Program in Public Health

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Anteater Instruction & Research Building, Suite 2010
Undergraduate Advising: 949-824-2358
Graduate Advising: 949-824-7095
http://publichealth.uci.edu/

Overview

The Program in Public Health was established in 2003 to provide institutional focus for existing academic strengths in various sub-disciplines of public health and to facilitate well-grounded education and innovative research in emerging cross-disciplinary topics in the field. Undergraduate degree programs in public health began enrolling students in 2006, and the Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention was established in 2007 to advance the collaborative interdisciplinary mission of public health research, education, service, and professional development. The Department offers a B.S. in Public Health Sciences, a B.A. in Public Health Policy, a minor in Public Health, a Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) in three emphases: Environmental Health, Epidemiology, and Sociocultural Diversity and Health, and a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Health in two concentrations: Disease Prevention and Global Health. The Department also offers a dual-degree M.D./M.P.H. and a joint Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Environmental Health Sciences with the School of Medicine. Future plans and information is available at the Program in Public Health website. The Program is fully accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health.

Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention

Oladele Ogunseitan, Department Chair

Overview

The mission of the Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention is to create, integrate, and translate population-based knowledge into preventive strategies to reduce the societal burden of human disease and disability through excellence in interdisciplinary research, education, and service. This is a forward-thinking mission that acknowledges and complements traditional discipline-based research and training in public health. It is a specific mission that is increasingly recognized by eminent organizations such as the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, by research and education funding institutions such as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Health & Society Scholars Program, and by distinguished Schools of Public Health.

New sources of funding for research and education are emerging, including the translational science initiative of the National Institutes of Health, to support this ecological paradigm of public health. The societal challenges facing health care and the burden of diseases at the community, national, and international levels have increased the demand for experts capable of researching, developing, and implementing programs to prevent disease and to improve population health. The Department hosts activities that bridge disciplinary perspectives, methods, and practices to nurture new leaders in public health through research and training on risk factors that render people vulnerable to diseases in their communities and the development of strategies for preventing disease by separating risk factors from specific vulnerable populations.

Degrees

Public Health PolicyB.A.
Public Health SciencesB.S.
Public Health*M.P.H.
Public Health**Ph.D.
*

With emphases in Environmental Health; Epidemiology; and Sociocultural Diversity and Health.

**

 With concentrations in Disease Prevention and Global Health.

Honors

Honors Research Program in Public Health

The Public Health Honors Program provides an opportunity for selected outstanding students in the program to pursue advanced work in independent research and earn honors in Public Health upon graduation. Successful completion of the honors program requires three quarters of commitment, while enrolled in PUBHLTH H192A-PUBHLTH H192B-PUBHLTH H192C. Students are also expected to enroll in supervised Undergraduate Research (PUBHLTH 199) with their research mentor. The program concludes with a presentation and submission of an honors culminating thesis.

Eligibility and Application Process

In order to be considered, a student must have satisfied the following requirements: completion of all lower-division Public Health courses required for the major; completion of at least five upper-division Public Health courses; an overall UCI grade point average of a minimum of 3.5; and a minimum 3.5 grade point average in all required and completed Public Health courses. Acceptance into the program is based upon evidence of the student’s ability, interest in research, and proposed thesis project with a faculty member.

Admission to the program is based on formal invitation and/or an application to participate in the Public Health Honors Program submitted by the student in the spring quarter of the junior year.

Requirements

Beyond fulfilling the regular courses required for either the Public Health Sciences or Public Health Policy major, honor students must take the following: 

A. Fall Quarter
PUBHLTH H192A Public Health Honors Seminar and Thesis I (4 units)
PUBHLTH 199 Undergraduate Research (1-4 units)
B. Winter Quarter
PUBHLTH H192B Public Health Honors Seminar and Thesis II (4 units)
PUBHLTH 199 Undergraduate Research (1-4 units)
C. Spring Quarter
PUBHLTH H192C Public Health Honors Seminar and Thesis III (4 units)
PUBHLTH 199 Undergraduate Research (1-4 units)
Graduation with Honors

Honors at graduation, e.g., cum laude, magna cum laude, summa cum laude, are awarded to about 12 percent of the graduating seniors. Eligibility for such honors will be on the basis of grade point average (GPA). A minimum overall GPA of 3.5 is required for consideration. Students must have completed at least 72 units in residence at a University of California campus by the end of the final quarter prior to graduation. The student’s cumulative record at the end of the final quarter is the basis for consideration for awarding Latin honors. Other important factors are considered visit at  Honors Recognition .

Campuswide Honors Program

The Campuswide Honors Program is available to selected high-achieving students from all academic majors from their freshman through senior years. For more information contact the Campus­wide Honors Program, 1200 Student Services II; 949-824-5461; honors@uci.edu; http://www.honors.uci.edu/.

Dean’s Honor List

The quarterly Dean’s Honor List is composed of students who have received a 3.5 grade point average while carrying a minimum of 12 graded units.

Public Health Honors, Scholarships, Prizes, and Awards

The following honors, scholarships, prizes, and awards are presented at the annual Public Health Honors and Awards Ceremony held in June.

Outstanding Contribution to Public Health and Community. This award is for undergraduates who have made significant contributions to the Public Health community, including the intellectual growth of others.

Excellence in Community and UCI Service. This award is to signify any work/research done by a student that benefits the campus community or the community-at-large.

Excellence in Public Health Research. This award is for research conducted by a student that is exceptional in quality.

Excellence in Writing. This award honors students who best demonstrate an ability to communicate ideas clearly through writing.

Special Recognition. This award is given to undergraduates who deserve special recognition.

Recognition of Preceptors. This award goes to nominated Practicum Preceptor Sites who have shown an outstanding commitment to UCI students or have been nominated for the award by student recognition.

Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree

All Program in Public Health students must complete the following requirements.

All students must meet the University Requirements.
Program Requirements:

Grade Requirement: A minimum grade point average of at least C (2.0) is required (1) overall, (2) in all courses required for the major program, (3) in the upper-division courses required for the major, and (4) in PUBHLTH 195W.

Residence Requirement: After matriculation, all Public Health courses required for the major must be successfully completed at UCI. The Program in Public Health strictly enforces the UCI residence requirement. At least 36 of the final 45 units completed by a student for the bachelor’s degree must be earned in residence at the UCI campus. (The Program considers courses taken in the Education Abroad Program to be in-residence courses.)

Normal Progress: Students in the Public Health Program are expected to make progress toward their degree, and their progress will be monitored. If normal academic progress toward the degree in Public Health is not being met, students will be subject to probation.

Double Majoring and Minoring

Second majors and/or minors will not be approved unless the student can complete both the degree and double major/minor(s) in their allotted time permitted at UCI. Students must be in good standing and not on academic probation for acceptance as a double major/minor(s).

Students may not enter as a double major, but Public Health students interested in other areas may apply for a double major after their first quarter, if the Public Health Program approves.

Overlap Restrictions

Double Majoring in Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy. Students may double major in Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy; however there are only seven courses that may overlap between the two majors. Students may overlap PUBHLTH 1, PUBHLTH 2, PUBHLTH 101, MATH 2A, MATH 2B, STATS 7 or STATS 8, and PUBHLTH 195W. There are no other courses that can count for both majors.

Other Double Majors. In fulfilling degree requirements for multiple majors, a maximum of two courses may overlap between any two majors.

Major and Minor Requirements. In fulfilling minor requirements, a maximum of two courses may overlap between a major and minor. No course overlap is permitted between minors.

Students may not double major in Public Health Sciences, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nursing Science, Biomedical Engineering: Premedical, or with any of the School of Biological Sciences majors or minors.

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Undergraduate Program

The B.S. in Public Health Sciences and the B.A. in Public Health Policy degree programs train students in multidisciplinary approaches to public health practice and research. The degrees explore both quantitative and qualitative aspects of public health at all levels of analysis. Graduates will advance, through selective employment or further education, to become the new generation of public health professionals prepared to face the emerging challenges to human health from a population perspective using cutting-edge prevention approaches.

Students who are interested in pursuing a premedical program should note that additional courses will be needed beyond the requirements of the public health degrees to fulfill requirements for medical school.

Students considering the public health degrees should carefully evaluate their academic preparation and career goals before enrolling in either the B.S. or B.A. degree program. Changing from a degree program to the other is possible, but will require completion of the required lower- and upper-division courses specified for each program. It is also possible for a student to enroll in both the B.S. and B.A. degree programs (double major), provided the student completes all the requirements outlined under each degree.

The Department also offers an undergraduate minor.

Academic Advising: Academic, Career, Public Health

AIRB Suite 2010
http://publichealth.uci.edu/ph_docs/new_ugrad

Academic Advising

The Public Health Student Services Office coordinates the advising program and provides academic counseling. Undergraduate Public Health students should consult the Public Health Student Services Office for information on academic requirements for the degree, career opportunities, the Public Health 198/199 Research Program, the Public Health Honors Research Program, and student organizations such as the Public Health Association. Students can also visit the Public Health Student Services Office to process change-of-major requests, apply for graduation, obtain information about public health alumni, professional development, or for any other help they might need related to their academic career at UCI.

Peer Academic Advisors. The Peer Academic Advisors are upper-division Public Health majors who bring with them valuable academic, social, and professional experiences. Their functions include counseling students in matters of major selection, program planning, petitioning, tutoring, learning skills problems, and participation in co-curricular and extracurricular activities. The Peer Advisors are located in the Public Health Student Services Office. Office hours are posted at the beginning of each quarter.

Career Advising

Information on graduate and professional schools in public health can be obtained from the Public Health Student Services Office. The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. See the Career Center section for additional information.

Areas of opportunity open to those with a Bachelor of Science in Public Health Sciences degree include laboratory technology, publishing, technical editing, pharmaceutical sales, and training programs in county, state, and federal agencies. The bachelor’s degree is necessary to pursue studies leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. The B.S. degree, plus short training periods, may prepare students for employment in education, medical technology (usually one year), allied health positions, and various other areas.

Areas of opportunity open to those with a Bachelor of Arts in Public Health Policy degree include health care administration and planning, lobbying, corporate planning, health promotion, health education (in hospitals, clinics, government agencies, etc.), mental health, chemical dependency, case managing, insurance, health strategizing, fundraising, community organization, and social work. The B.A. degree, plus brief training periods, may prepare students for employment in education, administration, nonprofit corporations, and various other areas.

Education (community colleges, state colleges, or private schools), medical illustration, and public health (which includes hospital administration, biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, social work, public health education, maternal and child health, and chronic, infectious, and tropical diseases) are fields in which opportunities are available upon completion of a master’s program. Other areas where advanced degrees are necessary include medicine, dentistry, law, nursing, actuary, optometry, podiatry, osteopathy, physical therapy, and veterinary medicine.

Health Sciences Advising

Students desiring to enter the health sciences should have their majors checked in the Public Health Student Services Office. Admissions tests for medical, dental, pharmacy, and graduate schools should be taken in the spring, a year and one-half before the student plans to enter.

Leaders in nearly all health professional schools recommend that students preparing to seek admission to their schools plan to obtain a bachelor’s degree. Students who plan to enter a school of dentistry, medicine, or other areas of the health sciences may receive the required preprofessional training at UCI. This preprofessional training may be accomplished by (1) completing a major in Public Health Sciences and specializing the degree to complete specific course requirements of the dental, medical, or other professional school the student expects to attend. or (2) majoring in any school or department and fulfilling concurrently the specific course requirements of the dental, medical, or other professional school the student expects to attend.

Practicum

A major part of the undergraduate curriculum in Public Health is the Practicum requirement. Public Health Practicum and Culminating Experience (PUBHLTH 195W) is an 8-unit required course for students majoring in Public Health Policy or Public Health Sciences. The course allows students to gain hands-on experience at an approved organization in the field of public health. Preparation for the Practicum course requires that each student interview officials at a selected site. There is an online catalog of approved organizations that have agreed to accept, train and supervise Public Health students in the ongoing activities of the organization. Students must choose a placement site listed in the Practicum catalog. Unlisted sites will not be approved for registration. All students are required to spend 100 hours (about 10 hours per week) at the public health organization during the quarter in which they are enrolled in PUBHLTH 195W.

Practicum is open only to upper-division Public Health students who are in good academic standing and have completed all prerequisite course work. Practicum must be taken for a letter grade. Additional information, including Practicum enrollment procedures and prerequisites, can be found at the Public Health website.

Change of major. Students who wish to change their major to Public Health Sciences or Public Health Policy should contact the Public Health Student Services office for information about change-of-major requirements, procedures, and policies. Information is also available at the UCI Change of Major Criteria website.

Requirements for the B.S. Degree in Public Health Sciences

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the Program Requirements.
Major Requirements
A. Lower-Division Requirements
PUBHLTH 1 Principles of Public Health
PUBHLTH 2 Case Studies in Public Health Practice
CHEM 1A- 1B- 1C- 1LC- 1LD General Chemistry
   and General Chemistry
   and General Chemistry
   and General Chemistry Laboratory
   and General Chemistry Laboratory 1
CHEM 51A- 51B- 51C- 51LB- 51LC Organic Chemistry
   and Organic Chemistry
   and Organic Chemistry
   and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
   and Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2
BIO SCI 93 From DNA to Organisms
BIO SCI 94 From Organisms to Ecosystems
BIO SCI 97 Genetics
BIO SCI 98 Biochemistry
BIO SCI 99 Molecular Biology
MATH 2A- 2B Single-Variable Calculus
   and Single-Variable Calculus
STATS 7 Basic Statistics
or STATS 8 Introduction to Biological Statistics
And three Social and Behavioral Science courses, with at least two in the same discipline selected from the following:
Psychology:
Introduction to Psychology
Sociology:
Introduction to Sociology
Globalization and Transnational Sociology
Social Problems
Economics:
Introduction to Economics
Global Economy
Basic Economics I
Basic Economics II
Anthropology:
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Introduction to Archaeology
Introduction to Language and Culture
Political Science:
Introduction to Political Science: Micropolitics
Introduction to Political Theory
Introduction to Politics Around the World
Social Ecology:
Introduction to Environmental Analysis and Design
B. Upper-Division Requirements
PUBHLTH 101 Introduction to Epidemiology
Select two of the following:
Cell Biology
Developmental Biology
Human Physiology
Neurobiology and Behavior
Five additional upper-division courses with at least one course chosen from each of the three topic areas: 3
Epidemiology, Genetics, and Health Informatics:
Eukaryotic and Human Genetics 4
Development and Disease 4
Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease 4
Processes in Ecology and Evolution 4
Introduction to Computational Biology 4
Microbial Genetics 4
Introduction to Computational Biology 4
Social Epidemiology 4
PUBHLTH 102–119 4
Environmental and Global Health Sciences:
Ecological Anthropology 4
Race, Gender, and Science
Medical Anthropology
Medicine, Food, and Health 4
HIV/AIDS in a Global Context
Biology of Integrative Medecine
Ecosystem Ecology 4
Population Dynamics in Ecology, Epidemiology, and Medicine 4
Limnology and Freshwater Biology 4
Field Freshwater Ecology 4
Environmental Ethics 4
Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability I
   and Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability II 4
Writing/Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability III 4
Advanced Organic Chemistry 4
Race, Gender, and Science
Geographic Information Systems
Global Climate Change and Impacts 4
Ecosystem Ecology 4
Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability I
   and Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability II 4
Writing/Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability III 4
Public Health Law: Fundamentals in Action
PUBHLTH 160–179 4
Geographical Information Systems for Public Health 4
Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research in Public Health
Nuclear Environments
Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability I
   and Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability II 4
Writing/Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability III 4
Infectious and Chronic Diseases:
Developmental and Cell Biology Laboratory 4
Physiology Laboratory 4
Infectious Disease Dynamics 4
The Physiology of Human Nutrition 4
Genetics of Complex Traits 4
Advanced Biochemistry
Biochemistry Laboratory 4
Advanced Molecular Biology 4
Molecular Biology Laboratory 4
Experimental Microbiology Laboratory 4
Immunology with Hematology 4
Advanced Immunology Laboratory 4
General Microbiology
Virology
   and Viral Pathogenesis and Immunity 4
Molecular Biology of Cancer 4
Human Parasitology 4
Molecular Pharmacology I 4
Molecular Pharmacology II 4
Public Health and Wellness
PUBHLTH 180–189 4
C. Practicum Requirement
PUBHLTH 195W Public Health Practicum and Culminating Experience (8 units) 5
1

CHEM 1C and CHEM 1LC are corequisites. Series change effective for new students beginning fall 2011.

2

Series change effective beginning fall 2012. CHEM 1LD will be a prerequisite for CHEM 51LB.

3

Upon petition, PUBHLTH 100 may also be taken to fulfill upper-division course work in specific topic areas, depending on course content.

4

Note additional prerequisites.

5

Taken for upper-division writing credit.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Public Health Policy

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the Program Requirements.
Major Requirements
A. Lower-Division Requirements
PUBHLTH 1 Principles of Public Health
PUBHLTH 2 Case Studies in Public Health Practice
Select three of the following:
Nutrition Science
Biology of Oriental Medicine
Global-Change Biology
The Biology of Human Diseases
Biology of Cancer
The Brain and Behavior
Drugs and the Brain
Brain Dysfunction and Repair
Mind, Memory, Amnesia, and the Brain
AIDS Fundamentals
From DNA to Organisms
Environmental Quality and Health
AIDS Fundamentals
Natural Disasters
Complete:
MATH 2A- 2B Single-Variable Calculus
   and Single-Variable Calculus
STATS 7 Basic Statistics
or STATS 8 Introduction to Biological Statistics
And three Social and Behavioral Science courses, with at least two in the same discipline selected from the following:
Psychology:
Introduction to Psychology
Sociology:
Introduction to Sociology
Globalization and Transnational Sociology
Social Problems
Economics:
Introduction to Economics
Global Economy
Basic Economics I
Basic Economics II
Anthropology:
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Introduction to Archaeology
Introduction to Language and Culture
Political Science:
Introduction to Political Science: Micropolitics
Introduction to Political Theory
Introduction to Politics Around the World
Social Ecology:
Introduction to Environmental Analysis and Design
B. Upper-Division Requirements
PUBHLTH 101 Introduction to Epidemiology
PUBHLTH 122 Health Policy
PUBHLTH 144 Health Behavior Theory
Seven additional upper-division courses with at least two courses in each topic area selected from the following courses: 1
Health Policy and Management:
Special Topics in Asian American Studies 2
Drugs, Crime, and Social Control
Geographic Information Systems
Econometrics I
   and Econometrics II
   and Econometrics III 3
Management Science 3
Introduction to Management Information Systems
Introduction to Business and Government 3
US Healthcare Systems 3
Business of Medicine 3
Special Topics in Management 2
Urban Inequality
Foundations of Community Health 3
Environmental Sustainability II
Urban Design Principles
Urban Public Policy 3
Public Policy Analysis 3
Law and Society 3
PUBHLTH 120–139 3
Geographic Information Systems
Introduction to Global Health
Geographical Information Systems for Public Health
Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research in Public Health
Medical Sociology
Social and Behavioral Health Sciences:
Medical Anthropology
Medicine, Food, and Health 4
HIV/AIDS in a Global Context
Violence in Society 3
Environmental Psychology
Health Psychology 3
Behavioral Medicine 3
Human Stress 3
Child Health Psychology 3
Clinical Health Psychology 3
Environmental Psychology 3
Violence in Society 3
Social Epidemiology 3
Social Epidemiology 3
PUBHLTH 140–159 3
War and Public Health
Social Ecology of Health Promotion 3
C. Practicum Requirement
Public Health Practicum and Culminating Experience (8 units) 4
1

Upon petition, PUBHLTH 100 may also be taken to fulfill upper-division course work in specific topic areas, depending on course content.

2

Course content requires approval by the Program.

3

Note additional prerequisites.

4

Taken for upper-division writing credit.

Minor in Public Health

The minor in Public Health provides students with the fundamental knowledge of principles, applications, and skills needed to develop a firm appreciation of health and disease prevention at the population level, and to use this special knowledge to transform the experience of their major education into innovative approaches for solving problems in health care and assessment.

Teaching and learning. Public Health education demands interdisciplinary engagement. The minor curriculum is intended to engage students from majors across the campus by introducing them to the main concepts and branches of public health, while also giving them the skills and values needed to translate their major education into meaningful projects in population health assessment and disease prevention. In concert with the major degrees in public health, the minor emphasizes learning through the ecological model of public health where the linkages and relationships among multiple determinants affecting health are examined to identify critical nodes of opportunities to improve the health of populations at various scales of analysis.

Service. Public Health education also demands community engagement. All students of Public Health are encouraged to incorporate public health impacts and benefit assessments into societal functions that ground their understanding of public problems. Experience in public health service may be acquired through participation in learning opportunities and by reflecting critically on those experiences under the auspices of vigorous campus organizations such as the Public Health Association.

Requirements for the Minor

Nine courses are required (36 units), no more than two of which may be taken on a Pass/Not Pass basis, distributed as follows:

A. Complete:
PUBHLTH 1 Principles of Public Health
PUBHLTH 2 Case Studies in Public Health Practice
B. Seven upper-division courses in Public Health with at least one from each of five subject-cluster areas as follows:
Epidemiology, Genetics, and Health Informatics
PUBHLTH 101–119
Health Policy and Management
PUBHLTH 120–139
Social and Behavioral Health Sciences
PUBHLTH 140–159
Environmental and Global Health Sciences
PUBHLTH 160–179
Infectious and Chronic Diseases
PUBHLTH 180–189

No more than two courses may overlap between the student’s major degree and the minor in Public Health.

Residence Requirement: A minimum of six courses required for the minor must be completed at UCI. Approved courses taken in the UC Education Abroad Program are considered to be in-residence courses.

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Graduate Programs

The Program in Public Health offers a Master of Public Health (M.P.H.), a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Health, and a dual degree M.D./M.P.H. with the School of Medicine. Detailed information about the degree programs follows.

Master of Public Health

The distinctive mission of the UCI M.P.H. program is to create a motivated cadre of public health professionals who are prepared to implement effective strategies for reducing the burden of disease and disability in culturally diverse communities, and who are primed to draw from their broad training in the global dimensions of public health principles to lead and work collaboratively on precise assessments of health-risk factors and on the management of evidence-based prevention strategies.

In addition to meeting all the training requirements in the core competency subjects recommended by the Association of Schools and Programs in Public Health (ASPPH), students enrolled in the UCI M.P.H. program will have the opportunity for in-depth pursuit of one of three emphasis areas: Environmental Health, Epidemiology, or Sociocultural Diversity and Health. The M.P.H. is a 60-unit program. A full-time student must enroll in at least 12 units per quarter. Part-time enrollment is also allowed. To maintain residency, part-time students must enroll in four to eight units per quarter. All students are required to complete 240 hours of fieldwork at an approved public health practicum site. The Program is fully accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health.

Further information may be obtained from the Public Health website, by calling 949-824-7095, or by sending an email to phgo@uci.edu.

Career Information

Graduates of the UCI M.P.H. program will find employment in both public and private agencies committed to preventing disease and promoting health in all aspects of society. Earning a graduate degree gives new professionals a competitive edge over students who complete their education at the bachelor’s degree level. In particular, the curriculum of the M.P.H. program at UCI is specifically designed to create students who can combine knowledge of the five core disciplines in public health with leadership, communication, and problem-solving skills to meet the needs of culturally diverse communities. Earning an M.P.H. degree will allow graduates to pursue supervisory positions and career advancement opportunities that may be unattainable without an advanced degree. Students may also wish to combine an M.P.H. with a clinical degree in the health professions to increase opportunities for employment.

Course work in the M.P.H. program can also prepare a student to pursue doctoral programs in public health. The Ph.D. is a research-based degree that prepares the candidate for research and teaching positions in institutions of higher education. The Dr.P.H. is a professional degree that prepares candidates for careers as practitioners in high-level administration or teaching.  The UCI Program in Public Health offers a Ph.D. in Public Health with concentrations in Disease Prevention and Global Health. More information about careers and graduate school in public health can be obtained through the ASPPH and the Council on Education for Public Health.

General Admission Requirements

The M.P.H. program accepts students for the fall quarter only. Students are encouraged to begin the application process early to facilitate the timely submission of the application. The deadline for receipt of all application materials for the M.P.H. program is December 15. There are no specific course prerequisites needed to enroll, and the program is open to students with bachelor’s degrees in a variety of disciplines. Individuals from diverse cultural, geographic, and socioeconomic backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

To be eligible to apply for the M.P.H. program, applicants must meet certain minimum academic requirements. Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited academic institution, have earned a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B average) in undergraduate course work, and possess strong verbal and quantitative skills as reflected by Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores. Applicants may also submit standardized test scores from the MCAT, GMAT, or LSAT in lieu of the GRE. If the applicant has, from a UC-equivalent university, a Ph.D. in a health-related field, a medical degree, or is currently enrolled in medical school, a test score must be submitted, but the test score’s date does not need to be within the validity period. Evaluations of applicant files for admission to the M.P.H. program will consist of an assessment of transcripts of previous academic work, standardized graduate admission test scores, statement of purpose, letters of recommendation, and other relevant qualifications. Applicants must choose one of the three available emphases at the time of application.

Applicants must submit both the Application for Graduate Admission and the School of Public Health Application Service (SOPHAS) application in order to be considered for admission. For more information on admissions, visit the Public Health website or contact phgo@uci.edu.

Program Requirements

The M.P.H. is a 60-unit degree program consisting of fourteen courses taken over five quarters. Eight courses must be taken by all students. In addition, students choose three courses in their emphasis and three elective courses. The introductory course in the foundations of public health and the five core competency courses must be taken for a letter grade. Any foundation or core competency courses in which a minimum grade of B is not achieved must be re-taken.

Required Courses. All students begin the program with the four-unit introductory course Foundations of Public Health (PUBHLTH 200). The five core competency courses, each of which is four units, are Probability and Statistics in Public Health (PUBHLTH 207A), Introduction to Environmental Health Science (PUBHLTH 264), Graduate Epidemiology in Public Health (PUBHLTH 206), Health Policy and Management (PUBHLTH 222), and Health Behavior Theory (PUBHLTH 244). Students must also complete at least two quarters of the Graduate Seminar (PH 291) for two units each quarter, and the Graduate Practicum and Culminating Experience in Public Health (PUBHLTH 295) (eight units).

Emphasis Courses. Three courses (four units each) in one of the three emphases are required. Students choose their emphasis at the time of application and select courses with the help of a faculty mentor in that emphasis.

Elective Courses. Three elective courses (four units each) are required. Students select electives in light of their educational and career goals.

Practicum and Culminating Experience. Students are required to complete a supervised internship of 240 hours while registered in the Graduate Practicum and Culminating Experience in Public Health (PUBHLTH 295). The practicum experience follows the first three academic quarters of study in public health, the completion of all core competency courses, and advancement to candidacy. A compendium of approved practicum sites is available online to enrolled M.P.H. students. The student’s work at the practicum site is expected to culminate in a comprehensive written report.

All M.P.H. students are required to maintain an electronic portfolio to document their academic and practical progress throughout the curriculum. The portfolio facilitates reflection on core and emphasis area competencies defined for the M.P.H. degree. Students are required to give an oral presentation near the end of their studies to demonstrate competence for the degree.

Comprehensive Examination. A two-part comprehensive examination will be administered by the faculty of the student’s area of emphasis in the fall quarter. The normative time to take the exam is in the fall quarter, but it is also offered in the spring by special request. Part one consists of a multiple choice proctored examination on the core competency areas and the cross-disciplinary themes of public health. Part two consists of an analysis of case studies in the student’s area of emphasis. Students must pass both parts of the examination before they can be advanced to candidacy for the M.P.H. degree.

For students enrolled full-time, the normative time for completion of the M.P.H. degree is six quarters, and the maximum time permitted is nine quarters. For students enrolled part-time, the normative time is nine quarters, and the maximum is fifteen quarters. Students admitted with advanced standing due to prior graduate-level training may receive credit for up to one-fifth of the total units required toward the M.P.H. degree, upon petition and demonstration of competency associated with those courses. Such credits are not applicable to the graduate practicum and graduate seminar.

M.D/M.P.H. Dual Degree Program

The M.D./M.P.H. program requires five years for completion. It is aimed at individuals who are seeking a career as physicians concerned about making a significant difference in community disease prevention. Students in this program pursue a combined curriculum for an M.D. degree from the School of Medicine and an M.P.H. degree from the Program in Public Health.

Students must be currently enrolled in the M.D. program in order to apply to the dual M.D./M.P.H. program. During their second or third year of medical school, interested students submit both the Application for Graduate Admission and the School of Public Health Application Service (SOPHAS) application in order to be considered for admission. Final acceptance to the program is granted by the Program in Public Health, and M.P.H. coursework begins following the student's third year of medical school. Students should be aware that enrollment in the M.D. program does not guarantee acceptance into the M.P.H. program.

The MCAT, along with the completion of three years of medical school training in good standing, currently serve as a waiver for the GRE entrance examination usually required for application to the M.P.H. program. The total number of units required to graduate from each program separately are satisfied in the M.D./M.P.H. program. 

Contact the M.D./M.P.H. Student Affairs Officer at 949-824-7095 for more information.

Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health

The distinctive mission of the Ph.D. in Public Health is to train graduate students to conduct original research on the determinants of health status of populations, and the translation of such knowledge to improve strategies for preventing disease and disability. Graduates of the Ph.D. program will be prepared for independent and collaborative research careers, and to teach at advanced levels of instruction. Students enrolled in the Ph.D. in Public Health must concentrate in either Global Health or Disease Prevention.

Concentration in Global Health

The focus of the Ph.D. research concentration in Global Health is to train excellence in research through engagement in hypothesis-driven projects to investigate the global context of disease burden and the improvement of population health status. The program will attract candidates who seek to analyze problems at the intersection of risk, vulnerability, and disease. Activities may include investigation of strategies to make research results that have already produced benefits in one country or region effective in underprivileged regions. The program trains students in integrative expertise essential for global health research with hypotheses in the nexus of content (risk analysis), context (vulnerability assessments), and process (translation of knowledge to reduce the burden of disease).

The specific learning objectives of the Concentration in Global Health are for graduates of the degree to: 

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the major theoretical underpinnings of advances in global health research.
     
  2. Explain the relationship between theory and research methods focused on understanding the association of risk, vulnerability, and outcome in global health.

  3. Compare and contrast the health status of different populations with respect to their burden of disease. 

  4. Formulate research hypotheses in the intersection of risk factors, vulnerable populations, and burden of disease. 

  5. Compose research proposals and conduct original research resulting in discoveries that contribute to improved understanding of risk factors and variations in disease burden in a population, and strategies to alleviate the burden at the global level. 

Concentration in Disease Prevention 

The focus of the Ph.D. concentration in Disease Prevention is to train excellence in research to discover insights into how human behavior, social constraints, and other contextual factors influence strategies to prevent disease in populations that are vulnerable to risk factors. The program emphasizes the ecological model of disease prevention, with research hypotheses emerging through multi-layered analysis of determinants of health status, including individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and overarching policy. Students generate the hypotheses for their research in the nexus of risk factors, health behavior, and vulnerable populations. 

The specific learning objectives of the Concentration in Disease Prevention are: 

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the major theoretical underpinnings of strategies for disease prevention. 

  2. Explain the relationship between theory and research methods focused on understanding the association of risk, behavior, and vulnerability with respect to disease pathways. 

  3. Analyze interrelationships among the determinants of illness and maladaptive health behaviors using theories of health behavior.

  4. Formulate research hypotheses in the intersection of health risk factors, health behavior, and health promotion and policies toward disease prevention. 

  5. Compose research proposals and conduct original research resulting in discoveries that contribute to improved understanding of the role of behavior and health promotion strategies in mitigating the vulnerability to health risk factors in specific populations, with the goals of applying the knowledge to disease prevention.

Career Information

The Ph.D. in Public Health prepares graduates to initiate independent and collaborative research careers in academic institutions, to teach at advanced levels of instruction, and to lead research efforts at agencies dedicated to public health at all levels of organization. Graduates of the Ph.D. in Public health will gain employment at research universities, government agencies, or private sector organizations including research institutes, hospitals, and public health foundations. 

General Admission Requirements

Students enroll in the Ph.D. in Public Health in the fall quarter of each year. Applicants are encouraged to start the application process early by consulting with faculty members whose research activities align with the applicant’s interests and academic background. The deadline for receipt of all application materials is December 1. Applicants must choose one of the two available concentrations at the time of application. Master’s level degrees in health-related disciplines are the preferred preparation for admission to the Ph.D. in Public Health. Applicants to the Ph.D. in Public Health who come with undergraduate degrees from other related majors might be required to take supplementary courses in addition to the preparatory module of the Ph.D. program. 

All applicants must have an overall grade point average of B (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better and take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test. Applicants must meet the general admission requirements of the UCI Graduate Division and submit both the Application for Graduate Admission and the School of Public Health Application Service (SOPHAS) application in order to be considered for admission. 

Each Ph.D. student must serve as a teaching assistant for at least two quarters during the graduate program. If English is not the student’s first language, the student must pass a campus-approved oral English proficiency exam prior to serving as a teaching assistant.

For more information on admissions, visit the Public Health website or contact phgo@uci.edu.

Program Requirements

A main feature of the Ph.D. in Public Health is the situation of dissertation research in an ecological framework that considers multi-level analysis of public health questions. We integrate this feature in the two concentrations, each with knowledge modules and creative activity that must be satisfied in partial fulfillment of the degree requirements. All Ph.D. students are required to complete a minimum of 88 quarter-units according to the following modules: 

  1. Preparatory Module: Courses on the following topics: 

    1. Development of research proposals (PUBHLTH 288). 

    2. Research design (PUBHLTH 297). 

    3. Statistical analysis (STATS 201, STATS 202, STATS 203). 

    4. Qualitative methods. 

    5. Epidemiologic methods (PUBHLTH 205). 

    6. Contemporary ethical and regulatory issues governing research in public health (PUBHLTH 292). 

    7. Communication of research findings to various audiences (PUBHLTH 294). 

    8. Team research through participation in directed research with a faculty research group (PUBHLTH 298). 

  2.  Concentration Module: Seven core courses: 
    1. Global Health Research (One course each in Advances in Global Health (PUBHLTH 282), Global Burden of Disease (PUBHLTH 280), International Epidemiology (PUBHLTH 213), and Geographic Information Science (PUBHLTH 283), and t wo courses each in the thematic areas of Risk Factors and Vulnerable Populations); 

    2. Disease Prevention Research (One course each in Health Promotion (PUBHLTH 245), Social Research Methods (PUBHLTH 246), Social Epidemiology (PUBHLTH 208), and Health Behavior (PUBHLTH 244), and two courses each in the thematic areas of Risk Factors and Vulnerable Populations). 

  3.  Research Module: Requires students to: 

    1. Establish a dissertation committee of faculty members. 

    2. Submit a research proposal and advance to Ph.D. candidacy by defending the proposal. 

    3. Consistently enroll in research course units (Students must register for at least three quarters of the dissertation research course (PUBHLTH 296) under the supervision of the Chair of the dissertation committee). 

    4. Conduct research under the supervision of faculty member(s) to complete original research. 

    5. Submit and defend a dissertation to the faculty committee. 

  4.  Elective Module: elective courses are not designated, and may be used to fill any deficiency in a student’s background or advance knowledge in a particular subject. Students consult with faculty mentor and research dissertation committee to select elective courses, subject  to review by the Program’s curriculum committee.

The qualifying examination consists of two parts. The first part is a written test based on the breadth of knowledge of subjects within the Ph.D. concentration. The second part is an oral defense of the student’s research proposal. Students must submit a detailed research proposal to a committee of five faculty members consisting of four members with formal appointments in Public Health, and an external member. Advancement to doctoral candidacy is contingent on passing the qualifying examination. We expect students to sit for the qualifying examination by the beginning of their third year in the program. Ph.D. completion requires submission of an acceptable dissertation and oral defense. The normative time to degree is six years, and the maximum time permitted is eight years. 

Teaching Requirement 

Students enrolled in the Ph.D. in Public Health are required to serve as Teaching Assistants in public health courses for two quarters during their graduate study. Teaching is an important component of graduate training, as it helps graduate students learn how to communicate effectively about their field of knowledge. In addition, teaching experience is valuable to those planning for a career in academia. Graduate students with comparable prior teaching experience (e.g., through postgraduate degrees earned at UC Irvine or other comparable institution) may request a waiver of the teaching requirement.

Courses

PUBHLTH 1. Principles of Public Health. 4 Units.

Introduces the major concepts and principles of public health and the determinants of health status in communities. Emphasizes the ecological model that focuses on the linkages and relationships among multiple natural and social determinants affecting health. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences, Public Health Policy, and Nursing Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 2. Case Studies in Public Health Practice. 4 Units.

Presents case studies in various themes of public health practice to demonstrate how the principles of public health were established and continue to evolve.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 7. Introduction to Public Health Statistics. 4 Units.

Introduces the development and application of statistical reasoning and methods in addressing, analyzing, and solving problems in public health, health care, and biomedical, clinical, and population-based research and practice.

Overlaps with SOCECOL 13, STATS 7, STATS 8, MGMT 7.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

PUBHLTH 10. Special Topics in Public Health . 2-4 Units.

Introduction to emerging topics in public health. Topics addressed vary each quarter. Course may be offered online.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PUBHLTH 30. Human Environments. 4 Units.

Study of natural and physical components of earth's environmental problems due to human activities. Topics include global air, water, soil, biodiversity, rainforests, energy, demographics, agriculture, and urbanization. Theme is sustainability. Integrated into the science are social, legal, and economic considerations.

(II)

PUBHLTH 60. Environmental Quality and Health. 4 Units.

A survey of how pollution in the natural and physical environment affects human health. Topics are toxicology, epidemiology, risk assessment, water, food, air, radiation, pesticides, solid and hazardous waste. Included are interdisciplinary elements of environmental regulations, environmental education, consumer protection.

(II)

PUBHLTH 80. AIDS Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Considers the biological and sociological bases of the AIDS epidemic. Topics include the history of AIDS, current medical knowledge, transmission, risk reduction, and how the community can respond.

Same as BIO SCI 45.

(II)

PUBHLTH 90. Natural Disasters. 4 Units.

Natural disasters are natural processes that adversely affect humans. By examining these processes students develop a basic understanding of Earth's physical environment. Topics include: tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, severe weather, flooding, climate change, mass extinctions and impacts with space objects.

(II)

PUBHLTH 91. Disparities in Health Care. 2-8 Units.

Student participatory course practicing initiation, planning, and coordination of various speakers on the subject of Disparities in Health Care.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

PUBHLTH 100. Special Topics in Public Health. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of public health. Topics addressed vary each quarter. Course may be offered online when topic is Public Health in the Corporate World.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PUBHLTH 101. Introduction to Epidemiology. 4 Units.

The distribution of disease and injury across time, space, and populations. Covers basic concepts and methods of descriptive epidemiology including the natural history of disease, data, and indices of health.

Prerequisite: STATS 7 or STATS 8 or PUBHLTH 7.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 102. Social Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Overviews evidence linking environmental factors to mental and physical disorders including such variables as socioeconomic status, income inequality, work stress, job loss, social capital, location, and other demographic characteristics. Measurement and research design issues of both individual and aggregate levels.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and SOCECOL 10 and SOCECOL 13.

Same as PSY BEH 183S.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 103. Introduction to Genetic Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Examines the methodological approaches for studying the importance of genetic factors and gene-environment interactions in human diseases. Topics include: genetic and epidemiological concepts, population studies, family studies, and applications in medicine and public health.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 101.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 104. Analytic and Applied Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Covers basic concepts of analytic epidemiology and applications, including experimental and observational designs, prevention, screening, treatment and rehabilitation, infectious disease, and injury prevention.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 101.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 105. Introduction to Medical Informatics. 4 Units.

Broad overview of medical informatics for students with varied backgrounds. Electronic medical records, online resources, mobile technologies, patient safety, and computational design. Legal, ethical, and public policy issues. Health systems management. Evaluation and fieldwork for health systems.

Same as IN4MATX 171.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

PUBHLTH 106. Project in Health Informatics. 4 Units.

Students undertake significant quarter-long projects related to health informatics. Topics may include field evaluations of health care technologies, prototypes, iterative design, and system implementations.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 105 or IN4MATX 171.

Same as IN4MATX 172.

PUBHLTH 107. Epidemiology of Drug Use and Misuse. 4 Units.

Applies epidemiologic concepts to the use and misuse of licit/illicit substances. Emphasizes descriptive aspects of drug use and determinants of progressing from experimental use to misuse. Assesses subgroups of abusers, risk factors, trends, and surveillance techniques for estimating drug prevalence.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Public Health Policy and Public Health Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 119. Special Topics in Epidemiology and Genetics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of epidemiology and genetics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PUBHLTH 120. Nutrition and Global Health. 4 Units.

Global issues related to nutrition and public health. Evaluation of nutritional risk factors associated with the development of chronic diseases and the role of nutritional medicine in prevention. Topics include food safety, communicable diseases, supplements, and regulatory issues.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 121. Introduction to Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 4 Units.

Examines health and disease in contemporary American culture/society with definitions, models, and practices of what has come to be known as "orthodox" or "conventional" medicine. Selected "alternative" or "complementary" modes of promoting health and well-being including homeopathy, herbology, and chiropractic.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 122. Health Policy. 4 Units.

Considers social and economic aspects of health and disease in the United States. What are the proper roles of the individual, community, and government in improving health and health care? International comparisons will be made wherever possible.

Same as PP&D 170.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 123. Public Issues in Biotechnology. 4 Units.

An assessment of developments in biotechnology potentially affecting various facets of human society, or warranting significant public debate. Covers the implications of genetic engineering and other biotechnological developments for public health, environment, agriculture, legislation, research ethics, public policy, and commerce.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1 and PUBHLTH 2.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 124. Environmental and Public Health Policy. 4 Units.

Examines factors involved in shaping public health and environmental policy. Topics include the role of science in public health policy, the function of governmental regulatory agencies, citizen participation, and economic and sociopolitical aspects of controlling infectious diseases and regulating carcinogens.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 125. Foundations of Community Health. 4 Units.

A social ecological framework for understanding community health is presented. Measures of individual and community health are compared, and the influence of personal and environmental factors on individual, group, and population health is examined. Community health promotion strategies are discussed.

Same as PP&D 112.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 126. Public Health Law: Fundamentals in Action. 4 Units.

Addresses the relationship of U.S. public health law to health systems at the individual and population levels. Examines legislative and judicial concepts and how they are applied to disease prevention strategies, health services, management, and policy.

PUBHLTH 127. Public Health Programs for the Corporate World. 4 Units.

International perspective on workplace health promotion. Strategies for developing programs to improve employee health and to decrease risks of chronic degenerative diseases. Case studies include assessment of employee health, program design, implementation, and evaluation. Emphasis on disease prevention. Course may be offered online.

PUBHLTH 129. Public Health Administration. 4 Units.

Examines historical aspects of public health administration including policies, procedures, trends, and development of organizations. Addresses information and skills necessary to succeed in public health leadership roles. Discusses strategic planning, collaborations, and ethical considerations for successful management in public health.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Restriction: Upper-division only. Public Health Policy and Public Health Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 134. Asian American Community Public Health. 4 Units.

Focuses on major issues and concepts of community health and their application to public health programs for Asian American populations. Analyzes individual, institutional, community, and policy factors that influence a person's health status within a larger environmental context.

Same as ASIANAM 134.

PUBHLTH 139. Special Topics in Health Policy and Administration. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of health policy and administration. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 141. Clinical Health Psychology. 4 Units.

Behavioral role in etiology, treatment, and prevention of certain diseases. Behavioral intervention including biofeedback, stress-, pain-management, health habit counseling, and other skills to assist patients make cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes needed to cope with disease or achieve better health.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C.

Same as PSY BEH 141H.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences, Public Health Policy, and Psychology and Social Behavior majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 142. The Human Pain Experience. 4 Units.

Examines the physiological and sociocultural correlates of human pain perception. Emphasis on laboratory and clinical methods of measuring acute and chronic pain; social influences on the experience and communication of pain; biopsychosocial approaches to pain control.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and any upper-division course from the Health or Pre-clinical Psychology areas.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 143. Social Ecology of Health Promotion. 4 Units.

Core themes of Social Ecology are examined as they apply to major areas of health promotion research and practice. Students attend lectures and work collaboratively on team projects conducted in university and community settings.

Same as SOCECOL 131.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences, Public Health Policy, and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 144. Health Behavior Theory. 4 Units.

Introduces theoretical perspectives from the social sciences to understand health behavior from the vantage point of individuals, their interpersonal contacts, communities, and ecological contexts. Application of theory to public health problems is a central focus.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 146. Health Promotion Programs. 4 Units.

Examines ecological perspectives of health promotion programs and risk factors related to mortality/morbidity. Analyzes effectiveness of health promotion strategies and issues in the existing healthcare systems in light of sociocultural beliefs and economical/political conditions.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Public Health Policy and Public Health Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 147. Drug Abuse and Its Prevention. 4 Units.

Theoretical and practical underpinnings of drug abuse and its prevention at the individual and population levels. Students practice developing drug abuse prevention schemes for specific populations. Recent developments in pharmacological and biobehavioral theories of drug dependence are explored.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 148. Public Health Communication. 4 Units.

Theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of communication sciences in public health practice. Techniques of effective communication, including fear appeal and deterrence; social marketing; public-private partnerships; health service delivery; and outreach in rural and urban settings, and for international health strategies.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1 and PUBHLTH 2.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 150. Public Health and Wellness. 4 Units.

Presents information about wellness from both science and policy perspectives in order to demonstrate the role of wellness in public health. Emphasizes the conditions that create wellness in the individual, the community, the nation, and the world.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 151. Environmental Psychology. 4 Units.

Impact of the physical environment on individual and group behavior. Three basic concerns examined: (a) environmental determinants of behavior at the individual and interpersonal level; (b) social planning and urban design; (c) methodological approaches to the study of environmental issues.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL E8 or SOCECOL 10 or PP&D 4.

Same as PSY BEH 171S, PP&D 151.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, Psychology and Social Behavior, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 159. Special Topics in Social and Behavioral Health Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social and behavioral health sciences. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PUBHLTH 160. Environmental Pollution and Remediation. 4 Units.

The study of pollution—its identification, risks, and remediation. Analysis of sources of natural and anthropogenic environmental pollutants using ecological concepts, chemical fate and transport, engineering technologies, economics, and policy to provide understanding and solutions to these problems.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 161. Environmental Geology. 4 Units.

Introduction to geologic principles and applications to environmental problems. Topics include: tectonic processes, earth materials, soils, river processes, groundwater, the coastal environment, slope failures, seismic hazards, mineral resources, and land-use evaluation based on geologic conditions. Examples from case studies.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 162. Human Ecology of Health. 4 Units.

Many human health problems are directly associated with ethnicity, sex, and age. Integrates the science of these issues with anthropology, geography, economics to understand the relationship, management, treatment. Involves lectures and discussions to probe these factors.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 163. Introduction to Environmental Health Science. 4 Units.

Focuses on processes of exposure to environmental toxins/agents and their impact to human health and the environment. Media transport, exposure assessment, susceptibility, behavior, and health effect of several toxins are discussed.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 164. Toxic Chemicals in the Environment. 4 Units.

Explores the sources, transformation, and sinks of toxic chemicals in the environment, and their effects on public health. Covers regulatory issues and design-for-the-environment initiatives to reduce or eliminate the adverse effects of toxic chemicals.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1 and PUBHLTH 2.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 164L. Toxic Chemicals in the Environment Laboratory. 4 Units.

Covers field sampling techniques and laboratory analysis methods for assessing the occurrence and effects of toxic chemicals in environmental compartments, including water, soils, sediments, air, and food resources.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1 and PUBHLTH 2. Prerequisite or corequisite: PUBHLTH 164.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 165. Issues in Potable Water Reuse. 4 Units.

Provides an in-depth study of the treatment and subsequent reuse of wastewater for drinking. Analyzes existing regulations for both drinking water and reuse situations, microbial and chemical contaminants, health concerns and risk assessment.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL E8.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 166. Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Basic geographic, cartographic, and GIS concepts including computer representation of physical, political, statistical, and social aspects of space using vector and grid-based maps. Experience with extensive geographic base map files and databases through use of GIS software (ArcView 3.x).

Same as CRM/LAW C148.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences, Public Health Policy, and Criminology, Law and Society majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 167. Air Pollution, Climate, and Health. 4 Units.

Introduction to how air pollutants are emitted into the atmosphere, how people are most exposed to air pollutants in developed and developing areas, physical and meteorological processes that affect transport, and the influence of air pollutants on global warming.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 168. Nuclear Environments. 4 Units.

Understanding the impact of the nuclear age on the environment and human health through interrelated developments of nuclear power and nuclear weapons. The early years of weapon development, catastrophic environmental pollution, perils of nuclear power in the U.S. and Russia.

Same as INTL ST 122, SOCECOL E127.

PUBHLTH 169. Human Exposure Modeling. 4 Units.

Indirect methods in estimating human exposure to environmental agents. Topics include air, noise, dermal and ingestion exposure assessment, time-activity and micro-environmental approach, uncertainty and variability analysis, and the use of GIS and remote sensing in exposure assessment.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 170. Introduction to Global Health. 4 Units.

Provides a foundational interdisciplinary understanding of global health issues and their importance to various societal goals, including poverty reduction, economic productivity, and peace promotion. Covers major communicable and non-communicable diseases and demographic patterns of disease burden.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

PUBHLTH 171. Human Exposure to Environmental Contaminants. 4 Units.

Introduces origins of human's realization that chemicals in the environment may adversely affect health. Introduces the theory and principles of exposure assessment. Covers estimation of exposure, variability of measures, the way exposure assessment is incorporated into the risk-assessment paradigm.

PUBHLTH 173. Health and Global Environmental Change . 4 Units.

Overview of scientific underpinnings of global environmental change and human health consequences. Provides an understanding of the fundamental dependency of human health on global environmental integrity. Encourages disciplinary cross-fertilization through interaction of students in environmental, health, and policy sciences.

Prerequisite: One upper-division course in environmental science, public health, environmental policy, and/or environmental management.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 175. Environmental Modeling and Risk Assessment. 4 Units.

Surveys the general principles, basic mathematical methods, and practices of environmental modeling and human health risk assessment. Topics include advection-dispersion models, risk management, and risk perception. Students conduct an original risk assessment as a final group project.

Prerequisite: MATH 2A and STATS 7.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 275 and TOX 275.

PUBHLTH 176. War and Public Health. 4 Units.

Explores how war impacts public health both globally and domestically in the United States. Focus on the link between war and the burden that it ultimately places on physical, mental, environmental, and societal health as well as on health systems.

PUBHLTH 179. Special Topics in Environmental and Global Health Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of environmental and global health sciences. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PUBHLTH 180. Epidemiology of Infectious Disease. 4 Units.

Examines the distribution of infectious disease and the health and disease risk among human populations. Introduces basic methods for infectious disease epidemiology. Case studies of important diseases, including HIV and malaria, are conducted.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

PUBHLTH 189. Special Topics in Infectious Diseases. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of infectious diseases. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUBHLTH 190. Geographical Information Systems for Public Health. 4 Units.

Provides a broad introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems software to carry out projects for visualizing and analyzing spatial data to address significant issues of health care and policy-planning.

Overlaps with PUBHLTH 166, CRM/LAW C148.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 283.

PUBHLTH 191A. Seminar: Advances and Challenges in Public Health. 2 Units.

Forum for exploring recent advances and challenges in all disciplines of public health research and practice. Features case studies exemplifying the integration of core competencies with cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes of public health.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 291A.

PUBHLTH 191B. Seminar: Advances and Challenges in Public Health. 2 Units.

Forum for exploring recent advances and challenges in all disciplines of public health research and practice. Features case studies exemplifying the integration of core competencies with cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes of public health.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 291B.

PUBHLTH 191C. Seminar: Advances and Challenges in Public Health. 2 Units.

Forum for exploring recent advances and challenges in all disciplines of public health research and practice. Features case studies exemplifying the integration of core competencies with cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes of public health.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 291C.

PUBHLTH H192A. Public Health Honors Seminar and Thesis I. 4 Units.

Provides an opportunity for selected students to pursue advanced work in research and earn Public Health Honors. Students will conduct their honors research project with faculty through lectures, guest speakers, creating timelines and assignments.

Corequisite: PUBHLTH 199.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Public Health Policy and Public Health Sciences graduate students only.

PUBHLTH H192B. Public Health Honors Seminar and Thesis II. 4 Units.

Students initiate and complete data collection for the honors thesis. In addition, students begin data analysis and summarize results at a class symposium at the end of the quarter. A faculty mentor provides supervision and feedback on thesis chapters.

Corequisite: PUBHLTH 199.
Prerequisite: PUBHLTH H192A.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: Public Health Policy and Public Health Sciences students only.

PUBHLTH H192C. Public Health Honors Seminar and Thesis III. 4 Units.

Students write their honors research project (PUBHLTH H192A-PUBHLTH H192B) and prepare an oral report to be presented at a class symposium at the end of the quarter. A faculty mentor provides supervision and feedback on thesis chapters.

Corequisite: PUBHLTH 199.
Prerequisite: PUBHLTH H192B.

Restriction: Public Health Policy and Public Health Sciences students only.

PUBHLTH 193. Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research in Public Health. 4 Units.

Issues of scientific integrity and satisfies the requirements for training in public health ethics. Includes guidelines for responsible conduct of research, federal and international codes, administrative review and approval, conflict of interest, and privacy and safety of research participants.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors only. Upper-division students only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 292.

PUBHLTH 194A. Clinical and Translational Research Preparatory I. 4 Units.

Provides training for students with an interest in clinical and translational research in the health care setting. Cultivates skills for study design, research literature review, ethics, responsible conduct of research, and cultural competence while emphasizing professionalism and personal responsibility.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

PUBHLTH 194B. Clinical and Translational Research Preparatory II. 1-4 Units.

Provides opportunities for students to participate in clinical and translational research through rotations in at least two health care settings. Builds on preparation through the first course (194A) in the sequence to support exploration of various research topics.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 194A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

PUBHLTH 194C. Clinical and Translational Research Preparatory III. 4 Units.

Provides opportunities for students to work closely in a particular clinical and translational research setting. Builds on preparation through the didactic instruction presented in first course of the sequence (194A) to support deeper engagement on a particular research topic.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 194A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

PUBHLTH 194D. Clinical and Translational Research Preparatory IV. 4 Units.

Provides opportunities for students to participate in clinical and translational research through placement in a research laboratory. This course is a continuation of 194C in which students have the opportunity to participate in a permanent research rotation.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 194C.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

PUBHLTH 195W. Public Health Practicum and Culminating Experience. 8 Units.

Provides direct opportunities for Public Health majors to observe and participate in public health activities and/or research; and to cultivate skills for verbal and written communication of contemporary public health topics for an integrative culminating experience.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1 and PUBHLTH 2. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Public Health Sciences and Public Health Policy majors only.

(Ib)

PUBHLTH 197. Field Studies in Public Health. 2-12 Units.

For students who may either accompany faculty members on field trips or engage in post-practicum work at a field agency.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1 and PUBHLTH 2.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

PUBHLTH 198. Directed Studies. 1-4 Units.

Student participation in a series of research-related activities performed in an individual or small-group setting under the guidance of a faculty advisor.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 1.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

PUBHLTH 199. Undergraduate Research. 1-4 Units.

Original research with Public Health faculty. Attendance at regular research group meetings is also generally expected, and a quarterly written report is required. Strongly recommended for students considering research careers and/or graduate degree programs.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

PUBHLTH 200. Foundations of Public Health. 4 Units.

Presents the overarching framework, principles, and core responsibilities of public health research and practice from a multidisciplinary perspective. Provides necessary foundation for further studies toward advanced cross-cutting approaches essential for public health practice.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 203. Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Presents descriptive and experimental approaches to the recognition of the causal association of disease in the general population, as these approaches apply to populations using different student designs and models free from the literature.

Same as EPIDEM 203.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 204. Biostatistics. 4 Units.

Designed to help students develop an appreciation for statistician's view of the research process, emphasizing biomedical research. Instills an understanding of how statistical models are used to yield insights about data that form evidence-based understanding of the world around us.

Same as EPIDEM 204.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 205. Advanced Epidemiologic Methods. 4 Units.

Advanced topics in the design and statistical analysis of epidemiologic studies. Topics include simulation methods, counter-matching and multiphase study designs, missing data, and Bayesian analysis. Published simulation studies are discussed and replicated using the R software package.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 101B or STATS 111 or STATS 211.

Same as EPIDEM 217.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 119.

PUBHLTH 206. Graduate Epidemiology in Public Health. 4 Units.

Presents descriptive and experimental approaches to the recognition of the causal association of disease in the general populations, as these approaches apply to populations using different student designs and models from the literature.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 207A. Probability and Statistics in Public Health. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistical methods, using examples in public health. Topics include descriptive statistics, laws of probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and power calculations for one- and two-sample comparisons.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 206 and MATH 2A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 207B. Analysis of Public Health Data Using Statistical Software. 4 Units.

Overview of common statistical methods in public health and how to implement them in R. Topics include linear regression, ANOVA, the Kruskal-Wallis test, logistic regression, missing data and censoring, Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log-rank tests, and Cox regression.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 207A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 208. Advances in Social Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Advances understanding of social distribution and social determinants of disease through multiple risk factor models and mechanisms that emphasize developmental and socio-environmental risk factors on mental and physical health across the life span.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 209. Methods of Demographic Analysis. 4 Units.

Introduces basic demographic methods used in social science and public health research. Topics include sources and limitations of demographic data; components of population growth; measures of nuptiality, fertility, mortality, and population mobility projection methods; and demographic models.

Same as SOCIOL 226A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 210. Cancer Epidemic and Prevention. 4 Units.

Explores the global burden of various cancers, including geographical and societal distribution. Includes causes, diagnosis, and interactions among genetic, environmental, and behavioral risk factors. Covers major cancer preventative strategies.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 203.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 211. Public Health Genomics. 4 Units.

Explores the role of genetic predisposition in the occurence of the human diseases with emphasis on population screening and prevention of disease. Includes interactions between genetic factors and environmental situations, policies, and ethics of population genomics.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 203.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 212. Intermediate Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Learn to design and conduct epidemiologic studies using common designs. Determine why bias and measurement error arise in observational studies, and how they influence effect estimates. Perform and interpret epidemiologic data analyses using statistical software.

Corequisite: PUBHLTH 207.
Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 203.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 213. International Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Explores methodological approaches in the literature on international trials and requires formulation of proposals to answer public health questions of interest in a developing country setting. Students develop case study aims, ideal teams, and budget in an international context.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 214. Surveillance Systems. 4 Units.

Surveillance as a fundamental element of the practice of public health is examined in terms of the application and evaluation of monitoring systems. Topics include surveillance of infectious and chronic diseases, environmental constituents, and other indicators of population health.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 206.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 219. Special Topics in Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Health Informatics. 4 Units.

Current research in biostatistics, epidemiology, and health informatics. Topics vary from quarter to quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 220. Public Health Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. 4 Units.

Examines using cost-effectiveness information to allocate limited resources to maximize health benefits to a population; defining and measuring cost, survival and health-related quality of life; and how to calculate cost-effectiveness using decision trees and Markov simulation models.

Same as PP&D 226.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 221. Health Promotion and Planning. 4 Units.

Focuses on health and health care in the United States, but discussion of global health issues and/or international comparisons will be made whenever possible. Considers both the social and economic aspects of health and disease.

Same as PP&D 241.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 222. Health Policy and Management. 4 Units.

Multidisciplinary inquiry into theory and practice concerned with delivery, quantity, costs of health care for individuals and populations. Explores managerial and policy concerns regarding structure, process, outcomes of health services including the costs, financing, organization, outcomes, and accessibility of care.

Same as PP&D 243.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 223. Risk Communication. 4 Units.

Examines theory and research related to the communication of scientific information in risk communication contexts, risk perceptions, and behavior as related to decision-making under risk.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 224. Public Health Leadership. 4 Units.

Integrates theory and practice of public health leadership through lectures on global health leadership, case studies on leadership issues, and course assignments that include assessment of leadership traits, and development of individual career mission, vision, and values statements.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 239. Special Topics in Health Policy and Management. 4 Units.

Current research in health policy and management. Topics vary from quarter to quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 240. Topics in Environmental Health Promotion and Education. 4 Units.

Focuses on design of intervention strategies dependent on the environmental agent, exposure to assessment, SES, health effects, stakeholders, and support base. Programmatic design includes media selection, communication/education, and pre/post surveys. Analysis of transborder and local environmental health promotion programs.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 241. Environmental Policy and Global Sustainability. 4 Units.

Seminar organized around four transcendent questions: does the world value sustainability, what challenges must be met to move toward it, what are the roots of inequality, and is capitalism compatible with sustainability.

Same as SOCECOL 250.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 242. Theories of Health Communication. 4 Units.

Explores the concepts, constructs, and theories of communication in health and risk contexts. Examines interpersonal, family, organizational, and mediated communicative processes about health care and conditions from a global perspective.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 244. Health Behavior Theory. 4 Units.

Introduces the field of Health Behavior and then segues into major theoretical perspectives. Focus on health behavior change from the vantage point of individual health behavior and theoretical abstraction. Explores how to relate theory to behavior-change intervention programs.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 245. Health Promotion Planning. 4 Units.

Introduces strategic planning integral to intervention planning in public health practice and research, emphasizing the fundamental domains of social and behavioral health science and practices. Students develop an intervention plan for a specific health problem, health behavior, and target population.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 246. Social Research Methods. 4 Units.

An interactive graduate seminar covering topics related to the research process and study design. Begins with conceptualizing research questions, hypotheses, and then turns to topics in measurement and concludes with experimental, quasi-experimental, and observational study designs.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 247. Program Evaluation. 4 Units.

Introduces methods, tools, and procedures for systematic investigation of the effectiveness of programs in health and social services for disease intervention, prevention, and health promotion. Includes development of program evaluation plans, logic models, contextual frameworks, study designs, and data analyses.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 248. Fundamentals of Maternal and Child Health - Programs, Problems, and Policy. 4 Units.

Overview of issues facing women, children, and families from a public health perspective. Discusses role of socio-economic, political, biological, environmental factors on population health. Studies historical foundations and current factors impacting Maternal Child Health programs and legislation in the US.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 250. Health Status and Care Disparities. 4 Units.

Expert health care providers present viewpoints and interdisciplinary strategies for addressing sociocultural, economic, gender, age, and other disparities in population health status and care provision.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 259. Special Topics in Social and Behavioral Health Sciences. 4 Units.

Current research in Social and Behavioral Health Sciences. Topics vary from quarter to quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 261. Environmental Hydrology. 4 Units.

Provides an overview of the occurrence, distribution, and movement of water in the environment. Quantitative methods are introduced for analyzing hydrologic processes. Human impacts on water distribution and quality are considered.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 262. Earthquakes and Seismic Hazard. 4 Units.

Provides an overview of earthquakes and introduction to seismic hazard. Topics include characteristics and effects of earthquakes, sources of earthquakes, seismic hazard assessment, introduction to earthquake loss estimation and mitigation. California examples are emphasized.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 263. Seminar in Paleoseismology. 4 Units.

Provides an introduction to paleoseismology and its applications. Topics include data collection methods, data analysis, earthquakes in different tectonic environments, and applications to seismic hazard assessment and fault characterization.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 264. Introduction to Environmental Health Science. 4 Units.

Convergence of agents (chemical, physical, biological or psychosocial) in environment can emerge as diseases influenced bu social, political, and economic factors allowing them to become rooted in society. How these agents from various spheres come together and impact human health.

Same as EPIDEM 264, TOX 264.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 265. Advanced Environmental Health Science. 4 Units.

Explores the complex relationships among exposure processes and adverse health effects of environmental toxins focusing on specific chemicals, sources, transport media, exposure pathways, and human behaviors. Techniques of environmental sampling for exposure assessment are discussed.

Same as EPIDEM 265.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 269. Air Pollution, Climate, and Health. 4 Units.

Emission of air pollutants into the atmosphere, physical and meteorological processes that affect transport, and influence on global warming. Concepts of how and where people are most exposed, and how exposures and health effects differ in developed and developing regions.

Same as EPIDEM 269, EHS 269.

PUBHLTH 270. Human Exposure to Environmental Contaminants. 4 Units.

Introduces founders of conceptual thought that environmental contaminants can impact health. Theory and principles of exposure assessment, the continuum from emissions of a contaminant into the environment to evidence of health effects in a population.

Same as EPIDEM 270, EHS 270.

PUBHLTH 271. Health Impacts of Environmental Change. 4 Units.

Seminar on health impacts of environmental change at various scales of analysis. Uses numerical models such as "MIASMA" and "TARGETS" to analyze alternative outcomes of environmental-change scenarios. Presentations from experts are featured.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 272. Environmental Health and Quality. 4 Units.

Concepts and principles of environmental health. Focuses on industrial hygiene, water and air quality, noise pollution, and environmental carcinogens. Discusses theory and implementation practices through review of legislative measures and enforcement procedures. Examines social and biological interactions surrounding each topic.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 273. Environmental Health, Science, and Policy. 2 Units.

Topics relevant to the field of environmental health, science, and policy are covered in depth. Included are: hazardous and biological pollutants in soil, water, air; remediation technologies; water conflicts; and regulations pertaining to contaminants.

Restriction: Graduate students only

PUBHLTH 275. Environmental Modeling and Risk Management. 4 Units.

Surveys the general principles, basic mathematical methods, and practices of environmental modeling and human health risk assessment. Topics include advection-dispersion models, risk management, and risk perception. Students conduct an original risk assessment as a final group project.

Prerequisite: MATH 2A and STATS 7.

Same as EHS 275.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 175.

PUBHLTH 276. Toxic Chemicals in Environment. 4 Units.

Industrial ecology of toxicants and their impacts on environmental quality and human health. Explores theoretical basis of toxicity thresholds and regulatory issues. Uses classic and contemporary research articles to understand the legacy of traditional toxicants, and to identify emerging threats.

Same as EPIDEM 244.

Restriction: Grad students only or Consent of instructor to enroll

PUBHLTH 277A. Target Organ Toxicology I. 6 Units.

Analysis of responses occurring in 12 organ systems of humans exposed to environmental chemicals at toxic levels; distinctive cellular and tissue structure and physiological function; toxicological responses discussed in terms of phenomena, mechanisms of action, and methods of study.

Same as EHS 206A.

PUBHLTH 277B. Target Organ Toxicology II . 6 Units.

Analysis of responses occurring in 12 organ systems of humans exposed to environmental chemicals at toxic levels; distinctive cellular and tissue structure and physiological function; toxicological responses discussed in terms of phenomena, mechanisms of action, and methods of study.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 277A or EHS 206A.

Same as EHS 206B.

PUBHLTH 278. Industrial Toxicology. 4 Units.

Analysis of responsibilities toxicologists have in industry, including product safety, generating material safety, data sheets, animal testing, ecotoxicological testing, risk/hazard communication, and assisting industrial hygienists and occupational physicians; emphasis on interdisciplinary nature of industrial toxicology and communication skills.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 277B or EHS 206B.

Same as EHS 220.

PUBHLTH 279. Special Topics in Environmental & Occupational Health. 4 Units.

Current research in environmental and occupational health. Topics vary from quarter to quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Grad students only

PUBHLTH 280. Global Burden of Disease. 4 Units.

Introduces composite measures of disease burden, including Disability Adjusted Life Years and their use in prioritizing disease burden at local, regional, and global levels. Focuses on WHO's landmark assessments and introduces DISMOD software for specific analyses.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 281. Infectious Disease Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Geographical distribution of infectious diseases and the health and disease risk in diverse human populations. Introduces basic methods for infectious disease epidemiology and case studies of important diseases. Includes surveillance, outbreak investigation, emerging pathogens, traditional and molecular epidemiology.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 282. Advances in Global Health. 4 Units.

Critical appraisal of advances in taming the global burden of disease. The underlying sectoral determinates of health, and health systems development through multiple frames, including economics, infectious and chronic disease, nutrition, injury, culture, social/political organization, humanitarian emergencies, and international organizations.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 283. Geographical Information Systems for Public Health. 4 Units.

Provides a broad introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems software to carry out projects for visualizing and analyzing spatial data to address significant issues of health care and policy-planning.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 190.

PUBHLTH 284. Graduate Field Studies. 2-12 Units.

Field studies with Public Health faculty.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 285. Global Health Law and Diplomacy . 4 Units.

Extends theory and practice of law and diplomacy from the scope of health to trade, intellectual property, national security, human rights, and environmental protection. Focuses on negotiations that shape and manage the global policy environment for health.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 287. Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health. 4 Units.

General introduction to qualitative research methods for investigating public health questions at various scales from community level to global populations. Emphasizes systematic approaches to the collection, analysis, interpretation of qualitative data.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 288. Research Proposal Writing in Global Health. 4 Units.

Overview of financial support for research in global health and disease prevention. Collaborative agreements, guidelines for proposal writing, team building, budgeting, peer-review process, and transitioning from proposal to research project implementation.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 289. Special Topics in Global Health and Disease Prevention. 4 Units.

Current research in global health and disease prevention. Topics vary from quarter to quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 290. Special Topics in Public Health. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of public health. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 291A. Seminar: Advances and Challenges in Public Health. 2 Units.

Forum for exploring recent advances and challenges in all disciplines of public health research and practice. Features case studies exemplifying the integration of core competencies with cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes of public health.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only .

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 191A.

PUBHLTH 291B. Seminar: Advances and Challenges in Public Health. 2 Units.

Forum for exploring recent advances and challenges in all disciplines of public health research and practice. Features case studies exemplifying the integration of core competencies with cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes of public health.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 191B.

PUBHLTH 291C. Seminar: Advances and Challenges in Public Health. 2 Units.

Forum for exploring recent advances and challenges in all disciplines of public health research and practice. Features case studies exemplifying the integration of core competencies with cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes of public health.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 191C.

PUBHLTH 292. Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research in Public Health. 4 Units.

Issues of scientific integrity and satisfies the requirements for training in public health ethics. Includes guidelines for responsible conduct of research, federal and international codes, administrative review and approval, conflict of interest, and privacy and safety of research participants.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with PUBHLTH 193.

PUBHLTH 293. Foundations of Clinical and Translational Science. 4 Units.

Introduces rationale and imperative for clinical translational science and various approaches being developed to speed-up discoveries and their transformation into health care practices. Compares and contrasts current impediments to clinical research with the potential and transformative power of translational science.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 294. Research Communication in Public Health. 4 Units.

Strategies for effective writing and oral presentation of research characteristics and results to various audiences. Includes exercises in writing for the public, for scholarly journals, and at conferences.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 295. Graduate Practicum and Culminating Experience in Public Health. 8 Units.

Provides opportunities for hands-on experience for graduate students at agencies or organizations engaged in public health practice. Students are matched with placement sites based on academic preparation and students' career goals. The practicum report is integrated into the culminating experience.

Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 200 and PUBHLTH 291.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Master of Public Health students only.

PUBHLTH 296. Doctoral Dissertation Research and Writing. 1-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Public Health faculty.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 297. Research Design. 4 Units.

Provides training in research design and methods. Students learn how to evaluate the strength of research findings based on the methods used by a researcher and learn to use lessons from the course to develop a research proposal.

Same as PP&D 297.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 298. Directed Studies in Public Health. 2-4 Units.

Directed study with Public Health faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 299. Independent Study in Public Health . 2-8 Units.

Independent research with Public Health faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUBHLTH 399. University Teaching. 2-4 Units.

Limited to teaching assistants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Faculty

Dean B. Baker, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health
Scott Bartell, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences; Epidemiology; Social Ecology; Statistics
Hans-Ulrich Bernard, Ph.D. University of Goettingen, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Program in Public Health
Zuzana Bic, Dr.P.H. Loma Linda University, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Program in Public Health
Stephen C. Bondy, Ph.D. University of Birmingham, Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Pharmacology; Program in Public Health
Tim-Allen Bruckner, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Program in Public Health; Planning, Policy, and Design
Bharath Chakravarthy, M.D. Boston University, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Program in Public Health
Wayne Wei Chung Chang, M.D. Saint Louis University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Yunan Chen, Ph.D. Drexel University, Associate Professor of Informatics; Program in Public Health (medical informatics, human-computer interaction)
Bongkyoo Choi, Sc.D. University of Massachusetts, Assistant Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Ralph W. Cygan, M.D. State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Robert Detrano, M.D. University of Rome, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences; Program in Public Health
Rufus D. Edwards, Ph.D. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences; Epidemiology
Aviane Forde, J.D. Thomas M. Cooley Law School, Lecturer of Program in Public Health
Chad P. Garner, Ph.D. Oxford University, Associate Professor of Epidemiology; Program in Public Health
Daniel L. Gillen, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor of Statistics; Epidemiology; Program in Public Health
Elisabeth Gonzalez, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Program in Public Health
Michele B. Goodwin, J.D. Boston College, Chancellor's Professor of School of Law; Program in Public Health
Lisa B. Grant Ludwig, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Professor of Program in Public Health
F. Allan Hubbell, M.D. Baylor University, Professor Emeritus of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, M.D. University of Bonn, Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Michael T. Kleinman, Ph.D. New York University, Adjunct Professor of Community & Environ Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health
Elliott H. Kornhauser, M.D. University of Toronto, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Cynthia Lakon, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Assistant Professor of Program in Public Health
Shahram Lotfipour, M.D. University of Iowa, Professor of Emergency Medicine; Program in Public Health
Ulrike Luderer, M.D., Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Medicine; Developmental and Cell Biology; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health (reproductive toxicology, developmental toxicology, developmental basis of ovarian toxicity, ovarian cancer)
Frank L. Meyskens, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr. Endowed Chair and Professor of Medicine; Biological Chemistry; Epidemiology; Program in Public Health
Michael J. Montoya, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Associate Professor of Anthropology; Chicano/Latino Studies; Culture and Theory; Program in Public Health (social inequality and health, race and ethnicity, social and cultural studies of science, technology, and medicine, participation of ethnic populations in biomedical research, the U.S./Mexican border, critical bioethics)
Dana Mukamel, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Andrew Noymer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health
Oladele A. Ogunseitan, Ph.D. University of Tennessee, Department Chair and Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences
Annie E. Ro, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Program in Public Health
Abbas-Jean Roayaei, Ph.D. Florida State University, Lecturer of Program in Public Health
Miryha G. Runnerstrom, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Program in Public Health
Terry L. Schmidt, Dr.H.A. Medical University of South Carolina, Lecturer of Program in Public Health; Paul Merage School of Business
Peter L. Schnall, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Tonya L. Schuster, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Lecturer of Sociology; Program in Public Health
Behjat Sharif, Ph.D. Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Lecturer of Program in Public Health
Roxane C. Silver, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Program in Public Health (coping with traumatic life events (personal losses and collective traumas), stress, social psychology, health psychology)
Lisa Sparks, Ph.D. University of Oklahoma, Adjunct Professor of Program in Public Health
Sharon M. Stern, Ph.D. University of Utah, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emerita of Program in Public Health
Daniel S. Stokols, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Social Behavior; Epidemiology; Planning, Policy, and Design; Program in Public Health (environmental psychology, science of team science, transdisciplinary public health)
Bryan Sykes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Program in Public Health; Sociology (demography, criminology, research methods, health, social inequality, statistics)
David Timberlake, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health; Epidemiology
Veronica M. Vieira, D.Sc. Boston University, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences
Lari B. Wenzel, Ph.D. Arizona State University, Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Jun Wu, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences
Guiyun Yan, Ph.D. University of Vermont, Professor of Program in Public Health; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Program in Public Health
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