2016-17 Edition

Special Programs

This section includes a variety of special programs that are available through the School of Humanities. Click on the tabs above for information about each program.

Click here for the list of Courses in Humanities.

 

 

 

 

 

Minor in Humanities and Law

Jeffrey Helmreich, Director
85 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-6525
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/humlaw/

The minor in Humanities and Law is comprised of courses in the School of Humanities that UCI graduates have found to be useful in developing skills and knowledge that prepare them for law-related careers. One set of courses develops skills in critical reading, writing, and analysis that are necessary in dealing with legal issues. Another set presents theoretical and analytical perspectives on ethical, political, and social issues relevant to the law. A final set focuses on specific legal issues from a humanistic perspective. Lower-division requirements primarily develop foundational skills in the first set, whereas upper-division requirements build on these skills by addressing the concerns from the other sets. The minor does not include how-to courses on particular legal practices.

Requirements for the Minor in Humanities and Law

A. Complete:
PHILOS 22 Introduction to Law and Society
or PHILOS 133 Topics in Philosophy of Law
B. Complete:
ENGLISH 11 Society, Law, and Literature
or GEN&SEX 60B Gender and Law
C. Select one of the following options:
Humanities Core Lecture
and Humanities Core Writing
and Humanities Core Lecture
and Humanities Core Writing
and Humanities Core Lecture
and Humanities Core Writing (1.)
(or the Humanities Core Alternative) 1
or
PHILOS 2 or PHILOS 29 and one course, not used above, chosen from: PHILOS 22, PHILOS 133, ENGLISH 11, or GEN&SEX 60B
D. Five upper-division courses from among a list of quarterly approved courses, at least one each from philosophy, history, and either literature or classics. 2
1

The Humanities Core Alternative is also an option. Visit the School of Humanities Undergraduate Study website for additional information.

2

Consult the Humanities and Law website for currently approved courses.

Students considering a career in law are strongly encouraged to take advantage of other law-related courses offered across the campus and of extracurricular activities such as the Pre-Law Society.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: Four upper-division courses required for the minor must be successfully completed at UCI. Two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department chair.

Interdisciplinary Minor in Asian Studies

http://www.humanities.uci.edu/asianstudies/

Robert Uriu, Co-Director, School of Social Sciences
rmuriu@uci.edu

Qitao Guo, Co-Director, School of Humanities
guoq@uci.edu

The countries and cultures of Asia are significant participants in the world community. They present compellingly different models for social organization, historical development, and cultural commitments. The many countries of this large and complex region provide challenges and opportunities whether one plans to be a scholar, a business person, or a diplomat. The minor in Asian Studies draws upon the expertise of faculty throughout UCI to create opportunities for students to explore Asian topics in a variety of fields, to develop advanced language skills, and to acquire a broader perspective as they apply the disciplinary training of their major field to effective and informed studies of Asian subjects. The minor is open to all UCI students.

Requirements for the Interdisciplinary Minor in Asian Studies

Students choose one country and language of specialization. At the present the Asian Studies minor focuses on China, Japan, or Korea.

Requirements for the minor are met by taking eight courses (of which no more than four may be lower-division) as specified below.

A. One upper-division History course with a focus on Asia approved by the director.
B. Three quarters of course work in one Asian language of specialization beyond the first-year level. Approved courses are:
1. Second-, third-, or fourth-year language: 1
Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
and Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
and Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Dialect Background Track
and Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Dialect Background Track
and Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Dialect Background Track
Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Mandarin Background Track
and Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Mandarin Background Track
and Intermediate Mandarin Chinese - Mandarin Background Track
Advanced Mandarin Chinese
and Advanced Mandarin Chinese
and Advanced Mandarin Chinese
Fourth-Year Mandarin Chinese
and Fourth-Year Mandarin Chinese
and Fourth-Year Mandarin Chinese
Intermediate Japanese
and Intermediate Japanese
and Intermediate Japanese
Advanced Japanese
and Advanced Japanese
and Advanced Japanese
Fourth Year Japanese
and Fourth Year Japanese
and Fourth Year Japanese
Intermediate Korean
and Intermediate Korean
and Intermediate Korean
Intermediate Korean for Students with a Previous Background in Korean
and Intermediate Korean for Students with a Previous Background in Korean
and Intermediate Korean for Students with a Previous Background in Korean
Advanced Korean
and Advanced Korean
and Advanced Korean
Fourth Year Korean
and Fourth Year Korean
and Fourth Year Korean
Other sequences in Asian languages as available.
2. Either Classical Chinese or Classical Japanese:
Classical Chinese
and Classical Chinese
and Classical Chinese
Classical Japanese
and Classical Japanese (plus a third quarter of Japanese language study)
3. Literature courses taught in the original language: 2
Chinese Literature: Advanced Texts
Japanese Literature: Advanced Texts
Korean Literature: Advanced Texts
Or graduate seminars
C. Four additional courses selected from an approved list. 3
1. At least two of these courses must be taken in one (or more) department(s) other than the student’s major department.
2. The courses must cover at least two different Asian countries, one of which is the country of language specialization.
3. No more than two of the courses may be lower-division (and only one may be lower-division if any combination of second- or third-year East Asian language is used for the language required above).
1

These courses require placement examinations given by the Academic Testing Center. Students who, for example, place out of CHINESE 2B would then take CHINESE 2C, CHINESE 3A-CHINESE 3B to meet the requirement.

2

These courses have a prerequisite of completion of the fourth-year language sequence or its equivalent.

3

Available at the Asian Studies Minor website.

NOTE: A maximum overlap of two courses is permitted between this minor and a student’s major.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: Four upper-division (or graduate) courses must be successfully completed at UCI. Two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department chair.

Interdisciplinary Minor in Jewish Studies

Matthias Lehmann, Director
400 Murray Krieger Hall
949-824-6735
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/jewishstudies/

The minor in Jewish Studies is an interdisciplinary program that introduces students to the many facets of Jewish cultures through the study of the history, philosophy, art, literature, languages, and social and political institutions of Jews from ancient to modern times. The minor provides students with grounding in areas of fundamental importance to the Humanities and Social Sciences, supporting and enriching the students’ majors. The minor may be taken in tandem with any major and prepares students for graduate programs in Jewish Studies. The interdisciplinary approach of Jewish Studies exposes students to a wide range of disciplines and, like other established liberal arts fields, provides a foundation for pursuing a range of careers.

Requirements for the Minor in Jewish Studies

A. Complete:
HISTORY 18A Introduction to Jewish Cultures
B. Select at least four upper-division courses from the approved list on the Jewish Studies website 1
C. Select three additional, lower- or upper-division courses from the approved list on the Jewish Studies website. 1
1

Students should consult the Jewish Studies website. With the approval of the Director, other relevant courses may satisfy the requirements for the minor.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: At least four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department chair.

Interdisciplinary Minor in Latin American Studies

Adriana Johnson, Director
322 Humanities Hall
949-824-6901
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/latinamericanstudies/

Latin America is a complex cultural and historical region created by Spanish and Portuguese colonization in the New World and which encompasses territories and peoples from the southernmost tip of South America to the Caribbean Islands and the United States. As an area born out of a series of conquests, migrations, contacts, and conflicts, it is transcultural, multi-lingual, and multi-ethnic. It has been a vital part of the formation of the modern world even as it has continued to function as a source for the expression of economic, political, and cultural alternatives to dominant Western formations. The minor provides deeper knowledge and expertise in this region for students interested in a variety of careers. It complements the disciplinary training of a students’ major field by asking that students engage with Latin America through a variety of disciplines and by working with faculty across different schools at UCI.

Requirements for the Minor in Latin American Studies

Requirements for the minor are met by taking eight courses (of which no more than three may be lower-division) as specified below. No more than four courses may be taken in any one single department.

A. Complete one of the following core courses:
Latin America, U.S. Latino, and Iberian Cultures
Problems in History: Latin America
Latin America and the Caribbean
B. One course from each of the following three categories—History, Culture, and Social Sciences—selected from the approved list on the Latin American Studies website. 1
C. Four additional courses selected from the approved list. 1
1

The approved list is available at the Latin American Studies website.

With the approval of the director, other relevant courses also may satisfy the requirements for the minor.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: Four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. Two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department chair.

Graduate Emphasis in Latin American Studies

The Graduate Emphasis in Latin American Studies is open to students from all fields and allows students to gain interdisciplinary knowledge about the study of Latin America and form scholarly relationships with a range of faculty and graduate students interested in Latin America from across the UCI campus. The emphasis requires one year-long foundation workshop on Latin American Studies and two graduate seminars dealing centrally with issues related to Latin America.

Admission

Applicants must first be admitted to, or currently enrolled in, a Master’s or Ph.D. program at UCI and submit an application form to the director of the emphasis. Students should ideally apply while they are still engaged in coursework, but exceptions may be considered by the committee.

Requirements for the Graduate Emphasis in Latin American Studies

Minimum course work for the graduate emphasis in Latin American Studies consists of three courses: a three quarter course entitled Issues in Latin American Studies (HUMAN 265A, HUMAN 265B, HUMAN 265C) and two approved electives that are centrally related to the study of Latin America. Many students may elect to take one of these seminars within their home departments as course-work that also satisfies other degree requirements. One of these seminars must be from outside the student’s home department (and not cross-listed with their home department). For students completing an M.A. thesis or Ph.D. dissertation, the research project will engage the study of Latin America as part of the overall project and one member of the candidate’s dissertation committee should be a core or affiliate faculty in Latin American Studies.

Interdisciplinary Minor in Persian Studies

Touraj Daryaee, Director
400 Murray Krieger Hall
949-824-6735
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/persianstudiesminor/

The interdisciplinary minor in Persian Studies offers undergraduate students an opportunity to study the Iranian and the Persianate world through the study of language, literature, history, and culture. Students who complete the minor will acquire command of the Persian language and have a grasp of the history, literature, art and architecture, cinema, and/or music of the Iranian and the Persianate world. With a minor in Persian Studies, students will learn how to study Persian literary and historical texts and selected cultural art forms as well as the history of Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikestan, and beyond. The minor may be taken in tandem with any major.

Requirements for the Minor in Persian Studies

Requirements for the minor are met by taking eight courses (32 units) beyond PERSIAN 2C (of which no more than four may be lower-division, excluding first and second year Persian language courses) as specified below. No more than four courses may be taken in any one single discipline.

A. Complete the following:
PERSIAN 2C Intermediate Persian (or equivalent proficiency)
PERSIAN 50 Persian Culture
B. Select three of the following:
HISTORY 131A History of Zoroastrianism
HISTORY 131B Ancient Persia
HISTORY 131C Medieval Persia
HISTORY 131D Modern Iran
HISTORY 131E Topics in Iranian History
C. Select four courses chosen from an approved list. 1
1

Consult the Persian Studies minor website for a list of approved courses. With the approval of the Director, other relevant courses also may satisfy the requirements for the minor.

Residence requirement for the minor: Four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI.

Additional Interdisciplinary Minors

Information about the following two minors in available in the School of Social Sciences section of the Catalogue.

The minor in Conflict Resolution provides skills in conflict analysis and resolution and a useful understanding of integrative institutions at the local, regional, and international levels.

The minor in Chicano/Latino Studies is designed to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language, history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, film, drama, music) accomplishments in the Chicano/Latino communities.

Information about the following minors is available in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

The minor in Civic and Community Engagement seeks to provide students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values to engage as citizens and active community members in the twenty-first century. The minor is distinguished both by what students learn, and by how they learn it.

The minor in Global Sustainability trains students to understand the changes that need to be made in order for the human population to live in a sustainable relationship with the resources available on this planet.

The minor in the History and Philosophy of Science explores how science is actually done and how it has influenced history, and is concerned with determining what science and mathematics are, accounting for their apparent successes, and resolving problems of philosophical interest that arise in the sciences.

The minor in Native American Studies focuses on history, culture, religion, and the environment. The three core courses serve as an introduction to the Native American experience from the perspective of different historical periods and frameworks of analysis.

Academic English/English as a Second Language Program

335 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-6781
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/esl/

Robin Scarcella, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Director of the Academic English/English as a Second Language Program and Professor of Academic English and English as a Second Language and of Education (linguistics, language development emphasis)

Academic English 20A-B-C-D through 29 are for students who have been admitted to UCI and who need additional coursework in Academic English. Enrollment in a number of the Academic English classes is restricted to those students who place into that course based on the results from the Academic English placement test. Students required to complete AC ENG 20A, AC ENG 20B, AC ENG 20C, AC ENG 20D, and/or AC ENG 22A must complete the lower-division reading/writing requirement before their seventh quarter or they will be subject to probation. They are to enroll in WRITING 39A immediately after they are authorized to do so by the Academic English/English as a Second Language Program. Academic English courses are required to be completed as a Pass/Not Pass only grade option which will apply toward the 12 baccalaureate unit limit on P/NP only coursework. Students will receive workload credit for Academic English courses taken beyond this 12-unit limit but will not receive additional credits applicable to the bachelor’s degree.

Minor in Medical Humanities

Sven Bernecker, Co-Director
Annalisa Coliva, Co-Director

85 Humanities Instructional Building
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/medicalhumanities/

Medical Humanities is an interdisciplinary, humanistic, and cultural study of illness, health, health care, and the body. In contrast to the medical sciences, the medical humanities – which include bioethics, narrative medicine, history of medicine, culture studies, science and technology studies, medical anthropology, philosophy, dance, music, literature, film, and visual and performing arts – focus more on meaning making than measurement.

Students explore the boundaries between sickness and health, and learn to see life through a patient’s eyes. Topics include the authority of the physician, the role of the hospital, the doctor-patient relationship, the social dimensions of racial and gender differences, and changing conceptions of disease and healing.

The minor may be combined with any major and of particular interest to those students planning to attend medical school, nursing school, pharmacy school, and public health school, as well as students in the humanities seeking to pursue graduate work in the field of medical humanities.

Requirements for the Minor in Medical Humanities

A. Select one of the following:
Health, Wellness, and Conception of the Body
Art and Medicine
B. Select one of the following:
Scientific and Specialized Terminology
Scientific Concepts of Health
Gender and Science
Introduction to Ethics
Contemporary Moral Problems
C. Select one of the following:
Sexuality, Health and Medicine
Medical Ethics
D. Complete the following:
MED HUM 195 Capstone Seminar: The Clinical Moral Laboratory
E. Select three additional courses chosen from those listed above in A, B, and C, and among a list of quarterly approved courses. With the approval of the Co-Directors of the Minor in Medical Humanities, other relevant courses may satisfy the requirements for the minor. 1
1

 The list of quarterly approved courses is available on the Medical Humanities website.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: Four upper-division courses required for the minor must be successfully completed at UCI. Two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided course content is approved in advance by the Co-Directors of the Minor in Medical Humanities.

Academic English and ESL Courses

AC ENG 20A. Academic Writing. 5 Units.

Grammar, sentence structure, paragraph and essay organization of formal written English. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Placement into AC ENG 20A.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

AC ENG 20B. Academic Writing. 5 Units.

Grammar, sentence structure, paragraph and essay organization of formal written English. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: AC ENG 20A or placement into AC ENG 20B.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

AC ENG 20C. Essentials of Academic Writing. 5 Units.

Grammar, sentence structure, paragraph and essay organization of formal written English. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: AC ENG 20B or placement into AC ENG 20C.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

AC ENG 20D. Academic Writing. 5 Units.

Grammar, sentence structure, paragraph and essay organization of formal written English. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: AC ENG 20C.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

AC ENG 22A. Academic English Reading and Vocabulary. 2 Units.

Intensive reading exercises with occasional practice in extensive reading, focusing on comprehension, development of vocabulary, syntax, rhetorical features, reading strategies, and study skills.

Prerequisite: Placement into AC ENG 22A.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

AC ENG 22B. ESL Reading and Vocabulary. 2 Units.

Extensive reading and discussion with emphasis on journal articles, textbook chapters, notetaking, and the interpretation of charts, diagrams, tables, and figures.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

AC ENG 23A. ESL Pronunciation I. 2 Units.

Designed for international graduate students. Provides an emphasis on pronunciation. Development of listening and speaking skills in five fundamental areas: pronunciation, intonation, word stress, listening comprehension, and informal campus communication. Presentations of personal experiences and reports on graphs.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

AC ENG 23B. ESL Conversation II. 2 Units.

Designed for international graduate students. Provides an emphasis on conversational fluency. Further development of listening and speaking skills: review of English sounds, sentence stress, and rhythm. Oral reports, debates, and reports on graphs and surveys.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

AC ENG 23C. ESL Advanced Communication III. 2 Units.

Designed for international graduate students with advanced communication skills. Further development of listening and speaking skills: review of minimal pairs, consonant blends, intonation, stress and rhythm. Oral presentations emphasized utilizing graphs, syllabi, academic terms, and video presentations on academic work.

Prerequisite: AC ENG 23A or AC ENG 23B.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

AC ENG 24. ESL International TA Workshop. 2 Units.

Designed for advanced-level international students preparing to be teaching assistants. Provides extensive practice in oral and written communication skills associated with teaching introductory-level college courses and participating in academic presentations and discussions. Review and analysis of language problems.

Prerequisite: AC ENG 23A or AC ENG 23B or AC ENG 23C.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

AC ENG 28. Grammar. 2-4 Units.

A full review of English grammar covering the following areas: grammar terms, verb tenses, verb forms, conditionals, passive and word forms, punctuation, sentence structure. The concepts are applied in targeted sentence and paragraph writing practice.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

AC ENG 29. Special Topics in ESL. 2 Units.

Directed and individualized work in English as a second language not covered in the AC ENG 20, 21, 22 sequence. Course may be offered online.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

AC ENG 139W. Advanced Academic Writing Across the Curriculum. 4 Units.

Designed for transfer students who speak English as a second language. Focuses on developing academic reading and writing skills including essay content, organization, vocabulary, and grammar. Academic content also covered.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

Medical Humanities Courses

MED HUM 1. Health, Wellness, and Conception of the Body. 4 Units.

Asks what is health and who gets to have it? What is considered a “healthy” or “sick” body? We analyze historical and contemporary experiences of illness, medicine, and caregiving, including how patients represent their bodies and healing.

(GE III or IV ).

MED HUM 3. Art and Medicine . 4 Units.

Analyzes the relationship between medicine and the visual arts from the late medieval to modern periods, covering topics such as anatomy, optical medical technologies, gender and race in medicine, and popular representations of disease and doctors.

(GE II or IV ).

MED HUM 195. Capstone Seminar: The Clinical Moral Laboratory. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary exploration of the clinical encounter, and the importance of meaning making in these “moral laboratories.” Students enter the clinical space as participant observers, and reflect on how the clinical site informs and challenges reading practices.

Prerequisite: MED HUM 1 or MED HUM 3 or GEN&SEX 60A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

Faculty

Kurt R. Buhanan, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language; European Languages and Studies; Humanities
Benjamin Duncan, Ph.D. University of Memphis, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Amanda Jerome, M.A. California State University, Fullerton, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Rose Jones, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Larisa Karkafi, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Friederike Kaufel, M.A. California State University, Long Beach, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Gabseon Lee, M.A. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Sei Young Lee, M.A. University of Arizona , Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Karen R. Lenz, M.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Kathie Levin, Ph.D. Bar-Ilan University, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Jacob E. Ludwig, M.A. California State University, San Bernadino, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Carey Minnis, M.A. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Victorya S. Nam, M.A. Biola University, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Aziz-Ul-Haq Qureshi, M.A. California State University, Long Beach, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Gina A. Ruggiero, M.A. The New School, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Vanessa L. Russell, M.A. California State University, Fullerton, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Robin C. Scarcella, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Academic English/English as a Second Language; Education
Arnold K. Seong, M.F.A. University of Washington, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Brenna L. Shepherd, M.A. California State University, Long Beach, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Paul J. Spencer, M.A. , Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Heather Stern, M.S. California State University, Fullerton, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Robin S. Stewart, M.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Anna K. Striedter, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Debra S. Thiercof, M.S. California State University, Fullerton, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Catherine Vimuttinan, M.A. University of Southern California, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Brandon S. Wolff, M.A. University of San Francisco, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Mary Ellen Rice Wynn, M.A. California State University, Fullerton, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
Omaima A. Zayed, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Academic English/English as a Second Language
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