Appendix

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University Administration

Under the State constitution, governance of the University is entrusted to The Board of Regents. The Regents appoint the President of the University, and with the President’s advice, the officers of the University. Authority in academic matters is delegated by The Regents to the Academic Senate, which consists of faculty and certain administrative officers. The Academic Senate determines academic policy for the University as a whole, sets conditions for admission and the granting of degrees, authorizes and supervises courses and curricula, and advises the University administration on faculty appointments, promotions, and budgets. Additionally, each campus has a divisional Academic Senate.

The President is executive head of the total institution. Each campus has a Chancellor as its chief administrative officer. Students participate in policy-making at both the campus and Universitywide levels.

The Regents of the University of California

Regents Ex Officio

Governor of California and President of The Regents: Jerry Brown
Lieutenant Governor of California: Gavin Newsom
Speaker of the Assembly: Toni Atkins
State Superintendent of Public Instruction: Tom Torlakson
President of the Alumni Associations of the University of California: Yolanda Gorman
Vice President of the Alumni Associations of the University of California: Rodney Davis
President of the University: Janet Napolitano

Appointed Regents1

Richard C. Blum (2026)
William C. De La Peña (2018)
Gareth Elliott (2025)
Russell S. Gould (2017)
Eddie Island (2017)
George Kieffer (2021)
Sherry L. Lansing (2022)
Monica Lozano (2022)
Hadi Makarechian (2020)
Eloy Otiz Oakley (2024)
Norman J. Pattiz (2026)
John Perez (2024)
Bonnie Reiss (2020)
Frederick Ruiz (2016)
Richard Sherman (2025)
Bruce D. Varner (2018)
Paul Wachter (2016)
Charlene Zettel (2021)
Abraham Oved (Student Regent-Designate July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016)

Regents-Designate2

Harvey Brody (July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016)
Cynthia So Schroeder (July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016)

1

Regents except ex-officio Regents and the student Regent, are appointed by the Governor to 12-year terms commencing on March 1. Ex-officio Regents serve by virtue of their elected or appointed positions; the student Regent is appointed by the Regents to a one-year term commencing on July 1.

2

 One-year terms expiring June 30.

Faculty Representatives to The Regents

Mary Gilly (September 1, 2013 - August 31, 2015)
Dan Hare (September 1, 2014 - August 2016)

Staff Advisors to The Regents

Deidre Acker (July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016)
LaWana Richmond (July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016)

Principal Officers of The Regents

General Counsel and Vice President – Legal Affairs: Charles F. Robinson
Treasurer of The Regents and Chief Investment Officer and Vice President – Investments: Jagdeep Singh Bachher
Secretary and Chief of Staff to The Regents: Anne Shaw
Senior Vice President – Chief Compliance and Audit Officer: Sheryl Vacca

Office of the President

President of the University: Janet Napolitano
Vice President – Office of the National Laboratories: Kimberly S. Budil
Executive Vice President – Chief Financial Officer: Nathan Brostrom
Provost and Executive Vice President – Academic Affairs: Aimee Dorr
Executive Vice President – UC Health: John D. Stobo
Senior Vice President – Government Relations: Nelson Peacock
Executive Vice President – Chief Operating Officer: Rachael Nava

Chancellors

Chancellor at Berkeley: Nicholas B. Dirks
Chancellor at Davis: Linda Katehi
Chancellor at Irvine: Howard Gillman
Chancellor at Los Angeles: Gene D. Block
Chancellor at Merced: Dorothy Leland
Chancellor at Riverside: Kim A. Wilcox
Chancellor at San Diego: Pradeep K. Khosla
Acting Chancellor at San Francisco: Sam Hawgood
Chancellor at Santa Barbara: Henry T. Y. Yang
Chancellor at Santa Cruz: George R. Blumenthal

UCI Officers

Chancellor: Howard Gillman
Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor: Enrique J. Lavernia
Vice Chancellor, Administrative and Business Services: Wendell C. Brase
Vice Chancellor, Planning and Budget: Meredith Michaels
Interim Vice Chancellor, Research: James W. Hicks
Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs: Thomas A. Parham
Vice Chancellor, University Advancement: Gregory R. Leet
Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs: Howard J. Federoff
Interim Chief Executive Officer, Medical Center: Howard J. Federoff

UCI Deans and Chairs of Independent Academic Units

Interim Dean, Claire Trevor School of the Arts: Stephen Barker
Dean, Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences: Frank M. LaFerla
Dean, The Paul Merage School of Business: Eric Spangenberg
Interim Dean, School of Education: Mark J. Warschauer
Dean, The Henry Samueli School of Engineering: Gregory Washington
Dean, School of Humanities: Georges Van Den Abbeele
Dean, Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences: Hal S. Stern
Dean, School of Law: Erwin Chemerinsky
Dean, School of Medicine: Howard J. Federoff
Dean, School of Physical Sciences: Kenneth C. Janda
Dean, School of Social Ecology: Valerie Jenness
Dean, School of Social Sciences: William M. Maurer
Dean, Continuing Education, Distance Learning, and Summer Session: Gary W. Matkin
Dean, Graduate Division: Frances M. Leslie
Dean, Division of Undergraduate Education: Michael Dennin
Interim Director, Program in Nursing Science: E. Alison Holman
Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences: A. Richard Chamberlin
Chair, Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention: Oladele Ogunseitan

UCI Administrators

Associate Chancellor/Chief of Staff: Michael R. Arias
Associate Chancellor: Ramona Agrela
Associate Vice Chancellor, Strategic Communications: Ria M. Carlson
Associate Vice Chancellor, Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity, and Title IX/ Sexual Harassment Officer: Kirsten Quanbeck
Senior Assistant Vice Chancellor, Constituent and Alumni Relations: Goran S. Matijasevic
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Alumni Relations, and Executive Director, UCI Alumni Association: Barney Ellis-Perry
Director, Intercollegiate Athletics: Michael Izzi
Senior Vice Provost: Michael P. Clark
Senior Vice Provost, Academic Affairs: Herbert P. Killackey
Vice Provost, Academic Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and Director of ADVANCE: Douglas M. Haynes
Vice Provost, Academic Initiatives:  Albert F. Bennett
Vice Provost, Academic Personnel: Diane K. O'Dowd
Vice Provost, Academic Planning: Judith Stepan-Norris
Vice Provost for Graduate Education: Frances M. Leslie
Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning: Michael Dennin
Chief of Staff to the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor: Jeff Lefkoff
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Academic Personnel: Joan K. Tenma
Associate Vice Chancellor and Chief Information Officer: Dana F. Roode
University Librarian: Lorelei Tanji
University Ombudsman: J. Michael Chennault
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Healthcare Measurement and Evaluation: Sherrie Kaplan
Interim Associate Vice Chancellor, Administrative and Business Services: Richard L. Coulon
Associate Vice Chancellor and Campus Architect: Rebekah Gladson
Assistant Vice Chancellor/Controller, Accounting and Fiscal Services: Bent Nielsen
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Facilities Management and Environmental Health and Safety: Marc A. Gomez
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Human Resources: John Daly
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Planning and Budget: Martha Graciano
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Institutional Research and Decision Support: Ryan M. Cherland
Associate Dean, Graduate Division: Susan Bibler Coutin
Associate Vice Chancellor, Research Administration : Mark W. Warner
Associate Vice Chancellor, Research: James W. Hicks
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Research Development: Jacob E. Levin
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Administrative Operations and Planning: D. Sinqui Musto
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Research Administration: Bruce A. Morgan
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Technology Alliances: Ronnie C. Hanecak
Associate Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs: Daniel J. Dooros
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Wellness, Health, and Counseling Services: Marcelle C. Holmes
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Enrollment Services: Brent Yunek
Assistant Vice Chancellor and Dean of Students, Student Life and Leadership: Rameen Talesh
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Constituent Development: Sylvia Acosta
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Community and Government Relations: Kate Klimow
Assistant Vice Chancellor, University Development: Daniel Montplaisir
Senior Assistant Vice Chancellor, Strategic Planning and Administration: Lynn Rahn
Interim Assistant Vice Chancellor, UC Irvine Health Advancement: Sylvia Acosta

Refer to http://www.oit.uci.edu/telephone/principal-officers/ for a complete list of UCI administrators.

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UCI Faculty Distinctions

The 2007 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and former Vice President Al Gore. Several UC Irvine climate scientists have played a part in writing, reviewing, and editing IPCC climate change reports over the last decade, including Michael Prather, Professor of Earth System Science and Fred Kavli Chair in Earth System Science; Donald R. Blake, Professor of Chemistry and Earth System Science; Michael L. Goulden, Associate Professor of Earth System Science and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Gudrun Magnusdottir, Professor of Earth System Science; James T. Randerson, Associate Professor of Earth System Science; Soroosh Sorooshian, Director of the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS), and UCI Distinguished Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Earth System Science; Susan E. Trumbore, Professor of Earth System Science; Stanley C. Tyler, Researcher, Department of Earth System Science; Jin-Yi Yu, Associate Professor of Earth System Science; and Charles S. Zender, Associate Professor of Earth System Science.

UCI Nobel Laureates

Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2004
Irwin Rose, UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Department of Physiology and Biophysics (d. 2015)

Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1995
F. Sherwood Rowland, Research Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Earth System Science, and Bren Chair (d. 2012)

Nobel Prize in Physics, 1995
Frederick Reines, UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Physics (d. 1998)

Templeton Prize, 2010

Francisco J. Ayala, University Professor and Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences

UCI Endowed Chairs

Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr. Endowed Chair
Frank L. Meyskens, Jr., Director of the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center and Professor of Medicine

Louise Turner Arnold Chair in the Neurosciences
Daniele Piomelli, Professor, Departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Pharmacology, and Biological Chemistry

Hana and Francisco J. Ayala Dean’s Chair
Frank LaFerla, Dean and Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior and Neurology

Howard Baskerville Professor of Humanities
Nasrin Rahimieh, Professor of Comparative Literature

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Chair in Laser Biomedicine
Michael W. Berns, Professor of Surgery, Developmental and Cell Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Opthalmology, Radiology, and Management

Grace Beekhuis Bell Chair in Biological Chemistry
Suzanne B. Sandmeyer, Professor of Biological Chemistry, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, and Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Opthalmology, Radiology, and Management

Donald Bren Professors, The Donald L. Bren Endowment

Francisco J. Ayala, Founding Director of the Bren Fellows Program and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and of Philosophy

Michael Carey, Professor of Computer Science

Sheldon Greenfield, Professor of Medicine

Wilson Ho, Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Chemistry

Ramesh C. Jain, Professor of Information and Computer Sciences

Arthur D. Lander, Director, Center for Complex Biological Systems and Professor of Developmental and Cell Biology, Biomedical Engineering, and Pharmacology

Gary Olson, Professor of Informatics

Judy Olson, Professor of Informatics, Management, and Planning, Policy, and Design

Paolo Sassone-Corsi, Director of the Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism and UCI Distinguished Professor, Departments of Biological Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Conexant-Broadcom Chair in the Center for Pervasive Communications
Hamid Jafarkhani, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Thomas and Mary Cesario Endowed Chair in Medicine
Alpesh Amin, Professor of Medicine, Management, Public Health, and Nursing Science; Executive Director, Hosipitalist Program

John E. Connolly Chair
Michael J. Stamos, Department Chair of Surgery and Professor of Clinical Surgery

Dean’s Leadership Circle Endowed Professorship
Andrew J. Policano, Professor of Management, Economics, and Public Policy

Edward A. Dickson Emerti Professor
Keith Nelson, Professor Emeritus of History
J. Hillis Miller, Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature

Philip J. DiSaia Chair in Gynecologic Oncology
Robert E. Bristow, Director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology and Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecologic Oncology)

Lawrence K. Dodge Endowed Chair in Integrative Biology
John Longhurst, Director of the Susan Samueli Center for Integrative Medicine; Professor of Medicine (Cardiology), Physiology and Biophysics, Pharmacology, and Biomedical Engineering; and Susan Samueli Chair in Integrative Medicine

Suzanne Dykema Endowed Chair In Pancreatic Cancer
David Imagawa, Professor of Clinical Surgery

Edwards Lifesciences Chair
Steven C. George, Director of the Edwards Lifesciences Center for Advanced Cardiovascular Technology and Professor of Biomedical Engineering and of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

Endowed Chair in Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Oncology
Kenneth Chang, Professor in Clinical Medicine

Walter B. Gerken Chair in Enterprise and Society
Rajeev K. Tyagi, Professor of Management

Hasso Brothers Endowed Chair in Radiological Sciences
Scott C. Goodwin, Professor of Clinical Radiological Sciences

Clifford S. Heinz Chair
Stergios Skaperdas, Professor of Economics

Roger W. and Janice M. Johnson Chair in Civic Governance and Public Management
Martha Feldman, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design, Management, Political Science, and Sociology

Fred Kavli Chair in Earth System Science
Ellen Druffel, Professor of Earth System Science

Kirkup Chair in Psychiatry and Human Behavior for the Medical Treatment of Stuttering
Gerald Maguire, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

The Robert A. and Barbara L. Kleist Chair in Informatics
Gillian Hayes, Professor of Informatics and Education

Irving H. Leopold Chair in Ophthalmology
Roger F. Steinert, Professor of Ophthalmology

William J. Link Chair in Biomedical Engineering
Abraham Lee, Department Chair and Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

John S. and Marilyn Long Chair in U.S.-China Business Law
Benjamin van Rooij, Professor of Law and Criminology, Law and Society

John D.  and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning
Mizuko “Mimi” Ito, Professor in Residence of Anthropology, Education, and Informatics

Dorothy J. Marsh Chair in Reproductive Biology
Philip J. Di Saia, Chief of Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Radiation Oncology

Della Martin Chair in Psychiatry
William E. Bunney, Jr., UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

Maseeh Chair in Persian Studies and Culture
Touraj Daryaee, Director of the Dr. Samuel M. Jordan Center for Persian Studies and Culture and Professor of History

Maseeh Professor in Persian Performing Arts
Hossein Omoumi, Professor of Music and of Persian Performing Arts

Gary McCue Administrative Term Chair in Cosmology
James Bullock, UCI Chancellor’s Fellow and Professor of Physics and Astronomy

James L. McGaugh Chair in the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
John F. Guzowski, Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior

Abraham I. Melden Chair in Moral Philosophy
Margaret Gilbert, Professor of Philosophy

Paul Merage Chair in Business Growth

David A. Hirshleifer, Professor of Management and Economics

Terrence J. Shevlin, Professor of Management

Eric L. and Lila D. Nelson Chair in Neuropharmacology
Olivier Civelli, Department Chair of Pharmacology and Professor, Departments of Pharmacology, Developmental and Cell Biology, and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Nichols Term Chair in Neuroscience
Claudia Kawas, Professor of Neurology and of Neurobiology and Behavior

Jack W. Peltason Endowed Chair
Bernard N. Grofman, Professor of Political Science and Economics

Raymond Pryke Endowed Chair in First Amendment Law
Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean of the School of Law and UCI Distinguished Professor of Law and Political Science

The Edward J. Quilligan Chair in Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Manuel Porto, Department Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal-Fetal Medicine)

The Robert and Marjorie Rawlins Chair of Music
David Brodbeck, Professor of Music

Ronald W. Reagan Endowed Chair in Geriatrics
Laura Mosqueda, Director of the Program in Geriatrics, and Professor of Clinical Family Medicine (Family Medicine and Geriatrics)

Reeve-Irvine Chair in Spinal Cord Injury Research
Oswald Steward, Director, Reeve-Irvine Research Center; Senior Associate Dean for Research, School of Medicine; and Professor, Departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Neurobiology and Behavior, and Neurosurgery

Chair in Rhetoric and Communication
Virginia Jackson, Associate Professor of English

Norman Rostoker Chair in Applied Physics
Toshiki Tajima, Professor of Physics and Astronomy

Henry Samueli Endowed Chairs

Xiaoqing Pan, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Physics and Astronomy

William A. Sirignano, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

H. Kumar Wickramasinghe, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Biomedical Engineering, and Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

The Henry Samueli Endowed Chair in Engineering in the Center for Engineering Science in Design
J. Michael McCarthy, Director, The Henry Samueli School of Engineering Center for Engineering Science in Design (CESD) and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Susan Samueli Chair in Integrative Medicine
John Longhurst, Professor of Medicine (Cardiology), Physiology and Biophysics and Pharmacology, and Lawrence K. Dodge Endowed Chair in Integrative Medicine

Walter R. Schmid Chair in Pediatric Urology
Antoine Khoury, Professor, Department of Urology

Danette (Dee Dee) Shepard Chair in Neurological Studies
Tallie Z. Baram, Professor, Departments of Pediatrics, Neurology, Physiology and Biophysics, and Anatomy and Neurobiology

Jack H. Skirball Endowed Chair
James V. Jester, Professor, Departments of Ophthalmology and Biomedical Engineering

Ted and Janice Smith Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Information and Computer Science
Hal S. Stern, Dean of the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences and Professor of Information and Computer Sciences

Robert R. Sprague Chair in Brain Imaging
Steven G. Potkin, Director of the Brain Imaging Center and Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

Taco Bell Chair in Information Technology Management
Vijay Gurbaxani, Professor of Management and Informatics

Teller Family Chair in Jewish History
Matthias Lehmann, Professor of History

Edward and Vivian Thorp Chair in Mathematics
Karl C. Rubin, Department Chair and Professor of Mathematics

Thomas T. and Elizabeth C. Tierney Chair in Global Peace and Conflict Studies
Etel Solingen, Professor of Political Science

Claire Trevor Dean’s Endowed Chair, Claire Trevor School of the Arts
Stephen Barker, Interim Dean of the Claire Trevor School of the Arts and Professor of Drama

Claire Trevor Professors in the Arts

Robert Cohen, Professor of Drama

Daniel Joseph Martinez, Professor of Arts

Donald McKayle, Professor of Dance

Fong and Jean Tsai Chair in Women's Imaging
Stephen Feig, Division Director of Mammography and Professor of Clinical Radiological Sciences, Department of Radiological Sciences

UC Presidential Chair
Peter M. Rentzepis, Professor of Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, and Computer Science

UCI ADVANCE Term Chair
Chuu-Lian Terng, Professor of Mathematics

UCI Excellence in Teaching Chair in Mathematics
Richard Schoen, Professor of Mathematics

Dr. Stanley van den Noort Endowed Chair
Steven L. Small, Professor, Departments of Neurology, Neurobiology and Behavior, and Cognitive Sciences 

Drew, Chace, and Erin Warmington Chair in the Social Ecology of Peace and International Cooperation
Scott A. Bollens, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design

UCI Chancellor’s Fellows

Marianne Bitler, Professor of Economics

William Branch, Professor of Economics

James Bullock, Professor of Physics and Gary McCue Administrative Term Chair in Cosmology

Elizabeth Cauffman, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior and Education

Susan Charles, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior

John R. Hipp, Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society and Sociology

Simon Huttegger, Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Svetlana Jitomirskaya, Professor of Mathematics

Matthew Law, Professor of Chemistry

Mona Lynch, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society

Michael J. Montoya, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Chicano/Latino Studies, and Public Health

Andrew Penner, Professor of Sociology

Gary Richardson, Professor of Economics

Guillaume Rocheteau, Professor of Economics

Timonthy Tait, Professor of Physics and Astonomy

Leslie Thompson, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior and Psychiatry and Human Behavior

Kathleen K. Treseder, Department Vice Chair and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Professor of Earth System Science

Marcelo Wood, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior

UCI Chancellor’s Professors

Kei Akagi, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Music

Pierre Baldi, Director of the Institute for Genomics and Bioinformatics and UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Computer Science, Biomedical Engineering, and Biological Chemistry

Dan L. Burk, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Law

Kitty Calavita, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Criminology Law, and Society

Chuansheng Chen, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior

Imran S. Currim, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Management

Nikil Dutt, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

David Eppstein, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Computer Science

Catherine Fisk, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Law

Bryant Garth, UCI Chancellor’s Professor School of Law

Michael T. Goodrich, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Computer Science

Richard L. Hasen, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Political Science

Hamid Jafarkhani, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Conexant-Broadcom Chair in the Center for Pervasive Communications

Zeev Kain, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care

Frank LaFerla, Dean of Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences and UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior

Eva Y. Lee, Department Chair and UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Biological Chemistry

Peter Li, UCI Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus of Mathematics

John S. Lowengrub, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Mathematics, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, and Biomedical Engineering

Marc J. Madou, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

Steven J. Mailloux, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of English

George E. Marcus, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Anthropology

Carrie Menkel-Meadow, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Law

Kristen Monroe, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Political Science

David Neumark, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Economics and Management

Margot Norris, UCI Chancellor’s Professor Emerita of English and Comparative Literature

Eric Pearlman, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Ophthalmology and Physiology and Biophysics

Reginald M. Penner, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Chemistry

Thomas L. Poulos, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Physiology and Biophysics, and Chemistry

Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of English

Charles Ragin, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Sociology

James T. Randerson, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Earth System Science and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

R. Anthony Reese, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Law

Bryan Reynolds, UCI Chancellors Professor of Drama

Markus Ribbe, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

Gabriele Schwab, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Comparative Literature and Anthropology

Eli Simon, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Drama

Ivan Soltesz, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Physiology and Biophysics, and Neurobiology and Behavior

Daniel Stokols, UCI Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus of Planning, Policy, and Design and of Psychology and Social Behavior

Richard Taylor, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Informatics

Brook Thomas, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of English

Chen S. Tsai, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Gene Tsudik, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Computer Science

Jeffrey Wasserstrom, UCI Chancellor's Professor of History 

Cecile Whiting, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Art History

UCI Distinguished Professors

Satya N. Atluri, UCI Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

John C. Avise, UCI Distinguished Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Frank Bean, UCI Distinguished Professor of Sociology

Donald R. Blake, UCI Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Earth System Science

William E. Bunney, Jr., UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Della Martin Chair in Psychiatry

Michael D. Cahalan, Department Chair and UCI Distinguished Professor of Physiology and Biophysics

Charles R. Cantor, UCI Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Physiology and Biophysics

Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean of the School of Law, UCI Distinguished Professor of Law and Political Science, and Raymond Pryke Endowed Chair in First Amendment Law

Barbara A. Dosher, UCI Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Sciences

Michael V. Drake, UCI Distinguished Professor of Ophthalmology

Greg Duncan, UCI Distinguished Professor of Education, Economics, and Psychology and Social Behavior

Jacquelynne S. Eccles, UCI Distinguished Professor of Education

Said Elghobashi, UCI Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

William Evans, UCI Distinguished Professor of Chemistry

Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts, UCI Distinguished Professor of Chemistry

Zachary Fisk, UCI Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy

Anthony A. James, UCI Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics and of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

Enrique Lavernia, UCI Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences

Elizabeth F. Loftus, UCI Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Criminology, Law and Society; Cognitive Sciences; and Law

Penelope Maddy, UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science and of Mathematics

David B. Malament, UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Logic and Philosophy of Science

Mihai Maniutiu, UCI Distinguished Professor of Drama

Bruce McNaughton, UCI Distinguished Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior

Ricardo Miledi, UCI Distinguished Research Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior

Jack Miles, UCI Distinguished Professor of English

J. Hillis Miller, UCI Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature

Shaul Mukamel, UCI Distinguished Professor of Chemistry

Larry E. Overman, UCI Distinguished Professor of Chemistry

Yvonne Rainer, UCI Distinguished Professor Emerita and Claire Trevor Professor Emerita of Art

Vicki Ruiz, UCI Distinguished Professor of History and Gender and Sexuality Studies

Ruben G. Rumbaut, UCI Distinguished Professor of Sociology

Donald G. Saari, Director of the Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences and UCI Distinguished Professor of Economics and Mathematics

Masanobu Shinozuka, UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Brian Skyrms, UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science and of Economics, and Director of the Minor in the History and Philosophy of Science

David A. Snow, Co-Director of the Center for Citizen Peacebuilding and UCI Distinguished Professor of Sociology

Soroosh Sorooshian, UCI Distinguished Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Earth System Science

George Sperling, UCI Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Sciences and of Neurobiology and Behavior

Eric J. Stanbridge, UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics

Ngugi wa Thiong’o, UCI Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature

UCI Faculty Membership in Major U.S. Learned Societies

American Academy of Arts and Sciences: 34
American Association for the Advancement of Science: 135
American Philosophical Society: 7
American Physical Society: 43
National Academy of Engineering: 11
National Academy of Sciences: 25
National Academy of Sciences–Institute of Medicine: 4

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THE MANUAL OF THE IRVINE DIVISION OF THE ACADEMIC SENATE

PART III - APPENDICES OF THE IRVINE DIVISION

Appendix VIII: UCI Academic Senate Policy on Academic Integrity

Revised: 12/12/96, 10/12/00, 11/21/02, 1/21/03, 1/26/06, 4/05/07, 6/7/2007, 6/5/08, 4/23/15

I.  Preamble

The University of California, Irvine is an institution of learning, research, and scholarship that is strengthened by the existence of an environment of integrity. As members of the academic community, instructors, students, and administrators are responsible for maintaining this environment. It is essential that all members of the University practice academic integrity and accept individual responsibility for their work and actions. Violating the Academic Integrity Policy is unacceptable, devaluing the teaching and learning experience for the entire community. While at UCI, members of the academic community should become better educated about the ethical framework underpinning academic integrity and improve their moral standards supporting it.

The UCI Academic Senate Policy on Academic Integrity states the general rules and procedures associated with student academic integrity. This Academic Integrity Policy applies to undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in a UCI course. A separate policy governs the integrity of research. 

Medical students are governed by policies specified in the UCI School of Medicine Handbook: http://www.meded.uci.edu/docs/2010-2011%20Handbook.pdf

Law students are governed by policies specified in School of Law Academic Honor Code: http://www.law.uci.edu/current/UCI_Law_Honor_Code.pdf.

II. Defined Terms

  1. Academic Integrity Policy: the UCI Academic Senate Policy on Academic Integrity.
  2. Academic Integrity Policy Violations: outlined in the Procedures document of the Academic Integrity Policy.
  3. Academic Consequences: grades assigned by Instructor.
  4. Administrative Sanctions: outlined in the Procedures document of the Academic Integrity Policy.
  5. AIAO: Academic Integrity Administrative Office.
  6. Instructor: faculty member or instructor of record.
  7. Student: any student or students who have allegedly violated the Academic Integrity Policy.
  8. Hearing Panel: subcommittee of the Council of Student Experience as outlined in the Procedures document of the Academic Integrity Policy.

III. Students' Responsibilities

All students are expected to complete a course in compliance with the Instructor's standards. No student shall engage in any activity involving any Academic Integrity Policy Violations. No student shall engage in any activity that involves attempting to receive a grade by means other than honest effort, and shall not aid another student who is attempting to do so. All students are encouraged to notify instructors, but may also notify the AIAO, about observed incidents of Academic Integrity Policy Violations. Instructors should take reasonable steps to preserve the confidentiality of students making such reports.

All students have the responsibility to become familiar with and abide by the Academic Integrity Policy.

IV. Instructors’ Responsibilities

Instructors should create an environment in their classes where academic integrity is understood and supported. They should assign grades in a transparent and equitable manner. Specifically:

When an Instructor believes that a Student has violated the Academic Integrity Policy, the Instructor should report the incident to the AIAO within thirty instructional days of discovering the possible Academic Integrity Policy Violation. The Instructor shall participate in the process according to the Academic Integrity Policy.

In all cases, the Instructor shall determine the Student’s grade in the course.

V. Teaching Assistant’s (TA) and Reader’s Responsibilities

A student acting in the capacity of a Teaching Assistant (TA) or Reader has a special responsibility to safeguard academic integrity. A TA/Reader shall equitably grade student work in the manner set by the Instructor. A TA/Reader shall not provide a student with any information or collaboration that would aid the student in completing the course in a dishonest manner (e.g. providing access to unauthorized material related to tests, examinations, or homework).

When a TA/Reader has evidence of an Academic Integrity Policy Violation, the TA/Reader should report the incident to the Instructor. The Instructor should report the incident to the AIAO. 

VI. Responsibility for Resolution of Cases of Violation of the Policy

The responsibility for maintaining the standards of academic integrity rests with two University authorities: the Instructor and the AIAO. Under the Standing Orders of the Regents, discipline is the exclusive responsibility of the campus administration while authority over courses and curricula is under the exclusive authority of the Instructor through the Academic Senate.

A. Role of the Instructor

The Instructor shall assign grades in the course as appropriate to the work involved. All Academic consequences (e.g. scores on the assignments and course grades) are under the sole purview of the Instructor in the course.

B. Role of The AIAO

The AIAO manages the cases for all students accused of Academic Integrity Policy Violations and is the central repository for all case-related materials. The AIAO is the initial contact for the Instructor or students on all cases of Academic Integrity Policy Violations. 

The AIAO is also responsible for imposing administrative sanctions. These sanctions shall be in accordance with guidelines authorized by the Council on Student Experience. Administrative sanctions range in severity from administrative probation to dismissal from the University. Students found responsible for multiple cases of Academic Integrity Policy Violations may be subject to dismissal from the University.

The AIAO must notify the Student (and if needed, the Instructor) of any allegations of Academic Integrity Policy Violations. The AIAO adjudicates cases when the Student disputes the possible imposition of administrative sanctions related to Academic Integrity Policy Violations. The AIAO can request meetings with the Instructor and Student to discuss the case, sanction, or procedure. The AIAO must follow the procedures and communicate in a timely manner. He or she may extend any timelines in the Academic Integrity Policy when practical exigencies so dictate, in which case all involved parties will be notified in writing and via email. 

If the Student appeals the AIAO's decision, the AIAO shall schedule a Hearing Panel (see below) to review the case and make a final determination of the appropriate sanction.

The duty of the AIAO is not merely disciplinary. The office is encouraged to work with faculty and students to create a culture in which academic integrity is valued.

C. Records Management

The AIAO must archive its records to reflect the resolution of the case, and shall maintain a record of all cases as described in the Procedures document. The AIAO shall report annually to the Academic Senate Council on Student Experience, to the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor, the Associated Undergraduate Students of the University of California, Irvine, and the Associated Graduate Students of the University of California, Irvine on all of the following: (1) the number, nature, and type of cases; (2) the pattern of decision-making; (3) the severity and type of academic consequences and administrative sanctions; and (4) other relevant matters as directed by the Council on Student Experience.

D. Role of the Hearing Panel

If the Student requests a hearing, the AIAO will request the Subcommittee on Academic Integrity of the Council on Student Experience to convene a Hearing Panel to review the case. (See the Procedures document.) The Hearing Panel will hear evidence on the case from the Student, Instructor, and other relevant parties as determined by the panel. The Hearing Panel shall communicate the final decision to the AIAO.

VII. Procedures for Resolution of Cases of Academic Integrity Policy Violations

These are described in the Procedures document of the Policy.

VIII. MAINTENANCE OF DISCIPLINARY RECORDS

The AIAO will maintain a record of each student who receives a letter(s) of Academic Integrity Policy Violations as described in the Procedures document. Maintaining such a record is not an administrative sanction.

On This Page:


Principles of Community

UC Irvine is a multicultural community of people from diverse backgrounds. Our activities, programs, classes, workshops, lectures, and everyday interactions are enriched by our acceptance of one another, and we strive to learn from each other in an atmosphere of positive engagement and mutual respect.

Our legacy for an increasingly multicultural academic community and for a learning climate free from expressions of bigotry is drawn from the United States and California Constitutions, and from the charter of the University of California which protects diversity and reaffirms our commitment to the protection of lawful free speech. Affirmation of that freedom is an effective way of ensuring that acts of bigotry and abusive behavior will not go unchallenged within the university. Tolerance, civility and mutual respect for diversity of background, gender, ethnicity, race and religion are as crucial within our campus community as are tolerance, civility and mutual respect for diversity of political beliefs, sexual orientation and physical abilities. Education and clear, rational and vigorous challenges are positive responses to prejudice and acts of bigotry.

The university’s nondiscrimination policy, in compliance with applicable federal and state law, covers treatment in university programs and activities as well as admission and employment. UCI expects all those affiliated with it to adhere to the letter and the spirit of university nondiscrimination policies and related federal and state laws. Information concerning these policies is available at the University of California's Office of the President.

Allegations of physical abuse, threats of violence, or conduct that threatens the health or safety of any person on university property or in connection with official university functions will be investigated promptly and, where found to exist, appropriate actions will be taken in accordance with university policy.

All who work, live, study and teach at UCI are here by choice and, as part of that choice, should be committed to these Principles of Community which are an integral part of the guidelines by which the university community can successfully conduct its affairs.

Student Conduct and Discipline

Students enrolling in the university are expected to assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner compatible with the university’s function as an educational institution. The University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students sets forth standards of conduct expected of UCI students. The Policies lists rules concerning conduct and related matters, as established by the policies of the Regents and the President of the University, and incorporates campus regulations.

Anti-Hazing Compliance

The State of California and the University of California have expressly and repeatedly asserted their opposition to hazing and preinitiation activities which do not contribute to the positive development and welfare of the individuals involved.

In February 2006, the Education Code of the State of California was repealed and amended to codify within the Penal Code a new definition of hazing. In accordance with the revised Education Code and Penal Code, students are advised of the following:

Education Code 32052

Any person who participates in the hazing of another, or any corporation or association which knowingly permits hazing to be conducted by its members or by others subject to its direction or control, shall forfeit any entitlement to State funds, scholarships, or awards which are enjoyed by him, by her, or by it, and shall be deprived of any sanction or approval granted by any public educational institution or agency.

Penal Code 245.6

Section 245.6 of the Penal Code reads:

  1. It shall be unlawful to engage in hazing, as defined in this section.
  2. “Hazing” means any method of initiation or preinitiation into a student organization or student body, whether or not the organization or body is officially recognized by an educational institution, which is likely to cause serious bodily injury to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university, or other educational institution in this state. The term “hazing” does not include customary athletic events or school-sanctioned events.
  3. A violation of this section that does not result in serious bodily injury is a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of not less than one hundred dollars ($100), nor more than five thousand dollars ($5,000), or imprisonment in the county jail for not more than one year, or both.
  4. Any person who personally engages in hazing that results in death or serious bodily injury as defined in paragraph (4) of subdivision (f) of Section 243 of the Penal Code, is guilty of either a misdemeanor or a felony, and shall be punished by imprisonment in county jail not exceeding one year, or by imprisonment in the state prison.
  5. The person against whom the hazing is directed may commence a civil action for injury or damages. The action may be brought against any participants in the hazing, or any organization to which the student is seeking membership whose agents, directors, trustees, managers, or officers authorized, requested, commanded, participated in, or ratified the hazing.
  6. Prosecution under this section shall not prohibit prosecution under any other provision of law.

Campus Safety and Security

The UC Irvine Police Department (UCIPD) is responsible for the safety and security of the UCI campus and the University of California, Irvine Medical Center. UCIPD and UCI administration make continual efforts to reduce crime on campus and at the UC Irvine Medical Center.

Crime Prevention

The UCI Police Department offers educational programs and presentations to the campus community. The Department teaches a variety of prevention and awareness topics. These topics include:  drugs and alcohol, domestic violence, sexual assault, identity theft, property and auto theft, workplace violence, and personal safety. The personal safety component is further developed through the RAD (Rape Aggression Defense) Program for women. For more information, or to schedule a presentation, call 949-824-5223 or visit the UCIPD website. Crime prevention tips are also available on the website.

Safety Tips

All members of the UCI community should be aware of their surroundings by using common sense and practicing safety precautions. Theft is the most common security problem. Property theft is preventable if you keep your personal belongings (backpack, laptop computer, cellular phone) in sight, within arm’s length, or secured in a locked place. Students living on campus should keep their doors locked at all times. Faculty and staff should keep valuables locked up while they are in their workplace. The last person to leave a laboratory or building should lock the doors. Report the presence of unknown visitors or suspicious persons to the UCI Police Department or UC Irvine Medical Centerr Security as soon as possible.

While on campus at night, it is suggested that you do not walk alone. The UCI Safety Escort Service (949-824-SAFE) is available for safety escorts between campus locations. 

Emergency Call Boxes (Blue Light Phones)

Emergency call boxes (Blue Light Phones) are located throughout the UCI campus and the UC Irvine Medical Center. These call boxes are to be used to report emergencies, crimes, suspicious persons or activities, accidents, and safety hazards.

The campus has 150 Blue Light Phones installed around the ring mall, housing communities, and in parking structures and lots. Blue Light Phones are represented by a diamond on the campus map. Call boxes are easily identified by the blue light on top of the terminal, and the boxes have the ability to detect all sounds within a 15-foot radius. To activate the emergency call box, push the red button located on the front of the terminal. You are then automatically connected to the UCI Police Department Communications Center. The UC Irvine Medical Center has 21 emergency call boxes located throughout the complex and in the southeast corner of the Manchester parking lot. These phones are also connected to the UCIPD Communications Center.

Substance Abuse Policies

UCI is designated a drug-free environment, and only under certain conditions is the consumption of alcohol permitted. The sale, manufacture, distribution, or possession of any controlled substance is illegal under both state and federal laws. Such laws are strictly enforced by UCIPD. All members of the UCI community who violate these laws are subject to disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, fines, and imprisonment.

Sales, consumption, and the furnishing of alcohol on the UCI campus is restricted by UCI’s Alcohol Policy and California State law, and are controlled by the California Department of Alcohol and Beverage Control (ABC). ABC and UCIPD share enforcement of alcohol laws on campus. It is unlawful to sell, furnish, or give alcohol to a person under the age of 21 years (this includes the Anthill Pub & Grille). The possession of alcohol by anyone under 21 in a public place, or in a place open to the public, is illegal. It is also a violation of UCI’s Alcohol Policy for anyone under the age of 21 to consume or possess alcohol in any public or private housing area on campus. Students and employees found violating alcohol/substance policies or laws could be subject to sanctions by the University.

Weapons Policy

The California Penal Code contains several sections regarding possessing weapons on college campuses. The UCI Police Department encourages all members of the campus community to be familiar with the following statutes that regulate the possession of weapons.

Section 626.9 – Felony Violation – Bringing or possessing a firearm on the grounds of a University of California campus, or any property owned or operated by the University of California, without written permission from the UCPD Chief of Police.

Section 626.10(b) – Misdemeanor or Felony Violation – Bringing or possessing any dirk, dagger, ice pick, or knife having a fixed blade longer than 2 ½ inches on university grounds.

Section 16590 – Misdemeanor or Felony Violation – Possessing a undetectable firearm, cane gun, wallet gun, zip gun, belt buckle knife, blackjack, billy club, nunchaku, shuriken, and metal knuckles.

Section 21510 – Misdemeanor Violation – Carry upon the person, or in the passenger or driver’s area of a vehicle, a switch blade knife having a blade two or more inches in length.

UCIPD asks that you immediately report any situation in which a subject states they have a firearm on campus, or that they intend to a use a firearm on campus. You can choose to remain anonymous when making a report.

To Report an Incident

UCIPD needs your help to build and maintain a safe community. If you witness suspicious or unusual behavior on campus, please contact UCIPD. UCI police officers will assess the situation and take the appropriate action. Please report crimes; you can ask to be anonymous.

On campus, dial 9-1-1 for a police, medical, or fire emergency. For non-emergency police services dial 949-824-5223. The UCI Police Department’s campus office is open 24 hours a day and is located on the ground floor of the Public Services Building, at the corner of East Peltason and Pereira Drives.

At the UC Irvine Medical Center, dial 9-1-1 for a police, medical, or fire emergency. For non-emergency police service dial 714-456-5493. The UC Irvine Medical Center Security office is located in Building 33.

Crimes occurring off campus should be reported immediately to the city/state law enforcement agency where the crime occurred.

UCI Crime Statistics

Pursuant to the Federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1999, the University of California, Irvine annually publishes statistics of reported occurrences of criminal activity on and off campus and at the UC Irvine Medical Center. This information is available to all students, faculty, staff, and the general public.

The University of California, Irvine’s annual security report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crime that occurred on campus, in certain off-campus buildings controlled by UCI, at the UC Irvine Medical Center, and on public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus and UC Irvine Medical Center. The annual security report also includes institutional policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. The fire safety report includes statistics concerning fires that occurred in on campus student housing facilities. Copies of these reports are available on the UCI Police Department website. Copies may also be obtained by visiting the UCI Police Department front counter Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

UCI Police Department
100 Public Services Building
Irvine, CA 92697-4900
949-824-5223
Records Unit: 949-824-7798

Computer- and Network-Use Policy

The University of California, Irvine provides computing resources and worldwide network access to members of the UCI electronic community for legitimate academic and administrative pursuits to communicate, access knowledge, and retrieve and disseminate information. All members of the UCI community (faculty, staff, students, and authorized guests) sharing these resources also share the rights and responsibilities for their use.

Rights and Responsibilities

Worldwide, open-access electronic communication is a privilege and continued access requires that users act responsibly. Users should be able to trust that the products of their intellectual efforts will be safe from violation, destruction, theft, or other abuse. Users sharing computing resources must respect and value the rights and privacy of others, respect the integrity of the systems and related physical resources, and observe all relevant laws, regulations, and contractual obligations. Users are responsible for refraining from acts that waste resources, prevent others from using them, harm resources or information, or abuse other people. To help protect files, users are responsible for setting passwords appropriately and for keeping passwords confidential by not giving them to another person.

Most UCI-owned computers are under the control of a system administrator or lab manager. These administrators are expected to respect the privacy of computer system users. However, UCI computer system administrators may access user files or suspend services on the systems they manage without notice as required to protect the integrity of computer systems or to examine accounts that are suspected of unauthorized use, misuse, or have been corrupted or damaged. This includes temporarily locking vulnerable accounts, removing hung jobs, reprioritizing resource intensive jobs, and such.

Many UCI departments have their own computing and networking resources and policies. When accessing computing resources, users are responsible for obeying both the policies described here and the policies of other departments. Student responsibilities are also described in the University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students. In addition, all users are responsible for obeying policies of off-campus network services accessed using UCI resources.

Examples of Misuse

Examples of misuse include, but are not limited to:

  • Knowingly running or installing on any computer system or network, or giving to another user, a program intended solely for the purpose of damaging or placing excessive load on a computer system or network. This includes, but is not limited to, computer viruses, Trojan horses, worms, bots, flash programs, or password cracking programs.
  • Attempting to circumvent data protection schemes or uncover security loopholes without prior written consent of the system administrator. This includes creating and/or running programs that are designed to identify security loopholes and/or intentionally decrypt secure data.
  • Using computers or electronic mail to act abusively toward others or to provoke a violent reaction, such as stalking, acts of bigotry, threats of violence, or other hostile or intimidating “fighting words.” Such words include those terms widely recognized to victimize or stigmatize individuals on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, and other protected characteristics.
  • Posting on electronic bulletin boards or Web pages materials that violate the University’s codes of conduct (faculty, student). This includes posting information that is slanderous or defamatory in nature or displaying graphically disturbing or sexually harassing images or text in a public computer facility or location that are in view of other individuals.
  • Attempting to monitor or tamper with another user’s electronic communications or reading, copying, changing, or deleting another user’s files or software without the explicit agreement of the owner.
  • Violating terms of applicable software licensing agreements or copyright laws.
  • Using campus networks to gain, or attempt to gain, unauthorized access to any computer system.
  • Using a computer account or obtaining a password without appropriate authorization.
  • Facilitating or allowing use of a computer account and/or password by an unauthorized person.
  • Employing, either directly or by implication, a false identity when using an account or other electronic resources. This includes sending unauthorized mail that appears to come from someone else.
  • Performing an act without authorization that will interfere with the normal operation of computers, terminals, peripherals, networks, or will interfere with others’ ability to make use of the resources.
  • Using an account for any activity that is commercial in nature not related to work at UCI, such as consulting services, typing services, developing software for sale, advertising products, and/or other commercial enterprises for personal financial gain.
  • Deliberately wasting computing resources, such as playing games (for example, MUDS or IRC) while someone else is waiting to use the computer for UCI-related work, sending chain letters, spamming, treating printers like copy machines, storing or moving large files that could compromise system integrity or preclude other users’ right of access to disk storage, and the like.
Consequences of Misuse

Misuse of computing, networking, or information is unacceptable, and users will be held accountable for their conduct. Serious infractions can result in temporary or permanent loss of computing and/or network privileges and/or Federal or State legal prosecution. Appropriate corrective action or discipline may be taken in conformance with applicable personnel policies, student policies, collective bargaining agreements, and procedures established by the Academic Senate. California Penal Code, Section 502 makes certain computer abuses a crime, (such as illegal reproduction of software protected by U. S. copyright law) and penalties can include a fine and/or imprisonment. Files may be subject to search under proper authorization.

Minor infractions of this policy, such as poorly chosen passwords, overloading systems, excessive disk space consumption, are typically handled internally to the department in an informal manner. More serious infractions such as abusive behavior, account invasion or destruction, attempting to circumvent system security, and the like are handled formally through the Office of the Dean of Students or by other appropriate officials.

Contact Information

For additional information, contact the Office of Information Technology by calling 949-824-2222, or by sending email to oit@uci.edu. OIT Help Desk offices are located in Administrative Module B, Building 423 - parking lot 16.

Privacy and Student Records

The University of California campuses maintain various types of records pertaining to students; some are maintained for academic purposes; others, such as hospital and employment records, are maintained for other specific purposes. Student records —that is, those pertaining to students in their capacity as students—include but are not limited to academic evaluations, transcripts, test scores and other academic records, general counseling and advising records, disciplinary records, and financial aid records. At UCI, an “applicant” becomes a “student” at the time of submission of their Statement of Intent to Register form.

The disclosure of information from student records is governed in large measure by the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), by the State of California Education Code, and by University policy and procedures implementing these laws which protect the student’s right of privacy, provide safeguards for the confidentiality of student records, and permit students access to their own records.

Pursuant to the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and the University of California Policies Applying to the Disclosure of Information from Student Records, students at the University have the following five rights:

  1. To inspect and review records pertaining to themselves in their capacity as students.
  2. To inspect records maintained by the campus of disclosure of personally identifiable information from their student records.
  3. To seek correction of their student records through a request to amend the records or a request for a hearing.
  4. To file complaints regarding alleged violation of the rights accorded students by the Federal Act with the Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-5920.
  5. To have withheld from disclosure, in the absence of their prior consent for release, personally identifiable information from their student records, with exceptions as noted in the University student records policies.

There are instances in which information can be disclosed without prior written consent of the student. University officials may require access to student records in the course of the performance of their assigned duties. Further, confidential information can be disclosed without prior written consent of the student (a) in connection with conditions of certain financial aid awards; (b) when the campus is complying with a judicial order or subpoena; and (c) when authorized federal or State officials are conducting an audit or evaluation of federally supported educational programs. There are also other situations in which the University is required to disclose information. The University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students, Part B, Section 130.721 contains a list of exceptions.

Normally, the campus will release the following as personally identifiable information which can be made public:

  • student’s name
  • date and place of birth
  • address (local and/or permanent)
  • campus email address
  • telephone numbers
  • dates of attendance
  • major field of study
  • grade level
  • degrees and honors received
  • number of course units in which enrolled
  • enrollment status, (e.g., undergraduate or graduate, full-time or part-time)
  • most recent previous educational institution attended
  • participation in officially recognized activities, including intercollegiate athletics
  • name, weight, and height of participants on intercollegiate University athletic teams
  • photo

However, students have the right to refuse to permit any or all of these categories to be designated public information with respect to themselves. Students should view the Privacy section on the University Registrar’s website to see what information is available for release, and what groups may have access to that information.

Students wishing to restrict release of public information should contact the Registrar’s Office for instructions on how to do so.

If a student requests that information from his or her records not be regarded as public information, then the information will not be released to anyone without the written consent of the student. The student should be aware of the important implications of exercising this right. For example, if a request is made to withhold from disclosure a student’s name and degrees and honors received, the campus cannot release for publication information on any honors received by the student, such as election to Phi Beta Kappa, and cannot include the student’s name and degree earned in the campus commencement program without the written consent of the student. Similarly, if a request is made to withhold from disclosure a student’s name and dates of attendance, a student’s status as a student cannot be verified for potential employers with out the written consent of the student. Further, if a student’s last instruction to the campus was to withhold from disclosure the degree granted to that student and the date on which the degree was conferred, that information cannot be confirmed for a third party in connection with the appointment of that graduate to a new position or in connection with an honor that individual received without the written consent of the student.

It is extremely important for each student to keep the Registrar’s Office currently informed as personal data changes occur to assure that accurate and complete records are maintained.

Students are informed annually of their rights under the University’s student records policies and FERPA. Copies of the FERPA and University and campus policies are available for review in the Reference Room, Langson Library. In addition, University policies are published in the University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students.

Complaints regarding alleged violation of the rights accorded students by FERPA may be filed with the University Registrar. A complaint must be made within 180 days of when the alleged violation was discovered (not necessarily when the alleged violation may have occurred). Additionally, a student may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education’s Family Policy Compliance Office.

Types and locations of major student records maintained by the campus are listed in the following table; consult the UCI website, or the Campus Directory, or building directories for room numbers.

Type of Record Location of Record Responsible Official
School, department, or programAdministrative office for particular unitDean, Chair, or Director
Academic Testing CenterAnteater Instruction and Research Bldg. (AIRB) Room 3040Director, Testing Center
Admissions—UndergraduateAldrich HallDirector, Admissions and Relations with Schools
Admissions—GraduateAldrich HallDean, Graduate Division
Admissions—School of LawLaw BuildingAssistant Dean, Admissions
Admissions—School of MedicineMed. Sci. IDirector, Admissions
Career CenterStudent Services IDirector, Career Center
Child Care ServicesEarly Childhood Education CenterDirector, Child Care Services
CounselingStudent Services IDirector, Counseling Services
Dean of StudentsStudent CenterDean of Students
Disability ServicesDisability Services CenterDirector, Disability Services
Education Abroad ProgramStudent Services IICoordinator, Study Abroad Center
Financial AidAldrich HallDirector, Financial Aid
Financial Services (Cashier, Collections)Aldrich HallManager, Financial Services
HousingStudent CenterDirector, Housing
International CenterStudent CenterDirector, International Center
Learning and Academic Resource CenterSecond Floor, Rowland HallDirector, Learning and Academic Resource Center
Ombudsman Services205 Multipurpose Science & Technology Bldg. (MSTB)University Ombudsman
ParkingPublic Services BuildingParking Supervisor
Registrar—Graduate/UndergraduateAldrich HallUniversity Registrar
Registrar—School of MedicineMed. Sci. IAssistant Deputy Registrar
Registrar—School of LawLaw BuildingLaw School Registrar
Relations with SchoolsAldrich HallDirector, Admissions and Relations with Schools
Student ConductStudent CenterDean of Students
Student HealthStudent Health CenterDirector, Student Health
Summer SessionUniversity ExtensionDirector, Summer Session
Undergraduate EducationAldrich HallDean, Undergraduate Education
University ExtensionUniversity ExtensionDean, Continuing Education
VeteransStudent CenterCoordinator, Veterans Student Services
Incidental Records (minutes of various committees, copies of correspondence in offices not listed above, and other records not listed)Aldrich HallVice Chancellor Student Affairs, or other Student Affairs officials (for conduct issues, could be Dean of Students, Dean of Undergraduate Education, or Dean of the Graduate Division)

NOTE: Pursuant to the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), individual institutions may implement disclosure policies that exceed those outlined in the Act. It should be noted that University of California policies are more restrictive than those outlined in FERPA. The disclosure policies for the UC campuses are outlined in the University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students, sections 130.00-134.00.

Employment and Salary Information

Average Salaries by Discipline1
Field of Study Bachelor's
Business$51,508.00
Communications$49,395.00
Computer Science$61,287.00
Engineering$62,998.00
Humanities$45,042.00
Math & Sciences$56,171.00
Social Sciences$49,047.00
1

Source: A national survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, representing the average starting salaries of undergraduates of fall 2013 throughout the country. It should be noted that a wide variation in starting salaries exists within each discipline based on job location, type of employer, personal qualifications of the individual, and employment conditions at the time of job entry.

UCI Six-Year Graduation Rates by Sex and Ethnicity

Fall 2008
Men
Ethnicity Entered Graduated % Graduated
International Student543463.0%
African American443272.7%
American Indian7685.7%
Asian1,09196288.2%
Hispanic27421377.7%
Other/Unknown12911085.3%
White43536183.0%
Total2,0341,71884.5%
Women
Ethnicity Entered Graduated % Graduated
International Student503876.0%
African American524688.5%
American Indian151173.3%
Asian1,3611,22489.9%
Hispanic38832984.8%
Other/Unknown12110788.4%
White54047287.4%
Total2,5272,22788.1%
Total Entering Freshmen
Ethnicity Entered Graduated % Graduated
International Student1047269.2%
African American967881.3%
American Indian221777.3%
Asian2,4522,18689.2%
Hispanic66254281.9%
Other/Unknown25021786.8%
White97583385.4%
Total4,5613,94586.5%

NOTE: Students who declined to state their gender are included in Men.
Source: UC Irvine Office of Institutional Research

UCI Six-Year Graduation Rates of Freshmen Who Received Athletically Related Financial Aid

Fall 2008 Entering Freshmen
Men
Total Entered Total Graduated Total % Graduated
352057.1%
Women
Total Entered Total Graduated Total % Graduated
282278.6%

Source: UC Irvine Office of Institutional Research

Nondiscrimination and Sexual Harassment Policy Statements

UC Irvine is committed to creating and maintaining an environment in which all persons who participate in university programs and activities can work and learn together in an atmosphere free of all forms of discrimination and harassment. Such behavior is prohibited by law and university policy. The university will respond promptly and effectively to reports of discrimination and harassment, and will take appropriate action to prevent, to correct, and when necessary, to discipline behavior that violates university policy. 

Student-Related Matters. The University of California, in accordance with the applicable Federal and State law and university policy, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity, pregnancy,1 physical or mental disability, medical condition (cancer-related or genetic characteristics), ancestry, marital status, age, sexual orientation, citizenship, or service in the uniformed services.2 The university also prohibits sexual harassment. This nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access, and treatment in university programs and activities.

Employment Practices. The University of California prohibits discrimination against or harassment of any person employed by or seeking employment with the university on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender, gender expression, gender identity, pregnancy,1 physical or mental disability, medical condition (cancer-related or genetic characteristics), genetic information (including family medical history), ancestry, marital status, age, sexual orientation, citizenship, or service in the uniformed services.The university also prohibits sexual harassment, which is a form of sex discrimination.

Consensual sexual or romantic relationships between members of the university community are subject to other university policies, including the Faculty Code of Conduct and the UCI Policy on Conflicts of Interest Created by Consensual Relationships.

University policy also prohibits retaliation against any employee or person seeking employment for bringing a complaint of discrimination or harassment pursuant to these policies or against a person who assists someone with a complaint of discrimination or harassment, or who participates in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a complaint of discrimination or harassment.

In addition, it is the policy of the university to undertake affirmative action, consistent with its obligations as a Federal contractor, to assure equal employment opportunity for minorities and women, for persons with disabilities, and for protected veterans.3

University policy is intended to be consistent with the provisions of applicable State and Federal laws. Inquiries regarding the University’s nondiscrimination and sexual harassment policies may be directed to: Kirsten K. Quanbeck, Associate Vice Chancellor of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Sexual Harassment/Title IX Officer/Director of the UCI Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity, 103 Multipurpose Science and Technology Building, Irvine, CA 92697-1130; oeod@uci.edu; telephone 949-824-5594 (voice), 824-7593 (TDD).

1

Pregnancy includes pregnancy, childbirth, and medical conditions related to pregnancy or childbirth.

2

"Service in the uniformed services" as defined by the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (USERRA), as well as state military and naval service.

3

Protected veterans includes veterans with disabilities, recently separated veterans, Vietnam-era veterans, active duty wartime or campaign badge veteran, or Armed Forces service medal veterans.

Sex Offenses Policy

UC Irvine is committed to creating and maintaining a community in which all individuals who participate in university programs and activities can work and learn together in an atmosphere free of all forms of harassment, exploitation, or intimidation, including sexual assault, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and retaliation. Such behavior violates both law and university policy. The university will respond promptly and effectively to reports of sex offenses, and will take appropriate action to prevent, to correct, and when necessary, to discipline behavior that violates university policy.

Questions or reports regarding the University's policy on sex offenses may be directed to Kirsten K. Quanbeck, Associate Vice Chancellor of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and Sexual Harassment/Title IX Officer/Director of the UCI Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity, 103 Multipurpose Science and Technology Building, Irvine, CA 92697-1130; telephone 949-824-5594 5594 (voice), 824-7593 (TDD); oeod@uci.edu.

Links to the full text of the university policies on Nondiscrimination, Sexual Harassment, the Faculty Code of Conduct, Conflicts of Interest Created by Consensual Relationships, and Sex Offenses are available at the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity Policies and Guidelines website.

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