2018-19 Edition

School of Humanities

On This Page:


Tyrus Miller, Dean

143 Humanities Instructional Building
Undergraduate Counseling: 949-824-5132
Graduate Counseling: 949-824-4303
www.humanities.uci.edu

Overview

The School of Humanities promotes practical liberal arts for the 21st century. The School is internationally recognized for its outstanding programs in the main areas of humanistic inquiry: history; languages; philosophy; and literature, film, and the arts. With a faculty whose distinctions include two Pulitzer Prizes and numerous other national and international awards, the School offers 22 majors and 36 minors that include those in traditional disciplines, languages other than English, and interdisciplinary areas of study.

The core educational mission of the humanities is imparting to students tools of analysis that will allow them to understand, describe, and explain the world around them in a critical context. A liberal arts education in the humanities prepares students to examine a variety of written and visual forms and to communicate effectively. All Humanities students are introduced to writing, philosophy, history, visual culture, literature, and a language other than English. Students in Humanities majors are given the opportunity to conduct an intensive conversation with the traditions, both past and present; and as a result, develop the ability to understand and make sense of other people and their cultures. Humanistic inquiry equips students to enter the world as globally thinking citizens.

Because language is the humanist’s essential tool and the traditional medium of historical record, philosophical speculation, and literary creation and criticism, the School of Humanities places special emphasis on language and training in composition. The School offers programs in more than a dozen languages other than English. The serious study of language other than English is crucial to fostering critical thinking, objective self-reflection, and international awareness. The distinguished programs in creative writing, literary journalism, and the Program in Academic English/English as a Second Language are housed in Humanities. Humanities Core integrates the multi-disciplinary study of the humanities along with lower-division writing for majors who enter as freshmen.

Interdisciplinary study is an essential feature of the Humanities Honors Program as well as of many of the School's undergraduate degree programs. Examples of undergraduate programs located in Humanities that cut across disciplinary boundaries are the majors in Global Cultures, Global Middle East Studies, and Religious Studies, and the interdisciplinary minors in Archaeology, Latin American Studies, and Medical Humanities.

Students majoring in the humanities are particularly well-prepared for careers in all fields that rely on analysis, judgment, and argument. Humanities students have moved into business, medicine, the law, education, politics, public policy, academia, new media and journalism. Employers in all sectors increasingly request college graduates who can communicate effectively across cultures, think critically, and have the ability to learn and adapt on the job. Employers can provide a specific form of technical training, but the School of Humanities provides the thinking and writing skills, as well as the social and emotional intelligence that allow graduates to excel in a wide range of professions.

Degrees

African American Studies B.A.
Art History B.A., M.A.
Asian American Studies B.A., M.A.
Chinese Studies B.A.
Classics B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Comparative Literature B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Culture and Theory M.A., Ph.D.
East Asian Cultures B.A.
East Asian Languages and Literatures M.A., Ph.D.
English B.A., M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D.
European Studies B.A.
European Thought and Culture M.A.
Film and Media Studies B.A.
French B.A.
Gender and Sexuality Studies B.A.
German M.A., Ph.D.
German Studies B.A.
Global Cultures B.A.
Global Middle East Studies B.A.
History B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Japanese Language and Literature B.A.
Korean Literature and Culture B.A.
Literary Journalism B.A.
Philosophy B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Religious Studies B.A.
Spanish B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Visual Studies M.A., Ph.D.

Honors at Graduation

Campus criteria for honors at graduation are described in the section Honors Recognition. In addition to campus criteria, the School of Humanities uses cumulative GPA as the criterion for the awarding of Honors at Graduation. The official designation of Honors on the diploma and transcript will be based upon the candidate’s cumulative GPA and total units completed at the end of the final quarter.

Humanities Commons

Julia R. Lupton, Associate Dean for Research
1110 Humanities Gateway; 949-824-1662
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/commons/; HumCom@uci.edu

UCI’s Humanities Commons explores the scope of human experience by supporting faculty and graduate student scholarship, engaging in collaborative projects, and providing opportunities for campus-public partnerships. The Humanities Commons provides small grants to School of Humanities faculty for research expenses, conference programming, publication subvention, and conference travel. School of Humanities graduate students can apply for funding for dissertation research and for presenting collaborative conferences. In addition to serving as a liaison and coordinator for cross-campus and multi-campus projects, the Humanities Commons builds partnerships that engage the School of Humanities with community organizations and public institutions.

Humanities Studio and Computing Facility

The Humanities Studio/Academic Resources & Technology (formerly Humanities Instructional Resource Center) and the Humanities Computing Facility (HCF) share space in Humanities Hall and provide comprehensive technology support for instruction, research, and faculty and staff development.

The Humanities Studio services and facilities include video and audio libraries, and audiovisual equipment. HCF includes the computer labs, fee-based laser printing, support for wireless networking in the Humanities quad, and computing consultation. Both facilities provide technology-related research and development assistance for faculty, and both graduate and undergraduate students. HCF houses two PC labs, one Macintosh lab, and one drop-in lab (with both Macs and PCs). The facility has more than 100 stations. HCF also provides a wide range of computer services (scanning, document conversion, workshops, and more).

Both HCF and Humanities Studio labs provide a wide variety of instructional resources such as multimedia applications and development stations, foreign language word processing, Web browsing (including support for non-Roman alphabets), language learning materials, among others. The labs are available to Humanities students, instructors, and staff for class instruction and drop-in purposes.

Thanks to a partnership between Graham Arader and Georges Van Den Abbeele, Dean of the School of Humanities, Humanities Studio is currently home to $1 million worth of historic art from Arader's historic art collection. The art is available for viewing throughout the Humanities Studio. The artwork features natural history watercolors, woodcuts, engravings, lithographs, chromolithographs, and maps dating from the 16th to 19th centuries.

Arader has devoted more than four decades to building a comprehensive gallery of natural history artwork, including hand-colored aquatints and lithographs by John James Audubon and other important ornithological, zoological, and botanical artists. Arader has confirmed that Audubon’s works continue to be his most sought-after pieces. For more information, or to schedule an art-viewing in advance, please contact the Operations Manager of Humanities Studio, at 949-824-6344. 

Additional information may be obtained by visiting the Humanities Studio website, the HCF Computer Consulting Office, 4000 Humanities Gateway, 949-824-7609, or the Humanities Studio main offices, 269 Humanities Hall, 949-824-6344.

Humanities Out There (H.O.T.) Program

Humanities Commons, Humanities Gateway 1st Floor
949-824-1948

H.O.T. is an outreach program between UCI’s School of Humanities and local cultural institutions, such as public libraries and museums. The program consists of a quarterly series of pedagogical and public humanities training sessions. Undergraduate students in the program volunteer at the quarter’s chosen field site, supervised by faculty and advanced graduate students in the humanities.

Requirements for undergraduates include attending at least five training sessions at UCI; attending at least two workshops in the field; weekly electronic journal entries; and a three- to five-page paper with an academic focus. Undergraduates can earn two or four units of H.O.T. credit each quarter through HUMAN 195.

Dr. Samuel M. Jordan Center for Persian Studies and Culture

Touraj Daryaee, Director
1118 Humanities Gateway
949-824-3638
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/persianstudies/
sjcps@uci.edu

The Samuel Jordan Center for Persian Studies and Culture is devoted to the study of Iran and the Persianate world. Drawing on the strengths of the entire campus, the Center focuses on interdisciplinary research projects that bridge the arts, humanities, engineering, medicine, and the sciences. The Center sponsors events such as lectures, performances, and film screenings that draw a campus and community audience throughout the year.

Courses, including language, literature, history, music, and culture at the undergraduate and graduate levels, are the backbone of the Center’s academic and pedagogical mission. These academic courses are offered by affiliated faculty and administered by different units. The Humanities Language Learning Program offers courses on Persian language. Courses in ancient, medieval, and modern Persian history are administered by the Department of History. Courses on modern Persian literature and the literature of Iranian diaspora are offered through the Department of Comparative Literature. And courses on Persian music are housed within the Department of Music. A list of courses and information on the Persian Studies minor is available on the minor’s website.

Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree

All students must meet the University Requirements.

School Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of HUMAN 1A-HUMAN 1AS-HUMAN 1B-HUMAN 1BS-HUMAN 1C-HUMAN 1CS taken for letter grades in the freshman year.
    Transfer students in all majors in the School of Humanities may substitute for the Humanities Core appropriate course work as described on the School of Humanities website. No overlap is permitted between the Humanities Core substitution and a student’s departmental/major requirements.
  2. College-level course work equivalent to UCI’s sixth quarter of study (2C level, or for Latin or Greek, one 103 and one 104, or two 103s or 104s) in a language other than English or equivalent competence. The final course must be taken for a letter grade and passed with a grade of C or better. NOTE: Please refer to the course listings in the Catalogue (http://catalogue.uci.edu/allcourses/) for information regarding required prerequisites for the 2C level language courses, or Latin or Greek 103 or 104.

Unless otherwise specified, courses taken to satisfy major, minor, and school requirements must be a minimum of 4 units each. Unless otherwise specified, no more than one independent or directed group study course may be petitioned toward major or minor requirements. Unless otherwise specified, all courses taken to satisfy major and school requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

Quarterly consultation with a faculty advisor is recommended.

Maximum Overlap Between Major Requirements: In fulfilling degree requirements for multiple majors, a maximum of two courses may overlap between any two majors.

Maximum Overlap Between Major and Minor Requirements: In fulfilling minor requirements, a maximum of two courses may overlap between a major and a minor. No course overlap is permitted between minors.

Normal Progress in the Major: School of Humanities majors are expected to take at least one course required for their major program each quarter as well as make progress toward the completion of the School’s language other than English requirement.

School Residence Requirement: At least five upper-division courses required for each major must be completed successfully at UCI. Completion of a minor program is optional; however, for certification in a minor, at least four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. See individual major and minor requirements for specific courses and how participation in the Education Abroad Program (EAP) can affect the residence requirement. Exceptions are considered on a case-by-case basis and decided in consultation between the appropriate department or faculty member and the Associate Dean of Humanities for Curriculum and Student Affairs.

Internship Policy. In most cases, Humanities students are not allowed to earn credit for off-campus internships. However, if a department or program determines that the internship is academically appropriate and promotes the student’s academic goals, the student may take the internship as Independent Study and unit credit will be given. The sponsoring department or program and the instructor will in all cases require a substantial academic product, such as a paper, growing out of the internship.

A student who wishes to seek approval for an off-campus internship and earn course credit must file an Independent Study form with the department/program of the sponsoring faculty. A student who wishes to apply approved credit toward degree requirements, other than elective units, must also petition for approval from the Humanities Undergraduate Study Office, prior to beginning the internship.

UCI approved internship courses are applied to major requirements as specified by individual major requirements.                           

Change of Major. Students who wish to change their major to one offered by the School of Humanities should contact the Humanities Undergraduate Counseling Office for information about change-of-major requirements, procedures, and policies. Information is also available at the UCI Change of Major Criteria website.

Undergraduate Programs

The following majors are offered:

African American Studies, B.A.
Art History, B.A.
Asian American Studies, B.A.
Chinese Studies, B.A.:
Classics, B.A.
Comparative Literature, B.A.
East Asian Cultures, B.A.
English, B.A.
European Studies, B.A.
Film and Media Studies, B.A.
French, B.A.
Gender and Sexuality Studies B.A.
German Studies, B.A.
Global Middle East Studies, B.A.
Global Cultures, B.A.
History, B.A.
Japanese Language and Literature, B.A.
Korean Literature and Culture, B.A.
Literary Journalism, B.A.
Philosophy, B.A.
Religious Studies, B.A.
Spanish, B.A.

The following minors are offered:

African American Studies
Archaeology
Art History
Asian American Studies
Asian Studies
Chinese Language and Literature
Chinese Studies
Classical Civilization
Comparative Literature
English
European Studies
Film and Media Studies
French
Gender and Sexuality Studies
German Studies
Global Cultures
Global Middle East Studies
Greek
History
Humanities and Law
Italian Studies
Japanese Language and Literature
Japanese Studies
Jewish Studies
Korean Literature and Culture
Latin
Latin American Studies
Literary Journalism
Medical Humanities
Persian Studies
Philosophy
Queer Studies
Religious Studies
Russian Studies
Spanish
Spanish/English Bilingual Education

Humanities Undergraduate Study

Yong Chen, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Student Services
143 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-5132
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/undergrad/

The Office of Undergraduate Study provides academic counseling to students pursuing majors within the School of Humanities, as well as students interested in changing to, or adding a double major in School of Humanities disciplines. Students should consult an academic counselor with questions about University policies and regulations, degree requirements, course content, options for majors and minors, study abroad, honors opportunities, or when facing academic difficulties. 

Humanities Peer Mentor Program

The Humanities Peer Mentor Program is designed to address some of the academic, cultural, and social needs of freshmen in the School of Humanities. While all new Humanities freshmen will benefit from participation in the program, it is particularly useful for new first generation college students. It has a goal of developing leadership skills in both the mentors and the protogees/mentees. The program features two-tiered mentoring, with successful upper-division students mentoring small groups of new students, and the student mentors in turn working with faculty and staff. Another focus of the program is to encourage the student mentors to go on to graduate school.

Participants attend workshops on topics such as communication styles, study skills, procrastination and time management, and studying abroad, as well as take part in a variety of more social events. They also produce weekly journals in which they express their ideas and raise issues for their mentors. Call 949-824-5132 for additional information.

Humanities Honors Program

Jayne Lewis, Director
143 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-5132; www.humanities.uci.edu/undergrad/opportunities/honors.php

The Honors Program within the School of Humanities is a two-year, upper-division program designed to challenge exceptional students from all majors by providing special opportunities for intellectual growth in an interdisciplinary setting. Honors students benefit from small seminars, individual faculty attention, peer support, and the chance to pursue independent research. They think deeply about the meaning and value of humanistic inquiry and thus actively shape its future while honing their skills as thinkers, writers, and citizens of the world.

Humanities Honors students complete a two-part course of study. In their junior year, students take three quarters of an interdisciplinary Proseminar (HUMAN H120) organized around a single topic or problem, such as crime and punishment, state and civil society, the development of religion in the West, or the self, nature, and the American dream. The sequence is designed to compare and contrast modes of analysis and critical thinking in several disciplines in the Humanities, such as history, literary studies, and philosophy. In a small seminar setting, students are encouraged to become reflective about their own chosen disciplines.

In their senior year, students take a sequence of courses beginning in the fall with a Senior Honors Seminar (HUMAN H140), and continuing in the winter and spring with the Senior Honors Thesis (HUMAN H141) and the Senior Honors Colloquium (HUMAN H142W), in which they complete an independent research project under the direction of a faculty member on a topic chosen by the student. A prize is awarded for the year’s outstanding thesis.

In both sequences, the Honors students benefit from their close association with exceptional scholars and the challenge and support of their intellectual peers.

Students interested in learning how the Humanities Honors Program will fit into their regular courses of study are encouraged to contact the Humanities Undergraduate Study Director; telephone 949-824-5132.

Campuswide Honors Program

The Campuswide Honors Program is available to selected high-achieving students from all academic majors from their freshman through senior years. For more information contact the Campus­wide Honors Program, 1200 Student Services II; 949-824-5461; honors@uci.edu; or visit the Campuswide Honors Program website.

Study Abroad Center

The Study Abroad Center, which includes the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) and the International Opportunities Program (IOP), assists students in taking advantage of the many worldwide opportunities that exist for study, work, internship, volunteering, and research. School of Humanities majors and minors can benefit from a broader perspective of their fields by studying for one year at a university in such countries as China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, Spain, or the United Kingdom through UCEAP. Students can also augment their exposure to other cultures with programs sponsored through IOP. Visit the Study Abroad Program website or an academic counselor for additional information.

Language Other than English Placement and Progression

The following policies apply to all UCI students taking language other than English courses.

Language Other Than English Progression. Within the beginning and intermediate language instructional sequences (1A-B-C and 2A-B-C, and for Latin and Greek, 1A-B-C and 100) students must earn a grade of at least C (or Pass) in order to advance to the next level of instruction, unless an exception is permitted by the appropriate course director and the Associate Dean of Humanities for Curriculum and Student Services. A student may not go back and take a lower-level course for credit once a more advanced level has been completed with a passing grade. Nor may a student be enrolled in more than one level of the same language at the same time (for example, a student may not enroll in language 2B and 2C concurrently).

Language Other Than English Placement. Placement tests are required for the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Spanish (for students with no previous college course work), and Vietnamese. Contact the UCI Academic Testing Center for information; telephone 949-824-6207; email: testcenter@uci.edu; or visit the Testing Center website. Placement tests are recommended but not required for French and German language courses. The purpose of placement testing is to ensure success in UCI language courses.

For languages other than English which are not listed above (and for French and German if the placement test is not taken), students entering UCI with previous high school language training only are placed as follows: in general, one year of high school work is equated with one quarter of UCI work. Thus, students with one, two, three, or four years of high school language other than English will normally enroll in 1B-, 1C-, 2A-, or 2B-level language courses, respectively. Students who opt to “go back” one quarter will earn credit (i.e., a student with three years of high school language other than English may opt to take 1C instead of 2A). If it has been five or more years since the last high school course, the student may begin at 1A for credit. Exceptions must have the approval of the appropriate course director and the Associate Dean of Humanities for Curriculum and Student Services.

Students will not receive credit for repeating at UCI language other than English courses for which they received transfer credit from another institution, even if they are placed by testing into the equivalent of a previously taken course.

Language Other Than English Advanced Placement Credit. Students cannot earn units or grade points at UCI in courses from which they have been exempted on the basis of Advanced Placement credit. However, since Advanced Placement awards a maximum of 8 units for scores of 4 and 5, students may elect to take 2C or the equivalent for credit.

Native Speakers of Languages Other Than English. A native speaker of a language other than English is defined by the University as someone who attended the equivalent of secondary school in another country where the language of instruction was other than English. Students with prior background in a language other than English should consult the UCI Academic Testing Center to see if a placement test is available to demonstrate competence in that language. If an appropriate means of evaluating competence in a non-English language of instruction does not exist, satisfactory completion, with a C average or better, or equivalent, of one year of formal schooling at the 10th-grade level or higher in an institution where the language of instruction is not English will meet the School of Humanities Language Other Than English requirement equal to second-year language. Appropriate documentation and translation, when necessary, must be presented to substantiate that the course work was completed. For some majors offered by the School of Humanities, students may be exempted from taking third-year language study in that language. In this case, the student must substitute appropriate upper-division courses in the major to replace the number of exempted courses. For example, if a native speaker of Spanish is exempted from SPANISH 3A and SPANISH 3B, that student must replace those two courses with two other upper-division Spanish courses offered by the Department of Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Repeating Deficient Foreign Language Other Than English Grades. First- and second-year language other than English courses and third-year language other than English composition courses are sequential and each is prerequisite to the next. This is generally true also of fourth-year Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Students wishing to repeat a deficient grade in one of these courses must repeat it prior to continuing on to the next level of the language. A student may not go back and retake a lower-level course for credit once a more advanced level has been completed with a passing grade.

Graduate Programs

Humanities Office of Graduate Study

Yong Chen, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Student Services
157 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-5557

The School of Humanities offers graduate degrees in a wide range of disciplines, as well as in interdisciplinary programs. The School’s graduate programs are generally aimed at those pursuing a Ph.D., with the Master’s degree awarded along the way. Exceptions include the M.A. program in the Department of English, the M.A. program in the Department of History and the Department of European Languages and Literatures, and 4+1 M.A. programs (B.A. and M.A in five years) in Art History, Asian American Studies, and European Thought and Culture. In addition, the Department of English administers the M.F.A. in Creative Writing (Fiction/Poetry).

The School of Humanities houses five graduate emphases that may be pursued in conjunction with study toward the doctorate: Asian American Studies, Critical Theory, Feminist Studies, Latin American Studies, and Visual Studies.

Graduate students participate in the affairs of the School of Humanities by serving as representatives on various departmental, schoolwide, and campuswide committees.

Courses

HUMAN 1A. Humanities Core Lecture. 4 Units.

Through a range of cultural traditions and an interdisciplinary approach to works of literature, history, philosophy, and contemporary media, this course introduces students to the humanities.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(IV)

HUMAN 1AES. Humanities Core Writing: Entry Level Writing. 4 Units. 2 Workload Units.

A small writing course for Entry Level Writing students exploring the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1A

Grading Option: Workload Credit Letter Grade with P/NP.

Overlaps with HUMAN 1AS, HUMAN H1AS.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

HUMAN 1AS. Humanities Core Writing. 4 Units.

A small writing course in which students explore the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1A
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Overlaps with HUMAN 1AES, HUMAN H1AS.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(Ia)

HUMAN 1B. Humanities Core Lecture. 4 Units.

Through a range of cultural traditions and an interdisciplinary approach to works of literature, history, philosophy, and contemporary media, students are introduced to the humanities.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(IV)

HUMAN 1BES. Humanities Core Writing: Entry Level Writing. 4 Units. 2 Workload Units.

A small writing course for Entry Level Writing students exploring the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1B
Prerequisite: HUMAN 1AES. HUMAN 1AES with a grade of C- or better

Grading Option: Workload Credit Letter Grade with P/NP.

Overlaps with HUMAN 1BS, HUMAN H1BS.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(Ia)

HUMAN 1BS. Humanities Core Writing. 4 Units.

A small writing course in which students explore the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1B
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Overlaps with HUMAN H1BS, HUMAN 1BES.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(Ia)

HUMAN 1C. Humanities Core Lecture. 4 Units.

Through a range of cultural traditions and an interdisciplinary approach to works of literature, history, philosophy, and contemporary media, students are introduced to the humanities.

Prerequisite: HUMAN 1A or HUMAN 1B

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(IV and VII and VIII ).

HUMAN 1CES. Humanities Core Writing: Entry Level Writing. 4 Units. 2 Workload Units.

A small writing course for Entry Level Writing students exploring the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1C
Prerequisite: HUMAN 1BES with a grade of C- or lower.

Grading Option: Workload Credit Letter Grade with P/NP.

Overlaps with HUMAN 1CS, HUMAN H1CS.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

HUMAN 1CS. Humanities Core Writing. 4 Units.

A small writing course in which students explore the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1C
Prerequisite: HUMAN 1AS or HUMAN H1AS or HUMAN 1AES or HUMAN 1BS or HUMAN H1BS or HUMAN 1BES. HUMAN 1AS with a grade of C or better. HUMAN H1AS with a grade of C or better. HUMAN 1AES with a grade of C or better. HUMAN 1BS with a grade of C or better. HUMAN H1BS with a grade of C or better. HUMAN 1BES with a grade of C or better

Overlaps with HUMAN H1CS, HUMAN 1CES.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(Ia)

HUMAN H1AS. Humanities Core Writing: Honors. 4 Units.

A small writing course for Campuswide Honors students exploring the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1A
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Overlaps with HUMAN 1AS, HUMAN 1AES.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only. Lower-division students only.

(Ia)

HUMAN H1BS. Humanities Core Writing: Honors. 4 Units.

A small writing course for Campuswide Honors students exploring the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1B
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Overlaps with HUMAN 1BS, HUMAN 1BES.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only. Lower-division students only.

(Ia)

HUMAN H1CS. Humanities Core Writing: Honors. 4 Units.

A small writing course for Campuswide Honors students exploring the ideas presented in the companion lecture course and illustrated in the literary, historical, philosophical, and media works assigned.

Corequisite: HUMAN 1C
Prerequisite: HUMAN 1AS or HUMAN H1AS or HUMAN 1AES or HUMAN 1BS or HUMAN H1BS or HUMAN 1BES with a grade of C or better.

Overlaps with HUMAN 1CS, HUMAN 1CES.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(Ia)

HUMAN 10. Masterpieces of Literature. 4 Units.

Students closely read major works of world literature that are significant (1) in their own right, (2) for a specific literary tradition, and (3) because of their reception in other cultural contexts. Literature written in English and English translation.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV and VIII ).

HUMAN 52. Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. 4 Units.

Provides a comprehensive overview of current issues in bilingual education and bilingualism. Topics include dimensions of bilingualism, the effects of bilingualism on children's linguistic and cognitive development, bilingual education programs, literacy, special needs, and assessment.

Same as EDUC 52, LINGUIS 51B.

HUMAN H80. Exploring Memory. 4 Units.

Questions about human memory are central to a wide range of disciplines. Students will explore how historians, sociologists, social psychologists, legal experts, and neuroscientists understand human memory and apply their findings to understand and shape their own societies.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(IV)

HUMAN H81. The Vietnam War . 4 Units.

Examines the origins, evolution, opposition against, conclusion, and legacy of the United States in the Vietnam War.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(GE III or IV ).

HUMAN H82. Sanctuary: Medieval and Modern. 4 Units.

Principles and significance of the practice of legal sanctuary in medieval English history, literature, and religion. Development of modern use of churches and other safe spaces in the American Civil Rights movement, immigrant sanctuary movements, and international asylum.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(General Education III or IV ).

HUMAN H83. How Nations Remember. 4 Units.

Just like people, nations select and organize what and how they want to remember. Compares how specific historical events (such as slavery and the Holocaust) are memorialized in various countries and represented in public art works, museums, literature, and film.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

HUMAN 100. Latin America and the Caribbean. 4 Units.

Introduces students to Latin America and the Caribbean by focusing on the social, cultural, economic, and/or political issues and processes that have widely affected the region during various time periods.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HUMAN H120. Honors Proseminar . 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary Honors courses organized each year around a single topic problem designed to compare and contrast modes of analysis in history, literary studies, and philosophy.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

Restriction: Humanities Honors students only.

HUMAN H140. Senior Honors Seminar. 4 Units.

Directed by Humanities Honors Thesis Advisor and required of students in Humanities Honors program and Humanities majors in Campuswide Honors Program. Designed to facilitate exchange of ideas and research strategies among students and begin process of writing senior honors thesis.

Restriction: Humanities Honors students only. Seniors only.

HUMAN H141. Senior Honors Thesis. 4 Units.

Directed independent research required of participants in the Humanities Honors Program and Humanities majors in the Campuswide Honors Program.

Prerequisite: HUMAN H140

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only. Humanities Honors students only.

HUMAN H142W. Senior Honors Colloquium. 4 Units.

Completion, presentation, and discussion of Senior Honors Theses.

Prerequisite: HUMAN H141

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only. Humanities Honors students only.

(Ib)

HUMAN H145. Arts of Contemporary Communication. 4 Units.

A workshop seminar exploring the theory and practice of visual design, data visualization, and oral presentation. Designed to get students to think about, and hone their skills in, effective presentation of information in multiple media.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only. Humanities Honors Program students can enroll as space allows.

HUMAN 175. Topics in Humanities and Science . 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary topics exploring the relationship between the humanities and the physical and biological sciences.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

HUMAN 195. Humanities Out There (H.O.T.) Practicum. 0 - 2 Units.

H.O.T. sponsors tutoring opportunities in local schools and after-school sites for UCI students. Requirements include weekly one-hour training sessions at UCI; at least eight off-site tutoring sessions; and short writing assignments.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

HUMAN 197. Individual Field Study. 1-4 Units.

Individually arranged field study.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

HUMAN 198. Directed Group Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed group study on special topics.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HUMAN 199. Directed Research. 1-4 Units.

Directed research for senior Humanities students.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Seniors only.

HUMAN 220B. Studies in Literary Theory and Its History. 4 Units.

Introduction to criticism and aesthetics for beginning graduate students. Readings from continental, English, and American theorists.

Same as CRITISM 220B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

HUMAN 260A. Critical Theory Workshop.

A year-long Critical Theory Workshop, conducted by a team of instructors, conceived as a reading group, and developed with the input of all participants, where significant texts are discussed and analyzed in class.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

HUMAN 260B. Critical Theory Workshop.

A year-long Critical Theory Workshop, conducted by a team of instructors, conceived as a reading group, and developed with the input of all participants, where significant texts are discussed and analyzed in class.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

HUMAN 260C. Critical Theory Workshop. 4 Units.

A year-long Critical Theory Workshop, conducted by a team of instructors, conceived as a reading group, and developed with the input of all participants, where significant texts are discussed and analyzed in class.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

HUMAN 261. Race and Justice Studies Writing Seminar . 4 Units.

A required writing-intensive seminar conducted by an instructor affiliated with the Race and Justice Studies emphasis. Students with manuscripts on relevant topics will read and critique peer manuscripts, and revise manuscripts toward completion of articles, dissertation chapters, and other publications.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C260C

Same as CRM/LAW C261, SOC SCI 253K.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

HUMAN 265A. Issues In Latin American Studies I.

Students discuss significant texts on Latin America from a range of disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts. This course will meet 3-4 times per quarter throughout the academic year.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

HUMAN 265B. Issues In Latin American Studies II.

Students discuss significant texts on Latin America from a range of disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts. This course will meet 3-4 times per quarter throughout the academic year.

Prerequisite: HUMAN 265A

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

HUMAN 265C. Issues In Latin American Studies III . 4 Units.

Students discuss significant texts on Latin America from a range of disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts. This course will meet 3-4 times per quarter throughout the academic year.

Prerequisite: HUMAN 265B

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

HUMAN 270. Advanced Critical Theory. 4 Units.

Seminars on various topics in critical theory.

Prerequisite: Students should have taken introductory courses before enrolling in these seminars.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HUMAN 298. Humanities Out There (H.O.T.) Practicum. 4 Units.

Individual study with H.O.T. faculty supervisor.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

HUMAN 398A. Foreign Language Teaching: Approaches and Methods. 2 Units.

Introduces approaches and methods of foreign language learning and teaching, and the theoretical models of second-language acquisition and teaching. Focus areas include lesson planning, teaching vocabulary, grammar, speaking, reading, writing, listening, culture, task-based teaching, uses of digital media.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

HUMAN 398B. Foreign Language Teaching: Approaches and Methods. 2 Units.

Introduces approaches and methods of foreign language learning and teaching, and the theoretical models of second-language acquisition and teaching. Focus areas include lesson planning, teaching vocabulary, grammar, speaking, reading, writing, listening, culture, task-based teaching, uses of digital media.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

HUMAN 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Associates in Humanities Core course.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

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