2016-17 Edition

Department of Comparative Literature

Nasrin Rahimieh, Department Chair
243 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-6406
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/complit/
complit@uci.edu

Overview

Comparative Literature is the study of the world through its literatures and cultures. Critical theory and translation provide frameworks for making moves: across languages, media, geographic borders, and political visions. In the Department of Comparative Literature, graduate and undergraduate students immerse themselves in national and regional literatures—of Asia, Africa, Latin America, North America, and Europe—while simultaneously placing those cultural practices within dynamic global exchanges, both historical and contemporary. Through courses, conferences, collaborative projects, and digital media, Comparative Literature at UCI advances critical cosmopolitanism—a kind of worldliness cultivated by creative engagements with power, peoples, and their symbolic practices. From novel to poetry, drama to film, monuments to political protest, comics to audio, urban space to visual culture—Comparative Literature introduces students to global cultures in the widest sense, and to the theoretical lenses essential for putting them in perspective. Writing, speaking, visualizing, blogging, social networking: through multiple media Comparative Literature students at every level interpret and engage with other academics and publics outside the academy. Together, students of Comparative Literature strive for a continually evolving practice of critical awareness and political action: a global literacy and citizenship through which to face the challenges of life and work in the 21st century.

The Department of Comparative Literature offers a major with three emphases: Comparative Literature and Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, and World Literature. It also offers a minor. The Department seeks to foster and maintain a lively community that includes undergraduates, graduates, and faculty, and to that end holds a variety of meetings and activities so that majors can get to know one another and other members of the Department.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Comparative Literature

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Department Requirements for the Major
A. Complete:
COM LIT 60A World Literature
COM LIT 60B Reading with Theory
COM LIT 60C Cultural Studies
B. Complete:
COM LIT 190W Advanced Seminar in Comparative Literature and Theory (capstone seminar)
C. Select two additional upper-division Comparative Literature courses or other upper-division courses offered in the School of Humanities.
D. Completion of one of the three emphases:
1. Emphasis in Comparative Literature and Critical Theory
(a) Select five upper-division courses in Comparative Literature.
(b) Competence in a foreign language sufficient for reading and understanding literature and culture in that language may be demonstrated through course work in one of the following ways:
(1) Two upper-division courses in a foreign literature or culture in which texts are read in the original, or
(2) One upper-division course in a foreign literature or culture in which texts are read in the original, plus one upper-division course in a literature or culture in translation, or
(3) Students of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean take three years of language training plus one approved upper-division course in a foreign literature or culture in which texts are read in the original language or in translation, or
(4) Students of languages for which no language training is offered past 2C may take any two upper-division courses in a foreign literature or culture in translation.
(5) Students who study Greek and Latin fulfill the entire requirement by successfully completing two years of college-level language training and one upper-division course in a foreign literature or culture in translation.
An Independent Study course may substitute for any part (i.e., either a language or literature course) of the foreign language requirement upon petition to the undergraduate studies director in Comparative Literature.
2. Emphasis in Cultural Studies
(a) Select six upper-division courses in Comparative Literature (three of which must be from the following list):
Topics in Comparative Multiculturalism
Gender, Sexuality, Race, Class
Discourse, Ideologies, and Politics
Critical Cultural Studies
Popular Culture
The Metropolis and Other Cultural Geographies
Literature, Arts, and Media
Literature, History, and Society
3. Emphasis in World Literature
Select six upper-division courses in Comparative Literature (three of which must be from the following list):
Nations, Regions, and Beyond
Topics in Comparative Multiculturalism
Colonialisms and Postcolonialisms
Diasporic Literatures and Cultures
Literatures in Dialogue
Literature in Translation 1
1

COM LIT 150 may be replaced with other approved foreign literature-in-translation courses offered in the Humanities.

Residence Requirement for the Comparative Literature Major: COM LIT 190W and four additional upper-division courses in Comparative Literature or other upper-division courses offered in the School of Humanities must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved by the appropriate program advisor or chair.

Planning a Program of Study

The Department offers close consultation for academic planning. All students should plan courses of study with faculty advisors. Students who wish to pursue double majors, special programs, or study abroad are urged to seek advising as early as possible.

Additional Information

Careers for the Comparative Literature Major

Courses in Comparative Literature train students to read critically, to think and write analytically in a variety of genres and media, to learn languages, and to do independent research, always in a global context. This course of study helps qualify majors for careers in education, international relations, law, government, technology, communications and media, nonprofit organizations, and publishing. In recent years graduates from the Department of Comparative Literature have won Fulbrights, gone on to law school, nursing school, and master’s programs in social work or psychology, and found jobs in public relations firms, done editorial work, and conducted clinical research in pharmaceutical firms. The Comparative Literature major is also excellent preparation for an academic career. Graduates have gone on to Ph.D. programs at Michigan, Cambridge, Harvard, Princeton, UCLA, UC Berkeley, and other schools. Many also teach English, world literature, and modern foreign languages at the high-school level.

Minor in Comparative Literature

Departmental Requirements for the Comparative Literature Minor
A. Complete:
COM LIT 60A World Literature
COM LIT 60B Reading with Theory
COM LIT 60C Cultural Studies
B. Select three upper-division courses in Comparative Literature.
C. Select one additional upper-division course in Comparative Literature or another upper-division course offered in the School of Humanities.

Residence Requirement for the Comparative Literature Minor: Four upper-division courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved by the appropriate program advisor or chair.

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Graduate Program

Comparative Literature faculty at UCI Irvine are particularly well equipped to guide students in Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Rhetorical Studies, Postcolonial Theory, Critical Race Theory, Theory of the Novel, Gender and Queer Theory, and Political Theory; the faculty also have expertise in African literature, Persian literature, Irish literature, Caribbean literature, Indigenous literatures, East Asian film, Latin American literature and film, Digital Culture, and Sound Studies, and offer seminars that deal with some of the major figures and issues in contemporary theoretical debates, including Deleuze, Foucault, Gramsci, Derrida, as well as object relations theory/psychoanalysis, theories of sovereignty, state formation, and subaltern studies, and the study of the everyday. The M.A. degree is considered to be a step toward the Ph.D.; only students intending to complete the doctorate are admitted to the program. Applicants must hold a B.A. or equivalent degree and should normally have majored in Comparative Literature, English, or a foreign literature. Majors in other disciplines (e.g., philosophy, history, visual studies, women’s studies, ethnic studies) will be considered, provided that a sufficient background in literary and cultural studies and in at least one foreign language is demonstrated.

The Department offers a track in (1) Comparative Literature with an emphasis in a literary tradition, (2) Comparative Literature with an emphasis in Translation Studies, and (3) Comparative Literature with an emphasis in Critical Theory. (See the departmental graduate student handbook for a description of these emphases.) Graduate students in Comparative Literature may also complete an emphasis in Chinese Language and Literature, Classics, East Asian Cultural Studies, French, German, Japanese Language and Literature, or Spanish. Emphases in Asian American Studies, Critical Theory, Feminist Studies, and Visual Studies are available through the School of Humanities. Within these emphases, students enroll in sequences of courses that highlight individual interests and expertise. In consultation with advisors, students may also develop individualized curricula that cut across these and other offerings in the Department and School.

A minor field specialization is recommended. This optional component promotes engagement with a field or methodology outside the student’s specialization. It may be of a national, historical, disciplinary, or methodological nature, with the student of western postmodern literary theory and forms engaging in a focused study of ancient Greek or Roman philosophy and culture, for example, or the student of East Asian languages and diasporic literatures may work in anthropology or ethnography. This optional component of the student’s program may be fulfilled through course work, independent studies, or a Qualifying Examination topic.

Graduate students in Comparative Literature must demonstrate a command of two foreign languages consistent with their particular focus of study within the program. Competence in two foreign languages is required for the Ph.D. and is verified through examination, a longer translation project, and/or course work.

The Department recognizes that most of its graduate students intend to become teachers, and believes that graduate departments should be training college teachers as well as scholars—indeed, that teaching and scholarship complement one another. Thus candidates for the Ph.D. are expected to acquire experience in teaching, and all Ph.D. candidates gain supervised training as part of the seminar work required for the degree.

Several substantial fellowships are available to graduate students.

The Schaeffer Fellowship provides $20,000 plus fees for up to two years to Ph.D. students in Comparative Literature for whom translation will be a crucial element of their dissertation work. Scholars translating literary or historical texts or archival materials not previously reliably available in English as part of their dissertation research are eligible. Multiple fellowships per year may be awarded. Students interested in the Schaeffer Fellowship should contact the Department prior to applying to the Ph.D. program.

The Murray Krieger Fellowship in Literary Theory is intended for an outstanding entering graduate student pursuing the Ph.D. in Comparative Literature or English who demonstrates a primary interest in theory as theory relates to literary texts.

A range of other fellowships is also available to students in the Department.

Master of Arts in Comparative Literature

Entering students are assigned a faculty advisor who usually serves as the chair of the student’s M.A. examination committee (which consists of at least two other members of the faculty). Nine courses and an examination are required to complete the degree. The normal academic load for both M.A. and Ph.D. candidates is three courses a quarter; teaching assistants take two courses in addition to earning credit for University teaching. Only in exceptional circumstances will students be permitted to undertake programs of less than six full courses during the academic year.

The M.A. examination is normally taken during the quarter in which the student completes course work. For the examination, the candidate submits an M.A. paper and a statement of purpose outlining past and future course work and preliminary plans for the Ph.D. qualifying examination. The M.A. examination consists of a discussion of the student’s paper and the statement of purpose. In practice, it resembles an extended advising session, but with particularly close attention to the student’s paper.

Doctor of Philosophy in Comparative Literature

The doctoral program in Comparative Literature prepares the student for a professional career in the research and teaching of comparative literary and cultural studies. Some students also choose to enter professions (e.g., specialized research, nonprofit organizations, international cultural exchange) in which the specialized work in a specific field indicated by an advanced degree is highly desirable.

Normally, students who have not done graduate work at another university must complete at least 18 courses. Upon completion of the course work, the student takes a qualifying examination on four areas formulated by the student in consultation with the four faculty members who make up the examination committee. The four areas are to cover a major field, a secondary field, a special topic, and theory. All four areas are to be related to each other and to work toward the dissertation. The examination is part written, part oral, according to a formula decided by the student and the committee. The examination as a whole should reflect the student’s ability to work in at least two languages.

After passing the qualifying examination, the student forms a dissertation committee of three faculty members, formulates a dissertation topic in consultation with them, and submits a prospectus for the dissertation along with a preliminary bibliography. Study toward the Ph.D. culminates in the dissertation. The normative time for advancement to candidacy is four years. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is seven years, and the maximum time permitted is nine years.

Courses

COM LIT 8. Travels in Comparative Literature. 4 Units.

Readings in English and in English translation on such topics as love, war, cities, travel writing, politics, fantasy and science fiction, violence.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV)

COM LIT 9. Introduction to Multiculturalism. 4 Units.

Various themes and forms of literary and cultural production within a multicultural framework, including African American, Asian American, Chicano/Latino, and Native American literatures and cultures.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV, VII)

COM LIT 10. Topics in World Literature. 4 Units.

Introduction to texts from across the globe and from different historical periods. Readings in English and English translation.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

COM LIT 60A. World Literature. 4 Units.

An introduction to the comparative study of literatures and cultures in a global context. Studies literary texts and other media across the borders of various cultures, historical periods, and traditions. All texts are read in English translation.

(IV, VIII)

COM LIT 60B. Reading with Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to theory and methods of literary and cultural criticism in a global context. Students read theoretical approaches to literature, culture, and ideas. Marx and Freud, e.g., may be studied alongside readings in narrative poetry, film, song lyrics, novel.

(IV, VIII)

COM LIT 60C. Cultural Studies. 4 Units.

Introduces students to a variety of cultural practices (literature, blogs, films, radio, comics) from across the globe. Focuses on the ways that context, genre, and medium (e.g., written, visual, oral) affect how these practices are produced, circulated, and received.

(IV, VIII)

COM LIT 100A. Nations, Regions, and Beyond. 4 Units.

Intensive study of national and regional cultural and literary traditions from across the globe, among them the literary and cultural production of the Middle East, Africa, Europe, the Americas, and Asia.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 102. Comparative Studies in Literature and Theory. 4 Units.

In-depth discussion of special topics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 102W. Comparative Studies in Literature and Theory. 4 Units.

In-depth discussion of special topics.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(Ib)

COM LIT 105. Topics in Comparative Multiculturalism. 4 Units.

Treats the literatures and cultures of one or more minority groups in California and the United States, including African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicano/Latinos, and Native Americans, and their relations to other national literatures.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

COM LIT 107. Colonialisms and Postcolonialisms. 4 Units.

Explores topics such as colonialism and race, decolonization, pre- and postcoloniality, globalization, and the cultural dynamics of colonization and subjectivity.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 108. Diasporic Literatures and Cultures. 4 Units.

Literatures, cultures, and histories of diasporic groups, e.g., literature of the Persian diaspora; cinema of the African diaspora.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 120. Philosophy, Culture, and Literature. 4 Units.

Discusses contemporary and historical philosophical questions and figures--for example, existentialism or debates about artificial intelligence--in interaction with culture and literature.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 121. Narrative, Pattern, and Text. 4 Units.

Explores textual patterns, structures, and effects. May include topics such as novel, hypertext, genre, reader responses, intertextuality.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 122. Rhetorical Approaches to Literature. 4 Units.

Studies the art and politics of rhetoric and persuasion in connection with cultural works from various times and places, for example, classical political speeches, Internet journalism.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 123. Literatures in Dialogue. 4 Units.

Studies how texts interact across time and space in a global context. Uses concepts of influence, imitation, and parody, to ask, for example, how the Homeric epics can help us understand Caribbean novels and U.S. movies such as Troy.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 130. Gender, Sexuality, Race, Class. 4 Units.

Discusses the roles of differences such as race, class, gender, and sexuality in society, culture, and literature across the globe, covering topics such as theoretical and literary representations of queer sexuality, gender performance, critical race theory.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 131. Psychoanalysis and Culture. 4 Units.

Discusses major psychoanalytic writings of Freud and others in connection with questions of culture.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 132. Discourse, Ideologies, and Politics. 4 Units.

Compares ideologies and systems, e.g., nationalism and fundamentalism, as they affect literature and culture in a global context.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 140. Critical Cultural Studies. 4 Units.

Introduces a variety of ways of understanding cultural phenomena in relation to different power structures. These cultural phenomena may include comics, film, literature, sports, music, festivals, telling stories, or eating out.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 141. Popular Culture . 4 Units.

Critical analyses of popular culture such as comics, oral narratives, films, TV, music, in an internationl framework.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 142. The Metropolis and Other Cultural Geographies. 4 Units.

Examines the relationship between space and culture; cultural production in the city, suburb, and/or countryside; spaces in texts and artifacts (film, literature, comics, photographs) in a global context.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 143. Literature, Arts, and Media. 4 Units.

Explores literature and other arts and media in a global context. May include film and electronic media, fine arts, oral cultures, architecture, in an international framework.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 144. Literature, History, and Society. 4 Units.

Explores the relationship between literary texts and their historical and social contexts in an international framework. Courses may address, for example, literary and cultural expressions in social revolutions or the way literary texts talk back to medicine, religion, and anthropology.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 150. Literature in Translation. 4 Units.

The study of literary works in one or more genres in English translation. May be a comparative study of works from several different original languages or a concentration on works from a single cultural/linguistic tradition.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 160. World Cinema . 4 Units.

Comparative analysis of contemporary film in languages other than English.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

COM LIT 190W. Advanced Seminar in Comparative Literature and Theory. 4 Units.

Capstone seminar for the Comparative Literature major. Deepens understanding of the field through investigation of a special topic and a substantial research and writing project.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Comparative Literature majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

COM LIT 198. Special Topics. 1-4 Units.

Directed group study of selected topics.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

COM LIT 199. Independent Study in Comparative Literature. 1-4 Units.

To be taken only when the materials to be studied lie outside the normal run of departmental offerings.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

COM LIT 200A. History of Comparative Literature and Introduction to Methods and Theories of CL. 4 Units.

Seminar designed to introduce graduate students in Comparative Literature to the discipline of Comparative Literature. Issues and theories of comparative literary and cultural study are covered. Strongly recommended for first and second year students before the M.A. exam and review.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

COM LIT 200B. Theories of Translation. 4 Units.

The reproduction, translation, and transfer of literary and cultural, ideological and political, and symbolic codes and texts have long been the object of study in Comparative Literature. Addresses the diverse ways in which expressive systems interact and intersect.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 200C. Theories of Globalization, Inter-Nationalism, and Postcolonialism. 4 Units.

Addresses both theories and the complex history of literary and cultural expression in a national, trans-, inter-, and post-national, global frame. Topics may include: globalism and nationhood, theories of citizenship and political subjecthood, postcolonial literature and theory.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 200D. Cultural Rhetoric and Rhetorical Theory. 4 Units.

Surveys contemporary theories of cultural rhetoric and the cultural rhetoric of contemporary theory, and interrogates the intersection of rhetoric, critical theory, and cultural studies. Both historical and contemporary theories of rhetoric and cultural rhetorics are studied.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 210. Comparative Studies . 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Comparative Literature. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

COM LIT 220. Translation Workshop. 2-4 Units.

Trains students in the methodologies and practice of translation. Students focus on the translating process in a series of case studies and individual projects.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

COM LIT 290. Reading and Conference. 4-12 Units.

Studies in selected areas. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

COM LIT 291. Guided Reading Course. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

COM LIT 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

A units-only course for students in the dissertation phase.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

COM LIT 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

M. Ackbar Abbas, M.Phil. University of Hong Kong, Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (Hong Kong culture and postcolonialism, visual culture, architecture and cinema, cultural theory, globalization)
Eyal Amiran, Ph.D. University of Virginia, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (digital media theory, twentieth-century literature, narrative and textual theory, psychoanalysis, modern and postmodern intellectual history)
Luis Avilés, Ph.D. Brown University, Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (Golden Age literature and critical theory)
Etienne Balibar, Ph.D. Catholic University of Nijmegen, Professor Emeritus of French; Comparative Literature (political philosophy, critical theory, epistemology of the social sciences, ethics)
Ellen S. Burt, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century French literature and nineteenth-century poetry)
Nahum D. Chandler, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Director of the Graduate Program in Culture and Theory and Associate Professor of African American Studies; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (modern intellectual history, history of the human sciences)
James A. Fujii, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Japanese; Comparative Literature (modern Japanese literature, human-animal relations, cultural studies)
Alexander Gelley, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature (eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European novel, critical theory)
David Theo Goldberg, Ph.D. The Graduate Center, City University of New York, Director of the UC Humanities Research Institute and Professor of Comparative Literature; Anthropology; Criminology, Law and Society; Culture and Theory (race, racism, race and the law, political theory, South Africa, digital humanities)
Hu Ying, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Chinese; Comparative Literature (narrative literature, translation theory, feminist theory)
Susan C. Jarratt, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; Education (histories and theories of rhetoric, ancient Greek rhetoric, writing studies)
Adriana M. Johnson, Ph.D. Duke University, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; Spanish and Portuguese (Latin American literature and film, subaltern studies, postcolonial studies, politics and culture)
Laura H. Kang, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies; Asian American Studies; Comparative Literature (feminist epistemologies and theories, cultural studies, ethnic studies)
Ketu H. Katrak, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr College, Professor of Drama; Comparative Literature (drama and performance, African drama and Ancient Sanskrit drama [from India], postcolonial literature and theory, women writers and feminist theory)
Arlene Keizer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory (African American and Caribbean literature, critical race and ethnic studies, feminist and psychoanalytic theory, cultural studies)
Rodrigo Lazo, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (hemispheric American studies, nineteenth century, Latino studies and the Americas, Cuba, immigrant literature)
Catherine Liu, Ph.D. Yale University, Department Chair and Professor of Film and Media Studies; Comparative Literature; Visual Studies (Hou Hsiao-hsien, culture wars, Frankfurt School, historiography of critical theory/cultural studies, surveillance, cold war culture and neoliberalism)
Julia R. Lupton, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean for Research and Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Education (Renaissance literature, literature and psychology)
Steven J. Mailloux, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor Emeritus of English; Comparative Literature (rhetoric, critical theory, American literature, law and literature)
J. Hillis Miller, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Endowed Chair and Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature; English (Victorian literature, critical theory)
Jane O. Newman, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; English; European Languages and Studies (comparative Renaissance and early modern literature and culture [English, French, German, Italian, neo-Latin], Mediterranean Renaissance studies, Baroque, afterlives of antiquity, Walter Benjamin, Erich Auerbach, pre-modern lessons for the modern and post-modern)
Carrie J. Noland, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of French; Comparative Literature (20th-century poetry and poetics, avant-garde movements in art and literature, critical theory, performance studies)
Margot Norris, Ph.D. State University of New York College at Buffalo, Professor Emerita of English; Comparative Literature (modern Irish, British, American and continental modernism, literature and war)
Laura B. O'Connor, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (Irish literature, twentieth-century poetry, Anglo-American modernism)
Kavita S. Philip, Ph.D. Cornell University, Associate Professor of History; Comparative Literature; Informatics (history of modern South Asia, science and technology, political ecology, critical theoretical studies of race, gender, colonialism, new media, and globalization)
Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan, Ph.D. Binghamton University, State University of New York, UCI Chancellor's Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory (critical theory, postcoloniality, nationalisms and diasporas, poststructuralism, postmodernism, democracy and minority discourse, cultural studies, globalization and transnationalism)
Nasrin Rahimieh, Ph.D. University of Alberta, Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; Gender and Sexuality Studies (Modern Persian literature and culture, diaspora studies, women's writing.)
John C. Rowe, Ph.D. State University of New York College at Buffalo, Professor Emeritus of English; Comparative Literature
Annette M. Schlichter, Ph.D. Humboldt University of Berlin, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (feminist theory and criticism, queer theory, critiques of heterosexuality, contemporary American literature, gender and literature, voice studies)
Beryl F. Schlossman, Doctorate University of Paris 7, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor of Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (Modern literature, critical theory, film studies, psychoanalysis, the arts in society.)
Gabriele J. Schwab, Ph.D. University of Konstanz, Department Chair and UCI Chancellor's Professor of Comparative Literature; Anthropology; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (modern literature, critical theory, psychoanalysis, comparative literature)
Martin Schwab, Ph.D. Heidelberg University, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (philosophy and aesthetics)
John H. Smith, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Comparative Literature; German (18th- and 19th-century literature and intellectual history, literary theory)
James Steintrager, Ph.D. Columbia University, Director of the Emphasis in Critical Theory and Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century comparative literature, ethical philosophy and literature, systems theory, amatory and erotic fiction)
Rei Terada, Ph.D. Boston University, Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory (theory, poststructuralism, nineteenth- and twentieth-century poetry)
Jennifer Terry, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, Associate Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies; Comparative Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies (cultural studies, social theory; science and technology studies, formations of gender and sexuality, critical approaches to modernity, American studies in transnational perspective, processes of militarization)
Ngugi Wa Thiong'O, B.A. Makerere University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature; English (African and Caribbean literatures, theater and film, performance studies, cultural and political theory)
Georges Y. Van Den Abbeele, Ph.D. Cornell University, Dean of the School of Humanities and Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (French and European philosophical literature, travel narrative and tourism/migration studies, critical theory and aesthetics, francophone literature, history of cartography, media history and theory.)
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