Requirements for a Bachelor’s Degree

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There are four groups of requirements that must be met to earn a baccalaureate degree from UCI: general UC requirements; UCI requirements, including the General Education (GE) requirement; school or program requirements; and degree-specific requirements.

UC and UCI requirements are described below. School or program and major-specific requirements are described in full in the academic unit sections.

Students with identified learning and/or physical disabilities, including language-acquisition problems, are eligible to receive support through the Disability Services Center; telephone 949-824-7494 (voice), 824-6272 (TTY), email: dsc@uci.edu. Staff can assist students from the time they are admitted to UCI until they graduate.

Catalogue Rights

Students enrolled at UCI from their freshman year may elect to meet as graduation requirements (UC, UCI, school, and major): (1) those in effect at the time of entrance, or (2) those subsequently established after entrance.

A readmitted student who has not been enrolled at UCI for three or more consecutive quarters (excluding summer sessions) must adhere to the graduation requirements: (1) in effect for the quarter in which the student is readmitted; or (2) those subsequently established.

Students transferring from other collegiate institutions may elect to meet as graduation requirements either: (1) those in effect at the time of enrollment at UCI; (2) those subsequently established; or (3) those in effect at UCI when the student first entered a previous, accredited collegiate institution, provided that the student has been continuously enrolled in a collegiate institution and that entry was not more than four years prior to the time of enrollment at UCI.

A transfer student who has had a break of enrollment of two consecutive semesters or three consecutive quarters (excluding summer sessions) may follow the requirements in effect at UCI: (1) at the time of enrollment at UCI; (2) those subsequently established; or (3) those in effect at the time of reentry into a previous, accredited collegiate institution, provided that reentry was not more than four years prior to enrollment at UCI.

A transfer student who has been continuously enrolled in college for more than four years prior to transfer may use: (1) the requirements in effect at the time of enrollment at UCI; (2) those subsequently established; or (3) those in effect at UCI four years prior to enrollment at UCI.

All students, whether enrolled at UCI from their freshman year, readmitted, or transfer, may elect to fulfill general education requirements as specified above, independent of how they choose to meet all other graduation requirements (UC, UCI [with the exception of general education], school, and major).

Students choosing to complete a minor, whether enrolled at UCI from their freshman year, readmitted, or transfer, may elect to fulfill minor requirements as specified above, independent of how they choose to meet all other graduation requirements (UC, UCI, school, and major).

Transfer students who complete one of the following options will be considered to have met the total UCI general education requirement except the upper-division writing requirement: (1) students who transfer from a four-year institution and who have completed the general education requirements of that college, upon approval of petition; (2) students who transfer from another UC campus and provide official documentation that they have met the general education requirements of that campus; (3) students who transfer from another UC campus and are in the process of completing the general education requirements of that campus, upon approval of petition, and who subsequently complete the remaining requirements of that campus at UCI; or (4) California Community College transfer students who have completed the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum. Transfer students may also elect to complete the UCI general education requirement.

University Requirements

English (UC Entry Level Writing)

Every undergraduate must demonstrate a proficiency in writing. The Entry Level Writing Requirement may be satisfied before admission in any of the following ways:

  1. Score 3 or higher on the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in English (Language or Literature); or
  2. Score 5 or higher on the International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher Level Examination in English (Language A only), or score 6 or higher on the IB Standard Level Examination in English (Language A only); or
  3. Score 680 or higher on the Writing section of the SAT Reasoning Test, or score 30 or higher on the ACT Combined English/Writing test.

The UC Entry Level Writing requirement may be met after admission by one of the following options:

  1. Passing the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination given in mid-May (and on subsequent dates) to all entering freshmen admitted for fall quarter (see Placement Testing). Freshmen admitted to UC will receive detailed information in April about the exam. Freshman students who are not California residents may take the exam in the fall after they enroll. Transfer students who have not satisfied the UC Entry Level Writing requirement should contact the UCI Composition Program Office, 420 Humanities Instructional Building; telephone (949) 824-6717.
  2. Prior to enrolling in the University, complete with a grade of C or better a transferable college course in English composition worth four quarter or three semester units. (Once a student enrolls at a UC campus, courses from institutions other than UC may not be used to satisfy the Entry Level Writing Requirement.) Students who meet the University’s basic requirements for minimal transfer eligibility, which include two transferable college courses in English composition, satisfy the Entry Level Writing Requirement.

NOTE: Those students who have not met the requirement before entrance must satisfy the requirement before the beginning of their fourth quarter at UCI. Students who have not satisfied the requirement by that time will be ineligible to enroll for a fourth quarter.

The UC Entry Level Writing requirement may be met after enrollment by one of the following options:

  1. Enrolling in Humanities Core writing courses designated “ES.” (NOTE: Students held for UC Entry Level Writing and enrolled in the Humanities Core must enroll in an ES section of the Humanities Core during their first quarter. Successful completion of these writing courses with a letter grade of C or better will satisfy the requirement. Students who do not receive a letter grade of C or better in HUMAN 1AES in the fall quarter and who continue to be held for UC Entry Level Writing must enroll in HUMAN 1BES during the winter quarter and satisfy the requirement by earning a letter grade of C or better.)
  2. Taking either WRITING 37 or WRITING 39A and receiving a letter grade of C or better in the course.

Students enrolled in Essentials of Academic Writing (AC ENG 20A, AC ENG 20B, AC ENG 20C, AC ENG 20D) must enroll in WRITING 39A immediately after they are authorized to do so by the Academic English/English as a Second Language Program. Students with a score of 2, 3, or 4 from the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination are also required to enroll in WRITING 39A; some students with these scores may be required to take the Academic English Placement Test before enrolling in WRITING 39A.

The Pass/Not Pass grade option may not be used to satisfy the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Students enrolled at UCI may take only UCI courses in satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement. Continuing UCI students may not take summer courses at another institution to satisfy this requirement.

American History and Institutions

This requirement may be met by one of the following options:

  1. Completion in an accredited high school of a one-year course in United States history with a grade of C or better, or a half-year course in United States history and a half-year course in American government with grades of C or better; or
  2. Achieving a score of 3, 4, or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in United States History; or
  3. Achieving a score of 550 or better on the SAT Subject Test in United States history; or
  4. Presentation of a certificate of completion of the requirement at another California institution; or
  5. Completion at UCI or another U.S. institution of one year of college-level United States history with grades of C or better, or one course in United States history and one in United States government with grades of C or better. Acceptable UCI courses: United States history—HISTORY 40A, HISTORY 40B, HISTORY 40C; United States government—POL SCI 21A.

UCI Requirements

Unit Requirement

Credit for a minimum of 180 quarter units, earned by examination, by other evaluation, or course work is required. A course normally offers four quarter units of credit.

Grade Requirement

A minimum grade average of at least C (2.0) is required (1) overall, (2) in all of the courses required for the major program, and (3) in the upper-division courses required for the major program. Higher averages than this may be required only in honors programs. Students who fail to attain a C (2.0) average in courses required in the major program may, at the option of the major unit, be denied the privilege of pursuing a major program in that unit. In this context, “the courses required in the major program” are defined as the courses required for the major and offered by the program of the student’s major (or programs, in the case of an interdisciplinary or interdepartmental major). A major can include additional courses required for the major in this set, with the approval of the Council on Education Policy. In this case, the list of additional courses is published in the Catalogue with the requirements for the major.

Residence Requirement

At least 36 of the final 45 units completed by a student for the bachelor’s degree must be earned in residence at the UCI campus. Exceptions to this rule may be allowed, with prior departmental approval, to students enrolled in the Education Abroad Program, the UCDC Academic Internship Program, the UC Center Sacramento Scholar Intern Program, or the International Opportunities Program with International Study Advance Contract.

General Education (GE) Requirement

UCI is committed to the values of a liberal education. One component of that commitment is the requirement that all undergraduates complete a set of general education (GE) requirements. General education courses introduce students to a range of ideas and intellectual activities that engage UCI scholars, providing both scope and balance to a University degree beyond the study of a specific major.

The general education requirements are intended to help undergraduates place the specialized study undertaken in the major within a broader context. They are designed to cultivate the skills, knowledge, and understanding that will make students effective contributors to society and the world. The general education requirements should enable UCI undergraduates to apply the abilities developed in their studies to identify significant issues, gather and evaluate available evidence, analyze alternatives, reach conclusions, communicate the results effectively, and take considered actions.

The general education requirement is a graduation requirement and, with the exception of the lower-division writing requirement, need not be satisfied during only the lower-division years. To satisfy the general education requirement, courses are required in each of the following categories:

I. Writing (two lower-division plus one upper-division course)

II. Science and Technology (three courses)

III. Social and Behavioral Sciences (three courses)

IV. Arts and Humanities (three courses)

V. Quantitative, Symbolic, and Computational Reasoning, with subcategories Va and Vb (three courses that may also satisfy another GE category)

VI. Language Other Than English (one course)

VII. Multicultural Studies (one course that may also satisfy another GE category)

VIII. International/Global Issues (one course that may also satisfy another GE category)

The specific courses in each area that students may use to satisfy the requirements are listed below. When a general education course is cross-listed with another course, that course also is available for fulfillment of the requirement. Students should refer to the Catalogue descriptions of the courses to determine which are cross-listed.

A course qualifies for a particular GE category based on its content rather than on the academic unit that offers it. However, to increase students’ exposure to a variety of disciplinary approaches, students are encouraged to choose GE courses from a wide range of schools and departments outside of the student’s major.

NOTE: The following list of courses approved for GE is effective for the 2015-16 academic year only. Because changes occur each year, students should consult the GE list annually to ensure that the courses they enroll in are on the list. GE credit is awarded for a course only if it appears on the list during the academic year when it is taken. To check the GE course offerings in a particular quarter, consult the Schedule of Classes on the University Registrar’s website.

General Education Categories

I. Writing

Because of the importance of visual, oral, electronic, and written communication in every academic discipline, in the professions, and in public life, the University is committed to developing a variety of communication abilities in students at all levels and in all areas. The Writing Requirement expresses this broad commitment, but the concern for and attention to rhetorically effective, accurate writing is expected in all courses.

The Writing Requirement consists of two courses at the lower-division level beyond the UC Entry Level Writing requirement and one upper-division course in a discipline.

Except where otherwise noted below, students must satisfy the UC Entry Level Writing requirement prior to fulfilling the UCI writing requirement.

Students who have not completed the lower-division writing requirement before the beginning of their seventh quarter at UCI will be subject to probation. Students transferring to UCI normally should have satisfied the lower-division writing requirement before entering UCI; if, however, they have not, they must complete it within their first three quarters of enrollment or they will be subject to probation. Academic English/English as a Second Language students must complete the lower-division writing requirement before the beginning of the seventh quarter following the completion of their AE/ESL courses or they will be subject to probation.

The third course must be an upper-division writing course, and it must be taken only after the successful completion of the lower-division requirement.

Students enrolled at UCI may take only UCI courses in satisfaction of the lower-division and upper-division writing requirements. Continuing UCI students may not take summer courses at another institution to satisfy lower-division or upper-division writing requirements.

After completing this GE requirement, successful students should be able to do the following:

Lower-division writing
  • demonstrate rhetorically effective, accurate academic writing and communication across a variety of contexts, purposes, audiences, and media using appropriate stance, genre, style, and organization;
  • develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading texts;
  • develop abilities in critical reading across a variety of genres and media;
  • and demonstrate information literacy skills by locating, evaluating, and integrating information gathered from multiple sources into a research project.
Upper-division writing
  • demonstrate rhetorically effective, discipline-specific writing for appropriate academic, professional, and public audiences;
  • demonstrate, at an advanced level of competence, use of discipline-specific research methods, genres, modes of development, and formal conventions;
  • and demonstrate advanced information literacy skills by locating, evaluating, and integrating information gathered from multiple sources into discipline-specific writing.
Ia. Lower-Division Requirement

The two courses taken to fulfill the lower-division requirement must be completed with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C). Students may select from the courses specified below:

  1. WRITING 39B Critical Reading and Rhetoric and WRITING 39C Argument and Research.
  2. WRITING 37 Intensive Writing and WRITING 39C Argument and Research. Recommended students only.
  3. Completion of the writing component of Humanities Core with a grade of C or better in (HUMAN 1AS or HUMAN H1AS or HUMAN 1BS or HUMAN H1BS or HUMAN 1BES), and in HUMAN 1CS or HUMAN H1CS.
  4. Students who complete WRITING 37 or WRITING 39B with a grade of B (3.0) or better may substitute as the second course of the lower-division writing requirement one of the following courses in creative writing: WRITING 30 or WRITING 31.
  5. WRITING 39B and completion of a First-Year Integrated Program (FIP) sequence, with a grade of C (or Pass) or better in the third quarter of the sequence.
Ib. Upper-Division Requirement

The course taken to fulfill the upper-division requirement must be completed with a minimum grade of C (or a Pass or Credit grade equivalent to C). The requirement may be satisfied by completing one of the following options:

  1. An upper-division course designated on a list of approved courses in the quarterly Schedule of Classes on the University Registrar’s website. NOTE: All courses approved to fulfill the upper-division writing requirement should have a “W” suffix. Students are encouraged to consult the Schedule of Classes or their advisor to determine the current upper-division writing requirement course offerings. If a course on the approved list is offered without the “W” suffix, it does not satisfy the upper-division writing requirement.
  2. Majors in the School of Biological Sciences, Physics majors, and Pharmaceutical Sciences majors satisfy the upper-division writing requirement in the manner specified in those academic unit sections of the Catalogue.

Students who fail to attain the required grades in the courses taken in fulfillment of the writing requirement should refer to the Academic Regulations and Procedures section for further information.

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement.  Click on the course for more information.

Ib. Upper-Division Requirement

Academic English and ESL (AC ENG)
AC ENG 139W Advanced Academic Writing Across the Curriculum
African American Studies (AFAM)
AFAM 162W The Black Protest Tradition
Anthropology (ANTHRO)
ANTHRO 121AW Kinship and Social Organization
ANTHRO 134GW HIV/AIDS in a Global Context*
ANTHRO 161TW Field Research: Asian Immigrants and Refugees in Orange County
ANTHRO 162BW Indian North America*
ANTHRO 180AW Anthropology Majors Seminar
ANTHRO H191W Honors Senior Thesis
Art (ART)
ART 101W Artists as Writers
Art History (ART HIS)
ART HIS 190W Practicum for Majors
Arts and Humanities (ARTSHUM)
ARTSHUM 100 The Arts in Theory and Practice
Asian American Studies (ASIANAM)
ASIANAM 100W Research Methodologies for Asian American Studies
Biological Sciences (BIO SCI)
BIO SCI E106L Habitats and Organisms
BIO SCI D111L Developmental and Cell Biology Laboratory
BIO SCI E112L Physiology Laboratory
BIO SCI N113L Neurobiology Laboratory
BIO SCI M114L Biochemistry Laboratory
BIO SCI E115L Evolution Laboratory
BIO SCI M116L Molecular Biology Laboratory
BIO SCI M118L Experimental Microbiology Laboratory
BIO SCI M121L Advanced Immunology Laboratory
BIO SCI M122L Advanced Microbiology Laboratory
BIO SCI M124L Virus Engineering Laboratory
BIO SCI M127L Virology and Immunology Laboratory
BIO SCI M130L Advanced Molecular Lab Techniques
BIO SCI E131L Image Analysis in Biological Research
BIO SCI E140L Evolution and the Environment Laboratory
BIO SCI E142W Writing/Philosophy of Biology
BIO SCI E161L Biology of Birds Lab
BIO SCI E166L Field Biology
BIO SCI E172L Plant Systematics Laboratory
BIO SCI E179L Field Freshwater Ecology
BIO SCI 191CW Writing/Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability III
Chicano/Latino Studies (CHC/LAT)
CHC/LAT 102W Chicano/Latino Research Seminar
CHC/LAT 148W Racial and Ethnic Relations in the United States
CHC/LAT 156W Chicano/Latinos and Labor
CHC/LAT 158W Feminisms of Color*
CHC/LAT 177W Culture and Close Relationships*
CHC/LAT H190CW Honors Thesis
Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM H181W Honors Seminar in Chemistry
Classics (CLASSIC)
CLASSIC 160W Topics in Classical Literature in English Translation
Comparative Literature (COM LIT)
COM LIT 102W Comparative Studies in Literature and Theory
COM LIT 190W Advanced Seminar in Comparative Literature and Theory
Computer Science and Engineering (CSE)
CSE 181CW Senior Design Project III
Dance (DANCE)
DANCE 185W Critical Issues in Dance
Drama (DRAMA)
DRAMA 109W Special Topics in Theory and Criticism
DRAMA 110W Special Topics in Classical Dramas
DRAMA 112W Special Topics in Early Modern and Neoclassical Theatre
DRAMA 116W Special Topics in Nineteenth-Century Dramas
DRAMA 118W Special Topics in Modern and Contemporary Drama
DRAMA 126W African American Film and Drama
DRAMA 129W Advanced Topics in Performance
DRAMA 132AW Writing for Performance
DRAMA 180W Contemporary Dramatic Criticism and Theory
Earth System Science (EARTHSS)
EARTHSS 190CW Writing/Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability III
EARTHSS 198W Senior Thesis in Earth System Science
EARTHSS H198 Honors Thesis in Earth System Science
Economics (ECON)
ECON 122CW Data Analysis Writing
ECON 123CW Econometrics III
ECON 142CW Industrial Organization III
ECON 144CW Urban Economics III
ECON 145FW Economics of the Environment II
ECON 149W Special Topics in Economics of Public and Private Organizations
ECON 153W Political Institutions, Legal Systems, and Economic Development
ECON 158W Economics of Education
ECON 164AW The Industrial Revolution in Western Europe
ECON 190BW Economics Honors Colloquium II
Education (EDUC)
EDUC 143AW Classroom Interactions I
EDUC 143BW Classroom Interactions II*
EDUC 179W Advanced Composition for Teachers
Electrical Engineering Computer Science (EECS)
EECS 159CW Senior Design Project III
English (ENGLISH)
ENGLISH 101W Undergraduate Seminar in Critical Writing: Topics in Literary History
Engineering (ENGR)
ENGR 190W Communications in the Professional World
ENGR 196W Engineering Thesis
ENGR H196W Honors Thesis
European Studies (EURO ST)
EURO ST 190W Senior Seminar in European Studies
Film and Media Studies (FLM&MDA)
FLM&MDA 139W Writing on Film and Media
French (FRENCH)
FRENCH 139W Literature and Society
Gender and Sexuality Studies (GEN&SEX)
GEN&SEX 139W Topics in Gender Studies
German (GERMAN)
GERMAN 140W Topics in Literary Theory and Criticism
GERMAN 150W German Literature and Culture in Translation
GERMAN 160W German Cinema
GERMAN 170W Topics in German Linguistics
History (HISTORY)
HISTORY 100W Writing About History
Humanities (HUMAN)
HUMAN H142W Senior Honors Colloquium
Information and Computer Science (I&C SCI)
I&C SCI 139W Critical Writing on Information Technology
Informatics (IN4MATX)
IN4MATX 162W Organizational Information Systems
International Studies (INTL ST)
INTL ST 154W Ethics and Justice in International Affairs
INTL ST 155BW Media Writing
Literary Journalism (LIT JRN)
LIT JRN 101BW Literary Journalism Core Writing Seminar
Logic and Philosophy of Science (LPS)
LPS 100W Writing Philosophy
LPS 142W Writing/Philosophy of Biology
Management (MGMT)
MGMT 191W Business Communication
Music (MUSIC)
MUSIC 142W Studies in Baroque Music
MUSIC 143W Studies in Classical Music
MUSIC 144W Studies in Romantic Music
MUSIC 145W Studies in Twentieth-Century Music
MUSIC 180AW Music and Material Culture
MUSIC 180W Music Criticism
Nursing Science (NUR SCI)
NUR SCI 110W Frameworks for Professional Nursing Practice
Philosophy (PHILOS)
PHILOS 100W Writing Philosophy
PHILOS 102W Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge
PHILOS 142W Writing/Philosophy of Biology
Pharmaceutical Sciences (PHRMSCI)
PHRMSCI 174L Biopharmaceutics and Nanomedicine Lab
PHRMSCI 177L Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory
Physical Science (PHY SCI)
PHY SCI 139W Technical Writing and Communication Skills
Physics (PHYSICS)
PHYSICS 121W Advanced Laboratory
Political Science (POL SCI)
POL SCI 120W Public Opinion
POL SCI 122BW California Politics
POL SCI 125AW The United States Congress
POL SCI 134JW Sexism and Power
POL SCI 137BW Types of Political Representation
POL SCI 138CW Ethics of Difference
POL SCI 150AW Seminar on Regime Change in East Asia
POL SCI 151EW Are Chinese Politics Changing?
POL SCI 156CW Citizen Politics
POL SCI 157AW Nationalism
POL SCI 171AW Law and Society
POL SCI 171CW Comparative Constitutional Politics
POL SCI 174CW U.S. Supreme Court
POL SCI 190W Senior Thesis
Psychology and Social Behavior (PSY BEH)
PSY BEH 192RW Culture and Close Relationships*
Cognitive Sciences (PSYCH)
PSYCH 111BW Honors Advanced Experimental Psychology
PSYCH 112BW Advanced Experimental Psychology
PSYCH 146MW Writing about Memory
Public Health (PUBHLTH)
PUBHLTH 195W Public Health Practicum and Culminating Experience
Social Science (SOC SCI)
SOC SCI 172AW American Culture
SOC SCI 183CW Seminar Conflict Resolution
SOC SCI 184GW Media Writing
SOC SCI 185W People in Society
SOC SCI H190C Honors Thesis
Social Ecology (SOCECOL)
SOCECOL 183CW Seminar Conflict Resolution
SOCECOL 186CW Writing/Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability III
SOCECOL H190W Honors Research
SOCECOL 194W Naturalistic Field Research
Sociology (SOCIOL)
SOCIOL 110W Research Methods
SOCIOL 120W Sociological Theory
SOCIOL 145W Occupations and Professions
SOCIOL 147AW Cities and Social Change
SOCIOL 152W Sociology of Art and Popular Culture
SOCIOL 154W Medical Sociology
SOCIOL 155BW Baseball and Society
SOCIOL 158CW Money, Work, and Social Life
SOCIOL 161W Sociology of Sex and Gender
SOCIOL 164W Aging and Society
SOCIOL 165AW Social Inequality: Sociological Perspectives*
SOCIOL 167AW Racial and Ethnic Relations in the United States
SOCIOL 168W Sexism and Power
SOCIOL 177W Immigration and Social Policy
SOCIOL 180AW Sociology Majors Seminar
SOCIOL 188BW Honors Research and Thesis
Writing (WRITING)
WRITING 101W Undergraduate Seminar: Applications in Literary Theory and Criticism for Creative Writing
WRITING 139W Advanced Expository Writing
WRITING 179W Advanced Composition for Teachers

II. Science and Technology

Understanding the nature of scientific inquiry and the operation of the biological, physical, and technological world is essential for making personal and public policy decisions in a technological society.

After completing this GE requirement, successful students should be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate a broad understanding of the fundamental laws of science, the principles underlying the design and operation of technology, and the interrelations among science and technology disciplines;
  • demonstrate a broad understanding of various natural phenomena that surround and influence our lives;
  • describe how scientists approach and solve problems;
  • solve problems and draw conclusions based on scientific information and models, using critical thinking and qualitative and quantitative analysis of data and concepts;
  • and explain the scope and limitations of scientific inquiry and the scientific method.

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement. Click on the course for more information.

Students must complete three courses from the following list:

II. Science and Technology

Arts (ARTS)
ARTS 80 Art, Technology, and Science*
Biological Sciences (BIO SCI)
BIO SCI 1A Life Sciences
BIO SCI 9A Nutrition Science
BIO SCI 9B Biology and Chemistry of Food and Cooking
BIO SCI 9D Diseases of the Twenty-First Century
BIO SCI 9E Horticulture Science
BIO SCI 9J Biology of Oriental Medicine
BIO SCI 9K Global-Change Biology
BIO SCI 9N Introduction to Complementary and Alternative Medicine
BIO SCI 10 The Biology of Human Diseases
BIO SCI 11 Topics in Biological Sciences
BIO SCI 23 Sustainable Landscaping: Design and Practices
BIO SCI 25 Biology of Cancer
BIO SCI 35 The Brain and Behavior
BIO SCI 36 Drugs and the Brain
BIO SCI 37 Brain Dysfunction and Repair
BIO SCI 38 Mind, Memory, Amnesia, and the Brain
BIO SCI 41 Aspects of Mood Disorder
BIO SCI 42 Origin of Life
BIO SCI 43 Media on the Mind
BIO SCI 44 Stem Cells and Brain Repair
BIO SCI 45 AIDS Fundamentals
BIO SCI 47 Stress
BIO SCI 55 Introduction to Ecology
BIO SCI 75 Human Development: Conception to Birth
BIO SCI H90 The Idiom and Practice of Science
BIO SCI 93 From DNA to Organisms
BIO SCI 94 From Organisms to Ecosystems
Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM 1A General Chemistry*
CHEM 1B General Chemistry*
CHEM 1C General Chemistry*
CHEM H2A Honors General Chemistry*
CHEM H2B Honors General Chemistry*
CHEM H2C Honors General Chemistry*
CHEM M3C Majors Quantitative Analytical Chemistry*
CHEM 12 Chemistry Around Us*
CHEM H90 The Idiom and Practice of Science*
Computer Science and Engineering (CSE)
CSE 21 Introduction to Computer Science I *
CSE 22 Introduction to Computer Science II*
CSE 41 Introduction to Programming*
CSE 42 Programming with Software Libraries*
CSE 43 Intermediate Programming*
Dance (DANCE)
DANCE 3 Scientific Concepts of Health
DANCE 4 Introduction to Quantitative Research in Exercise Science
Earth System Science (EARTHSS)
EARTHSS 1 Introduction to Earth System Science*
EARTHSS 3 Oceanography*
EARTHSS 5 The Atmosphere*
EARTHSS 7 Physical Geology*
EARTHSS 11 Climate Change and Policy
EARTHSS 13 Global-Change Biology
EARTHSS 15 Introduction to Global Climate Change*
EARTHSS 17 Hurricanes, Tsunamis, and other Catastrophes*
EARTHSS 19 Introduction to Modeling the Earth System*
EARTHSS 21 On Thin Ice: Climate Change and the Cryosphere*
EARTHSS 23 Air Pollution: From Urban Smog to Global Change *
EARTHSS H90 The Idiom and Practice of Science*
Economics (ECON)
ECON 11 The Internet and Public Policy*
Engineering (ENGR)
ENGR 1A General Chemistry for Engineers
History (HISTORY)
HISTORY 60 The Making of Modern Science
Information and Computer Science (I&C SCI)
I&C SCI 4 Human Factors for the Web
I&C SCI 5 Global Disruption and Information Technology
I&C SCI 6N Computational Linear Algebra*
I&C SCI 8 Practical Computer Security
I&C SCI 10 How Computers Work
I&C SCI 11 The Internet and Public Policy*
I&C SCI 21 Introduction to Computer Science I *
I&C SCI H21 Honors Introduction to Computer Science I*
I&C SCI 22 Introduction to Computer Science II*
I&C SCI H22 Honors Introduction to Computer Science II*
I&C SCI 31 Introduction to Programming*
I&C SCI 32 Programming with Software Libraries*
I&C SCI 33 Intermediate Programming*
I&C SCI 51 Introductory Computer Organization
I&C SCI 61 Game Systems and Design
Informatics (IN4MATX)
IN4MATX 12 Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money*
IN4MATX 41 Informatics Core Course I*
IN4MATX 42 Informatics Core Course II*
Logic and Philosophy of Science (LPS)
LPS 29 Critical Reasoning*
LPS 31 Introduction to Inductive Logic*
LPS 40 The Nature of Scientific Inquiry
LPS H80 Scientific Realism and Instrumentalism
LPS H81 What is Space?
LPS H91 The Philosophy and Biology of Sex*
Philosophy (PHILOS)
PHILOS 29 Critical Reasoning*
PHILOS 31 Introduction to Inductive Logic*
Physics (PHYSICS)
PHYSICS 3A Basic Physics*
PHYSICS 3B Basic Physics*
PHYSICS 3C Basic Physics*
PHYSICS 7C Classical Physics*
PHYSICS 7D Classical Physics*
PHYSICS 7E Classical Physics*
PHYSICS 12 Science Fiction and Science Fact*
PHYSICS 14 Physics of Energy and the Environment
PHYSICS 15 Physics of Music
PHYSICS 17 Physics of Athletics
PHYSICS 18 How Things Work
PHYSICS 19 Great Ideas of Physics
PHYSICS 20A Introduction to Astronomy*
PHYSICS 20B Cosmology: Humanity's Place in the Universe*
PHYSICS 20C Observational Astronomy*
PHYSICS 20D Space Science*
PHYSICS 20E Life in the Universe*
PHYSICS 21 Special Topics in Physics
PHYSICS H80 Impact of World War I on Science
PHYSICS H90 The Idiom and Practice of Science*
Public Health (PUBHLTH)
PUBHLTH 30 Human Environments
PUBHLTH 60 Environmental Quality and Health
PUBHLTH 80 AIDS Fundamentals
PUBHLTH 90 Natural Disasters
Social Science (SOC SCI)
SOC SCI 11A Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money*
University Studies (UNI STU)
UNI STU 13A Introduction to Global Sustainability I
UNI STU 13B Introduction to Global Sustainability II
UNI STU 17C Water III*

III. Social and Behavioral Sciences

Courses will focus on principles, sources, and interpretations of human behavior and on how people organize, govern, understand, and explain social life. This category includes the analysis of human behavior at all levels, from the individual to collective social, economic, and political life, and on the scientific methods used in the acquisition of knowledge and the testing of competing theories.

After completing this GE requirement, successful students should be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of principles, sources, and interpretations of human behavior and how people organize, govern, understand, and explain social life;
  • demonstrate an understanding of contemporary and historical perspectives on human behavior;
  • understand and explain the scientific methods used in the acquisition of knowledge and the testing of competing theories in the social and behavioral sciences;
  • and critically evaluate methods, findings, and conclusions in the research literature on human behavior.

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement. Click on the course for more information.

Students must complete three courses from the following list:

III. Social and Behavioral Sciences

African American Studies (AFAM)
AFAM 40A African American Studies I*
AFAM 40B African American Studies II*
AFAM 40C African American Studies III*
Anthropology (ANTHRO)
ANTHRO 2A Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology*
ANTHRO 2B Introduction to Biological Anthropology
ANTHRO 2C Introduction to Archaeology
ANTHRO 2D Introduction to Language and Culture
ANTHRO 41A Global Cultures and Society*
ANTHRO 134B Anthropology of Drugs
Asian American Studies (ASIANAM)
ASIANAM 50 Asian American Histories*
ASIANAM 51 The U.S. and Asia*
ASIANAM 52 Asian American Communities*
ASIANAM 53 Asian Americans and Comparative Race Relations*
Chicano/Latino Studies (CHC/LAT)
CHC/LAT 61 Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies I*
CHC/LAT 62 Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies II*
CHC/LAT 63 Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies III*
CHC/LAT 64 Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in Political Science*
CHC/LAT 66 Anthropology of Food*
CHC/LAT H80 Latina/o Childhoods: Comparative Approaches to the Study of Children and Youth
Criminology, Law and Society (CRM/LAW)
CRM/LAW C7 Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society
CRM/LAW C10 Fundamentals of Criminology, Law and Society
CRM/LAW C40 Forms of Criminal Behavior
Economics (ECON)
ECON 1 Introduction to Economics
ECON 11 The Internet and Public Policy*
ECON 13 Global Economy*
ECON 17 An Economic Approach to Religion
ECON 20A Basic Economics I
ECON 20B Basic Economics II
ECON 23 Basic Economics for Engineers
Education (EDUC)
EDUC 10 Educational Research Design
EDUC 30 21st Century Literacies
EDUC 40 Theories of Development and Learning Applied to Education
EDUC 55 Knowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science
English (ENGLISH)
ENGLISH 11 Society, Law, and Literature*
Engineering, Civil and Environmental (ENGRCEE)
ENGRCEE 60 Contemporary and Emerging Environmental Challenges
European Studies (EURO ST)
EURO ST 10 Historical Foundations*
EURO ST 11 Contemporary Issues and Institutions*
Gender and Sexuality Studies (GEN&SEX)
GEN&SEX 60A Gender and Science
GEN&SEX 60B Gender and Law
GEN&SEX 60C Gender and Religion*
History (HISTORY)
HISTORY 11 Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity Since WWII*
HISTORY 15C Asian American Histories*
HISTORY 15F What to Eat? Immigrants and the Development of American Cuisines*
Humanities (HUMAN)
HUMAN 55 What is the Origin of Language?*
Information and Computer Science (I&C SCI)
I&C SCI 3 Internet Technologies and their Social Impact
I&C SCI 11 The Internet and Public Policy*
I&C SCI 60 Computer Games and Society
Informatics (IN4MATX)
IN4MATX 12 Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money*
International Studies (INTL ST)
INTL ST 11 Global Cultures and Society*
INTL ST 13 Global Economy*
INTL ST 14 Introduction to International Relations*
Linguistics (LINGUIS)
LINGUIS 3 Introduction to Linguistics*
LINGUIS 10 Introduction to Phonology*
LINGUIS 20 Introduction to Syntax*
LINGUIS 51 Acquisition of Language
LINGUIS 68 Introduction to Language and Culture
Logic and Philosophy of Science (LPS)
LPS H91 The Philosophy and Biology of Sex*
LPS H95 Jurisprudence and Constitutional Law
Management (MGMT)
MGMT 4A Basic Economics for Managers I
MGMT 4B Basic Economics for Managers II
Philosophy (PHILOS)
PHILOS 22 Introduction to Law and Society
Political Science (POL SCI)
POL SCI 6A Introduction to Political Science: Political Analysis*
POL SCI 6B Introduction to Political Science: Macropolitics
POL SCI 6C Introduction to Political Science: Micropolitics
POL SCI 21A Introduction to American Government
POL SCI 31A Introduction to Political Theory
POL SCI 41A Introduction to International Relations*
POL SCI 44A Global Issues and Institutions*
POL SCI 51A Introduction to Politics Around the World*
POL SCI 61A Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in Political Science*
POL SCI 71A Introduction to Law
POL SCI H80 Globalization and Human Security*
Planning, Policy, and Design (PP&D)
PP&D 4 Introduction to Urban Studies
Psychology and Social Behavior (PSY BEH)
PSY BEH 9 Introduction to Psychology
PSY BEH 11A Psychology Fundamentals
PSY BEH 11B Psychology Fundamentals
PSY BEH 11C Psychology Fundamentals
Cognitive Sciences (PSYCH)
PSYCH 7A Introduction to Psychology
PSYCH 9A Psychology Fundamentals
PSYCH 9B Psychology Fundamentals
PSYCH 9C Psychology Fundamentals
PSYCH 21A Adolescent Psychology
PSYCH 46A Introduction to Human Memory
PSYCH 56L Acquisition of Language
PSYCH 78A Self-Identity and Society
Religious Studies (REL STD)
REL STD 17 An Economic Approach to Religion
REL STD 60 Gender and Religion*
Social Science (SOC SCI)
SOC SCI 1A Principles in the Social Sciences
SOC SCI H1E Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences
SOC SCI H1F Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences
SOC SCI H1G Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences
SOC SCI 2A Introduction to Social Science Analysis
SOC SCI 5A Introduction to Human Geography
SOC SCI 5D US World Geography*
SOC SCI 11A Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money*
SOC SCI 40 Social Policy and Public Service
SOC SCI 70C Comparing Cultures*
SOC SCI 78A Asian American Histories*
SOC SCI 78B Asian American Communities*
SOC SCI 78C Asian Americans and Comparative Race Relations*
Social Ecology (SOCECOL)
SOCECOL E8 Introduction to Environmental Analysis and Design
SOCECOL H20A Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences
SOCECOL H20B Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences
SOCECOL H20C Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences
Sociology (SOCIOL)
SOCIOL 1 Introduction to Sociology*
SOCIOL 2 Globalization and Transnational Sociology*
SOCIOL 3 Social Problems*
SOCIOL 31 Self-Identity and Society
SOCIOL 62 Families and Intimate Relations
University Studies (UNI STU)
UNI STU 13C Introduction to Global Sustainability III
UNI STU 15C Consciousness III*
UNI STU 16C How Race Is Made III*
UNI STU 17C Water III*

IV. Arts and Humanities

Study of the Arts and Humanities expands the student’s sense of diverse forms of cultural expression, past and present. Students develop their critical capacity as they discover how meaning is created and experience variously interpreted.

After completing this GE requirement, successful students should be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how visual and verbal communication is used in literature and film, art and music, and philosophy and history;
  • communicate an understanding and appreciation of diverse forms of cultural expression, past and present;
  • understand and explain the research methods used in the acquisition of knowledge and the testing of competing theories in the arts and humanities;
  • and think critically about how meaning is created and how experience is variously interpreted.

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement. Click on the course for more information.

Students must complete three courses from the following list:

IV. Arts and Humanities

African American Studies (AFAM)
AFAM 40A African American Studies I*
AFAM 40B African American Studies II*
AFAM 40C African American Studies III*
Arabic (ARABIC)
ARABIC 51 Introduction to the Koran*
Art (ART)
ART 1A Art in Context: History, Theory, and Practice
ART 1B Art in Context: History, Theory, and Practice
ART 1C Art in Context: History, Theory, and Practice
ART 9A Visual Culture: Media, Art, and Technology
ART 9B Visual Culture: A Culture Divided
ART 9C Visual Culture: Thematic Investigations
ART 12A Art, Design, and Electronic Culture
ART 12B Art, Science and Society: Steam to Steampunk
Art History (ART HIS)
ART HIS 40A Ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Art and Architecture*
ART HIS 40B Arts of Europe: Medieval and Renaissance*
ART HIS 40C Early Modern and Modern Art in Europe and America*
ART HIS 42A History of Asian Art: Arts of India*
ART HIS 42B History of Asian Art: Arts of China*
ART HIS 42C History of Asian Art: Arts of Japan*
ART HIS 42D History of Asian Art: Arts of Islam*
ART HIS 44 Image Collision: A Multicultural Approach to Images and Their Users*
Arts (ARTS)
ARTS 1 ArtsCore
ARTS 80 Art, Technology, and Science*
Asian American Studies (ASIANAM)
ASIANAM 50 Asian American Histories*
ASIANAM 51 The U.S. and Asia*
ASIANAM 54 Asian American Stories*
ASIANAM 55 Asian Americans and the Media*
Classics (CLASSIC)
CLASSIC 36A The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Early Greece
CLASSIC 36B The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Late Archaic and Classical Greece
CLASSIC 36C The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Fourth-Century and Hellenistic Greece
CLASSIC 37A The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic
CLASSIC 37B The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire
CLASSIC 37C The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome
CLASSIC 45A Classical Mythology: The Gods
CLASSIC 45B Classical Mythology: The Heroes
CLASSIC 45C Classical Mythology: Ancient and Modern Perspectives of Classical Mythology
Comparative Literature (COM LIT)
COM LIT 8 Travels in Comparative Literature
COM LIT 9 Introduction to Multiculturalism*
COM LIT 10 Topics in World Literature*
COM LIT 60A World Literature*
COM LIT 60B Reading with Theory*
COM LIT 60C Cultural Studies*
Dance (DANCE)
DANCE 80 Introduction to Ballet and Modern Dance*
DANCE 81 American Ballet and Modern Dance since 1900
DANCE 83 Dance in Feature Film
DANCE 85 Gender, Meaning, and Culture in Ballet
DANCE 90A Dance History 1A*
DANCE 90B Dance History 1B*
DANCE 90C Dance History 1C*
Drama (DRAMA)
DRAMA 10 Introduction to Theatre
DRAMA 11 The Rock and Roll Spectacle Show
DRAMA 15 Performance Now
DRAMA 16 Performing Culture
DRAMA 20A Culture in Performance
DRAMA 20B Culture in Performance
DRAMA 20C Culture in Performance
DRAMA 40A Development of Drama*
DRAMA 40B Development of Drama*
DRAMA 40C Development of Drama*
East Asian Languages and Literatures (E ASIAN)
E ASIAN 40 Topics in East Asian Popular Culture*
E ASIAN 55 Introduction to East Asian Cultures *
English (ENGLISH)
ENGLISH 8 Multicultural American Literature*
ENGLISH 10 Topics in English and American Literature
ENGLISH 11 Society, Law, and Literature*
ENGLISH 12 Young Adult Fiction
ENGLISH 28A The Poetic Imagination
ENGLISH 28B Comic and Tragic Vision
ENGLISH 28C Realism and Romance
ENGLISH 28D The Craft of Poetry
ENGLISH 28E The Craft of Fiction
European Studies (EURO ST)
EURO ST 10 Historical Foundations*
EURO ST 11 Contemporary Issues and Institutions*
Film and Media Studies (FLM&MDA)
FLM&MDA 85A Introduction to Film and Visual Analysis
FLM&MDA 85B Broadcast Media History and Analysis
FLM&MDA 85C New Media and Digital Technologies
French (FRENCH)
FRENCH 50 French Culture and the Modern World*
Gender and Sexuality Studies (GEN&SEX)
GEN&SEX 20 Queer Studies*
GEN&SEX 50A Gender and Feminism in Everyday Life*
GEN&SEX 50B Gender and Power*
GEN&SEX 50C Gender and Popular Culture*
German (GERMAN)
GERMAN 50 Science, Society, and Mind*
Hebrew (HEBREW)
HEBREW 50 Hebrew and Israeli Culture*
History (HISTORY)
HISTORY 10 The Holocaust*
HISTORY 12 Introductory Topics in History
HISTORY 15A Native American History*
HISTORY 15C Asian American Histories*
HISTORY 15D History of Sexuality in the US *
HISTORY 15E Memory and Migration: American Families on the Move*
HISTORY 15F What to Eat? Immigrants and the Development of American Cuisines*
HISTORY 16A World Religions I*
HISTORY 16B World Religions II*
HISTORY 16C Religious Dialogue*
HISTORY 18A Introduction to Jewish Cultures*
HISTORY 21A World: Innovations*
HISTORY 21B World: Empires and Revolutions*
HISTORY 21C World: Wars and Rights*
HISTORY 36A The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Early Greece
HISTORY 36B The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Late Archaic and Classical Greece
HISTORY 36C The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Fourth-Century and Hellenistic Greece
HISTORY 37A The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic
HISTORY 37B The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire
HISTORY 37C The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome
HISTORY 40A Colonial America: New Worlds
HISTORY 40B Nineteenth-Century U.S.: Crisis and Expansion
HISTORY 40C Modern America: Culture and Power
HISTORY 50 Crises and Revolutions*
HISTORY 60 The Making of Modern Science
HISTORY 70A Problems in History: Asia*
HISTORY 70B Problems in History: Europe*
HISTORY 70C Problems in History: United States
HISTORY 70D Problems in History: Latin America*
HISTORY 70E Problems in History: Middle East and Africa*
HISTORY 70F Problems in History: Transregional History*
Humanities (HUMAN)
HUMAN 1A Humanities Core Lecture
HUMAN 1B Humanities Core Lecture
HUMAN 1C Humanities Core Lecture*
HUMAN 10 Masterpieces of Literature*
HUMAN 55 What is the Origin of Language?*
HUMAN H80 Exploring Memory
Literary Journalism (LIT JRN)
LIT JRN 20 Introduction to Literary Journalism
Logic and Philosophy of Science (LPS)
LPS 60 The Making of Modern Science
Music (MUSIC)
MUSIC 3 Introduction to Music
MUSIC 4 Introduction to Opera
MUSIC 8 The Beatles and the Sixties
MUSIC 9 Rock: The Early Years
MUSIC 14A European and American Music 1700 - Twentieth Century
MUSIC 14B European and American Music 1700 - Twentieth Century
MUSIC 14C European and American Music 1700 - Twentieth Century
MUSIC 40B History of European Music: From the Renaissance through the Baroque*
MUSIC 40C History of European Music: Hasse to Mahler*
MUSIC 40D 20th Century Music*
MUSIC 42 Music and Gender*
MUSIC 44 Classical Music in Society*
MUSIC 45 History of Film Music
MUSIC 51 Music Technology and Computers
MUSIC 78 History of Jazz*
Persian (PERSIAN)
PERSIAN 50 Persian Culture*
Philosophy (PHILOS)
PHILOS 1 Introduction to Philosophy
PHILOS 2 Puzzles and Paradoxes*
PHILOS 4 Introduction to Ethics
PHILOS 5 Contemporary Moral Problems
PHILOS 6 Philosophy and Psychoanalysis
PHILOS 7 Introduction to Existentialism
PHILOS 9 Feminist Moral and Political Philosophy
PHILOS 10 History of Ancient Philosophy
PHILOS 11 History of Medieval Philosophy
PHILOS 12 History of Modern Philosophy
PHILOS 13 History of Contemporary Philosophy
PHILOS 23 Introduction to Problems of Self and Mind
Religious Studies (REL STD)
REL STD 5A World Religions I*
REL STD 5B World Religions II*
REL STD 5C Religious Dialogue*
REL STD 90 Aspects of Religion
Russian (RUSSIAN)
RUSSIAN 50 Russian Culture *
Social Science (SOC SCI)
SOC SCI 78A Asian American Histories*
Spanish (SPANISH)
SPANISH 50 Latin America, U.S. Latino, and Iberian Cultures*
University Studies (UNI STU)
UNI STU 15B Consciousness II
UNI STU 15C Consciousness III*
UNI STU 16B How Race Is Made II
UNI STU 16C How Race Is Made III*
UNI STU 17C Water III*

V. Quantitative, Symbolic, and Computational Reasoning

This category consists of two subcategories. Students are required to take one course in each of the subcategories and an additional course from either subcategory, for a total of three courses. A course approved for the GE requirement in category V and also approved for the GE requirement in a category other than V may be used to satisfy the requirements of both categories simultaneously. However, courses approved for both subcategories in category V may only be used once to satisfy one of the subcategories. The two subcategories are indicated as Va and Vb.

Va. Quantitative Literacy

Courses in this category focus on the quantitative description, evaluation, and assessment of events occurring in nature or in human social and political systems. This includes quantitative measurements made or data collected to study such events, analysis of the data, and implications of the analysis for our understanding of the events.

After taking a course in category Va, successful students will be able to do all of the following:

  • identify appropriate tools for quantitative analysis of processes or events;
  • have a basic familiarity with fundamental principles underlying quantitative descriptions of natural or social processes;
  • and be able to do one or more of the following:
    • evaluate studies and reports that assess risk and probability in everyday life;
    • use models of natural phenomena to make quantitative predictions of future behavior or events;
    • use models of economic and social structures to make quantitative predictions of future behavior or events.

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement. Click on the course for more information.

Va. Quantitative Literacy

Anthropology (ANTHRO)
ANTHRO 10A Probability and Statistics
ANTHRO 10B Probability and Statistics
Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM 1A General Chemistry*
CHEM 1B General Chemistry*
CHEM 1C General Chemistry*
CHEM H2A Honors General Chemistry*
CHEM H2B Honors General Chemistry*
CHEM H2C Honors General Chemistry*
CHEM M3C Majors Quantitative Analytical Chemistry*
CHEM 12 Chemistry Around Us*
CHEM H90 The Idiom and Practice of Science*
Computer Science and Engineering (CSE)
CSE 42 Programming with Software Libraries*
Earth System Science (EARTHSS)
EARTHSS 1 Introduction to Earth System Science*
EARTHSS 3 Oceanography*
EARTHSS 5 The Atmosphere*
EARTHSS 7 Physical Geology*
EARTHSS 15 Introduction to Global Climate Change*
EARTHSS 17 Hurricanes, Tsunamis, and other Catastrophes*
EARTHSS 21 On Thin Ice: Climate Change and the Cryosphere*
EARTHSS 23 Air Pollution: From Urban Smog to Global Change *
EARTHSS H90 The Idiom and Practice of Science*
Economics (ECON)
ECON 15A Probability and Statistics in Economics I
ECON 15B Probability and Statistics in Economics II
Education (EDUC)
EDUC 15 Statistics for Education Research
Information and Computer Science (I&C SCI)
I&C SCI 7 Introducing Modern Computational Tools
I&C SCI 32 Programming with Software Libraries*
Logic and Philosophy of Science (LPS)
LPS 31 Introduction to Inductive Logic*
Management (MGMT)
MGMT 7 Statistics for Business Decision Making
Philosophy (PHILOS)
PHILOS 31 Introduction to Inductive Logic*
Physics (PHYSICS)
PHYSICS 3A Basic Physics*
PHYSICS 3B Basic Physics*
PHYSICS 3C Basic Physics*
PHYSICS 7C Classical Physics*
PHYSICS 7D Classical Physics*
PHYSICS 7E Classical Physics*
PHYSICS 12 Science Fiction and Science Fact*
PHYSICS 20A Introduction to Astronomy*
PHYSICS 20B Cosmology: Humanity's Place in the Universe*
PHYSICS 20C Observational Astronomy*
PHYSICS 20D Space Science*
PHYSICS 20E Life in the Universe*
PHYSICS H90 The Idiom and Practice of Science*
Political Science (POL SCI)
POL SCI 10A Probability and Statistics in Political Science I
POL SCI 10B Probability and Statistics in Political Science II
Cognitive Sciences (PSYCH)
PSYCH 10A Probability and Statistics in Psychology I
PSYCH 10B Probability and Statistics in Psychology II
Public Health (PUBHLTH)
PUBHLTH 7 Introduction to Public Health Statistics
Social Science (SOC SCI)
SOC SCI 9A General Statistics and Probability I
SOC SCI 9B General Statistics and Probability II
SOC SCI 10A Probability and Statistics in Social Sciences I
SOC SCI 10B Probability Statistics in Social Sciences II
Social Ecology (SOCECOL)
SOCECOL 13 Statistical Analysis in Social Ecology
Sociology (SOCIOL)
SOCIOL 10A Probability and Statistics
SOCIOL 10B Probability and Statistics
Statistics (STATS)
STATS 7 Basic Statistics
STATS 8 Introduction to Biological Statistics
STATS 67 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Computer Science
Vb. Formal Reasoning

Courses in this category focus on aspects of formal reasoning including symbolic logic, mathematical modeling, and algorithmic reasoning.

After taking a course in category Vb, successful students will be able to do all of the following:

  • understand the concept and purpose of formal languages such as propositional and first-order logic, simple programming languages, mathematical models or linguistic formalisms;
  • possess an elementary grasp of the power and limits of formal methods; and be able to do one or both of the following:
    • apply formal tools of logic or mathematics to the analysis and evaluation of everyday and/or scientific arguments, texts, and communicative situations;
    • apply basic algorithms for the generation of logical deductions, linguistic structures, or computational processes.

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement. Click on the course for more information.

Vb. Formal Reasoning

Anthropology (ANTHRO)
ANTHRO 10C Probability and Statistics
Computer Science and Engineering (CSE)
CSE 21 Introduction to Computer Science I *
CSE 22 Introduction to Computer Science II*
CSE 41 Introduction to Programming*
CSE 42 Programming with Software Libraries*
CSE 43 Intermediate Programming*
CSE 46 Data Structure Implementation and Analysis
Earth System Science (EARTHSS)
EARTHSS 19 Introduction to Modeling the Earth System*
Humanities (HUMAN)
HUMAN 55 What is the Origin of Language?*
Information and Computer Science (I&C SCI)
I&C SCI 6B Boolean Algebra and Logic
I&C SCI 6D Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science
I&C SCI 6N Computational Linear Algebra*
I&C SCI 21 Introduction to Computer Science I *
I&C SCI H21 Honors Introduction to Computer Science I*
I&C SCI 22 Introduction to Computer Science II*
I&C SCI H22 Honors Introduction to Computer Science II*
I&C SCI H23 Honors Introduction to Computer Science III
I&C SCI 31 Introduction to Programming*
I&C SCI 32 Programming with Software Libraries*
I&C SCI 33 Intermediate Programming*
I&C SCI 46 Data Structure Implementation and Analysis
Informatics (IN4MATX)
IN4MATX 41 Informatics Core Course I*
IN4MATX 42 Informatics Core Course II*
IN4MATX 45 Patterns of Software Construction
Linguistics (LINGUIS)
LINGUIS 3 Introduction to Linguistics*
LINGUIS 10 Introduction to Phonology*
LINGUIS 20 Introduction to Syntax*
Logic and Philosophy of Science (LPS)
LPS 29 Critical Reasoning*
LPS 30 Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Mathematics (MATH)
MATH 2A Single-Variable Calculus
MATH 2B Single-Variable Calculus
MATH 2D Multivariable Calculus
MATH 3A Introduction to Linear Algebra
MATH 4 Mathematics for Economists
MATH 5A Calculus for Life Sciences
MATH 5B Calculus for Life Sciences
MATH 6G Linear Algebra
Philosophy (PHILOS)
PHILOS 2 Puzzles and Paradoxes*
PHILOS 29 Critical Reasoning*
PHILOS 30 Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Political Science (POL SCI)
POL SCI 10C Probability and Statistics in Political Science III
Cognitive Sciences (PSYCH)
PSYCH 10C Probability and Statistics in Psychology III
Social Science (SOC SCI)
SOC SCI 9C General Statistics and Probability III
SOC SCI 10C Probability Statistics in Social Sciences III
Sociology (SOCIOL)
SOCIOL 10C Probability and Statistics

VI. Language Other Than English

Study of a language other than English expands students’ horizons by encouraging understanding of another culture through its language and heightens awareness of one’s own language through the investigation of another linguistic system.

After completing this GE requirement, successful students should be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate competency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in a non-English language;
  • demonstrate an understanding of another (non-English speaking) culture through its language;
  • and demonstrate an understanding of one’s own language through the investigation of another, non-English linguistic system.

Students must demonstrate competency in a language other than English (includes American Sign Language) by completing one of the following six options:

  • College-level course work equivalent to UCI’s third quarter of study in a language other than English. UCI courses approved to satisfy this requirement are:

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement. Click on the course for more information.

VI. Language Other Than English

Arabic (ARABIC)
ARABIC 1C Fundamentals of Arabic
ARABIC S1BC Introductory Arabic
Chinese (CHINESE)
CHINESE 1C Fundamental Mandarin Chinese
CHINESE 1DC Fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese - Dialect Background Track
CHINESE 1MC Fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese - Mandarin Background Track
CHINESE S1BC Fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese
French (FRENCH)
FRENCH 1BC Intensive Fundamentals of French
FRENCH 1C Fundamentals of French
FRENCH S1BC Fundamentals of French
German (GERMAN)
GERMAN 1BC Intensive German Fundamentals
GERMAN 1C Fundamentals of German
GERMAN S1BC Fundamentals of German
Greek (GREEK)
GREEK 1C Fundamentals of Greek
GREEK S1BC Fundamentals of Greek
Hebrew (HEBREW)
HEBREW 1C Fundamentals of Hebrew
Italian (ITALIAN)
ITALIAN 1BC Intensive Italian Fundamentals
ITALIAN 1C Fundamentals of Italian
ITALIAN S1BC Italian Fundamentals
Japanese (JAPANSE)
JAPANSE 1C Fundamental Japanese
JAPANSE S1BC Fundamentals of Japanese
Korean (KOREAN)
KOREAN 1C Fundamental Korean
KOREAN 1KC Fundamental Korean for Students with a Previous Background in Korean
KOREAN S1BC Fundamentals of Korean
Latin (LATIN)
LATIN 1C Fundamentals of Latin
LATIN S1BC Fundamentals of Latin
Persian (PERSIAN)
PERSIAN 1C Fundamentals in Persian
PERSIAN S1BC Fundamentals of Persian
Russian (RUSSIAN)
RUSSIAN 1BC Intensive Russian Fundamentals
RUSSIAN 1C Fundamentals of Russian
Spanish (SPANISH)
SPANISH 1C Fundamentals of Spanish
SPANISH S1BC Fundamentals of Spanish
Vietnamese (VIETMSE)
VIETMSE 1C Fundamentals of Vietnamese
VIETMSE S1BC Fundamentals

For information on UCI’s prerequisites, course placement policies, and the grade required to advance to the next level of instruction, consult the School of Humanities (Language Other Than English Placement and Progression) section in this Catalogue.

  • Credit for three years of high school study or its equivalent in a single language other than English with a C average or better in the third year.
  • A score of 3, 4, or 5 on a College Board Advanced Placement Examination in a language other than English. NOTE: Students who earn a 3, 4, or 5 on the AP Chinese Examination must take the UCI Chinese placement examination to determine course credit.
  • A score of 570 or better on a College Board SAT Subject Test in a language other than English, with the exception of the test in Modern Hebrew for which a score of 500 or better is required.
  • Completion of an approved course of study through the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP). Careful planning is required to ensure that this requirement is fulfilled. Check with an EAP counselor at the Study Abroad Center to determine the programs in countries that fulfill this requirement.
  • The equivalent as determined by an appropriate and available means of evaluation. For information on availability of such examinations and testing schedules, consult the Academic Testing Center, (949) 824-6207. If an appropriate means of evaluating competence in a non-English language of instruction does not exist, satisfactory completion, with a C average or better, of one year of formal schooling at the sixth grade level or higher in an institution where the language of instruction is not English will meet the requirement. Appropriate documentation must be presented to substantiate that the course work was completed.

VII. Multicultural Studies

This requirement develops students’ awareness and appreciation of the history, society, and/or culture of one or more underrepresented groups in California and the United States.

After completing this GE requirement, successful students should be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate knowledge of one or more historically underrepresented groups’ culture, history, and development in California and the United States;
  • demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of cultural differences and inequities;
  • and demonstrate an understanding that cooperation and mutual understanding among all cultural groups is needed to interact successfully in a culturally diverse society.

Students must complete one course from the following list. In fulfilling category VII, students are encouraged to use courses that are also being used in fulfillment of other GE categories. For example, HUMAN 1C simultaneously satisfies category VII and a portion of category IV.

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement. Click on the course for more information.

VII. Multicultural Studies

African American Studies (AFAM)
AFAM 40A African American Studies I*
AFAM 40B African American Studies II*
AFAM 40C African American Studies III*
Anthropology (ANTHRO)
ANTHRO 85A Cultures in Collision: Indian-White Relations Since Columbus
ANTHRO 128B Race, Gender, and Science
ANTHRO 136K The Woman and the Body
ANTHRO 137A Reading Images Culturally
ANTHRO 162B Indian North America
ANTHRO 162BW Indian North America*
Art History (ART HIS)
ART HIS 44 Image Collision: A Multicultural Approach to Images and Their Users*
Asian American Studies (ASIANAM)
ASIANAM 50 Asian American Histories*
ASIANAM 52 Asian American Communities*
ASIANAM 53 Asian Americans and Comparative Race Relations*
ASIANAM 54 Asian American Stories*
ASIANAM 55 Asian Americans and the Media*
ASIANAM 144 The Politics of Protest
Chicano/Latino Studies (CHC/LAT)
CHC/LAT 61 Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies I*
CHC/LAT 62 Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies II*
CHC/LAT 63 Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies III*
CHC/LAT 64 Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in Political Science*
CHC/LAT 65 Ethnic and Immigrant America
CHC/LAT 66 Anthropology of Food*
CHC/LAT 114 Film Media and the Latino Community
CHC/LAT 116 Reading Images Culturally
CHC/LAT 142 Latinos and the Law
CHC/LAT 151 Latinos in U.S. Politics
CHC/LAT 153 Cross-Cultural Research on Urban Gangs
CHC/LAT 154 Latino Metropolis
CHC/LAT 158 Feminisms of Color
CHC/LAT 158W Feminisms of Color*
CHC/LAT 160 Perspectives on the U.S. - Mexican Border
CHC/LAT 163 U.S. Immigration Policy
CHC/LAT 168 Chicano/Latino Social Psychology
CHC/LAT 176 Race, Gender, and Science
CHC/LAT 177 Culture and Close Relationships
CHC/LAT 177W Culture and Close Relationships*
CHC/LAT 178 Health and the Latino Paradox
CHC/LAT 183 Multicultural Education in K-12 Schools
Comparative Literature (COM LIT)
COM LIT 9 Introduction to Multiculturalism*
Criminology, Law and Society (CRM/LAW)
CRM/LAW C156 Cross-Cultural Research on Urban Gangs
CRM/LAW C171 Latinos and the Law
Education (EDUC)
EDUC 124 Multicultural Education in K-12 Schools
EDUC 143BW Classroom Interactions II*
English (ENGLISH)
ENGLISH 8 Multicultural American Literature*
Gender and Sexuality Studies (GEN&SEX)
GEN&SEX 20 Queer Studies*
GEN&SEX 50A Gender and Feminism in Everyday Life*
GEN&SEX 50B Gender and Power*
GEN&SEX 50C Gender and Popular Culture*
GEN&SEX 188A Race, Gender, and Science
History (HISTORY)
HISTORY 15A Native American History*
HISTORY 15C Asian American Histories*
HISTORY 15D History of Sexuality in the US *
HISTORY 15E Memory and Migration: American Families on the Move*
HISTORY 15F What to Eat? Immigrants and the Development of American Cuisines*
Humanities (HUMAN)
HUMAN 1C Humanities Core Lecture*
International Studies (INTL ST)
INTL ST 177B Perspectives on the U.S. - Mexican Border
Linguistics (LINGUIS)
LINGUIS 2 Discovering Language
Music (MUSIC)
MUSIC 78 History of Jazz*
Political Science (POL SCI)
POL SCI 32A Dilemmas of Diversity
POL SCI 61A Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in Political Science*
POL SCI 124A The Politics of Protest
POL SCI 124B Latinos in U.S. Politics
POL SCI 126C U.S. Immigration Policy
Planning, Policy, and Design (PP&D)
PP&D 172 Latino Metropolis
Psychology and Social Behavior (PSY BEH)
PSY BEH 192Q Chicano/Latino Social Psychology
PSY BEH 192R Culture and Close Relationships
PSY BEH 192RW Culture and Close Relationships*
PSY BEH 192S Health and the Latino Paradox
Social Science (SOC SCI)
SOC SCI 70A Race and Ethnicity
SOC SCI 70C Comparing Cultures*
SOC SCI 78A Asian American Histories*
SOC SCI 78B Asian American Communities*
SOC SCI 78C Asian Americans and Comparative Race Relations*
SOC SCI 173G Film Media and the Latino Community
SOC SCI 173I Perspectives on the U.S. - Mexican Border
Sociology (SOCIOL)
SOCIOL 1 Introduction to Sociology*
SOCIOL 3 Social Problems*
SOCIOL 51 Asian American Family Community
SOCIOL 63 Race and Ethnicity
SOCIOL 65 Cultures in Collision: Indian-White Relations Since Columbus
SOCIOL 68A Ethnic and Immigrant America
Spanish (SPANISH)
SPANISH 3H Spanish for Heritage Speakers: Exploring U.S. Latino Issues
University Studies (UNI STU)
UNI STU 16C How Race Is Made III*

VIII. International/Global Issues

Courses in this category focus on significant cultural, economic, geographical, historical, political, and/or sociological aspects of one or more countries other than the United States.

After completing this GE requirement, successful students should be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate specific knowledge of the cultural, historical, social, economic, scientific, and political aspects of one or more foreign countries, and the connections among these aspects;
  • develop a broader understanding of the formation of different cultures and countries through the world;
  • and be prepared to engage in positive interaction with peoples of different cultures and nationalities.

Students must complete one course from the following list. In fulfilling category VIII, students are encouraged to use courses that are also being used in fulfillment of other GE categories. In addition, category VIII may be satisfied by one quarter’s participation in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) or one quarter’s participation in an International Opportunities Program (IOP) with an approved IOP Credit Contract. Summer study abroad on an EAP or IOP (with approved IOP Credit Contract) satisfies this requirement when the program is at least five weeks long and the student completes at least one course worth at least four quarter units.

Courses with an asterisk (*) can meet one or more GE requirement. Click on the course for more information.

VIII. International/Global Issues

Anthropology (ANTHRO)
ANTHRO 2A Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology*
ANTHRO 20A People, Cultures, and Environmental Sustainability
ANTHRO 30A Global Issues in Anthropological Perspective
ANTHRO 41A Global Cultures and Society*
ANTHRO 125X Transnational Migration
ANTHRO 134A Medical Anthropology
ANTHRO 134G HIV/AIDS in a Global Context
ANTHRO 134GW HIV/AIDS in a Global Context*
ANTHRO 135I Modern South Asian Religions
ANTHRO 136A Nationalism and Ethnicity in the Contemporary World
ANTHRO 136D Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective
ANTHRO 138Q Latino Music: A View of Its Diversity and Strength
ANTHRO 162A Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
ANTHRO 163A Peoples of the Pacific
ANTHRO 164P Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia
Arabic (ARABIC)
ARABIC 2A Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture
ARABIC 2B Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture
ARABIC 2C Intermediate Arabic Language and Culture
ARABIC 51 Introduction to the Koran*
Art History (ART HIS)
ART HIS 40A Ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Art and Architecture*
ART HIS 40B Arts of Europe: Medieval and Renaissance*
ART HIS 40C Early Modern and Modern Art in Europe and America*
ART HIS 42A History of Asian Art: Arts of India*
ART HIS 42B History of Asian Art: Arts of China*
ART HIS 42C History of Asian Art: Arts of Japan*
ART HIS 42D History of Asian Art: Arts of Islam*
Asian American Studies (ASIANAM)
ASIANAM 51 The U.S. and Asia*
Chicano/Latino Studies (CHC/LAT)
CHC/LAT 115A Latino Music: A View of Its Diversity and Strength
CHC/LAT 130 Introduction to Cuba: History, Culture, and Society
CHC/LAT 161 Transnational Migration
CHC/LAT 178A Medical Anthropology
Chinese (CHINESE)
CHINESE 2A Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
CHINESE 2B Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
CHINESE 2C Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
CHINESE 2DA Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Dialect Background Track
CHINESE 2DB Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Dialect Background Track
CHINESE 2DC Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Dialect Background Track
CHINESE 2MA Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Mandarin Background Track
CHINESE 2MB Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Mandarin Background Track
CHINESE 2MC Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Mandarin Background Track
CHINESE 3A Advanced Mandarin Chinese
CHINESE 3B Advanced Mandarin Chinese
CHINESE 3C Advanced Mandarin Chinese
Comparative Literature (COM LIT)
COM LIT 10 Topics in World Literature*
COM LIT 60A World Literature*
COM LIT 60B Reading with Theory*
COM LIT 60C Cultural Studies*
Dance (DANCE)
DANCE 80 Introduction to Ballet and Modern Dance*
DANCE 82 Topics in World Dance
DANCE 90A Dance History 1A*
DANCE 90B Dance History 1B*
DANCE 90C Dance History 1C*
Drama (DRAMA)
DRAMA 40A Development of Drama*
DRAMA 40B Development of Drama*
DRAMA 40C Development of Drama*
East Asian Languages and Literatures (E ASIAN)
E ASIAN 20 Asian Religions
E ASIAN 40 Topics in East Asian Popular Culture*
E ASIAN 55 Introduction to East Asian Cultures *
Earth System Science (EARTHSS)
EARTHSS 15 Introduction to Global Climate Change*
EARTHSS 17 Hurricanes, Tsunamis, and other Catastrophes*
EARTHSS 21 On Thin Ice: Climate Change and the Cryosphere*
EARTHSS 23 Air Pollution: From Urban Smog to Global Change *
Economics (ECON)
ECON 13 Global Economy*
European Studies (EURO ST)
EURO ST 10 Historical Foundations*
EURO ST 11 Contemporary Issues and Institutions*
French (FRENCH)
FRENCH 2A Intermediate French
FRENCH 2B Intermediate French
FRENCH 2C Intermediate French
FRENCH S2AB Intermediate French
FRENCH S2BC Intermediate French
FRENCH 50 French Culture and the Modern World*
Gender and Sexuality Studies (GEN&SEX)
GEN&SEX 60C Gender and Religion*
German (GERMAN)
GERMAN 2A Intermediate German
GERMAN 2B Intermediate German
GERMAN 2C Intermediate German
GERMAN S2AB Intermediate German
GERMAN S2BC Intermediate German
GERMAN 50 Science, Society, and Mind*
Hebrew (HEBREW)
HEBREW 2A Intermediate Hebrew
HEBREW 2B Intermediate Hebrew
HEBREW 2C Intermediate Hebrew
HEBREW 50 Hebrew and Israeli Culture*
History (HISTORY)
HISTORY 10 The Holocaust*
HISTORY 11 Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity Since WWII*
HISTORY 16A World Religions I*
HISTORY 16B World Religions II*
HISTORY 16C Religious Dialogue*
HISTORY 18A Introduction to Jewish Cultures*
HISTORY 21A World: Innovations*
HISTORY 21B World: Empires and Revolutions*
HISTORY 21C World: Wars and Rights*
HISTORY 50 Crises and Revolutions*
HISTORY 70A Problems in History: Asia*
HISTORY 70B Problems in History: Europe*
HISTORY 70D Problems in History: Latin America*
HISTORY 70E Problems in History: Middle East and Africa*
HISTORY 70F Problems in History: Transregional History*
Humanities (HUMAN)
HUMAN 1C Humanities Core Lecture*
HUMAN 10 Masterpieces of Literature*
International Studies (INTL ST)
INTL ST 11 Global Cultures and Society*
INTL ST 13 Global Economy*
INTL ST 14 Introduction to International Relations*
INTL ST 114A International Political Economy
INTL ST 117A Transnational Migration
INTL ST 145A International Law
INTL ST 153E Nationalism and Ethnicity in the Contemporary World
INTL ST 158A Modern South Asian Religions
INTL ST 158B Peoples of the Pacific
INTL ST 162B Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia
INTL ST 177F Introduction to Cuba: History, Culture, and Society
INTL ST 177J Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
INTL ST 183E Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Italian (ITALIAN)
ITALIAN 2A Intermediate Italian
ITALIAN 2B Intermediate Italian
ITALIAN 2C Intermediate Italian
Japanese (JAPANSE)
JAPANSE 2A Intermediate Japanese
JAPANSE 2B Intermediate Japanese
JAPANSE 2C Intermediate Japanese
JAPANSE S2AB Intermediate Japanese
JAPANSE S2BC Intermediate Japanese
JAPANSE 3A Advanced Japanese
JAPANSE 3B Advanced Japanese
JAPANSE 3C Advanced Japanese
Korean (KOREAN)
KOREAN 2A Intermediate Korean
KOREAN 2B Intermediate Korean
KOREAN 2C Intermediate Korean
KOREAN 2KA Intermediate Korean for Students with a Previous Background in Korean
KOREAN 2KB Intermediate Korean for Students with a Previous Background in Korean
KOREAN 2KC Intermediate Korean for Students with a Previous Background in Korean
KOREAN S2AB Intensive Intermediate Korean
KOREAN S2BC Intensive Intermediate Korean
KOREAN 3A Advanced Korean
KOREAN 3B Advanced Korean
KOREAN 3C Advanced Korean
Linguistics (LINGUIS)
LINGUIS 1 Languages of the World
Music (MUSIC)
MUSIC 40B History of European Music: From the Renaissance through the Baroque*
MUSIC 40C History of European Music: Hasse to Mahler*
MUSIC 40D 20th Century Music*
MUSIC 42 Music and Gender*
MUSIC 44 Classical Music in Society*
MUSIC 49A Asian in Western Music
Persian (PERSIAN)
PERSIAN 2A Intermediate Persian
PERSIAN 2B Intermediate Persian
PERSIAN 2C Intermediate Persian
PERSIAN 3A Advanced Persian
PERSIAN 3B Advanced Persian
PERSIAN 50 Persian Culture*
Political Science (POL SCI)
POL SCI 6A Introduction to Political Science: Political Analysis*
POL SCI 41A Introduction to International Relations*
POL SCI 43D Global Security and Cooperation
POL SCI 44A Global Issues and Institutions*
POL SCI 51A Introduction to Politics Around the World*
POL SCI H80 Globalization and Human Security*
POL SCI 141B International Political Economy
POL SCI 141C International Political Economy of East Asia
POL SCI 154F Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia
POL SCI 154G Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective
POL SCI 172A International Law
Religious Studies (REL STD)
REL STD 5A World Religions I*
REL STD 5B World Religions II*
REL STD 5C Religious Dialogue*
REL STD 60 Gender and Religion*
Russian (RUSSIAN)
RUSSIAN 2A Intermediate Russian
RUSSIAN 2B Intermediate Russian
RUSSIAN 2C Intermediate Russian
RUSSIAN 50 Russian Culture *
Social Science (SOC SCI)
SOC SCI 5D US World Geography*
SOC SCI 173Q Introduction to Cuba: History, Culture, and Society
SOC SCI 183E Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Sociology (SOCIOL)
SOCIOL 2 Globalization and Transnational Sociology*
SOCIOL 44 Births, Deaths, and Migration
SOCIOL 165AW Social Inequality: Sociological Perspectives*
Spanish (SPANISH)
SPANISH 2 Accelerated Intermediate Spanish
SPANISH 2A Intermediate Spanish
SPANISH 2AB Intermediate Intensive Spanish
SPANISH 2B Intermediate Spanish
SPANISH 2C Intermediate Spanish
SPANISH S2AB Intermediate Spanish
SPANISH S2BC Intermediate Spanish
SPANISH 3A Grammar and Composition
SPANISH 3B Composition and Grammar
SPANISH 44 Hispanic Literatures for Nonmajors
SPANISH 50 Latin America, U.S. Latino, and Iberian Cultures*
Vietnamese (VIETMSE)
VIETMSE 2A Intermediate Vietnamese
VIETMSE 2B Intermediate Vietnamese
VIETMSE 2C Intermediate Vietnamese

Or, students may complete one of the following fourth-quarter language options:

  1. Credit for four years of high school study or its equivalent in a single language other than English with a C average or better in the fourth year.
  2. A score of 4 or 5 on a College Board Advanced Placement Examination in a language other than English. NOTE: Students who earn a 3, 4, or 5 on the AP Chinese Examination must take the UCI Chinese placement examination to determine course credit.
  3. A score of 620 or better on a College Board SAT Subject Test in a language other than English, with the exception of the test in Modern Hebrew for which a score of 540 or better is required.
  4. The equivalent as determined by an appropriate and available means of evaluation. For information on availability of such examinations and testing schedules, consult the Academic Testing Center, (949) 824-6207. If an appropriate means of evaluating competence in a non-English language of instruction does not exist, satisfactory completion, with a C average or better, of two years of formal schooling at the sixth grade level or higher in an institution where the language of instruction is not English will meet the requirement. Appropriate documentation must be presented to substantiate that the course work was completed.

First-Year Integrated Program (FIP)

University Studies 13–17 are three-quarter multidisciplinary sequences for freshmen or lower-division students only. These integrated courses are designed to introduce students to the ways different disciplines approach similar problems and to provide a freshman learning community experience. Successful completion of all three quarters will satisfy several courses toward partial fulfillment of different general education (GE) requirement categories. Additional information is available in the First-Year Integrated Program section of this Catalogue.

School, Departmental, and Major Requirements

In addition to the University and UCI requirements listed above, each undergraduate student must satisfy the degree requirements for the major and, if applicable, the minor or concentration selected. UCI, school, and departmental or major and minor requirements may overlap; courses taken to fulfill a school or departmental requirement may also help fulfill the UCI general education requirement. Students are urged to make sure that they understand how many courses are permitted to satisfy more than one requirement. Information on specific degree requirements and courses is available in the academic unit sections of this Catalogue.

Students must declare a major by the time they reach junior status (90 units excluding college work completed prior to high school graduation), and should make certain that the background and the preparation prerequisite to junior and senior work in the major have been accomplished. Transfer students should read the section on Information for Transfer Students: Fulfilling Requirements for a Bachelor’s Degree.

Students should note that with the exception of courses designated Pass/Not Pass Only, courses taken Pass/Not Pass may not be used to satisfy specific course requirements of the student’s school and major, unless authorized by the appropriate dean. Additional information on grading is located in the Academic Regulations and Procedures section.

Minor Programs

For certification in a minor, a student must obtain a minimum overall grade point average of at least C (2.0) in all courses required for the minor program. No more than two courses applied to a minor may be taken Pass/Not Pass. Completion of the minor is noted on a student’s transcript. (Students are not required to minor in a program in order to graduate from UCI.)

Application for Graduation

In order to receive a degree, an undergraduate student must submit an online Application for Graduation via the Student Access link at the University Registrar's Office website no later than the published deadline. Specific deadline dates for filing are established quarterly so that candidates’ academic records can be reviewed to verify that all graduation requirements have been met. These dates vary among academic units. Students should contact their academic counseling office for deadline and degree audit information.

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