies (American literature, creative writing, poetry, poetics, autobiography)
Edgar T. Schell, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of English
Spencer Seward, M.F.A. George Mason University, Lecturer of English
Natalie Shapero, M.F.A. The Ohio State University, Associate Professor of English (poetry, poetics)
Gretchen K. Short, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Humanities; English
Barry E. Siegel, M.S. Columbia University, Professor of English (literary journalism, English)
Victoria A. Silver, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of English; Religious Studies (early modern literature and culture, religious studies, history and theory of rhetoric, literature and philosophy)
Richard A. Sims, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
James Steintrager, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century comparative literature, ethical philosophy and literature, systems theory, amatory and erotic fiction)
Michael F. Szalay, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor of English; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (contemporary television and literature)
Ngugi wa Thiong'o, B.A. Makerere University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature; English (African and Caribbean literatures, theater and film, performance studies, cultural and political theory)
Brook Thomas, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, UCI Chancellor's Professor Emeritus of English
Hector Tobar, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; English (storytelling, literature, history of Los Angeles, Latin American history, Latino history)
Harold E. Toliver, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of English
Andrew T. Tonkovich, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Irene Tucker, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of English (Victorian studies)
Georges Y. Van Den Abbeele, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies; French (French and European philosophical literature, travel narrative and tourism/migration studies, critical theory and aesthetics, francophone literature, history of cartography, media history and theory)
Ann J. Van Sant, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor Emerita of English
Andrzej J. Warminski, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean for Academic Personnel and Professor of English; Humanities (romanticism, history of literary theory, contemporary theory, literature and philosophy)
Claire Vaye Watkins, M.F.A. Ohio State University, Professor of English (creative writing, fiction, contemporary literature)
Jacqueline Y. Way, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Amy Wilentz, B.A. Harvard University, Professor of English (formal mechanisms of literary journalism, travel journalism as a literary form, explanatory journalism, role of journalism for the everyday reader)
Geoffrey Wolff, B.A. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of English
Monica Youn, M.Phil. Oxford University, Associate Professor of English (creative writing, poetry, poetics)

Criticism/English Courses

CRITISM 200A. Political Economy: Methods and Critique. 4 Units.

Introduction to canonical texts in Marxism coupled with an examination of the questions of race, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality that distend the calculus of the canon’s assumptive logic. May be taken after CLT&THY 200B.

Same as CLT&THY 200A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

English Courses

ENGLISH 8. Multicultural American Literature. 4 Units.

Writings from at least two historically underrepresented groups in California and the United States with particular attention to historical conditions of literary production. Considers in-depth how literary works relate to racial constructions, economic conditions, and/or social movements.

(IV and VII ).

ENGLISH 9. Shakespeare. 4 Units.

Plays by William Shakespeare are used to explore the playwright’s poetic gifts, theatrical imagination, and inquiry into human relationships and the human condition.

(IV)

ENGLISH 10. Topics in English and American Literature. 4 Units.

Explores the diversity of human expression manifested in selected works of literature. By engaging with substantial literary texts, students will think critically about how meaning is created and how experience is interpreted in literary language.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

(IV)

ENGLISH 10B. Topics in English and American Literature. 4 Units.

Linked with Writing 50. Explores the diversity of human expression manifested in selected works of literature. By engaging with substantial literary texts, students think critically about how meaning is created and how experience is interpreted in literary language.

Corequisite: WRITING 50

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

Overlaps with ENGLISH 10.

(IV)

ENGLISH 11. Society, Law, and Literature. 4 Units.

Examines how works of literature represent and influence the relation between law and society. The primary readings will be works of literature, but selections of works of law, politics, and sociology may also be assigned.

(III or IV ).

ENGLISH 11C. Society, Law, and Literature. 4 Units.

Linked with Writing 60. Explores how works of literature represent and influence the relation between law and society. The primary readings are works of literature, but selections of works of law, politics, and sociology may also be assigned.

Corequisite: WRITING 60

Overlaps with ENGLISH 11.

(III or IV ).

ENGLISH 12. Young Adult Fiction . 4 Units.

Young adult fiction studied in historical context, including the publishing industry and mass marketing, as well as education and literacy. Primary readings will focus on young adult fiction, but works of history, advertising, and film will also be included.

(IV)

ENGLISH 15. Introductory Seminar in English: Topics in Literary Studies. 4 Units.

Discussion-based seminar on a faculty-chosen topic that introduces majors and those considering a major in English to interpretive methodologies and critical frameworks that characterize the field of English studies.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

Restriction: English Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 16. The Craft of Poetry. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which these modes formulate experience. Students write several short analytic papers. Requires creative writing.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(IV)

ENGLISH 17. The Craft of Fiction. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which these modes formulate experience. Students write several short analytic papers. Requires creative writing.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(IV)

ENGLISH H80. Sanctuary: Medieval and Modern. 4 Units.

Principles and significance of the practice of legal sanctuary in medieval English history, literature, and religion. Development of modern use of churches and other safe spaces in the American Civil Rights movement, immigrant sanctuary movements, and international asylum.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Collegium students only.

(III or IV ).

ENGLISH H81. What is a Person?. 4 Units.

Contemporary debates about personhood in law, culture, and society. Beginning with the emergence of ideas of personhood in philosophy and theology, and culminating in the study of highly contested cases: slavery, abortion law, animal rights, corporate personhood, and artificial intelligence.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Collegium students only.

(III)

ENGLISH 100. Introduction to Literary Theory. 4 Units.

Using Plato and Aristotle as points of departure, addresses a range of perspectives and problems in literary theory. To be taken by English majors in the junior year.

Prerequisite: Three courses selected from ENGLISH 8, ENGLISH 9, ENGLISH 10, ENGLISH 11, ENGLISH 12, ENGLISH 15, ENGLISH 16, ENGLISH 17, LIT JRN 20, LIT JRN 21.

ENGLISH 101W. Undergraduate Seminar in Critical Writing: Topics in Literary History. 4 Units.

Each instructor identifies a topic within literary history; special attention is given to mastering the conventions of academic argument and expression. To be taken as early as possible in the junior year.

Prerequisite: Three courses selected from ENGLISH 8, ENGLISH 9, ENGLISH 10, ENGLISH 11, ENGLISH 12, ENGLISH 15, ENGLISH 16, ENGLISH 17; or LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and one course selected from the above list. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ENGLISH 102A. Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature. 4 Units.

Studies of works representative of Medieval and Renaissance literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre.

Prerequisite: Three courses selected from ENGLISH 8, ENGLISH 9, ENGLISH 10, ENGLISH 11, ENGLISH 12, ENGLISH 15, ENGLISH 16, ENGLISH 17. Or LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and one course selected from the above list.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 102B. Topics in Restoration and 18th-Century Literature . 4 Units.

Studies of works representative of Restoration and 18th-century literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre.

Prerequisite: Three courses selected from ENGLISH 8, ENGLISH 9, ENGLISH 10, ENGLISH 11, ENGLISH 12, ENGLISH 15, ENGLISH 16, ENGLISH 17. Or LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and one course selected from the above list.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 102C. Topics in Romantic and 19th-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Studies of works representative of Romantic and 19th-century literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre.

Prerequisite: Three courses selected from ENGLISH 8, ENGLISH 9, ENGLISH 10, ENGLISH 11, ENGLISH 12, ENGLISH 15, ENGLISH 16, ENGLISH 17. Or LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and one course selected from the above list.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 102D. Topics in 20th-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Studies of works representative of 20th-century literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre.

Prerequisite: Three courses selected from ENGLISH 8, ENGLISH 9, ENGLISH 10, ENGLISH 11, ENGLISH 12, ENGLISH 15, ENGLISH 16, ENGLISH 17. Or LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and one course selected from the above list.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 103. Topics in Literature, Theory, and Criticism. 4 Units.

A series of lectures on and discussions of announced topics in literary criticism, theory, history, genres, modes, major authors.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-division students only.

ENGLISH 105. Multicultural Topics in Literatures in English. 4 Units.

Focuses on ethnic or minority literatures, or treats issues related to race and cultural identity.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-division students only.

ENGLISH 106. Advanced Seminar: Topics in English Literature . 4 Units.

Capstone course. Provides intensive work on a topic within the area of literatures in English with particular attention to the theoretical, critical, or conceptual issues it raises, with the goal of producing a substantive research paper.

Prerequisite: (ENGLISH 101W or WRITING 101W) and (ENGLISH 100 and 102A) or (ENGLISH 100 and 102B) or (ENGLISH 100 and 102C) or (ENGLISH 100 and 102D) or (ENGLISH 102A and 102B) or (ENGLISH 102A and 102C) or (ENGLISH 102A and 102D) or (ENGLISH 102B and 102C) or (ENGLISH 102C and 102D) or (ENGLISH 103 and 102A) or (ENGLISH 103 and 102B) or (ENGLISH 103 and 102C) or (ENGLISH 103 and 102D) or (ENGLISH 105 and 102A) or (ENGLISH 105 and 102B) or (ENGLISH 105 and 102C) or (ENGLISH 105 and 102D) or (ENGLISH 100 and 103) or (ENGLISH 103 and 105) or (ENGLISH 100 and 105).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Seniors only. English Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 160. Topics in English Language Film and TV. 4 Units.

Focuses on the analysis of film and/or television traditions in the English-speaking world, from a historical, theoretical, or comparative perspective.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

ENGLISH 198. Special Topics. 4 Units.

Directed group study of selected topics as arranged by instructor.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ENGLISH 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

To be taken only when the materials to be studied lie outside the normal run of departmental offerings, and when the student will have no formal chance to pursue the subject. Research paper required.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ENGLISH 205. Master of English Seminar. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of literary history for Master of English students. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGLISH 206. Master of English Research and Writing Colloquium. 2 Units.

Studies in selected areas. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGLISH 207. Master of English Thesis Practicum. 2 Units.

A yearlong undertaking of original research and writing, developed in close coordination with a faculty mentor. Accordingly, the precise contents and contours vary by advisor and by project.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGLISH 208. Master of English Thesis Workshop. 4 Units.

Students practice the scholarly genres that they will use throughout their career as an academic. The ultimate goal is to move toward a finished piece of writing: a masters thesis.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGLISH 210. Studies in Literary History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of literary history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ENGLISH 225. Studies in Literary Genres. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of literary genres. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ENGLISH 230. Studies in Major Writers. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of major writers. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ENGLISH 255. Graduate Workshop in Academic Publishing. 4 Units.

Reading and critique of student-authored essays with the goal of producing a publishable essay. Instructor leads discussion, meets with students individually, and provides an introduction to appropriate venues for publication and the process of submission, peer review, and revision.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

ENGLISH 290. Reading and Conference. 4-12 Units.

Studies in selected areas. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ENGLISH 291. Guided Reading Course. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

ENGLISH 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

A units-only course for students in the dissertation phase.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGLISH 398. Rhetoric/Teaching of Composition. 4 Units.

Readings, lectures, and internship designed to prepare graduate students to teach composition. Formal instruction in rhetoric and practical work in teaching methods and grading.

ENGLISH 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

A units-only course for students appointed as teaching assistants or associates.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Literary Journalism Courses

LIT JRN 20. Introduction to Literary Journalism. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which literary journalism and related nonfiction modes formulate experience. Students complete a range of writing projects.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Literary Journalism Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(IV)

LIT JRN 21. Reporting for Literary Journalism. 4 Units.

Instruction and hands-on training in how to interview, report, research, and collect the types of information needed to write literary journalism.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Literary Journalism Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LIT JRN 100. Advanced Reporting. 4 Units.

Practical engagement with advanced reporting techniques of Literary Journalism, emphasizing the importance of thorough and effective research in the production of high-quality journalistic writing. Prepares students to make good decisions about where and how to publish their writing.

Prerequisite: LIT JRN 21

LIT JRN 101A. Studies in the History, Theory, and Ethics of Literary Journalism. 4 Units.

Lectures and discussion on topics that explore the historical and theoretical dimensions of literary journalism, with particular emphasis on the evolution of ethics in the field.

Prerequisite: LIT JRN 21 and LIT JRN 20 and (COM LIT 60A or COM LIT 60C or ENGLISH 8 or ENGLISH 9 or ENGLISH 10 or ENGLISH 11 or ENGLISH 12 or ENGLISH 15 or ENGLISH 16 or ENGLISH 17)

LIT JRN 101BW. Literary Journalism Core Writing Workshop. 4 Units.

Writing workshops in announced specialized genres that students will both study and practice. Examples include "The Memoir," "Review Writing," "The Editorial," "Writing Biography," "The Profile," and "Political Writing.".

Prerequisite: LIT JRN 101A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Students may enroll in one LITJ 101BW course per quarter.

(Ib)

LIT JRN 103. Lectures on Topics in Literary Journalism. 4 Units.

A series of lectures on, and discussions of, announced topics in literary journalism and the literature of fact. Examples include "Travel Literary Journalism"; "Literature of True Crime"; "Narratives in the Digital Age"; "Journalism on the Edge".

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-division students only.

LIT JRN 198. Special Topics. 4 Units.

Directed group study of selected topics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LIT JRN 199. Reading and Conference. 1-4 Units.

To be taken only when the materials to be studied lie outside the normal run of departmental offerings.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Writing Courses

WRITING 30. The Art of Writing: Poetry. 4 Units.

Beginners' workshop in the writing of poetry, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

(Ia)

WRITING 31. The Art of Writing: Prose Fiction. 4 Units.

Beginners' workshop in fiction writing, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

(Ia)

WRITING 40. Introduction to Writing and Rhetoric. 4 Units.

Introduction to the principles of rhetoric through readings and writing assignments across a range of genres, including fiction, non-fiction, journalism and academic essays. Rigorous instruction in composition and style, including organization, paragraph development, sentence-level mechanics. Letter Grade with P/NP Option.

Prerequisite: Placement via the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination is required.

Overlaps with WRITING 45, WRITING 40A.

WRITING 40A. Introduction to Writing and Rhetoric with Lab. 6 Units.

Introduces the principles of rhetoric through readings and writing assignments across a range of genres. Rigorous instruction in composition and style. Designed for students seeking additional English language support. Letter Grade with P/NP Option.

Prerequisite: Students must have taken the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination and the Academic English Placement Test.

Overlaps with WRITING 40, WRITING 45.

WRITING 45. Intensive Writing. 6 Units.

Critical reading and analysis conducted through literary, academic, journalistic, and fictional genres with additional instruction in paragraph development and sentence-level mechanics. Students analyze and apply rhetorical principles in a range of writing assignments. Letter Grade with P/NP Option.

Prerequisite: Students must have taken the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination.

Overlaps with WRITING 40, WRITING 50.

(Ia)

WRITING 50. Critical Reading and Rhetoric. 4 Units.

Critical reading and analysis conducted through literary, academic, journalistic, and fictional genres. Students analyze and apply rhetorical principles in a range of writing assignments. Letter Grade with P/NP Option.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Overlaps with WRITING 45.

(Ia)

WRITING 60. Argument and Research. 4 Units.

Intensive instruction in research methods, argumentation, and rhetorical invention. Readings selected from current nonfiction and materials located by students from the University library’s holdings, to include databases across a range of disciplines. Letter Grade with P/NP Option.

Prerequisite: WRITING 45 or WRITING 50 or AP36 or AP37. WRITING 45 with a grade of C or better. WRITING 50 with a grade of C or better. AP36 with a minimum score of 4. AP37 with a minimum score of 4

(Ia)

WRITING 90. Intermediate Poetry Writing. 4 Units.

Intermediate workshop in the writing of poetry, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings.

Prerequisite: WRITING 30 or WRITING 31

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 91. Intermediate Fiction Writing. 4 Units.

Intermediate workshop in the writing of fiction, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings.

Prerequisite: WRITING 30 or WRITING 31

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 101W. Undergraduate Seminar: Applications in Literary Theory and Criticism for Creative Writing. 4 Units.

Readings in literature, with discussions and written rhetorical responses on their making.

Prerequisite: (WRITING 30 or WRITING 31) and (WRITING 90 or WRITING 91) and (WRITING 30 or WRITING 31 or WRITING 90 or WRITING 91 or ENGLISH 16 or ENGLISH 17). Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(Ib)

WRITING 110. Short Story Writing. 4 Units.

Three-hour workshop in short fiction; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 111. Poetry Writing. 4 Units.

Three-hour advanced poetry writing workshop; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 113. Novel Writing. 4 Units.

Three-hour advanced workshop in fiction writing; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts.

WRITING 139W. Advanced Expository Writing. 4 Units.

Study of rhetoric, disciplinary genres, and modes of knowledge production; practice in writing effective prose. Essays of varying lengths, totaling at least 4,000 words.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

WRITING 197. Writing Internship . 2-4 Units.

Internships focused on writing. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students create a course from response essays, research essays, and assessment project data. Internships may include editing and publication projects, supervised teaching and tutoring assignments, community literacy projects.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

WRITING 250A. Graduate Writers' Workshop (Fiction). 4 Units.

Graduate fiction workshop open to students enrolled in the MFA program in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 250B. Graduate Writers' Workshop (Fiction). 4 Units.

Graduate fiction workshop open to students enrolled in the MFA program in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 250C. Graduate Writers' Workshop (Poetry). 8 Units.

Graduate poetry workshop open to students enrolled in the M.F.A. Programs in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 251A. Writing in Conference (Fiction). 4 Units.

Graduate fiction workshop open to students enrolled in the MFA program in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 251B. Writing in Conference (Fiction). 4 Units.

Graduate fiction workshop open to students enrolled in the MFA program in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 251C. Writing in Conference (Poetry). 8 Units.

Graduate poetry workshop open to students enrolled in the M.F.A. Programs in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.