2016-17 Edition

Department of Classics

Paul Andrew Zissos, Department Chair
400 Murray Krieger Hall
949-824-6735
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/classics/

Overview

The Department of Classics aims to provide the undergraduate student with a working knowledge of the origins and heritage of Graeco-Roman civilization. The Department is committed to a twofold purpose: (1) disseminating interest in and knowledge of Classical Civilization through the teaching of Greek and Latin language and literature; and (2) helping students, through courses in Classical literature, history, civilization, mythology, and religion taught through English translations, to appreciate the achievements of Greek and Roman culture and their pervasive influence on our own civilization.

The Department offers a major in Classics with three possible emphases. Students may choose an emphasis in Greek and Latin Language and Literature, Latin Language and Literature, or Classical Civilization. Students are encouraged to consult with the Classics faculty regarding the appropriate choice of major and design of their programs.

For the emphasis in Greek and Latin Language and Literature, study of the Classics must be based on competence in both Greek and Latin. This emphasis is designed to provide the student with language competence as rapidly as possible, so that by the end of first-year Greek or Latin the student has already been introduced to some of the major Classical authors in the original language. From then on, courses are devoted to reading and interpreting the literature of ancient Greece and Rome. In addition to their training in the languages, students increase their knowledge of the literature, history, and thought of the ancient world through the close study of some of its finest writers.

The Latin Language and Literature emphasis is designed for those students who want to focus on Rome and the Latin language as their area of study. By the end of first-year Latin, students will be reading and analyzing some of the most influential works in Latin literature. In addition to gaining an expertise in Latin, students also devote a portion of their study to an examination of the history and culture of ancient Rome by taking upper-division Classical Civilization courses with Rome as their focus and/or additional Latin courses. Courses from other departments in the School of Humanities with a focus on later historical periods heavily influenced by Roman culture (such as the medieval period) may be used to satisfy some of the degree requirements, with prior approval of the Department of Classics.

The emphasis in Classical Civilization is designed for students who do not plan to concentrate on the Classical languages or pursue graduate study in the Classics, yet wish to obtain an undergraduate degree based on a sound knowledge of the Classical world. This major requires one year of study (or its equivalent) of either Greek or Latin and courses taught in English translation concerning such topics as Classical literature, civilization, history, archaeology, art, drama, and philosophy.

Students entering UCI with previous Greek or Latin training may be given advanced standing. Usually, one year of high school work is equated with one quarter of UCI work. For example, students with one, two, or three years of high school Latin (or Greek) will enroll in Latin (or Greek) 1B, 1C, and 100, respectively. Placement may vary, depending on the extent of the student’s preparation. Students with transfer credit for Greek and/or Latin may not repeat those courses for credit. Students with high school training in the Classical languages are encouraged to consult with the Classics faculty before enrolling in Classics courses.

The Department adheres to the policy of giving its students an opportunity to participate in the departmental decision-making process. Student representatives, elected from and by the undergraduate majors, participate in all open departmental meetings. Representatives are responsible for maintaining close liaison with their constituency, for representing the students’ interest in curriculum and personnel matters.

Inquiries regarding language placement, prerequisites, planning a program of study, or other matters related to the Department’s offerings should be directed to the Office of the Chair, 400 Murray Krieger Hall, telephone 949-824-6735.

Study Abroad

The Department of Classics encourages students to take advantage of educational opportunities abroad while making progress toward their UCI degree. Classics majors and minors can benefit from a broader perspective of the field by studying for periods ranging from one quarter to one year at any number of universities all over the world through the UC Education Abroad Program. Students can also augment their exposure to Greek, Latin, and Classical civilizations by studying for a summer or during the academic year in Greece or Italy at programs sponsored by other academic institutions through the International Opportunities Program. To determine how study abroad can fit into a Classics major, visit the UCI Study Abroad Center's Study Abroad in Your Major website. See the Department of Classics Undergraduate Program Advisor for additional information.

Career Opportunities

The study of the ancient world is a valuable possession for modern life. The discipline of Classics is an important part of a well-rounded education. Greek and Latin language and literature, history, philosophy, mythology and religion make an excellent basis for exploring all periods of Western culture down to the present day. Classics is an interdisciplinary study, exploring human culture through a variety of methods and points of view. For this reason, the student who chooses to major in Classics may find many professional opportunities.

Graduate and professional schools in medicine, law, management, and other fields welcome students with training in Classics. So do many business corporations. Business, industry, and technology are well acquainted with the value of an education in Classics. They are aware that students with a strong background in a respected and challenging major such as Classics are disciplined thinkers who can express themselves in clear, coherent, and cogent language, capabilities that are considered valuable in future physicians, lawyers, and managers.

There are also specific vocational opportunities open to the graduate in Classics. A major in this field may lead to a career in high school teaching, or (after appropriate further study) in college or university teaching. It is also an excellent preparation for advanced study in other academic disciplines such as archaeology, history, comparative literature, philosophy, and linguistics, as well as for theological studies and for work in a wide range of the humanities and social sciences.

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on résumé preparation, job search, and interview techniques. See the Career Center section for additional information.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Classics

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
All students are subject to the Language Other Than English Placement and Progression policies.
Departmental Requirements for the Major

The B.A. program in Classics is devoted to the study of languages, literature, and culture of ancient Greece and Rome. Students select one of three emphases: (1) Greek and Latin Language and Literature; (2) Latin Language and Literature; or (3) Classical Civilization.

Emphasis in Greek and Latin Language and Literature
A. Choose either Greek Focus or Latin Focus:
1. Greek Focus:
The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Early Greece
and The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Late Archaic and Classical Greece
and The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Fourth-Century and Hellenistic Greece
and select six upper-division courses in Greek 100–104, GREEK 120
and select three upper-division courses in Latin 100–104
or
2. Latin Focus:
The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic
and The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire
and The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome
and select six upper-division courses in Latin 100–104
and select three upper-division courses in Greek 100–104
B. One additional upper-division course in Greek or Latin. One upper-division Classics class (CLASSIC 140, CLASSIC 150, CLASSIC 160, CLASSIC 170, CLASSIC 176) may be substituted for the upper-division Greek or Latin course with prior approval of the departmental undergraduate advisor.
C. Senior Capstone Requirement:
CLASSIC 192A-CLASSIC 192B (or equivalent) taken during the senior year. Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, students design and execute a senior project. Students may plan a project centering on an area of strong interest and may write a research paper, design a creative project, a primary or secondary school curriculum, or other similar projects. All project proposals must be approved by the end of CLASSIC 192A. Six units of CLASSIC 198, CLASSIC 199, or GREEK 199 may be substituted for CLASSIC 192A-CLASSIC 192B with prior approval of the departmental undergraduate advisor.
Emphasis in Latin Language and Literature
A. Complete:
CLASSIC 37A- 37B- 37C The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic
and The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire
and The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome
B. Select six upper-division courses in Latin 100–104.
C. Select four upper-division courses from the following:
Seminar in Latin Prose
Seminar in Latin Poetry
Classics and History: The Ancient World
Classical Mythology
Topics in Classical Literature in English Translation
Topics in Classical Civilization
International Studies and the Classics
Courses taken in another UCI department may be substituted with prior approval of the departmental undergraduate advisor; three of these courses must be Roman in topic (the fourth course may have a Greek topic).
D. Senior Capstone Requirement:
CLASSIC 192A-CLASSIC 192B (or equivalent) taken during the senior year. Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, students design and execute a senior project. Students may plan a project centering on an area of strong interest and may write a research paper, design a creative project, a primary or secondary school curriculum, or other similar projects. All project proposals must be approved by the end of CLASSIC 192A. Six units of CLASSIC 198, CLASSIC 199, LATIN 198, or LATIN 199 may be substituted for CLASSIC 192A- CLASSIC 192B with prior approval of the departmental undergraduate advisor.
Emphasis in Classical Civilization
A. Select one of the following:
Fundamentals of Latin
and Fundamentals of Latin
and Fundamentals of Latin
Fundamentals of Greek
and Fundamentals of Greek
and Fundamentals of Greek
or equivalent
and select one of the following:
The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Early Greece
and The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Late Archaic and Classical Greece
and The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Fourth-Century and Hellenistic Greece
The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic
and The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire
and The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome
Classical Mythology: The Gods
and Classical Mythology: The Heroes
and Classical Mythology: Ancient and Modern Perspectives of Classical Mythology
B. Select five upper-division Classics courses.
C. Select two additional upper-division Classics courses. These courses may be in related fields such as Classical history, Classical philosophy, or Classical art and if so, may be taken in another UCI department with prior approval of the departmental undergraduate advisor.
D. Senior Capstone Requirement:
CLASSIC 192A-CLASSIC 192B (or equivalent) taken during the senior year. Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, students design and execute a senior project. Students may plan a project centering on an area of strong interest and may write a research paper, design a creative project, a primary or secondary school curriculum, or other similar projects. All project proposals must be approved by the end of CLASSIC 192A. Six units of CLASSIC 198 or CLASSIC 199 may be substituted for CLASSIC 192A-CLASSIC 192B with prior approval of the departmental undergraduate advisor.

Residence Requirement for the Major: At least five upper-division courses required for the major must be completed successfully at UCI.

Planning a Program of Study

The Department believes in close consultation with students on academic advising and program planning. Students planning to major in Classics or minor in Greek, Latin, or Classical Civilization are strongly urged to consult with the departmental faculty at the earliest moment to learn about the various programs.

Minor in Archaeology

The interdisciplinary minor in Archaeology introduces students to modern archaeological theory and practice. Students are exposed to different approaches and theoretical frameworks used in the reconstruction of cultures based on their material remains and examine the use of such approaches and frameworks in a comparative context that emphasizes one geographic area. Students also become familiar with the importance of understanding the historical, geographic, and environmental contexts in which a particular material culture develops and transforms. The minor helps to prepare students for advanced training in art history, the archaeology of specific geographical regions, cultural resource management, museum studies, and historical preservation. It emphasizes classical and historical archaeology of the last 5,000 years of human history.

Requirements for the Minor in Archaeology

Completion of seven courses (28 units). Only one course from requirements D–F may be lower division. Courses that are listed in the Catalogue as “topics vary” must be approved by the Department of Classics undergraduate advisor.
A. Complete:
Introduction to Archaeology
B. Select one lower-division survey course on the pre-modern world from the following:
Global Cultures and Society
Ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Art and Architecture
History of Asian Art: Arts of India
World: Innovations
C. Select one upper-division social theory course from the following:
Ecological Anthropology
History of Anthropological Theory
Topics in Environmental History
D. Select one course on the social study of scientific inquiry from the following:
Science, Technology, Controversy
The Making of Modern Science
Gender and Feminism in Everyday Life
Gender and Power
Gender and Science
E. Geographic specialty:
Select two courses focusing on one particular area from the requirement F list.
F. Geographic subspecialty:
Select one course on an area outside the student’s geographic specialty from the following:
Africa and Asia:
Studies in Asian Art
Studies in Native and Tribal Art
Jewish History, Ancient to Early Modern Times
History of Zoroastrianism (or HISTORY 131B, 131C, 131D, 131E)
Africa: Societies and Cultures
Greece and Rome:
Studies in Ancient Art
Studies in Greek Art
Studies in Roman Art
The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Early Greece
The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Late Archaic and Classical Greece
The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Fourth-Century and Hellenistic Greece
The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic
The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire
The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome
Classics and History: The Ancient World
Topics in Classical Civilization
Americas:
Ancient Civilization of Mexico and the Southwest
Special Topics in Archaeology
Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
Indian North America
Modern African American Art
Studies in Native and Tribal Art
Chicana/Chicano History: Pre-Colonial to 1900

Residence Requirement for the Minor

Four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. Two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program provided course content is approved in advance by the Humanities Undergraduate Study Office.

Greek, Latin, and Classic Civilization Minors

Requirements for the Minors (Greek, Latin, and Classical Civilization)

The Department offers minors in Greek, Latin, and Classical Civilization.

Greek
Fundamentals of Greek
and Fundamentals of Greek
and Fundamentals of Greek
Select six upper-division courses in Greek 100–104. Greek 120 may be substituted for one course at the 100 level.
Latin
Fundamentals of Latin
and Fundamentals of Latin
and Fundamentals of Latin
Select six upper-division courses in Latin 100–104.
Classical Civilization
Select one of the following:
The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Early Greece
and The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Late Archaic and Classical Greece
and The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Fourth-Century and Hellenistic Greece
The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic
and The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire
and The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome
Classical Mythology: The Gods
and Classical Mythology: The Heroes
and Classical Mythology: Ancient and Modern Perspectives of Classical Mythology
Select five upper-division Classics courses, one of which may be in a related field such as history, art history, or philosophy.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: Four upper-division courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department chair.

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The University of California Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics

UC Irvine, UC Riverside, and UC San Diego

Michele Salzman, Chair, Joint Executive Committee

NOTE: Admission to the program is not available at this time. Contact the Department for information.

The UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics is a joint venture that combines faculty in Classics and related disciplines from the three southernmost University of California campuses—UC Irvine, UC Riverside, and UC San Diego.

Students accepted into the program may enroll at any of the three campuses, but normally apply for admission through UCI, which is the main location for instruction and administration. Applications are reviewed by an admissions committee composed of faculty members from all three campuses.

The goal of the program is to provide a graduate education that unites the main currents of modern literary, cultural, and social theory with the traditional skills and methodologies of classical philology. Candidates for degrees are expected to exhibit facility in Greek and Latin, competence in research, including theoretical approaches to texts and objects, digital skills for research and teaching, and experience in teaching. These goals are realized through the four core courses (CLASSIC 200A, CLASSIC 200B, CLASSIC 200C and CLASSIC 201) and seminars (CLASSIC 220).

All entering students are admitted into the Ph.D. program. With the exception of those granted advanced standing because they hold the M.A. degree in Classics from another institution, entering students may be awarded an M.A. along the way.

Faculty

Luci Berkowitz, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Professor Emerita of Classics, UCI (Greek literary history, computer application to literature)

Cynthia L. Claxton, Ph.D. University of Washington, Senior Lecturer in Classics, Undergraduate Program Director, and Humanities Language Learning Director, UCI (Greek prose, historiography)

Anthony Edwards, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature, UCSD (epic, Greek comedy, critical theory)

Richard I. Frank, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of History and Classics, UCI (Roman history, Latin elegy and satire, classical tradition)

Zina Giannopoulou, Ph.D. University of Illinois, Associate Professor of Classics and Graduate Advisor, UCI (literary theory and Platonic hermeneutics, Classical and Hellenistic philosophy, Greek tragedy and epic)

David Glidden, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, UCR (Greek and Roman philosophy)

Denver Graninger, Ph.D. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of History, UCR (social and political implications of Greek religion)

Monte Johnson, Ph.D. University of Toronto, Associate Professor of Philosophy, UCSD (ancient philosophy)

Dayna Kalleres, Ph.D. Brown University, Associate Professor of Literature and the Study of Religion, UCSD (early to late antique Christian literature and culture)

Andromache Karanika, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of Classics, UCI (Greek epic poetry, Greek lyric, folklore)

Marianne McDonald, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Theatre and Classics, UCSD (Greek and Roman theatre, ancient drama in modern plays, film, and opera)

Margaret M. Miles, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Art History and Classics, UCI (Greek and Roman art and archaeology, ancient Sicily, Greek religion)

Jozef Müller, Ph.D. Princeton University, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, UCR (Aristotle, Plato, Hellenistic Philosophy, and Neoplatonism)

Sheldon Nodelman, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Professor of Visual Arts, UCSD (Classical art and architecture, Roman portraiture, critical theory)

Maria C. Pantelia, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Department Chair and Professor of Classics, Director, Thesaurus Linguae Graecae®, UCI (Greek epic, Hellenistic poetry, digital technologies in the humanities)

Lisa Raphals, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Chinese/Comparative Literature, UCR (comparative philosophy, religion, history of science, and gender, with other interests in poetics and science fiction and media studies)

Wendy Raschke, Ph.D. State University of New York, Buffalo, Lecturer in Classics, UCR (Roman satire, Greek art and archaeology)

Michele Salzman, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr College, Chair, Joint Executive Committee, UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics and Professor of History, UCR (Late antiquity; Roman history and literature, religion, women’s studies)

Thomas F. Scanlon, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Professor of Classics, UCR (Greek and Roman historiography, ancient athletics)

Dana F. Sutton, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Professor Emeritus of Classics, UCI (Greek and Latin drama, Greek poetry, Anglo-Latin literature)

Edward Watts, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of History, UCSD (intellectual and religious history of the Early Byzantine Empire)

Andrew Zissos, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of Classics, UCI (Latin epic, medieval Latin, Roman culture)

Master of Arts in Classics

The requirements for the M.A. degree are two years (six quarters) of course work, followed by a comprehensive examination or completion of a Master’s thesis. A reading knowledge of either German, French, Italian, or an equivalent language, demonstrated by examination or appropriate course work, is also required. M.A. students must successfully complete a minimum of 12 approved, seminar-level courses. The normal course load is three 200-level courses each quarter distributed as follows: nine quarters of CLASSIC 220; three quarters of CLASSIC 200A, CLASSIC 200B, CLASSIC 200C, and CLASSIC 201; a fourth quarter may be substituted for a CLASSIC 220. Up to one quarter of CLASSIC 290 for research and writing of the Master’s thesis may be substituted for a CLASSIC 220. If remedial work is required in Greek or Latin, with the Graduate Advisor’s approval, one enhanced upper-division Greek or Latin course (enrolled as a CLASSIC 280) may be substituted for a CLASSIC 220. With the Graduate Advisor’s approval, M.A. students may substitute one external graduate seminar in a relevant area outside of Classics (at any of the three participating campuses) for a CLASSIC 220. At the end of a student’s M.A. studies, a positive vote of the program faculty is necessary for continuation in the Ph.D. program. The expected time for completion of the M.A. degree is two years.

Doctor of Philosophy in Classics

The requirements for the Ph.D. degree are three years (nine quarters) of course work. Minimum course requirements are four quarters of CLASSIC 200A, CLASSIC 200B, CLASSIC 200C, and CLASSIC 201; 12 quarters of CLASSIC 220; two external graduate seminars, from departments or programs outside of Classics. These may be taken from the offerings of any of the three campuses. Students may take up to two quarters of enhanced upper-division Greek or Latin courses (enrolled as 280s) in place of CLASSIC 220s with permission of the Graduate Advisor if remedial work is required in Greek or Latin. Where appropriate, in the third year of course work, a second CLASSIC 200A, CLASSIC 200B, or CLASSIC 200C, may be substituted for a CLASSIC 220. CLASSIC 280, Independent Study (supervised research), may be substituted for CLASSIC 220s only with the permission of the Graduate Advisor. Up to 12 equivalent graduate-level courses completed elsewhere may be substituted for Tri-Campus Program courses with approval of the Joint Executive Committee. CLASSIC 280 may be used, normally in the fourth year, to provide time to work on the Greek and Latin reading lists and to prepare for Qualifying Examinations, but these courses do not count toward the required 18 courses. Students are encouraged to take courses and seminars in relevant areas outside the program at any of the three campuses. At this stage, and during the fourth year of study, students are expected to have read extensively in the primary texts, in literary history and theory, and in ancient history. In addition, experience in supervised teaching and/or research activity is normally required. In order to qualify as a candidate for the Ph.D. and enter the dissertation stage, a student must pass a set of five written qualifying examinations, including Greek translation and Latin translation; Greek history and Roman history; history of Greek and Roman literature. Once these examinations have been passed, a student must submit a substantial dissertation prospectus, comparable to a research paper in scope and detail, and pass an oral examination administered by the candidacy committee. Ph.D. students must also demonstrate reading proficiency in one modern research language (normally German and French or Italian) by the end of their second year either through appropriate course work or by examination. Proficiency in a second modern research language is expected by the end of the third year. The normative time for advancement to candidacy is four years. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is six years, and the maximum time permitted is eight years.

The facilities, course offerings, programs, and individual faculty mentorship of all three campuses are available to students in the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics. In addition, program resources are enhanced through a cooperative teaching arrangement among the Tri-Campus Program and the Classics graduate programs at UC Los Angeles, UC Santa Barbara, and the University of Southern California.

Thesaurus Linguae Graecae®

The Thesaurus Linguae Graecae® (TLG®) is a research center at UCI. TLG has created a digital library of Greek literature, a unique resource for research in Greek literary and linguistic studies. Although administratively separate, TLG is closely affiliated with the Department of Classics. Information is available in the Office of Research section of this Catalogue.

Classics Courses

CLASSIC 5. Building English Vocabulary through Greek and Latin Roots. 4 Units.

Formation and use of English words from Greek and Latin derivatives. Particularly useful for first-year students who wish to augment their vocabulary systematically.

CLASSIC 10. Scientific and Specialized Terminology. 4 Units.

A study of English terms derived from Greek and Latin and important to contemporary medicine, science, and other professions, with emphasis on development of word-building skills. No prior knowledge of Greek or Latin required.

CLASSIC 36A. The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Early Greece. 4 Units.

A survey of ancient Greek civilization from its origins in the Bronze Age to the mid-Archaic period. Examines political and social history, as well as literature, art, religion, and archaeological remains.

Same as HISTORY 36A.

(IV)

CLASSIC 36B. The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Late Archaic and Classical Greece. 4 Units.

A survey of ancient Greek civilization from the Late Archaic period to the Classical period. Focuses on major institutions and cultural phenomena as seen through the study of ancient Greek literature, history, archaeology, and religion.

Same as HISTORY 36B.

(IV)

CLASSIC 36C. The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Fourth-Century and Hellenistic Greece. 4 Units.

A survey of ancient Greek civilization from the fourth century BCE through to the Hellenistic period. Focuses on major institutions and cultural phenomena as seen through the study of ancient Greek literature, history, archaeology, and religion.

Same as HISTORY 36C.

(IV)

CLASSIC 37A. The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic. 4 Units.

A survey of the development of Roman civilization from its eighth century BCE beginnings to the civil wars of the first century BCE. Examines political and social history, as well as literature, art, architecture, and religion.

Same as HISTORY 37A.

(IV)

CLASSIC 37B. The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire. 4 Units.

A survey of Roman civilization from Augustus’s consolidation of power following the civil wars of the first century BCE to the crisis of the third century CE. Includes social history, literature, art, architecture, and religion.

Same as HISTORY 37B.

(IV)

CLASSIC 37C. The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome. 4 Units.

A survey of Roman civilization from the crisis of the third century CE to the so-called “fall of Rome” in 476 CE. Examines political and social history, as well as literature, art, architecture, and religion.

Same as HISTORY 37C.

(IV)

CLASSIC 45A. Classical Mythology: The Gods. 4 Units.

An overview of the main myths of the gods of the ancient Greeks and Romans and their influence in contemporary and later literature and art. Includes readings from both ancient and modern sources. Course may be offered online.

(IV)

CLASSIC 45B. Classical Mythology: The Heroes. 4 Units.

An overview of the main myths of the heroes of the ancient Greeks and Romans and their influence in contemporary and later literature and art. Includes readings from both ancient and modern sources.

(IV)

CLASSIC 45C. Classical Mythology: Ancient and Modern Perspectives of Classical Mythology. 4 Units.

Detailed examination of key Greek and Roman myths, their interpretations, and the influence they have exerted on literature, art, and popular culture in subsequent periods.

(IV)

CLASSIC 99. Special Studies in Classics. 1-4 Units.

Lower-division level independent research with Classics faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

CLASSIC 140. Classics and History: The Ancient World. 4 Units.

Selected topics in society and culture of the Graeco-Roman world. Readings in translation.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CLASSIC 150. Classical Mythology. 4 Units.

Selected myths and legends as used in Classical literature, and their modern interpretations.

CLASSIC 160. Topics in Classical Literature in English Translation. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Classical literature. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CLASSIC 160W. Topics in Classical Literature in English Translation. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Classical literature. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(Ib)

CLASSIC 170. Topics in Classical Civilization. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Classical civilization. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CLASSIC 176. International Studies and the Classics. 4 Units.

Develops a broader understanding of the formation of different cultures and countries of Classical times and their impact on the modern world.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CLASSIC 192A. Senior Capstone. 2 Units.

Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, majors design and execute a senior project. This project may be a research paper, dramatic production, school curriculum, etc. All projects must be approved by the faculty mentor.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Grading Option: In progress only.

CLASSIC 192B. Senior Capstone. 4 Units.

Under the guidance of a faculty mentor, majors design and execute a senior project. This project may be a research paper, dramatic production, school curriculum, etc. All projects must be approved by the faculty mentor.

Prerequisite: CLASSIC 192A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

CLASSIC 198. Directed Group Study. 4 Units.

Special topics in Classical studies through directed reading and research.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

CLASSIC 199. Independent Study in Classics. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Classics faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

CLASSIC 200A. Contemporary Literary Theory and the Classics. 4 Units.

An introduction to contemporary literary theory focusing on important critical approaches; topics vary from year to year.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CLASSIC 200B. Diachronic Perspectives on Classical Antiquity. 4 Units.

Examines ways in which Classical texts and ideas have been received and appropriated for the diverse purposes of ancient and subsequent cultures.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CLASSIC 200C. Greece and Rome in Their Contemporary Cultural Contexts. 4 Units.

An introduction to the methods and perspectives of social scientific theory which can be used to study the material and social dimensions of the ancient cultures of Greece and Rome.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CLASSIC 201. Research and Pedagogical Tools for Classicists. 4 Units.

Covers various technical skills essential for successful research and pedagogy in Classics, including use of digital resources (e.g., bibliographical databases). Introduction to important disciplinary subfields, such as textual criticism and epigraphy. Selection of topics will be at instructor's discretion.

CLASSIC 203A. Survey of Greek Literature . 4 Units.

Intensive Greek readings in poetry and prose selected from the Tri-Campus Program reading list.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

CLASSIC 203B. Survey of Latin Literature. 4 Units.

Intensive Latin readings in poetry and prose selected from the Tri-Campus Program reading list.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

CLASSIC 205. CONCURRENT READING. 2 Units.

Special Instance.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Grad students only

CLASSIC 220. Classics Graduate Seminar. 4 Units.

Subject matter variable; mainly but not exclusively major literary topics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CLASSIC 280. Independent Study. 4-12 Units.

Supervised independent research. Subject varies.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate only.

CLASSIC 290. Research in Classics. 4-12 Units.

Research under Classics faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CLASSIC 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Classics faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CLASSIC 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Greek Courses

GREEK 1A. Fundamentals of Greek. 5 Units.

Elements of Classical Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary.

Overlaps with GREEK S1AB.

Restriction: GREEK 1A and GREEK S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

GREEK 1B. Fundamentals of Greek. 5 Units.

Elements of Classical Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary.

Prerequisite: GREEK 1A. GREEK 1A with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GREEK S1AB, GREEK S1BC.

Restriction: GREEK 1B and GREEK S1AB and GREEK S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

GREEK 1C. Fundamentals of Greek. 5 Units.

Introduction to reading texts.

Prerequisite: GREEK 1B. GREEK 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GREEK S1BC.

Restriction: GREEK 1C and GREEK S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

GREEK S1AB. Fundamentals of Greek. 7.5 Units.

First half of first- year Greek in an intensified form.

Overlaps with GREEK 1A, GREEK 1B.

Restriction: GREEK S1AB and GREEK 1A and GREEK 1B may not be taken for full credit.

GREEK S1BC. Fundamentals of Greek. 7.5 Units.

Second half of first- year Greek in an intensified form.

Prerequisite: GREEK S1AB or GREEK 1B. GREEK S1AB with a grade of C or better. GREEK 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with GREEK 1C, GREEK 1B.

Restriction: GREEK S1BC and GREEK 1B and GREEK 1C may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

GREEK 2. Introduction to Biblical Greek. 4 Units.

An inductive approach to learning to read Biblical Greek texts. Basic grammar, syntax, morphology, and vocabulary presented within the context of reading. Course is not a substitute for GREEK 1A, GREEK 1B, and GREEK 1C series.

GREEK 99. Special Studies in Greek. 1-4 Units.

Lower-division level independent research with Greek faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

GREEK 100. Topics in Attic Greek. 4 Units.

Selected readings in Attic Greek prose and poetry. Authors may include Xenophon, Lysias, Antiphon, Euripides, and others. Selections from prose and poetry will be read each quarter. Grammar and syntax review included.

Prerequisite: GREEK 1C or placement into GREEK 100. GREEK 1C with a grade of C or better.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GREEK 103. Seminar in Greek Prose. 4 Units.

Specialized and focused study of a particular Greek prose author or topic.

Prerequisite: GREEK 100.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GREEK 104. Seminar in Greek Poetry. 4 Units.

Specialized and focused study of a particular topic or author of Greek poetry.

Prerequisite: GREEK 100.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GREEK 120. Reading of Selected Portions of the New Testament. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of the New Testament. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: GREEK 1C or GREEK S1BC.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

GREEK 198. Directed Group Study. 4 Units.

Special topics in Greek culture and civilization through directed reading and research.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

GREEK 199. Independent Studies in Greek. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Greek faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Latin Courses

LATIN 1A. Fundamentals of Latin. 5 Units.

Elements of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary.

Overlaps with LATIN S1AB.

Restriction: LATIN 1A and LATIN S1AB may not be taken for full credit.

LATIN 1B. Fundamentals of Latin. 5 Units.

Elements of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary.

Prerequisite: LATIN 1A. LATIN 1A with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with LATIN S1AB, LATIN S1BC.

Restriction: LATIN 1B and LATIN S1AB and LATIN S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

LATIN 1C. Fundamentals of Latin. 5 Units.

Introduction to reading texts, including study of the poetry of Catullus and selected readings.

Prerequisite: LATIN 1B. LATIN 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with LATIN S1BC.

Restriction: LATIN 1C and LATIN S1BC may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

LATIN S1AB. Fundamentals of Latin. 7.5 Units.

First half of first-year Latin in an intensified form.

Overlaps with LATIN 1A, LATIN 1B.

Restriction: LATIN S1AB and LATIN 1A and LATIN 1B may not be taken for full credit.

LATIN S1BC. Fundamentals of Latin . 7.5 Units.

Second half of first-year Latin in an intensified form.

Prerequisite: LATIN S1AB or LATIN 1B. LATIN S1AB with a grade of C or better. LATIN 1B with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with LATIN 1B, LATIN 1C.

Restriction: LATIN S1BC and LATIN 1B and LATIN 1C may not be taken for full credit.

(VI)

LATIN 99. Special Studies in Latin. 1-4 Units.

Lower-division level independent research with Latin faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

LATIN 100. Topics in Classical Latin. 4 Units.

Selected readings in Classical Latin prose and poetry. Authors may include Cicero, Caesar, Ovid, Catullus, and others. Selections from prose and poetry will be read each quarter. Grammar and syntax review included.

Prerequisite: LATIN 1C or placement into Latin 100. LATIN 1C with a grade of C or better.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LATIN 103. Seminar in Latin Prose. 4 Units.

Specialized and focused study of a particular Latin prose author or topic.

Prerequisite: LATIN 100.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LATIN 104. Seminar in Latin Poetry. 4 Units.

Specialized and focused study of a particular topic or author in Latin poetry.

Prerequisite: LATIN 100.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LATIN 198. Directed Group Study. 1-4 Units.

Special topics in Roman culture and civilization through directed reading and research.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

LATIN 199. Independent Studies in Latin. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Latin faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Faculty

Luci B. Berkowitz, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Professor Emerita of Classics (Greek literary history, computer applications to literature)
Cynthia L. Claxton, Ph.D. University of Washington, Undergraduate Program Advisor, Humanities Language Learning Director and Senior Lecturer of Classics (Greek prose, historiography)
Richard I. Frank, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of History; Classics (Roman history, Classical tradition)
Zina Giannopoulou, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Graduate Advisor and Associate Professor of Classics; European Languages and Studies (philosophy and literature, Classical tradition, Plato, Greek tragedy and epic)
Andromache Karanika, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of Classics (Greek epic poetry, Greek lyric, folklore)
Maria C. Pantelia, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Director, Thesaurus Linguae Graecae® and Professor of Classics; Classics (Greek epic, Hellenistic poetry, digital technologies in the humanities)
Patrick J. Sinclair, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor Emeritus of Classics (rhetoric, Latin prose, lexicography)
Dana Sutton, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor Emeritus of Classics (Greek and Latin drama, Greek poetry, Anglo-Latin literature)
Paul A. Zissos, Ph.D. Princeton University, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Classics (Latin epic, medieval Latin, Roman culture)
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