School of Social Ecology

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Nancy Guerra, Dean
5300 Social & Behavioral Sciences Gateway
Undergraduate Student Services: 949-824-6861
Graduate Student Services: 949-824-5918
http://socialecology.uci.edu/

Overview

The School of Social Ecology is an academic unit committed to solving important social and environmental problems through interdisciplinary, community-engaged scholarship. Just as the field of ecology focuses on the relationships between organisms and their environments, social ecology is concerned with the relationships between humans and their environment. A key premise is that complex problems can only be understood by considering how people impact and are impacted by the multiple contexts they navigate. These contexts include families, schools, social networks, the workplace, culture, communities and the environment. 

Faculty and students in the School of Social Ecology apply scientific methods to the study of a wide array of pressing issues. These issues cluster into three primary research hubs: Healthy People and Places; Crime Prevention and Social Justice; and Technology and Human Potential. Specific problems addressed cover a broad range of topics including stress and coping, the effects of trauma on children and adults, healthy aging, flood risk management, poverty alleviation, sustainable cities, juvenile justice and correctional reform, eyewitness testimony, jury decision making, youth violence and delinquency prevention, policing, crime mapping, and the impact of social media on children’s lives. 

The School is home to three academic departments: Criminology, Law and Society; Urban Planning and Public Policy; and Psychology and Social Behavior; offers five undergraduate and nine graduate degrees; and has approximately 2600 undergraduate majors, 400 graduate students, 77 faculty, and more than 23,000 alumni. Although faculty are affiliated with an academic department, they are trained in a broad range of disciplines including anthropology, criminology, environmental studies, law, political science, psychology, public policy, sociology, and urban planning. Their research and teaching is distinguished by an emphasis on the integration of the concepts and perspectives from these multiple disciplines. This interdisciplinary focus is based on the School’s core belief that the analysis and amelioration of complex societal problems requires coordinated efforts from several disciplines.

The School of Social Ecology is a leader in community-engaged scholarship, not only in Southern California, but around the United States and internationally. Undergraduates are afforded opportunities to engage in laboratory-based learning as well as field-based learning through the School’s well-established and highly regarded Field Study Program that includes local, regional, national and international placement opportunities. Graduate training in the School of Social Ecology is organized around the study of contemporary problems and their solutions in the social and physical environment. Emphasis is placed upon theory and research that have implications for policy and intervention. Graduate students work closely with faculty in the classroom, in laboratories, and in the field on important projects that enhance their research skills while advancing knowledge and finding solutions to important societal problems.

Research Facilities

Social Ecology I and II and the nearby Social & Behavioral Sciences Gateway building are wireless environments that feature experimental research facilities for studying social phenomena such as parent-child interaction, prosocial behavior, memory functions, stress and health, social support processes, and mock jury discussions. The School also operates wet laboratory facilities to support innovative research in the field of salivary bioscience, as well as behavioral assessment laboratories. Students take advantage of up-to-date computing facilities and assistance to ensure that their skills prepare them for either advanced  study or for the changing needs of today’s workplace.

Centers for Research

The Institute for Interdisciplinary Salivary Bioscience Research (IISBR) pushes the cutting edge of knowledge related to the discovery and application of oral fluid (saliva) as a research and diagnostic specimen. Specific aims are to: (a) incorporate the measurement of indicators found in oral fluids into research—developmental, social, behavioral, health, clinical, prevention, and rehabilitative sciences—and determine whether understanding in those areas can be advanced using unique, minimally invasive measurements of biological systems through saliva; (b) open windows of opportunity for researchers in economics, psychology, sociology, anthropology, gerontology, nursing, social work, preventive medicine, medicine, occupational science, sports medicine, psychiatry, and neuroscience among others, and  (c) serve as a world stage for investigators to meet, discuss, and refine their ideas about the role of saliva as a research and diagnostic specimen. Researchers from universities and institutions across the country and internationally collaborate with IISBR. More information is available at the Institute for Interdisciplinary Salivary Bioscience Research website.

The Center for Evidence-Based Corrections (CEBC) has administered millions of dollars in state-funded research on juvenile and adult correctional programs, including research on rehabilitation, parole and reentry programs, monitoring of sex offenders, and correctional options for female offenders. CEBC, which consists primarily of Criminology, Law and Society faculty, is a nexus for policy-oriented research and graduate training. CEBC is also developing close ties with UCI’s School of Law. More information is available at the Center for Evidence-Based Corrections website.

The Blum Center for Poverty Alleviation was founded as part of a system-wide consortium that began with the Blum Center for Developing Economies at UC Berkeley, and now includes all ten of the University of California campuses. This federation of Blum Centers is united by the idea that world-class universities must play a leadership role in tackling the world’s most daunting challenge – poverty. UCI’s Blum Center undertakes collaborative interdisciplinary research focused on understanding and alleviating the contemporary challenges of low-resource communities. It also has developed innovative courses to introduce students to the many dimensions of poverty in the 21st century and to provide them with opportunities to make meaningful contributions to alleviating poverty at home and abroad. The School of Social Ecology works collaboratively with the UCI Division of Teaching & Learning to support Blum Center activities. More information is available at the UCI Blum Center website.

The Newkirk Center for Science and Society finds ways to develop and share research knowledge with the public and policymakers so they can make informed decisions on vital policy issues of law, education, environment, health care, crime, and public infrastructure. The Center carries out its mission in several ways: through workshops, colloquia, town hall meetings, distinguished visitors, and communication programs. One area in which the interests of several faculty members overlap with the focus of the Newkirk Center relates to expert testimony and, more broadly, the use (and misuse) of science in legal proceedings. More information is available at the Newkirk Center for Science and Society website.

The Center for Psychology and Law (CPL) draws together faculty from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society and the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior. UC Irvine is one of the world’s leading centers for research in the field of psychology and law. The Center’s primary goals are to foster collaboration and communication among academics, legal professionals, policy makers, and the general public, and to address areas of inquiry where social sciences and legal systems intersect. CPL’s mission is to bridge the gap between scientific evidence and public policy. More information is available at the Center for Psychology and Law website.

The Center in Law, Society and Culture (CLSC) brings together faculty in the Schools of Social Ecology, Social Sciences, and Humanities who share an interest in the role of social, cultural, and historical factors in the development of law and the importance of social and cultural assumptions in understanding and interpreting law. Law and culture has emerged as an exciting area of legal scholarship and UC Irvine has significant strength in this area. More information is available at the Center in Law, Society, and Culture website.

Water UCI serves as a coordinating vehicle to facilitate seamless collaboration across schools, departments, and existing research centers around questions of fundamental and applied water science, technology, management, and policy. Water UCI builds on existing campus-wide strengths by affording a plan for responding to the many “grand challenges” facing water resources, and for which UCI is well-equipped. More information is available at the Water UCI website

In the Community

The Criminology Outreach Program (COP) was established in 1999 to address the needs of under-served students in the community through education on the legal system. The mission is to create higher-education aspirations for junior high and high school students from neighboring districts that do not send a high proportion of graduates to college. The program acquaints students with college course content and procedures to familiarize them with the issues of student life and intellectual pursuit, and to involve students in the type of policy debates that occur in the field of criminology. The Criminology Outreach Program emphasizes four elements: critical thinking, writing, library research, and oral presentation skills. More information is available at the Criminology Outreach Program website.

The School of Social Ecology was the first school on campus to require community engagement as a key component of undergraduate education through its signature Field Study program. Through direct participation in a community organization, Field Study students develop their communication, critical thinking, analytical, methodological, professional, technological, and interpersonal skills. These tools prepare students to be the leaders of tomorrow as they tackle the pressing issues confronting business and community leaders locally, regionally, nationally, and globally. The Field Study requirement for students seeking a baccalaureate degree from Social Ecology may be fulfilled in a number of ways a including: Traditional Field Study (SOCECOL 195), Field Study Writing Seminar (SOCECOL 195W), a year-long Advanced Field Study (SOCECOL 195A-SOCECOL 195B-SOCECOL 195CW), the UC Capital Intern Programs in Sacramento and Washington DC, and the Blum Center/Living Peace/Social Ecology Global Service Scholars program (PSY BEH 192B, SOCECOL 189, summer international service trip, and SOCECOL 195 or SOCECOL 195W). More information is available at the Field Study Program website.

The Metropolitan Futures Initiative (MFI) aims to develop an improved understanding of communities and their potential for integrative and collaborative planning and action to ensure a bright future for the region. With initial focus on Orange County and its location within the larger Southern California area, the MFI is a commitment to build communities that are economically vibrant, environmentally sustainable, and socially just by partnering Social Ecology’s world-class, boundary-crossing scholarship with expertise throughout Southern California. More information is available at the Metropolitan Futures Initiative site.

Degrees

Criminology, Law and Society B.A., M.A.S., Ph.D.
Environmental Science and Policy B.A.
Legal and Forensic Psychology M.L.F.P.
Planning, Policy, and Design Ph.D.
Psychology and Social Behavior B.A., Ph.D.
Public Policy M.P.P.
Social Ecology B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Urban and Regional Planning M.U.R.P.
Urban Studies B.A.

Honors, Awards, and Scholarships

Social Ecology Honors Program

The Social Ecology Honors Program provides the opportunity for selected School of Social Ecology students to pursue advanced independent study.  Students may apply in the spring quarter of their junior year. In order to be considered, a student must have satisfied the following requirements: completion of all lower-division Social Ecology courses required for the major; completion of at least five upper-division Social Ecology courses with a grade point average of at least 3.5 in these courses; and achievement of an overall grade point average at UCI of at least 3.2. Acceptance into the program is based upon evidence of the student’s ability, interest in research, proposed thesis project and support from a faculty mentor. Successful completion of the program requires three quarters, including supervised independent work on a thesis research project (SOCECOL H190A-SOCECOL H190B) and written and oral presentation of an honors thesis (SOCECOL H190W).

Excellence in Research in Social Ecology

High-achieving students majoring in the School of Social Ecology can earn Excellence in Research in Social Ecology by participating in a two-part program consisting of faculty-supervised research in the junior and senior years and courses in methodology and statistics. To be eligible for the program, students must have earned an overall 3.2 UC GPA in their junior year, with grades of B or above in the required methodology and statistics courses (SOCECOL 10, SOCECOL 13, SOCECOL 111W, and SOCECOL 190). Students will work with a faculty mentor during at least one quarter by the end of their junior year in PSY BEH 196 or SOCECOL 198 or SOCECOL 199. Successful completion of the program also requires faculty-mentored Honors research (SOCECOL H190A-SOCECOL H190B) and completion of a senior research thesis or a report at a research conference (SOCECOL H190W). Students who have successfully completed all requirements may submit applications for the Excellence in Research in Social Ecology distinction in the spring quarter of their senior year.

Graduation with Latin Honors. Latin Honors at graduation will be awarded to approximately 16 percent of the graduating seniors based on units completed and GPA. To be eligible, students must have completed at least 72 units at a UC campus by the end of the final quarter prior to graduation. Approximately 2 percent of all majors will graduate summa cum laude, 4 percent magna cum laude, and 10 percent cum laude. The student’s cumulative record at the end of the final quarter is the basis for consideration for awarding Latin Honors. For more information about Latin Honors criteria contact the Social Ecology Student Services Office at 949-824-6861 or visit the Social Ecology website. Other important factors are also considered and can be reviewed at Honors Recognition.

Dean’s Honor List. Quarterly recognition for students who earned a 3.5 grade point average while carrying a minimum of 12 graded units. Quarterly recognition is noted on the student’s transcript.

Dean’s Award for Community Engagement. This award recognizes highly-engaged students who demonstrate both scholarly achievement and community service participation.

Fudge Family Foundation Scholarship. Two scholarships are awarded to outstanding students who have a strong academic record and who have established financial need because they are self-supporting or have other personal hardships that would make it difficult for them to complete their studies without this assistance.

School Awards. The School of Social Ecology recognizes the most outstanding undergraduate and graduate students for their academic achievements, contributions to the School, and service to the campus and community.

Excellence in Undergraduate Research Award in Honor of Gilbert Geis. This award was created to encourage and support undergraduate students who excel in research related to Criminology, Law and Society.

Michelle Smith Pontell Memorial Fellowship. This award is given annually to a graduate student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society for excellence in both research and course work.

Outstanding Achievement in Field Study. This award recognizes students who have gone “above and beyond” in their field study placements and/or who have completed an exceptional academic project as part of their field study.

Strauss Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded to an outstanding junior who has been active in service and is planning for a career in public service.

Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree

All students must meet the University Requirements.
School Requirements
A. Complete the following three lower-division courses:
CRM/LAW C7 Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society
SOCECOL 10 Research Design
SOCECOL 13 Statistical Analysis in Social Ecology
B. Select one of the following courses:
Introduction to Psychology
Psychology Fundamentals
Psychology Fundamentals
C. Select one of the following courses:
Introduction to Environmental Analysis and Design
Introduction to Urban Studies
D. Select one of the following courses:
Field Study (four units)
Advanced Field Study
Advanced Field Study
E. One additional upper-division course
One additional upper-division course (four units) chosen from any department in the School of Social Ecology or an additional four units of SOCECOL 195 or SOCECOL 195A, SOCECOL 195B, SOCECOL 195C. 1
School requirements for Psychology and Social Behavior majors:
A. Complete three lower-division courses:
SOCECOL 10 Research Design
SOCECOL 13 Statistical Analysis in Social Ecology
CRM/LAW C7 Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society
B. Select one of the following courses:
Introduction to Environmental Analysis and Design
Introduction to Urban Studies
C. Select one of the following courses:
Field Study (four units)
Advanced Field Study
Advanced Field Study
Departmental Requirements: Refer to individual departments.
Grade Requirement

A minimum grade average of at least C (2.0) is required (1) overall; (2) in all courses required for the major program, including the School requirements; and (3) in the upper-division courses required for the major.

Overlap Restrictions

Double Majors. In order to double major within the School of Social Ecology, major requirements must be met for both majors without any overlap of upper-division courses.

Other Double Majors. In fulfilling degree requirements for multiple majors, a maximum of two courses may overlap between any two majors.

Major and Minor Requirements: In fulfilling minor requirements, a maximum of two courses may overlap between a major and a minor. No course overlap is permitted between minors.

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The following majors are offered:

Criminology, Law and Society, B.A.
Psychology and Social Behavior, B.A.
Social Ecology, B.A.
Urban Studies, B.A.

The following minors are offered:

Criminology, Law and Society
Psychology and Social Behavior
Social Ecology
Urban and Regional Planning
Urban Studies

Undergraduate Program

The School of Social Ecology offers either a general interdisciplinary degree in Social Ecology or a more focused scholarship through degree programs in Criminology, Law and Society; Psychology and Social Behavior; and Urban Studies.

Change of Major. Students who wish to change their major to one offered by the School should contact the Social Ecology Student Services Office for information about change-of-major requirements, procedures and policies. Information is also available at the UCI Change of Major Criteria website.

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the School of Social Ecology bring a distinctive interdisciplinary perspective to the job market. Students graduate with a wealth of knowledge in marketable majors and have honed their communication, leadership, critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. The School provides an excellent foundation for those students who seek jobs in planning departments, mental health settings, educational institutions, and a variety of community and governmental agencies. Many Social Ecology students find that their interdisciplinary training also is useful for careers in public management, law, consulting, and business.

Through its dynamic courses and signature Field Study program, the School of Social Ecology provides useful preparation for students who wish to apply to graduate and professional schools of law, public policy/public administration, public health, social work, psychology, sociology, criminology, environmental studies, and urban planning.

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. Additional information is available in the Career Center section.

Field Study

Field Study is the signature program of the School of Social Ecology. All majors participate in the program, which is designed to provide students with the opportunity to examine social problems first-hand, apply theories and empirical findings learned in courses, effectively serving our communities and enhancing the value of their education.  The Field Study program is a unique experiential learning program for all majors in the School of Social Ecology and a key element of the School’s commitment to fostering civic engagement and training future leaders.

The general goal of Field Study is to integrate academic and experiential learning. This aim is based on evidence that learning is maximized when it is active, when students are engaged and when theories and research are informed by their application to “real world” problems and solutions. Students reflect on how to apply what they have learned in their courses to address societal and global challenges in a seminar led by ladder rank faculty. At the same time, through placements with one or more of the School’s 225-plus community partners, students gain pre-professional experience and develop their resume along with their academic and research skills. The settings provided for field study include a wide range of problem-oriented institutions and agencies in the non/not for-profit, public and private sectors.

Within Social Ecology, students may pursue one of three options to meet the Field Study requirement:  Field Study (traditional/quarterly), Advanced Field Study (full academic year), or Global Service Scholars (two academic courses, an international service trip and a field study seminar).


Traditional Field Study. In SOCECOL 195, students participate in day-to-day activities with a community partner selected from those listed and approved by the School of Social Ecology. Students have the opportunity to participate in the ongoing activities of an organization and develop personal, professional, and technical competencies. While completing their 100 hours at a community-based placement, students meet in a small group seminar with a faculty member to discuss the issues in the field and to develop a project to apply and hone their scholarship. Students may opt to fulfill upper-division writing through taking SOCECOL 195W, similar to SOCECOL 195, but with a strong emphasis on developing writing skills.

Advanced Field Study (SOCECOL 195A, SOCECOL 195B, SOCECOL 195CW) provides a select number of Social Ecology juniors and seniors with a deeper engaged learning experience over the course of an academic year (three quarters, October - June).  During this time they are placed with an agency for 10 hours/week. In addition to working with their agency on day-to-day services and operations, they also engage in variety of activities in collaboration with their agency. These may include conducting research that enhances the work of the organization, developing new activities or programs, working intensively with clients, engaging in outreach and community organization, participating in organizational development and advancement efforts, and more. The third quarter of the AFS year is designated as satisfying the UCI upper division writing requirement for undergraduates. With that in mind, students will, in addition to the work they do with their community partner, produce an analytical and reflective paper that distills the lessons they have learned from their community placement and, in the process, hones and deepens their writing skills. Students whose work includes original research may be selected to share their work at the UCI Undergraduate Research Symposium held during the spring quarter.


Global Service Scholars:  Building upon the Field Study program, this multi-part program offers students a unique opportunity to make a difference in the world by learning to approach issues with empathy and compassion. Through classroom work (PSY BEH 192B and SOCECOL 189) and a service trip abroad, students tackle poverty problems and bring their ingenuity to those in need. When they return to campus, they share their experience through participating in the classroom portion of field study. Funding for this program is provided in large part by the Living Peace Foundation and the UCI Blum Center for Poverty Alleviation. To keep the costs neutral for students, additional funds may be available, based on financial need, to cover airfare, housing expenses and program fees.


In addition to the school-sponsored programs, students may fulfill the field study requirement through participation in one of the following programs: JumpStart Team Leader, Public Health Practicum, UCDC Summer and Academic Internship Programs, UC Sacramento Summer and Academic Internship Programs. Students pursuing these programs should seek advising prior to enrolling in the programs.

Field Study embodies the School’s commitment to engaged scholarship, developing interdisciplinary approaches to social problems, and improving and making positive and lasting contributions to communities. Unlisted or inappropriate placements, as well as those that could give the appearance of nepotism or preferential treatment, will not be approved. Departmental approval for field study will be determined by the Field Study Director. Further information, including field study sign-up procedures and prerequisites, program applications, and placement opportunities is available at the Field Study Program website.

Planning a Program of Study

Because there are many alternative ways to plan a program, some of which may require careful attention to specific major requirements, students should consult with the Social Ecology Student Services Office, 102 Social Ecology I, to design an appropriate program of study.

Students who elect one of the majors in the School of Social Ecology in their freshman year might begin by taking the introductory courses required by their major. It is a good idea to take these courses early because they include fundamental concepts that are widely applicable in more advanced courses. In addition, the lower-division writing requirement of the general education requirement (category I) should be completed during the first year. In the sophomore year, the student might complete three courses toward the general education requirement, four courses in their major, and four electives. Students who are planning to go on to graduate school can use their freshman and sophomore years to advantage by taking courses in theory, research methods, statistics and other areas important to graduate study. In the junior and senior years, the student should take courses in the major area and should create an individualized program of study through a combination of courses and course modules that fall in an area of interest. Particular attention should be paid to planning a program of study that will ensure that major requirements are met prior to graduation. In the plan, students should include core courses for their major in their junior or early in their senior year. Students are encouraged to consider one of the many options for enriching their education through intensive involvement in research and/or community engagement through, for example, the Social Ecology Honors, Excellence in Research, and Field Study Programs.

Additional Curricular Options

Students in the School of Social Ecology may combine their course work with the following University programs and should consult an academic counselor for further information.

Campuswide Honors Program

The Campuswide Honors Program is available to selected high-achieving students from all academic majors from their freshman through senior years. For more information contact the Campuswide Honors Program, 1200 Student Services II; 949-824-5461; honors@uci.edu; or visit the Campuswide Honors Program website.

School of Education

Students who plan to obtain a teaching credential or a higher degree in the field of education should consult with counselors in the UCI School of Education early in their college career. Students completing a degree program in the School of Social Ecology may qualify for a waiver of the Single Subject Credential Examination. For additional information about teaching credentials, refer to the School of Education section.

UC Education Abroad Program

Upper-division students have the opportunity to experience a different culture while making progress toward degree objectives through the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP). UCEAP is an overseas study program which operates in cooperation with host universities and colleges in countries throughout the world. Visit the Study Abroad Program website for additional information.

Interdisciplinary Minors

These minors are available to all UCI students. Information is available in other sections of the Catalogue, as noted.

The minor in Civic and Community Engagement seeks to provide students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to engage as citizens and active community members in the 21st century. The minor is distinguished both by what students learn, and by how they learn it. See the Interdisciplinary Studies section for information.

The minor in Conflict Resolution provides skills in conflict analysis and resolution and a useful understanding of integrative institutions at the local, regional and international levels. See the School of Social Sciences section for information.

The minor in Global Sustainability trains students to understand the changes that need to be made in order for the human population to live in a sustainable relationship with the resources available on this planet. See the Interdisciplinary Studies section for information.

The minor in Native American Studies is an interdisciplinary, interschool program which focuses on history, culture, religion and the environment. See the Interdisciplinary Studies section for information.

Undergraduate Major in Social Ecology

Requirements for the B.A. in Social Ecology

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Requirements for the Major

Ten 4-unit upper-division courses (40 units) as specified below:

A. Three courses (12 units)—one course (numbered 100–193) selected from each of the three departments—Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design; and Psychology and Social Behavior.
B. Seven additional courses (28 units - numbered 100-193) selected from Social Ecology or the departments of Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design; and Psychology and Social Behavior. Course prerequisites established by the individual departments must be satisfied.

Students may petition to have two SOCECOL 199 courses (total of 8 units) count toward upper-division major credit, provided that the courses (1) were taken for a letter grade; (2) required a written term paper or research presentation at an academic conference; and (3) were taught by a Social Ecology faculty member whose name appears on a list maintained in the Social Ecology Student Services Office. Students may also petition graduate courses (numbered 200–209) to fulfill upper-division major requirements. A maximum of one PSY BEH 196 course may be counted toward the major. A maximum of one CRM/LAW C196 course may be counted toward the major.

Minor in Social Ecology

Social Ecology Minor Requirements

A. Three lower-division courses (12 units)
CRM/LAW C7 Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society
SOCECOL E8 Introduction to Environmental Analysis and Design
or
Introduction to Urban Studies
Select one of the following courses:
Introduction to Psychology
Psychology Fundamentals
Psychology Fundamentals
B. Six upper-division courses (24 units):
Three courses (12 units). One upper-division course (numbered 100-196) selected from each of the three departments-Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy and Design; and Psychology and Social Behavior.
Three additional courses (12 units). Selected from Social Ecology or the departments of Criminology, Law, and Society; Planning, Policy and Design; and Psychology and Social Behavior. Course prerequisites established by the individual departments must be satisfied.
NOTE: Students pursuing a major in the School of Social Ecology may not use upper-division coursework for both school major or minor requirements. No overlap is permitted. SOCECOL 198 and SOCECOL 199 may not be applied toward the minor.

Excellence in Research in Social Ecology

High-achieving students majoring in the School of Social Ecology can earn Excellence in Research in Social Ecology by participating in a two-component program consisting of faculty-supervised research and courses in methodology and statistics. To be eligible for the program, students must have earned an overall 3.2 UC GPA in their junior year, with grades of B or above in the required methodology and statistics courses (SOCECOL 10, SOCECOL 13, SOCECOL 111W, and SOCECOL 190). Students will work with a faculty mentor during at least two quarters of the junior year in PSY BEH 196 or SOCECOL 198 or SOCECOL 199. Successful completion of the program also requires faculty-mentored research (SOCECOL H190A-SOCECOL H190B) and completion of a senior research thesis or a report at a research conference (SOCECOL H190W). Applications for the program are submitted in the spring quarter of the senior year, after completion of all requirements.

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Graduate Programs

Graduate training is organized around the strengths of the School of Social Ecology’s individual departments (Criminology, Law and Society; Psychology and Social Behavior; Urban Planning and Public Policy).  The graduate curriculum in Social Ecology is distinguished by its interdisciplinary orientation both within and between departments. Students are trained to integrate the knowledge offered by traditional academic fields in order to examine important social, legal, and environmental problems from a perspective of breadth as well as depth. Faculty and graduate students share a commitment to study contemporary problems in the social and physical environments and to pursue empirically-based solutions to these problems. Problems and solutions are investigated from the complementary perspectives of a multidisciplinary faculty that include specialists in social, developmental, clinical, health, and cross-cultural psychology; emotion and memory; urban and regional planning, public policy, environmental planning, design, and sustainability; law and society; criminology; criminal justice policy, and race, social inequality, and justice.

The School offers five master’s degree programs. Master’s degrees include; the online Master of Advanced Studies (M.A.S.) in Criminology, Law and Society; the online Master of Legal and Forensic Psychology (M.L.F.P); the Master of Public Policy (M.P.P.), and the accredited Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.). In addition, many students in our doctoral programs obtain an M.A. in Social Ecology on the way to their Ph.D. The School also offers four Ph.D. degree programs. Doctoral students have the opportunity to earn a Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society; Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Behavior; or a Ph.D. in Planning, Policy, and Design. Our fourth doctoral program, Ph.D. in Social Ecology-Core, emphasizes interdisciplinarity and encourages students to pursue an individualized course of study.

Social Ecology faculty members apply diverse methods of scientific inquiry to study social, behavioral, and environmental problems. Evaluation research, legal research, questionnaire and survey methods, field research, naturalistic observation, physiological measures, and quasi-experimental techniques receive emphasis along with behavioral laboratory experimentation. Collaborative research with faculty members across the university is an important component of graduate education in the School.

Admission

To be considered for one of our graduate programs, students should submit their complete application file by the deadline listed on the UCI Graduate Division Admissions website: https://grad.uci.edu/academics/degree-programs/index.php. For a full description of application requirements and updated deadlines, please refer to the specific program website, which can be found here: https://grad.soceco.uci.edu.

Criminology, Law and Society Ph.D.
Planning, Policy, and Design Ph.D.
Psychology and Social Behavior Ph.D.
Social Ecology-Core Ph.D.
Master of Advanced Study in Criminology, Law and Society M.A.S.
Master of Legal and Forensic Psychology M.L.F.P.
Master of Public Policy M.P.P.
Master of Urban and Regional Planning M.U.R.P.
 

Master’s Programs

For catalogue information regarding master’s programs other than the M.A. in Social Ecology, please select the appropriate department for which the program is offered.

Master of Arts in Social Ecology

The M.A. in Social Ecology option is available to those students who have been admitted to one of the Ph.D. programs in Criminology, Law and Society; Psychology and Social Behavior; Social Ecology-Core; or Planning, Policy, and Design.

Requirements

The M.A. program in Social Ecology requires a thesis and satisfactory completion of seven approved courses (28 units).

A. Complete:
SOCECOL 200 Seminar in Social Ecology
B. Select one of the following:
Research Methods
Research Methods in Psychology
Research Design
C. Complete at least one additional approved course in statistics or methodology.
D. In addition, students must take a minimum of four elective courses, chosen in consulation with their faculty advisor.

Other courses should be selected with regard to the student’s academic and career objectives, and must be approved by their faculty advisor. The seven required courses must include at least five graduate courses and must be exclusive of any directed study, independent study, or thesis courses (SOCECOL 298, SOCECOL 299, or SOCECOL 295). A grade of B or better must be achieved in all courses. Students are advanced to candidacy for the M.A., and a thesis committee is appointed, after a review of their graduate work and thesis plans by a faculty committee.

Ph.D. Programs

Each incoming Ph.D. student is assigned a faculty advisor with whom the student meets regularly to discuss an individualized program of graduate education. The doctoral programs offered by the School of Social Ecology prepare students for academic careers in research and teaching. Graduates also are well qualified for employment in private, non-profit and government agencies, where they can bring advanced academic training, strong methodological and statistical skills, and special expertise in areas such as environmental design, urban and regional planning, criminal justice, and social policies affecting mental and physical health across the life course. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five to six years, depending upon the specific program. A shorter time to degree is possible for highly motivated students and for students who enter the doctoral program with a master’s thesis in a relevant field that is approved by a committee of three Social Ecology faculty.

Second Year Research Project Requirement

Doctoral students are strongly encouraged to become involved in research very early in their graduate careers by participating in the research projects of the faculty. Students usually complete a supervised research project before they begin work on their doctoral dissertation. Students should begin work on this second year research project during their first year and should complete the project during the second year in residence. The research project must be evaluated and approved by a committee of three Social Ecology faculty members.

Comprehensive Exam/Breadth Requirement

Students complete a comprehensive exam/breadth requirement during their second or third year of study, through which they demonstrate mastery of their discipline and research areas. Comprehensive Exam/Breadth requirements vary by program within the School; in all instances, they must be completed before the student can advance to candidacy for the Ph.D.

Advancement

A student may be formally advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. when all requirements except the dissertation have been completed, and when the student’s dissertation plan has been approved by the candidacy committee. Formal advancement to candidacy for the Ph.D. will be approved by the Dean of the Graduate Division upon recommendation by a unanimous vote of the student’s candidacy committee.

The advancement committee is appointed by the School of Social Ecology, on behalf of the Dean of the Graduate Division and the Graduate Council. The student will appear before this committee, ordinarily consisting of five faculty members, for an oral examination. The dissertation plan will include a thorough examination of the history of the problem being proposed for investigation, its current status, the way in which the proposed research will further knowledge, a detailed specification of the proposed method of investigating the problem, and a description of the planned methods for analyzing the data collected. The normative time for advancement to candidacy is three to four years. In no case will students be allowed to advance to candidacy after the end of their fifth year of study.

Formal advancement to candidacy for the Ph.D. will be approved by the Dean of the Graduate Division upon recommendation by a unanimous vote of the student’s candidacy committee. Alternatively, the committee may recommend a course of action to strengthen the student for advancement to candidacy at a future date. When the student is advanced to candidacy, a doctoral committee will be appointed on behalf of the Graduate Council. After the student is advanced to candidacy, a doctoral committee, ordinarily consisting of three members of the faculty, will supervise the preparation and completion of the doctoral dissertation. The dissertation should be completed and accepted within one to two years, and no later than three calendar years after the student’s advancement to candidacy.

All Ph.D. students who have not been advanced to candidacy will be formally evaluated by members of the Social Ecology faculty at the end of each year. At that time, the faculty may recommend that the student continue toward the Ph.D., complete the M.A. only, or cease graduate studies in the School. A negative evaluation at this point is evidence of failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress. Evaluation of Ph.D. students who have advanced to candidacy is the responsibility of the student’s doctoral dissertation committee.

Dissertation

The final years of doctoral study are devoted to developing and defending a dissertation proposal and conducting dissertation research.  Students must complete all requirements for the Ph.D. in Social Ecology by no later than their seventh year of study, adjusted for any approved leaves of absence that the student may have taken. It is expected that most students will complete the degree requirements well in advance of this deadline. Failure to complete all degree requirements by the end of the seventh year may result in initiation of steps to terminate the student’s status as a doctoral student.

Ph.D. in Social Ecology

For more detailed catalogue information regarding doctoral programs in the School of Social Ecology, please select the appropriate department for which the program is offered.

The training program that leads to the Ph.D. in Social Ecology allows students to develop a tailored course of graduate study that draws upon the knowledge of several traditional academic disciplines. The emphases of this training program are in keeping with the academic mission of the School, namely, its emphases on an interdisciplinary approach to theory and research, and the application of research to policy and intervention. Students are encouraged to integrate the diverse theoretical and methodological insights of several disciplines to analyze important social and environmental problems from a perspective of breadth as well as depth.

Course Requirements

The following five core courses are required:

A. Complete:
SOCECOL 200 Seminar in Social Ecology
SOCECOL 264A Data Analysis
SOCECOL 264B Data Analysis
B. Select one of the following:
Research Methods
Research Design
Research Methods in Psychology
B. Complete one additional approved graduate research methods or statistics course.
C. In addition, students must take a minimum of six elective courses, chosen in consultation with their faculty advisor.

Second Year Research Project Requirement

Students are strongly encouraged to become involved in research very early in their graduate careers by participating in the research projects of the faculty. Students complete a supervised research project before they begin work on their doctoral dissertation. Research is broadly construed to include experimental methods, questionnaire and interview studies, systematic field observation, secondary analyses, legal analyses, etc. Students should begin work on this second year research project during their first year and should complete the project during the second year in residence (preferably by the end of the winter quarter of the second year). The research project must be evaluated and approved by a committee of three Social Ecology faculty members. Normally, one faculty member will serve as the chair of the committee and the major advisor for the research, but students should consult with all three members of the committee about their research plans. [Note: Students who wish to submit the written report of their research as a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the M.A. must have the membership of their thesis committee approved by the Associate Dean of the School acting on behalf of the Dean of the School and must be advanced to M.A. candidacy the previous quarter. Please see information on M.A. in Social Ecology]. Please contact the Assistant Director of Graduate Student Services if you have any questions.

A written report of the research must be prepared for evaluation by the members of the committee.  The report typically will be comparable in scope and format to articles that appear in leading journals in the natural and behavioral sciences. Approval of the student's research project must be certified by obtaining the signature of each committee member on a form that is available by contacting the Assistant Director of Graduate Student Services.

Breadth Requirement

Students complete a breadth requirement during their third year of study, through which they demonstrate mastery of at least three research areas within Social Ecology. Several options are available for completing the breadth requirement, including completion of a written comprehensive examination or preparation of a major paper or series of papers that intensively examine specific research issues in Social Ecology. Preferably, the approach taken should be interdisciplinary. Each student's plans for completing the breadth requirement are developed in consultation with a committee of three Social Ecology faculty members. Students are encouraged to assemble and meet with this committee as early as possible during their graduate career, and are required to do so by no later than the third quarter of their second year of study. Please contact the Assistant Director of Graduate Student Services for details.

Once the student's plans have been approved and implemented, the committee will review the student's work to evaluate whether the breadth requirement has been fulfilled and to recommend additional work if it is deemed necessary. The breadth requirement must be completed before the student can advance to candidacy for the Ph.D.

Advancement/Prospectus Requirement

The fourth year of study is devoted to developing and defending a dissertation proposal and conducting dissertation research. The normative time for advancement to candidacy is four years. Students complete the dissertation in their fourth, fifth, or possible sixth year. See additional information under Advancement and Dissertation. Please take special note of the School of Social Ecology deadline that requires students to advance to candidacy for the Ph.D. by the end of their fifth year of study.

Dissertation

The final years of doctoral study are devoted to developing and defending a dissertation proposal and conducting dissertation research.  Students must complete all requirements for the Ph.D. in Social Ecology by no later than their seventh year of study, adjusted for any approved leaves of absence that the student may have taken. It is expected that most students will complete the degree requirements well in advance of this deadline. Failure to complete all degree requirements by the end of the seventh year may result in initiation of steps to terminate the student’s status as a doctoral student. 


Criminology, Law and Society Courses

CRM/LAW C7. Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society . 4 Units.

Introduces characteristics of the U.S. criminal justice system, including responses to crime, components of the system, and current challenges to the system. Examines structure and function of police and courts, criminal procedure, and sentencing and incarceration policies.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Urban Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

CRM/LAW C10. Fundamentals of Criminology, Law and Society . 4 Units.

Introduces three interdisciplinary literatures: criminology, socio-legal studies, and justice studies. Focuses on theoretical and empirical work addressing law making, law breaking, and legal systems.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

CRM/LAW C40. Forms of Criminal Behavior. 4 Units.

Undergraduates are introduced to the subjects of crime and criminal behavior. Topics include "street" and "white-collar" crimes. Histories of the offenses, the types of people who commit the crimes, and society's reactions to the offenses are presented.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

CRM/LAW C100. Special Topics in Criminology, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Special topic courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CRM/LAW C101. American Law. 4 Units.

Introduction to substantive and procedural law governing private dispute resolution, including common law (tort, property, contracts), lawsuits (civil procedure), and alternative dispute resolution; emphasis on the socio-legal ramifications of private disputes, particularly the modern tort system and tort reform movement.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C102. Introduction to the Comparative Study of Legal Cultures. 4 Units.

Traces the anthropological and comparative cultural study of law from the nineteenth century to the present; briefly surveys the diversity of recorded legal cultures and critically examines key concepts which have been used to describe and classify them.

Same as INTL ST 124A.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C103. US Legal Thought. 4 Units.

Evolution of legal thought in socio-historical context from 19th century to present; emphasizes the rise and fall of legal classicism and modern socio-legal critiques, including the law and society movement, critical legal studies, feminist legal theory, and critical race studies.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C104. Sociology of Law. 4 Units.

Examines law creation and law enforcement in their social and political context. Discusses the major theories of law and the modern state, and presents case studies in order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of these theoretical perspectives.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C105. Psychology and the Law. 4 Units.

Psychological assumptions of American legal system and mental health aspects of provision of criminal justice services. Civil commitment, insanity defense, competence to stand trial, jury selection, eye-witness identification. Use of police, courts, correctional institutions in prevention of behavior disorder.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7 or CRM/LAW C101

Same as PSY BEH 193E.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C106. Crime and Public Policy. 4 Units.

Explores nature and dimensions of crime in America and uses and limits of various strategies to control it. Topics include growth of imprisonment, the problem of domestic violence, the death penalty, gun control, and the potential of crime prevention programs.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C107. Deviance. 4 Units.

Perspectives on deviance and criminality in behavior, institution, community, and myth. The suitability of contemporary theories of deviant behavior.

Same as SOCIOL 156, PSYCH 177D.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Sociology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C108. Criminological Theory. 4 Units.

Explores the question of crime causation from a number of theoretical perspectives in the social sciences. Schools of thought examined include utilitarianism, positivism, human ecology, social structural approaches, social process (learning) theories, labeling, and radical-critical (political) perspectives.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C109. Juvenile Delinquency. 4 Units.

Patterns of delinquent behavior, theories that explain behavior, current research aimed at enhancing exploratory power. Attempts to prevent and control delinquency are put in historical perspective. Development of the current juvenile justice system and evolution of modern juvenile law.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Same as PSY BEH 193B.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C110. Community Context of Crime. 4 Units.

Examines the social context of high-crime communities, with special emphasis on the problems of poverty, joblessness, economic inequality, and racial discrimination. Assesses debates on the causes of these problems, and on the most effective policies to combat them.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C111. Theories of Punishment. 4 Units.

Survey of the various schools of thought regarding formal punishment theory. The purposes of legal sanctions are examined, including those of deterrence, rehabilitation, retribution, and incapacitation. Considers problems in realizing formal goals of punishment in practice.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C112. Legal Sanctions and Social Control. 4 Units.

Examination of criminal sanctions as mechanisms of social control. Includes the nature, function, and organization of courts as sanction generating institutions, and problems associated with punishing white-collar and corporate illegalities.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C113. Gender and Social Control. 4 Units.

Examines the legal system's use of sex as an organizing characteristic, focusing particularly on sameness and difference feminism, and tracing the evolution of equal treatment of men and women in the areas of constitutional rights, employment, education, and military service.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C114. Miscarriages of Justice. 4 Units.

Systematically describes, explains, and analyzes the causes and consequences of the wrongful accusation, prosecution, incarceration, and sometimes even execution, of the innocent in the American criminal justice system.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C115. Prisons, Punishment, and Corrections. 4 Units.

A review of how the U.S. punishes and rehabilitates convicted law violators. The conflicts among the major purposes of sentencing—rehabilitation, deterrence, incapacitation—are discussed, as well as the effects of different sanctions on public safety, offender rehabilitation, and justice system costs.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C116. Race, Ethnicity, and Social Control. 4 Units.

Provides a historical and sociological survey of racial and ethnic group relations in contexts of crime control, emphasizing the roles of racial ideology, structural racism, and social movements in shaping these dynamic relations, and their significance to American liberal democracy.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Same as CHC/LAT 152A.

CRM/LAW C117. Imprisonment and Reentry. 4 Units.

Offers an overview of imprisonment and reentry in the contemporary United States. Examines the development of the prison in the United States and explores changes in its composition, structure, and purpose over time.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C118. Domestic Violence. 4 Units.

General perspectives about domestic violence and theoretical accounts about what causes such behavior.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C119. Violence in Intimate Relationships. 4 Units.

Responses to various forms of domestic violence, such as intimate partner violence, child abuse. Criminal justice system and barriers to reporting to the police, prosecutors, courts. Human services, such as safety planning for victims, treatment programs, and restorative justice approaches.

Corequisite:
Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C118

CRM/LAW C120. Law and Inequality. 4 Units.

Various aspects of the law as related to three specific areas of inequality: immigration and immigrants, race, and gender. The role of law as a tool of social reform and limitations of the legal system historically in resolving inequality issues.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C122. Constitutional Law. 4 Units.

Examines the First and Fourteenth Amendments, focusing on freedom of speech and religion, and the incorporation of the Bill of Rights. Topics include political, symbolic, offensive, and obscene speech, student speech rights, and the free exercise and disestablishment of religion.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Overlaps with POL SCI 174A.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C123. Family Law. 4 Units.

Examines legal issues surrounding marriage, cohabitation, divorce, child custody and support, adoption, and the rights of parents and children in the family context. The findings of social science research are used to illuminate the legal issues.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7 or CRM/LAW C101

Same as PSY BEH 193F.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C125. Child Development, the Law, and Social Policy. 4 Units.

Examines the rights of children and adolescents in the U.S. and internationally; law and policy with regard to the family, government services, health care, education, juvenile justice and the labor market; and the connection between child development, law and policy.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C. Recommended: PSY BEH 111D or PSY BEH 112D.

Same as PSY BEH 120D.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C126. Drugs, Crime, and Social Control. 4 Units.

Drug abuse in the U.S.; the psychopharmacology of various drugs; biological, psychological, and sociological explanations for drug abuse. Policy issues are discussed; students will develop and defend a set of strategies for limiting harm done by drugs and drug laws.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C127. Hate Crimes. 4 Units.

Examines the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes and the larger social context within which they occur. The politics and dynamics of intergroup violence born of bigotry and manifested as discrimination; social policy designed to control bias-motivated violence.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C128. Environmental Law and Policy . 4 Units.

Environmental law as a combination of traditional legal principles and newly created statutes, rules, and decisions applied to environmental protection. Investigates roles of courts, legislature, executive branch and administrative agencies, and private citizens attempting to regulate environmental quality.

Same as UPPP 133.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors only. Planning, Policy, and Design Majors only.

CRM/LAW C130. Seminar on Gangs. 4 Units.

An overview of gangs, including the nature and definition of gangs; types of gangs; diversity of membership; theoretical explanations; criminal behavior; drug use and sales; law enforcement responses; gangs in correctional institutions; intervention and prevention strategies; and public policy issues.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C131. Organized Crime and American Society. 4 Units.

Examination of the phenomenon of American organized crime from a sociological perspective. Explanation of methods by which organized crime is tolerated at various levels of society. Emphasis on ways in which "underworld" interests interact with legitimate economic and political institutions.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C132. Forensic Science, Law, and Society. 4 Units.

Examines use of "forensic science" to resolve issues arising in criminal cases including crime scene analysis, DNA testing, fingerprints, trace evidence comparisons, profiling, lie detectors, other forensic techniques; evaluation, statistical characterization, and legal admissibility of evidence; regulation of forensic laboratories.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C133. Homicide and Suicide. 4 Units.

Examines similarities and differences among homicide and suicide, two major causes of death.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C134. Victimless Crimes. 4 Units.

Examines major theoretical, empirical, and policy-oriented research related to the design, implementation, and analysis of government intervention, through the criminal sanction, in the spheres of vice and morality.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C136. Forensic Psychology: Advanced Seminar. 4 Units.

The focus is on the psychology of criminal offending, particularly violent behavior. Examines violence, sexual offending, and mental disorder related to crime with regard to clinical assessment and treatment; mental health services within forensic institutions.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and PSY BEH 102C and (PSY BEH 178S or CRM/LAW C149)

Same as PSY BEH 156C, PSYCH 177F.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C137. Criminal Procedure. 4 Units.

Examines the law governing arrests (with and without a warrant); police detention; search and seizure; interrogation; use of informers, eavesdropping, wiretapping; examination and identification of suspects. Pretrial motions such as speedy trial and discovery of evidence may be covered.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C139. Police and Change. 4 Units.

Organizational efforts to modify police conduct are addressed by focusing on the history of policing in the United States including training, education, and the contributions of women.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C140. Surveillance and Society. 4 Units.

Explores the development and deployment of surveillance technologies in contemporary society. The social and legal impact of surveillance technologies, in such areas as crime control, privacy, trust, community, democracy, and the war on terror.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors only.

CRM/LAW C142. White-Collar Crime. 4 Units.

Examines criminal activity in business and corporate enterprise, organizations, and the professions. Theories regarding the causes and control of white-collar and corporate crime are covered as well as the numerous definitions of these terms.

Same as SOCIOL 142.

Restriction: Sociology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C144. Criminal Law. 4 Units.

Deals specifically with the substantive nature of criminal law and its historical development. Focuses on understanding the development of fundamental doctrinal principles upon which criminal law is based, including mens rea, actus reus, homicide, causation, group criminality, and exculpation.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C145. Government Crime. 4 Units.

Examines the legal, organizational, and political issues involved in the generation and control of government lawlessness. Readings present historical and theoretical perspectives in the abuse of government authority and the ability of the legal system to control such behavior.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C149. Violence in Society. 4 Units.

Current theory and research on aggression; anger and violence as problems in individual and social functioning. Process and functions of anger examined with regard to normal behavior and psychopathology. The determinants, prevalence, and implications of violence in society are analyzed.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Same as PSY BEH 178S.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C150. The Legal Profession. 4 Units.

Role of the legal profession in modern society, the diverse professional roles lawyers play, the American legal profession compared with that of other societies. "Litigation explosion," ethical problems, interactions between lawyers and other professionals, training and socialization of new lawyers.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C156. Cross-Cultural Research on Urban Gangs. 4 Units.

Taking an urban policy approach, examines the background and contemporary traditions of gangs in several ethnic groups including African-, Asian-, and Mexican-Americans. Cross-cultural exploration of the varied facets of gang life. The major social-control institutions affecting them.

Same as CHC/LAT 153.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Chicano/Latino Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VII)

CRM/LAW C160. Forensic Psychology . 4 Units.

Forensic psychology is the interface between clinical psychology and the law. Emphasizes clinically relevant legal topics (insanity defense; competency to stand trial) and includes critical thinking about issues that arise when psychologists are involved in legal proceedings.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSY BEH 11C

Same as PSY BEH 161C.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society M.A.S. students have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C162. Crime Hotspots. 4 Units.

Criminological theories of local public safety hazards or hotspots are introduced. Spatial statistics are developed for different types of hotspots. Hotspot policing theories are introduced and research on the effectiveness of policing strategies is reviewed.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C163. Ethics and Politics of Justice. 4 Units.

Theoretical perspective on how ethics and politics relate to criminal justice through an introduction to moral philosophy; consideration of specific theories of punishment and justice; and consideration of practical and empirical illustrations of the intersection of ethics, politics, and justice.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C164. Social Control of Delinquency. 4 Units.

Assumes familiarity with theories of delinquency, the juvenile justice system, and elements of juvenile law. Explores socio-historical origins and evolution of juvenile justice, current research and policy on delinquency prevention and treatment, and future directions of law, policy, and practice.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7. Recommended: CRM/LAW C109.

Same as PSY BEH 193C.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C165. The Death Penalty. 4 Units.

Examines why the U.S. continues to have a death penalty when so many other countries have abandoned it. Arguments for and against the death penalty are covered.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C167. Crime Measurement. 4 Units.

The strengths and weaknesses of three crime measures (police reports, victim surveys, and offender self-reports) are illustrated through analyses of research articles. Common measurement problems are analyzed with a focus on reliability and validity.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C168. Extreme Punishment . 4 Units.

Explores the history and law of America’s Eighth Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, examining the death penalty, long prison sentences, harsh confinement conditions, and other punishments. Students debate practical, legal, and moral arguments for and against these punishments.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C171. Latinos and the Law. 4 Units.

Examines a range of theoretical, empirical, and policy approaches to legal issues affecting the Latino population, with emphasis on California. Discusses topics concerning the purpose of law, the creation of law, and the enforcement of law.

Same as CHC/LAT 142.

(VII)

CRM/LAW C172. Culture Change and the Mexican People. 4 Units.

Reviews culture contact and colonization, innovation diffusion, acculturation, assimilation, culture conflict and marginality, modernization, urbanization, legal transformations. Mexico and the Southwestern U.S. are reviewed through several centuries to better appreciate the indigenous base of the Mexican people.

Same as CHC/LAT 155.

CRM/LAW C173. Maritime Piracy, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Explores the historical and contemporary images and reality of pirates and piracy since the 16th century across the globe through an analysis of primary sources, key historiographical and legal debates, and criminological theories.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C174. Immigration and Crime. 4 Units.

Examines immigration and crime in the global context, highlighting immigrants as criminals and victims; immigration and crime control; immigrants’ perceptions of the criminal justice system; public discourse and public perception on immigration and crime; and human rights issues.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

CRM/LAW C175. Issues in Policing. 4 Units.

Lectures and readings focus on the history and strategies of policing, measuring the quality of policing, and police misconduct. Strategies for enhancing the quality of policing for controlling misconduct are covered.

CRM/LAW C176. Classics in Crime Cinema. 4 Units.

A multidimensional understanding of crime films and how they shape public thinking about crime and criminals.

Restriction: CRM/LAW C176 and CRM/LAW C20 may not be taken for credit.

CRM/LAW C177. Eyewitness Testimony. 4 Units.

Faulty eyewitness testimony is a major cause of wrongful convictions. Covers the fast-growing topic of eyewitness testimony and memory for real-world events, both how psychologists study eyewitness capacity, and how the legal system has dealt with eyewitness issues.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10

Same as PSY BEH 193G.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Seniors only.

Concurrent with CRM/LAW C263.

CRM/LAW C178. Critical Race Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to Critical Race Theory and key American cases on racial inequality. Using this literature, examines the possibilities and pitfalls of legal claims of race, gender, and sexuality discrimination in the age of colorblindness.

Same as AFAM 157.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

CRM/LAW C179. Race and Incarceration. 4 Units.

Examines the racial politics of mass incarceration through historical, empirical, theoretical, and legal frameworks. Focuses on race, gender, and sexual differences to develop a critique on policing, incarceration, and other forms of punishment.

CRM/LAW C180. Power, Constructions of Deviance, and Social Control . 4 Units.

Examines the forms and limits of power in the construction of social deviants. Theories of state power are covered to understand the prison system as a contemporary driver of social inequality. The collateral consequences of mass incarceration are discussed.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C191. Law and Modernity. 4 Units.

The rise and spread of Enlightenment legal traditions, social contract theory, individual rights, ideologies of "liberty, equality, fraternity"; contradictions of liberal law, its understandings of "primitive" and "civilized"; pervasive myths of property, difference, race, and rights. Reading- and writing-intensive.

Same as ANTHRO 127A.

CRM/LAW C196. Research Seminar in Criminology, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Special topics research seminar. Content varies with interest of instructor. Capstone research opportunity with Criminology, Law and Society faculty members.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Anthropology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C201. Research Methods. 4 Units.

An introduction to techniques of inductive methodologies, including qualitative interviewing and participant observation, and deductive methodologies, including survey research and experimental and quasi-experimental design. Provides a sound overview of research methodology with tools to pursue specific methods in greater depth.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C207. Land-Use Law. 4 Units.

Investigates legal and institutional frameworks for development control. Review of constitutional issues implicated in land-use regulation. Traces development control historically and analyzes contemporary approaches to land-use control which reflect environmental and economic development concerns.

Same as UPPP 207.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C210. Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with the interrelated fields of criminology, law and society studies, and criminal justice studies. Organized around three well-established interdisciplinary literatures: criminology, sociolegal studies, and criminal justice studies.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C211. Legal Institutions and Society. 4 Units.

Acquaints students with the institutions of U.S. legal system and its operations, as well as with the constitutional framework undergirding this system, and defines the relationship between U.S. citizens and government at a variety of levels.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C212. Police, Courts, and Corrections. 4 Units.

Focuses on basic policy issues in the administration of the criminal justice system. The key elements of the criminal justice system are police, courts, and corrections. Prepares students for continued study of these organizations.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C213. Crime and Social Deviance. 4 Units.

Examines the major social scientific perspectives on criminal and deviant behavior. Specific deviant and criminal activities are described and explained using established theoretical frameworks.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C214. Research Methods. 4 Units.

Structures research methodology, the approach to developing and evaluating knowledge of the sciences for use in criminal justice professional activities. Special emphasis on differentiating scientific approaches from pseudo-science.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C215. Applied Statistics. 4 Units.

Provides a basis for the use of fundamental statistical analysis techniques for solving public policy and management problems through a series of assignments, examinations, and online discussions and demonstrations.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C216. Public Policy, Crime, and Criminal Justice. 4 Units.

Increases understanding of crime, violence, and the criminal justice system. Assesses the state of knowledge on key policy issues of our time. Discusses the contribution of communities, schools, employment, drugs, guns, and alcohol to crime and violence.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C217. Leadership. 4 Units.

Introduces concepts, ideas, and theories about leadership and its operation. Explores leadership concepts through interviews with leaders from the community and fellow classmates.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C218. Social Problems, Law, and Policy. 4 Units.

Capstone course for M.A.S. program in Criminology, Law and Society. Students choose a social problem related to crime, criminal justice, and law; relate the problem to legal and social issues; and devise a plan of action to research the problem.

Restriction: Graduate students only. Criminology, Law and Society Majors only.

CRM/LAW C219. Hate Crime. 4 Units.

Examines the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes, as well as the larger social context within which they occur, are reacted to, and seem to be proliferating.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C221. Sentencing and Corrections. 4 Units.

Reviews U.S. attempts to punish and rehabilitate convicted law violators. Conflicts among major purposes of sentencing (rehabilitation, deterrence, incapacitation, and retribution) are discussed, as well as effects of different sanctions on public safety, offender rehabilitation, and justice system costs.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C222. Ethnography. 4 Units.

Explores the theory and practice of ethnography with a focus on anthropology, the discipline most associated with ethnography. Students are exposed to the theoretical underpinnings of ethnographic work, traditional and innovative practices, and sample ethnographies.

Same as ANTHRO 230F, CHC/LAT 217.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C224. Organizational Perspectives on the Legal System. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with organization theory and research as ways to make sense of, navigate, and act on the legal system. Acquaints students with major frameworks in organization theory and their application to the system of legal organizations.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C227. Conflict Resolution: Theory and Methods. 4 Units.

Provide an understanding of the major alternatives to the traditional system for the administration of justice, expanding on some of the newer theories and methods in the field. Key research on social conflict and its resolution examined.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C228. Criminology: Micro Approaches. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the dominant theories in modern criminology, their theoretical antecedents and extensions, major empirical tests and implications for programs, policy and practice, and focuses on micro-level, individual theories of crime causation. Formerly Criminology, Law and Society C233A.

CRM/LAW C229. Criminology: Macro Approaches. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the dominant theories in modern criminology, their theoretical antecedents and extensions, major empirical tests and implications for programs, policy and practices, and addresses macro-level theories of crime causation. Formerly Criminology, Law and Society C233B.

CRM/LAW C231. Crime and Gender . 4 Units.

Examines the legal, political, social, economic, and policy implications of making gender (primarily) and race (secondarily) the focus in the study of crime, criminal law, and the criminal justice system.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C232. Juvenile Delinquency. 4 Units.

Examines the major theoretical perspectives regarding the onset, persistence, and desistance of juvenile delinquency, and examines empirical evidence for each perspective.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C234. Anthropology of Law. 4 Units.

Law has been a key site of anthropological inquiry since the discipline's nineteenth-century origins. Course introduces and critically assesses the contributions anthropology has made to sociolegal lytic trends.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C238. White-Collar Crime. 4 Units.

Examines the illegal behavior of individuals who commit crimes in the course of their employment. Special attention will be paid to ways in which power and organizational structure affect the behavior of the white-collar offenders.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C239A. Law and Society I. 4 Units.

Provides an introduction to the law and society field from its origins in social scientific, legal, and philosophical scholarship during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early-twentieth centuries. Formerly Criminology, Law, and Society C239.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C239B. Law and Society II. 4 Units.

Building on Law and Society I, addresses contemporary issues in the field from mid-twentieth century to the present with emphasis on the degree to which the field's foundational assumptions are being challenged, refined, or confirmed through current research.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C239A

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C241. Race, Ethnicity, and Social Control. 4 Units.

Origins and organization of racialized social control, with emphasis on criminal justice. Racial politics of criminal/juvenile justice considered in comparative (historical and international) perspective. Exploration of theoretical and methodological issues for research on race, ethnicity, and social control.

Same as CHC/LAT 221.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C242. Crime Hotspots. 4 Units.

Focuses on the criminological theory of hotspots, beginning with the “when, where, and why” questions and ending with the practical policing strategies that have been developed to mitigate hotspot public safety hazards.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C248. Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Prepares students to become proficient in the basic GIS functionality including visualization, data management, and spatial analysis.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C250. Preventing Errors of Justice. 4 Units.

Examines the types of errors that are made in the U.S. criminal justice system and how we might prevent these errors, including failures to convict guilty offenders as well as wrongful convictions of the innocent.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C252. Issues in Environmental Law and Policy. 4 Units.

Treatment of legal and policy strategies for promoting environmental protection and deterring environmental degradation within the context of other societal objectives. Topical approach with a focus on problems of special interest to criminologists and to environmental policy specialists.

Same as UPPP 252.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C255. Public Policy. 4 Units.

Explores different approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.

Same as POL SCI 221A, PP&D 221.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C260A. Race and Justice Studies Proseminar .

A year-long proseminar conducted by a team of instructors specializing in race and justice studies. Conceived as a reading and peer mentor group focusing on intellectual and professional development. Required for students pursuing the Race and Justice Studies emphasis.

Grading Option: In Progress (Letter Grade with S/U).

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C260B. Race and Justice Studies Proseminar.

A year-long proseminar conducted by a team of instructors specializing in race and justice studies. Conceived as a reading and peer mentor group focusing on intellectual and professional development. Required for students pursuing the Race and Justice Studies emphasis.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C260A

Grading Option: In Progress (Letter Grade with S/U).

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C260C. Race and Justice Studies Proseminar. 4 Units.

A year-long proseminar conducted by a team of instructors specializing in race and justice studies. Conceived as a reading and peer mentor group focusing on intellectual and professional development. Required for students pursuing the Race and Justice Studies emphasis.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C260B

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C261. Race and Justice Studies Writing Seminar . 4 Units.

A required writing-intensive seminar conducted by an instructor affiliated with the Race and Justice Studies emphasis. Students with manuscripts on relevant topics will read and critique peer manuscripts, and revise manuscripts toward completion of articles, dissertation chapters, and other publications.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C260C

Same as HUMAN 261, SOC SCI 253K.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C262. Special Topics in Race and Justice Studies. 4 Units.

A seminar focused on special issues in race and justice studies.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C263. Eyewitness Testimony. 4 Units.

Examines the evidence that shows that faulty eyewitness memory is the major cause of wrongful convictions. Explores what the legal system thinks of eyewitness testimony and how the legal system has dealt with eyewitness issues.

Same as PSY BEH P263.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C265. Memory and the Law. 4 Units.

Examines the controversial topic of repressed memory, or perception and memory of real-world events.

Same as PSY BEH P265.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C266. Psychology and the Law. 4 Units.

Overview of how psychology is applied to the civil and criminal justice systems, how case law shapes this application, and how legal decisions affect the direction of psychological research. Interdisciplinary approach to research in psychology, law, and/or criminology.

Same as PSY BEH P266.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C268. Contemporary Issues in Crime and Justice. 4 Units.

Intensive reading and discussion of several recent works that raise critical issues for criminology and criminal justice policy, with a special emphasis on issues of inequality, diversity, and social justice.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C275. Special Topics in Criminology, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Topics covered vary with interests of instructor.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CRM/LAW C296. Doctoral Dissertation Research and Writing. 2-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Criminology, Law and Society faculty.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

CRM/LAW C298. Directed Study. 2-4 Units.

Directed study with Criminology, Law and Society faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C299. Independent Study . 2-8 Units.

Independent research with Criminology, Law and Society faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Planning, Policy, and Design Courses

PP&D 129. American Public Policy. 4 Units.

Focuses on the development and implementation of public policy in the United States. Lectures cover theoretical models of the policy process as well as significant problems facing contemporary American decision-makers.

Same as POL SCI 121G, PUBHLTH 132, SOC SCI 152C.

PP&D 152. Cultural Ecology and Environmental Design. 4 Units.

Introduction to cultural ecology and environmental and architectural design. Addresses the understanding of people’s relationships with their built environments, the basic elements of architecture, architectural analysis, and cultural analysis are covered. Examines values in design and design for multicultural societies.

Prerequisite: PP&D 4

Restriction: Urban Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 178. International Divided Cities. 4 Units.

Investigates urban divisions in international cities where deep-seated nationalistic ethnic differences create pressures for intergroup conflicts, autonomy, or territorial separation, and can incite violence. Urban political polarization as it is manifest in the urban setting.

Same as SOCIOL 176, POL SCI 157B.

PP&D 204. Plan Development and Communication . 4 Units.

Graphic representation and communication of physical place characteristics, design and physical planning ideas and concepts using a variety of graphic techniques of free hand drawing, sketching, orthographic representations, scale drawings, 3D representations, maps, photo-documentation, and various media.

Restriction: Urban and Regional Planning Majors only.

PP&D 213. Advanced Qualitative Methods: Analyzing Qualitative Data. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the theory and practice of analyzing qualitative data. Student must have already learned about data collection and research design for qualitative research and they must have qualitative data they can analyze.

Same as POL SCI 273A, MGMTPHD 297K.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 221. Public Policy . 4 Units.

Explores different approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PUB POL 221.

Restriction: Public Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PP&D 279. Theories of Power and Empowerment. 4 Units.

Studies different ways of thinking about power and its uses. Explores theories of power that inform various notions of empowerment, including resistance, participatory democracy, and workplace empowerment.

Same as POL SCI 223A, MGMTPHD 297R.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PP&D 283. Collaborative Governance and Public Management. 4 Units.

Introduction to inclusive management. To make effective use of public resources, public managers are inventing ways of managing that alter relationships within organizations, between organizations, between sectors, and with the public. Requires rethinking fundamentals such as leadership and motivation.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PUB POL 283.

Restriction: Public Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Psychology and Social Behavior Courses

PSY BEH 9. Introduction to Psychology. 4 Units.

Introduction to field of psychology, addressing the application of scientific methods to the study of human development, learning, memory, problem solving, perception, biological mechanisms, emotions and motivation, personality, psychopathology, and effects of diverse social and cultural contexts on human behavior.

Same as PSYCH 7A.
Overlaps with PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Urban Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment. PSY BEH 9 and PSYCH 7A may not be taken for credit if taken after PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B, or PSYCH 9C.

(III)

PSY BEH 11A. Psychology Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Designed to provide freshman with an in-depth survey of general psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Same as PSYCH 9A.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Cognitive Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Urban Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment. PSY BEH 9 and PSYCH 7A may not be taken for credit if taken after PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B, or PSYCH 9C.

(III)

PSY BEH 11B. Psychology Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Designed to provide freshman with an in-depth survey of general psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Same as PSYCH 9B.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Cognitive Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Urban Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment. PSY BEH 9 and PSYCH 7A may not be taken for credit if taken after PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B, or PSYCH 9C.

(III)

PSY BEH 11C. Psychology Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Designed to provide freshman with an in-depth survey of general psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Same as PSYCH 9C.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Cognitive Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Urban Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment. PSY BEH 9 and PSYCH 7A may not be taken for credit if taken after PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B, or PSYCH 9C.

(III)

PSY BEH 100. Special Topics in Social Behavior. 4 Units.

Course content varies with interest of instructor.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 101D. Life Span Developmental Psychology. 4 Units.

Addresses the major issues, concepts, and methods of life span developmental psychology. The fundamental theories, distinctive methods, and the physical, perceptual, cognitive, social, motivational, and emotional development for each developmental phase of the life course are considered. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 102C. Abnormal Psychology. 4 Units.

Survey of disorders organized by the diagnostic categories of the American Psychiatric Association. Interdisciplinary orientation combines environmental, psychological, and organic perspectives on etiology and treatment.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and SOCECOL 10

Overlaps with PSYCH 120A.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 103H. Health Psychology. 4 Units.

Theory and research are considered as they contribute to an understanding of the role of psychological processes in health and illness. The distinction between prevention and treatment of illness is established, and a variety of psychosocial interventions are elaborated.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 104S. Social Animal: An Introduction to Social Psychology. 4 Units.

Theories and research exploring social behavior and social influences on behavior. Topics include methods of social research, attitude formation and change, social perception, the social self, stereotypes and prejudice, conformity, obedience, altruism, aggression, interpersonal relationships and love, and group behavior.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 110D. Infant Development. 4 Units.

Study of human development from conception through the first two years of life, covering processes and events in the domains of physical, social, and cognitive development.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 111D. Child Development. 4 Units.

Examines social, emotional, and intellectual growth and development between the ages of 2 and 12 years.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B

Overlaps with PSYCH 120D.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 112D. Adolescent Development. 4 Units.

Examines current research on the biological, social, and cultural contexts of adolescent development. Topics include the impacts of puberty, adolescents' decision-making competencies, changes in family and peer relationships, identity development, and psychosocial problems such as depression and problem behavior.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B

Overlaps with PSYCH 21A.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 113D. Adult Development. 4 Units.

Examines why and how we change (with attention to gains as well as losses) from ages 18-65 and the nature and sources of continuity over time. Topics include physical and intellectual functioning, personality, coping strategies, and social roles and relationships.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 114D. Gerontology. 4 Units.

Examines stereotypes and myths associated with aging; physiological and psychological changes that accompany old age; distinguishes behavior changes due to aging per se from those due to historical and socioeconomic factors; political, social aspects of old age in contemporary society.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 115D. Cognitive Development. 4 Units.

Examines theories on nature of cognitive development. Discusses behaviorist theories on role of the environment including those of Vygotsky and Piaget, and recent evidence from cognitive psychologists stressing the importance of knowledge and skills within specific domains.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B

Overlaps with PSYCH 141D.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 116D. Human Development and Cross-Cultural Perspectives. 4 Units.

Human development in diverse cultures (e.g., Asian, American, and African). Special emphasis on East-West contrasts and when East meets West (i.e., Asian-American experiences). Topics include parenting, family relations, language and cognition, schooling and academic achievement, and morality.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B) and SOCECOL 10

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 117D. The Psychology of Gender. 4 Units.

Discussion of gender identity development and examination of gender differences and similarities across the life span. Consideration of the biology and psychology of gender in relation to physical, behavioral, personality, and intellectual capabilities.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 118D. Human Sexuality. 4 Units.

A broad survey of human sexuality encompassing genetic factors, physiological and anatomical development, customary and atypical forms of behavior, reproductive processes, and cultural determinants.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 120D. Child Development, the Law, and Social Policy. 4 Units.

Examines the rights of children and adolescents in the U.S. and internationally; law and policy with regard to the family, government services, health care, education, juvenile justice and the labor market; and the connection between child development, law and policy.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C. Recommended: PSY BEH 111D or PSY BEH 112D.

Same as CRM/LAW C125.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 121D. Work and Family. 4 Units.

Effects of employment and unemployment on mental health and marital quality; effects of work on parenting and child development; corporate and social policies for "families that work"; young adults' decision-making about work and family.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 127D. Attachment Relationships. 4 Units.

Students learn about the development of attachment-related needs throughout development, as well as the links between attachment and emotion, psychopathology and treatment. Lectures emphasize classic as well as cutting-edge research and are supplemented by primary source readings.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 11A or PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11B or PSYCH 9B

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 136H. Behavioral Medicine. 4 Units.

Examines biobehavioral aspects of health and illness, focusing on how stress contributes to or exacerbates disease processes. Background information on psychosomatic medicine and stress models and detailed examination of specific organ systems emphasizing the reactivity of these systems to stress.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 137H. Human Stress. 4 Units.

Stress as a multidisciplinary topic. Biological, psychological, and sociological approaches to adaptation-related disorders. Effects of acute and chronic stress on emotions, physiology, and behavior. Methods of stress assessment, stress reduction, and intervention.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 138H. Child Health Psychology. 4 Units.

Exploration of psychological antecedents, concomitants, and consequences of medical illnesses in children. Children's beliefs about health, illness, and medication; the role of stress; coronary-prone behavior; therapeutic adherence and physician-patient interaction; coping with chronic illness; effects of child's illness on family.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 9C or PSYCH 7A. Recommended: SOCECOL 10.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 139H. Clinical Sport Psychology. 4 Units.

An interdisciplinary introduction to clinical sport psychology, that includes, among other things, an introduction to psychopathology in sport; plus the use of psychological skills training, including anxiety reduction techniques, visualization, self-efficacy, coping skills, concentration, and goal-setting in sports.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Overlaps with PSYCH 124S.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 140H. The Hardiness Approach to Stress Management. 4 Units.

New development within psychology involving a combination of motivations and skills that extensive research has shown enhances performance, conduct, morale, stamina, and health. Combines study of hardiness research with strategies for improvement of personal hardiness through a series of exercises.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 141H. Clinical Health Psychology. 4 Units.

Behavioral role in etiology, treatment, and prevention of certain diseases. Behavioral intervention including biofeedback, stress-, pain-management, health habit counseling, and other skills to assist patients make cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes needed to cope with disease or achieve better health.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Same as PUBHLTH 141.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 150C. Clinical Psychology. 4 Units.

Overview of theories, assessment techniques, research methodologies, and intervention approaches in clinical psychology. Psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic, and cognitive perspectives are examined along with ethical and professional issues.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and PSY BEH 102C

Overlaps with PSYCH 122C.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 151C. Psychological Testing and Assessment. 4 Units.

Laboratory-seminar exploration of diverse methods of assessing, analyzing, and recording behavior. Includes methods of direct behavioral observation, structured (analog) assessments, rating scales, interviewing, and self-monitoring. Development of assessment skills and their application in intervention and research programs.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C and PSY BEH 102C and PSY BEH 150C. Recommended: SOCECOL 10.

Overlaps with PSYCH 113T.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 152C. Clinical Child Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines research and theory concerning childhood psychopathology behavior disorders. Diagnosis and assessment, early identification of high-risk children, fears and phobias, antisocial behavior, childhood psychoses, autism, depression, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, and ethical and policy implications of identifying children who are different.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 153C. Developmental Psychopathology. 4 Units.

Research and theory of origins, course, and outcomes of disordered behavior. Continuity and change in patterns of behavior; environmental challenges and buffers; stress/competence in children; vulnerable/invincible children; children of mentally ill parents; families at risk; childhood antecedents of adult disorders.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C. Recommended: SOCECOL 10.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 154C. Cognitive Behavior Therapy. 4 Units.

Presentation of principles and procedures of therapeutic interventions based on cognitive-behavior methods. Cognitive factors in learning, emotional arousal, psychological disorder, and psychotherapy reviewed. Introduces the application of cognitive behavioral methods to problems of depression, anxiety, anger, pain, and impulsivity.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11C) or PSYCH 7A or (PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9C)

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 155C. Child Therapies. 4 Units.

Examines research methodologies, empirical data, and implications of diverse intervention strategies. Primary topics include psychotherapy process and outcome, family therapies, behavioral intervention, cognitive behavior modification, pediatric psychopharmacology, and ethical and social policy implications of intervening in other people's lives.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 156C. Forensic Psychology: Advanced Seminar. 4 Units.

The focus is on the psychology of criminal offending, particularly violent behavior. Examines violence, sexual offending, and mental disorder related to crime with regard to clinical assessment and treatment; mental health services within forensic institutions.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and PSY BEH 102C and (PSY BEH 178S or CRM/LAW C149)

Same as CRM/LAW C136, PSYCH 177F.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 160C. Clinical Neuroscience. 4 Units.

Offers an introduction to the neuroclinical bases of human behavior, including neuropsychological approaches to mental disorders. Also includes case formulations, research articles, therapeutic approaches, and other discussions related to select psychopathology and other neurobehavioral topics.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 11A or PSYCH 9A

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 161C. Forensic Psychology . 4 Units.

Forensic psychology is the interface between clinical psychology and the law. Emphasizes clinically relevant legal topics (insanity defense; competency to stand trial) and includes critical thinking about issues that arise when psychologists are involved in legal proceedings.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSY BEH 11C

Same as CRM/LAW C160.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society M.A.S. students have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 162C. Psychodynamic Studies. 4 Units.

Introduction to contemporary psychodynamic studies. Emphasis on clinical concepts associated with psychodynamic psychotherapy, including unconscious determinants of behavior, typical defenses, life experiences, and techniques. Exploration of links between psychodynamic-oriented psychotherapy and other disciplines (e.g., psychology, music, medicine, neuroscience, film).

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 163C. Human Neuropsychology. 4 Units.

A survey of human brain disorders using a clinical case study approach to illustrate fundamental issues in studying brain and behavior. Topics include sensory deficits, attentional neglect, amnesia, cortical organization, clinical psychopathology, and more.

Prerequisite: BIO SCI N110 or PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A

Same as BIO SCI N173, PSYCH 162N.

Restriction: School of Biological Sciences students have first consideration for enrollment. Cognitive Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 164C. Addiction. 4 Units.

Designed for those with an interest in the nature and treatment of addiction. Focuses on the etiology and treatment of addiction, but does not prepare students to treat substance abuse disorders.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C and PSY BEH 102C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 165C. Adult Psychopathology. 4 Units.

Advanced course in abnormal psychology, focusing on adult psychopathology. Covers historical and fundamental issues about psychiatric disorders, clinical research on disorders of anxiety, PTSD, mood, psychoses, personality, and dementia, and their biopsychosocial features, and attends to assessment and treatment.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 102C. Equivalent to PSY BEH 102C is also accepted.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 170S. Personality. 4 Units.

Comparison of the major theories of personality. Provides a frame of reference for understanding lifestyles, development, maturity, and psychopathology. Emerging research themes are used to identify promising lines of personality theorizing.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Overlaps with PSYCH 120P.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Sophomores only. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 171S. Environmental Psychology. 4 Units.

Impact of the physical environment on individual and group behavior. Three basic concerns examined: (a) environmental determinants of behavior at the individual and interpersonal level; (b) social planning and urban design; (c) methodological approaches to the study of environmental issues.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 173S. Social Relationships. 4 Units.

Examines major issues, concepts, and methods in the scientific study of social relationships. Topics include relationship formation and dissolution, friendships and love relationships, loneliness, bereavement, societal influences on close relationships, significance of close relationships for health and well-being.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and SOCECOL 10

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 174S. Error and Bias in Social Judgement. 4 Units.

Examines how people encode, reason about, and remember social information and explores how biases and shortcomings in social perception, judgment, and memory are central to understanding both effective social functioning and many forms of maladaptive behavior and social conflict.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 176S. Motivation. 4 Units.

History, major theories, methods, and applications of motivational psychology, with emphasis on European approaches. Origins of the field in personality, learning, cognition, and activation research. Recent innovations in motivational and volitional self-recognition. Current approaches, major debates, empirical research programs.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and PSY BEH 101D and (PSY BEH 104S or PP&D 151)

Overlaps with PSYCH 121M.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 178S. Violence in Society. 4 Units.

Current theory and research on aggression; anger and violence as problems in individual and social functioning. Process and functions of anger examined with regard to normal behavior and psychopathology. The determinants, prevalence, and implications of violence in society are analyzed.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C

Same as CRM/LAW C149.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 179S. Cultural Psychology. 4 Units.

An examination of culture's influence on human minds. Topics include culture's impact on perception, cognition, motivation, emotion, moral reasoning, communication, and health. Addresses cultural psychology's methods, history, and place within psychology and related fields.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 183S. Social Epidemiology. 4 Units.

Overviews evidence linking environmental factors to mental and physical disorders including such variables as socioeconomic status, income inequality, work stress, job loss, social capital, location, and other demographic characteristics. Measurement and research design issues of both individual and aggregate levels.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and SOCECOL 10 and SOCECOL 13

Same as PUBHLTH 102.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 184S. Positive Psychology . 4 Units.

The field of positive psychology focuses on what is right and positive about people and institutions. Course introduces findings associated with human strengths and positive emotions and provides clinical and personal applications and implications.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 185S. Industrial-Organizational Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines the application of social psychology to organizational settings. Topics include motivation of workers, group decision-making, leadership styles, career management, and organizational development.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11A or PSY BEH 11B or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9A or PSYCH 9B or PSYCH 9C

Overlaps with PSYCH 122I.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 187S. Psychology of Inequality. 4 Units.

Focuses on the psychological dimensions of poverty, wealth, and economic inequality.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 104S and PSY BEH 11C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 188S. Evolutionary Psychology. 4 Units.

Understanding our evolutionary origins is critical to truly understanding the complexities of human psychology. Explores how Darwinian principles, applied to both genes and culture, can help us understand not just how the mind works, but why.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 9C

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 192B. The Science and Practice of Compassion. 4 Units.

Explores the latest scientific research on compassion and its correlates, and considers practical strategies for increasing compassion in everyday life. Students discover how cutting-edge research is yielding insights into kindness, empathy, altruism, and compassion.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 192Q. Chicano/Latino Social Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines theories, research, and major issues of relevance to understanding social psychological processes in Chicano/Latino populations. Topics include social development, cultural orientations, gender and sexuality, close relationships, happiness and well-being, stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination, and mental and physical health.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as CHC/LAT 168.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Chicano/Latino Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VII)

PSY BEH 192RW. Culture and Close Relationships. 4 Units.

Examines cultural influences on close relationship processes including attraction, love, friendship, family, social support, and significance of close relationships for health and well-being. National and ethnic sources of cultural variation examined include Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as CHC/LAT 177W.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Chicano/Latino Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib, VII)

PSY BEH 192T. Cognition and Learning in Educational Settings. 4 Units.

Foundational concepts in cognition and development as applied to student learning. Primary topics include historical behaviorism, basic cognitive structure and processes, complex cognition, cognitive development, and motivation.

Same as EDUC 173.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Education Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 192U. Psychology of Learning, Abilities, and Intelligence. 4 Units.

Overview of classic positions on the mind, human abilities, and intelligence, especially as related to academic achievement. Contrasting views: psychometric versus information processing; experimental versus correlational research.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9

Same as EDUC 176.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Education Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 192V. Language and Literacy. 4 Units.

Addresses the linguistic principles and processes that underlie oral and written language proficiency. Emphasis is on how to use phonology, morphology, orthography, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics to support literacy and oral language development for K-12 students.

Same as EDUC 151.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Education Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 193B. Juvenile Delinquency. 4 Units.

Patterns of delinquent behavior, theories that explain behavior, current research aimed at enhancing exploratory power. Attempts to prevent and control delinquency are put in historical perspective. Development of the current juvenile justice system and evolution of modern juvenile law.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7

Same as CRM/LAW C109.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 193C. Social Control of Delinquency. 4 Units.

Assumes familiarity with theories of delinquency, the juvenile justice system, and elements of juvenile law. Explores socio-historical origins and evolution of juvenile justice, current research and policy on delinquency prevention and treatment, and future directions of law, policy, and practice.

Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7. Recommended: CRM/LAW C109.

Same as CRM/LAW C164.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 193E. Psychology and the Law. 4 Units.

Psychological assumptions of American legal system and mental health aspects of provision of criminal justice services. Civil commitment, insanity defense, competence to stand trial, jury selection, eye-witness identification. Use of police, courts, correctional institutions in prevention of behavior disorder.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7 or CRM/LAW C101

Same as CRM/LAW C105.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. SocEcol-Urban & Regional Plan Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 193F. Family Law. 4 Units.

Examines legal issues surrounding marriage, cohabitation, divorce, child custody and support, adoption, and the rights of parents and children in the family context. The findings of social science research are used to illuminate the legal issues.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7 or CRM/LAW C101

Same as CRM/LAW C123.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSY BEH 193G. Eyewitness Testimony. 4 Units.

Faulty eyewitness testimony is a major cause of wrongful convictions. Covers the fast-growing topic of eyewitness testimony and memory for real-world events, both how psychologists study eyewitness capacity, and how the legal system has dealt with eyewitness issues.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10

Same as CRM/LAW C177.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Seniors only.

Concurrent with CRM/LAW C263.

PSY BEH 196. Research Seminar in Psychology and Social Behavior. 4 Units.

Special topics research seminar. Content varies with interest of instructor. Capstone seminar for students who have conducted research with, or have a background in, the research topics of the PSB faculty member offering this seminar in a given quarter.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 11C

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

PSY BEH P200. Introduction to Legal and Forensic Psychology . 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with the interrelated fields of psychology, law, and forensic studies. Emphasizes clinically relevant legal topics (insanity defense; competency to stand trial) and includes critical thinking about issues that arise when psychologists are involved in legal proceedings.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P201. Research Methods in Psychology. 4 Units.

In-depth examination of the conceptualization of research problems and linkages between theory and the design of appropriate strategies for empirical research in psychological science. Topics include experimental and quasi-experimental designs, reliability and validity of measurement and non-experimental procedures.

Restriction: Graduate students only. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors only.

PSY BEH P202. Data Analysis and Statistics . 4 Units.

Statistical techniques to facilitate inferences in psychological research, including fundamentals of statistical inference and methods for analyzing data.

Overlaps with PSY BEH P264A.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P204. Adolescence. 4 Units.

Considers pubertal and cognitive changes and their social consequences; the family, peer group, school, and cultural contexts in which adolescence is embedded; and selected psychosocial issues including autonomy, identity, health, and well-being.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P208. Research Methods. 4 Units.

In-depth examination of issues relevant to designing and evaluating research in psychological science. Topics address casual inference, ethical issues surrounding the responsible conduct of research, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, reliability and validity of measurement, and non-experimental procedures.

Overlaps with PSY BEH P201.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P209A. Applied Psychological Research. 4 Units.

Focuses on scientific and professional issues in the field of psychology. Topics include communication skills; intervention approaches; collaboration, consultation, and referral; and ethical issues associated with at-risk populations research.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P212. Social Cognition. 4 Units.

Explores historical and current developments in cognitive social psychology. Topics include judgment and decision making, automatic versus controlled processing, affective forecasting, motivated reasoning, and the effects of emotion on memory and judgment.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P214. Seminar in Social Psychology. 4 Units.

Presents an overview of selected theoretical and empirical topics in social psychology including social influence and conformity, altruism and aggression, persuasion and attitude change, self and social perception, and social cognition.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P215. Psychology and Law . 4 Units.

An interdisciplinary approach to research in psychology, law, and/or criminology. Examines how psychology is applied to the civil and criminal justice systems, how case law shapes this application, and how legal decisions affect the direction of psychological research.

Overlaps with PSY BEH P266.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P218. Infancy. 4 Units.

Covers development from conception through the second year. Focus is on research and theory concerning infants' physical, social, cognitive, perceptual, emotional, and language development. Also covers transition to parenthood and family context of infant development.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P220. Developmental Psychology: Theories and History. 4 Units.

Examines key concepts, theories, and the historical and philosophical roots of research in human life span development. Focuses on biological and environmental causation, universalism and cultural relativism, continuity and change.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P222. Forensic Assessment . 4 Units.

Explores the various ways in which clinical psychology is relevant to the law, and how forensic psychologists can meaningfully contribute to the adjudicatory process. Examines legal, scientific, and ethical issues that arise when psychologists are involved in legal proceedings.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P223. Cross-Cultural Developmental Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines human development in diverse cultures (e.g., Asian, American, and African). Cultural diversity within the U.S. and acculturation of various ethnic groups will also be discussed. Topics include parenting, family relations, language, and cognition, schooling and academic achievement, and morality.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P224. Children and the Law. 4 Units.

Examines how psychology research and practice can inform several areas of law and social policy affecting children, adolescents, and families. Topics include education, mental health, reproductive rights, and delinquency.

Overlaps with PSY BEH 120D.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P226. Emotion in Psychology. 4 Units.

Covers original and recent theories of emotions and how they guide current research. Specific topics include neuroantomical structure of emotion, life-span emotional development, and health and emotion.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P230. Adulthood. 4 Units.

Focuses on early and middle adulthood. Examines extended period of transitioning to adulthood; changes in relationships with family members; impact of major role-related experiences (e.g., spouse, parent, worker) on development and well-being; continuity and change in personality and social identities.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P231. Professional Issues in Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines a variety of issues related to the professional socialization and development of graduate students in psychology. Topics include the publication process, sources of research funding, alternative employment options, competitiveness on the job market, and the academic career route.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P233. Personality. 4 Units.

Provides a frame of reference for understanding personality and its role in life-span development, the relationship of the individual to society, and both mental and physical illness.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P234. Childhood. 4 Units.

Provides graduate students with an overview of traditional and emerging theories, models, and research designed to understand children's development in the domains of cognitive, social, and emotional functioning.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P238. Child Psychopathology. 4 Units.

Examination of etiology, classification, and developmental pathways of disorders, as well as risk and resilience factors, during the childhood/adolescent years. Discussion of genetic influences and contextual risk factors as well as internalizing and externalizing disorders.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P242. Legal Reasoning and Jurisprudence. 4 Units.

Overview of the law and legal process as well as the history and assumptions underlying modern legal reasoning. Issues related to procedure and evidence as well as key jurisprudential perspectives are discussed.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P246. Affective Neuroscience. 4 Units.

Provides an overview of the emerging field of affective neuroscience. Emphasis is placed on mapping affective experience and behavior to brain function, including cross-level integration of anatomical, chemical, fMRI, and electrical data.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P247. EEG Methods . 4 Units.

Provides an in-depth training of the electroencephalogram (EEG) methodology with a specific focus on the event-related potential technique. Emphasis is on learning how to use this methodology and how to analyze data, with a focus on emotional stimuli.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P249. Advanced Social Psychology . 4 Units.

Conveys an appreciation of the flavors of contemporary social psychology, an understanding of empirical approaches to problems in this area, and a sense of the array of theoretical orientations in the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P250. Emotion, Reasoning, and Memory. 4 Units.

Examines research and theory on emotion from the perspective of cognitive psychology. Topics include the effects of emotions on attention, memory, and problem solving; the relations between emotional and cognitive development; flash-bulb memories of intense emotional experiences; eyewitness testimony.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P251. Clinical Interviewing and Treatment in a Forensic Setting. 4 Units.

Students receive an introduction to clinical interviewing, learn details of strategic, solution-focused therapy, and think critically about issues that come at the interaction of psychology and the law. Students are not "license-eligible" at end of this course.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P252. Law and Behavior: Compliance and Enforcement. 4 Units.

Provides sophisticated insight into the different ways through which law shapes behavior. Addresses both the economic amoral rational choice theories, as well as ideas from social psychology, criminology, and sociology about the moral, social, and and unconscious dimensions of compliance.

Restriction: Graduate students only. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors only.

PSY BEH P253. Master of Legal and Forensic Psychology Capstone. 4 Units.

Focuses on macro-level writing topics such as developing a meaningful research question, conducting a thorough review of relevant literature, and presenting a clear and convincing research-based argument.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P254. Mental Health and the Law . 4 Units.

Explores the history of criminalization of persons with mental illness. Topics include challenges and needs of persons with mental illness; civil and outpatient commitment; law enforcement responses to persons with mental illness; and mentally ill offenders in jails and prisons.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only. Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P255. Violence, Anger, and Psychopathology. 4 Units.

Overviews the prevalence of violence as a criminal and public health problem. Topics include violence within families and intimate partner relationships, traumatic origins of violence, the development of a violence-prone personality, the association of anger and violence with psychopathology.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only. Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P258. Health Psychology. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary exploration of emerging fields of health psychology and behavioral medicine. Topics: role of stress in development/treatment of medical problems; sociocognitive determinants of health and illness; interpersonal health transactions; behavioral approaches to medical problems such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P262. Interpersonal Processes and Health. 4 Units.

Examines traditions of research linking interpersonal processes to emotional or physical health. Topics include: role of social support in ameliorating stress, effects of social control on health-compromising behaviors, adverse effects of social relationships on health, causes of deficient social relationships.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P263. Eyewitness Testimony. 4 Units.

Examines the evidence that shows that faulty eyewitness memory is the major cause of wrongful convictions. Explores what the legal system thinks of eyewitness testimony and how the legal system has dealt with eyewitness issues.

Same as CRM/LAW C263.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P264A. Quantitative Methods in Psychology. 4 Units.

Statistical techniques for inference in psychological research including point, interval, and effect size estimation to establish test association between variables. General Linear Model techniques include single- and multifactor analysis of variance with use of linear contrasts and post hoc comparisons.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P264B. Advanced Quantitative Methods in Psychology. 4 Units.

Focuses on proper specification of multivariable regression models with emphasis on inferences using OLS and logistical regression. Emphasizes framework for assessing interaction and other complex relationships between response and predictor variables. Use of statistical software to analyze data.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH P264A

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P265. Memory and the Law. 4 Units.

Examines the controversial topic of repressed memory, or perception and memory of real-world events.

Same as CRM/LAW C265.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P266. Psychology and the Law. 4 Units.

Overview of how psychology is applied to the civil and criminal justice systems, how case law shapes this application, and how legal decisions affect the direction of psychological research. Interdisciplinary approach to research in psychology, law, and/or criminology.

Same as CRM/LAW C266.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P268. Coping with Stressful Life Events. 4 Units.

Explores how individuals cope with serious life crises (e.g., illness, bereavement), life transitions, and daily stressors. Considers how such events impact on people's cognitions, emotions, and health, and the role of others in the coping process.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P271. Human Evolution and Behavior. 4 Units.

Covers theories and empirical research concerning the evolutionary origins of human behaviors and their variations. An interdisciplinary course emphasizing both evolutionary psychology (e.g., mating strategies, kinship, and parenting) and molecular evolution (i.e., evolution of genes for various behaviors).

Same as BIOCHEM 217.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P273. Biobehavioral Aspects of Health and Illness. 4 Units.

Examines the behavior-physiology interactions of some major bodily systems: the nervous, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems. Analysis of normal and abnormal states of these systems as they relate to tissue injury, disease, and rehabilitation.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P274. The Psychobiology of Stress. 4 Units.

Introduction to stress physiology and psychoneuroimmunology and critical review of research in this area. Examines bi-directional relationships between psychological factors (e.g., stressors, social processes, emotions), neuroendocrine and immune systems, and disease.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P275. Special Topics in Psychology and Social Behavior. 4 Units.

Topics covered vary with interests of instructor.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P276. Meta Analysis. 4 Units.

The process of synthesizing results from a number of studies that address a common research question is often referred to as meta-analysis. This applied course explores the meta-analysis process from the coding of retrieved studies to the final research synthesis.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P279. Prosocial Behavior . 4 Units.

Focuses on detailed discussions of selected topics in contemporary psychology to hone in on a set of core processes that enable prosocial action, cooperation, and helping.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P280A. Interdisciplinary Salivary Bioscience. 4 Units.

Theory and research on the integration of salivary analytes into developmental, social, behavioral, and health sciences. Topics include oral fluid as biological specimens; practical aspects of sample handing, collection, and study design; basics of laboratory methods used for assaying saliva.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P280B. Interdisciplinary Salivary Bioscience Lab. 4 Units.

Laboratory sequel to the P280A seminar. Provides laboratory-based hands-on experience integrating salivary analytes into developmental, social, behavioral, and health sciences that also includes supervised training on sample processing.

Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY BEH P280A. PSY BEH P280A with a grade of B or better

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P281. Race and the Law. 4 Units.

Explores how race and other markers of social identity shape outcomes within the criminal justice system. Students examine how race, ethnicity, and national origin intersect with rules governing the policing, trials, and punishment.

Restriction: Master of Legal & Forensic Psy Degree students only.

PSY BEH P283H. Psychoneuroimmunology. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the field of psychoneuroimmunology and helps them develop the conceptual and methodological skills necessary for designing and interpreting research on the bidirectional relationship between the immune system and psychological processes.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P285. Anger: A Turbulent Emotion. 4 Units.

Provides an enriched perspective on anger beginning with its understanding in classical antiquity. Topics include developmental processes and trauma, anger physiology and neuroscience, anger-related physical health impairments, and the involvement of anger in psychopathology and violence.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P289. The Teaching of Psychology. 4 Units.

Provides students with the theory and skills needed to teach undergraduate psychology courses. Covers research on theories and methods of teaching, curriculum design, and evaluation. Students also gain practical experience preparing and presenting material.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors only.

PSY BEH P290. Research in Developmental Psychology. 4 Units.

Introduces graduate students to research conducted by individual faculty members in the area of developmental psychology. This is accomplished by having students involve themselves in the conceptualization, strategy, and implementation of the faculty member's research.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P291. Research in Health Psychology. 4 Units.

Introduces graduate students to research conducted by individual faculty members in the area of health psychology. This is accomplished by having students involve themselves in the conceptualization, strategy, and implementation of the faculty member's research.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P292. Research in Psychopathology and Behavior Disorder. 4 Units.

Introduces graduate students to research conducted by individual faculty members in the area of psychopathology and behavior disorder. This is accomplished by having students involve themselves in the conceptualization, strategy, and implementation of the faculty member's research.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P293. Research in Social and Personality Psychology. 4 Units.

Introduces graduate students to research conducted by individual faculty members in the area of social and personality psychology. This is accomplished by having students involve themselves in the conceptualization, strategy, and implementation of the faculty member's research.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P294A. Research Directions in Psychology and Social Behavior. 2 Units.

Introduces students to the current research of faculty, graduate students, and visitors to the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior. Includes examination of contemporary research issues and controversies, as well as issues related to students' development as professionals.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

PSY BEH P294B. Research Directions in Psychology and Social Behavior . 2 Units.

Introduces students to the current research of faculty, graduate students, and visitors to the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior. Includes examination of contemporary research issues and controversies, as well as issues related to students' development as professionals.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

PSY BEH P294C. Research Directions in Psychology and Social Behavior. 2 Units.

Introduces students to the current research of faculty, graduate students, and visitors to the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior. Includes examination of contemporary research issues and controversies, as well as issues related to students' development as professionals.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

PSY BEH P295. Research in Psychology and Law. 4 Units.

Introduces graduate students to research conducted by individual faculty members in the area of psychology and law. This is accomplished by having students involve themselves in the conceptualization, strategy, and implementation of the faculty member's research.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P296. Doctoral Dissertation Research and Writing. 4-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Psychology and Social Behavior faculty.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P298. Directed Studies in Psychology and Social Behavior. 2-4 Units.

Directed study with Psychology and Social Behavior faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSY BEH P299. Independent Studies in Psychology and Social Behavior. 2-8 Units.

Independent research with Psychology and Social Behavior faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Public Policy Courses

PUB POL 215. Statistics and Methods for Public Policy. 4 Units.

Introductory course with focus on gaining a sound understanding of what constitutes credible evidence in support of policy arguments and management decisions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUB POL 219. Information and Public Policy. 4 Units.

Evaluates strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative methods and the data used in making public policy claims. Looks at the bases of certain widely accepted measures of poverty, growth, environmental quality, and the like.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Public Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUB POL 221. Public Policy . 4 Units.

Explores different approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PP&D 221.

Restriction: Public Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PUB POL 225. Qualitative Methods . 4 Units.

Fieldwork, data collections techniques, and related issues for anti-positivistic research. Data collection techniques include observation, physical traces, participation, in-depth interview. Data checks include veracity, detail, completeness, rigor.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Public Policy Majors only.

PUB POL 227. Economics of Government. 4 Units.

Prepares students to analyze public policy questions with tools from economics. By the end, students should be able to identify important economic issues in public policy debates and consume and critique economic research on these topics.

Same as ECON 275.

PUB POL 240. Microeconomics and Public Policy. 4 Units.

Introduces the fundamental principles of microeconomics that are required for applied policy analysis. Provides students with an intuitive understanding of the microeconomic approach, and familiarizes them with concepts used in applied public policy analysis.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as ECON 255.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PUB POL 260. Policy and Ethics . 4 Units.

Examines the challenge of identifying ethical principles that can guide us in formulating and assessing public policy, the public policy process from an ethical perspective, and the ethics of the individual engaged in the public policy arena.

Restriction: Public Policy Majors only.

PUB POL 283. Collaborative Governance and Public Management. 4 Units.

Introduction to inclusive management. To make effective use of public resources, public managers are inventing ways of managing that alter relationships within organizations, between organizations, between sectors, and with the public. Requires rethinking fundamentals such as leadership and motivation.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PP&D 283.

Restriction: Public Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Social Ecology Courses

SOCECOL E8. Introduction to Environmental Analysis and Design. 4 Units.

Overview of general concepts, theoretical principles, and analytical techniques for investigating environmental systems. Integrates tools from natural and social sciences to analyze contemporary environmental challenges such as pollution, resource acquisition, facility and ecosystem design, impact assessments, formulation of environmental policy.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Urban Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Sciences Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Public Health Policy Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

SOCECOL 10. Research Design. 4 Units.

An introduction to the logic behind and methods of designing and conducting research studies in Social Ecology. Topics include how to measure variables of interest, identifying causal relationships, sampling, survey research methods, experiments, quasi-experimental designs, and ethics in research.

Overlaps with EDUC 10.

Restriction: School of Social Ecology students only.

SOCECOL 13. Statistical Analysis in Social Ecology. 4 Units.

Introduction to the techniques of statistical analysis in Social Ecology. Topics include probability, statistical inference, significance testing, univariate descriptive statistics, and multivariate analysis from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10A, PSYCH 10A, SOCIOL 10A, SOC SCI 9A, SOC SCI 10A, POL SCI 10A.

Restriction: School of Social Ecology students have first consideration for enrollment. No credit for SOCECOL 13 if taken concurrently with or after PSYCH 10A, ANTHRO 10A, SOCIOL 10A, POL SCI 10A, POL SCI 10B, POL SCI 10C, SOC SCI 9A, or SOC SCI 10A.

(Va)

SOCECOL H20A. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Same as SOC SCI H1E.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOCECOL H20B. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H1E or SOCECOL H20A

Same as SOC SCI H1F.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOCECOL H20C. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H1F or SOCECOL H20B

Same as SOC SCI H1G.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOCECOL 74A. Moral Development and Just Communities. 4 Units.

A three-quarter sequence exploring interpersonal, personal, and social issues based on principles of fairness and justice. Both the living environment of a University residence hall and selected institutions of society are analyzed in terms of moral development theory.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

SOCECOL 74B. Moral Development and Just Communities. 4 Units.

A three-quarter sequence exploring interpersonal, personal, and social issues based on principles of fairness and justice. Both the living environment of a University residence hall and selected institutions of society are analyzed in terms of moral development theory.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 74A

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

SOCECOL 74C. Moral Development and Just Communities. 4 Units.

A three-quarter sequence exploring interpersonal, personal, and social issues based on principles of fairness and justice. Both the living environment of a University residence hall and selected institutions of society are analyzed in terms of moral development theory.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 74B

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

SOCECOL 100. Special Topics in Social Ecology. 4 Units.

Special topics courses are offered from time to time. In general they will focus on a topic from interdisciplinary perspectives. Course content varies with the interest of the instructor.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: School of Social Ecology students only.

SOCECOL 111W. Advanced Research Methods. 4 Units.

For students planning to conduct senior research projects or apply to graduate school in social research fields. Topics include reviewing literature, preparing a research proposal, protecting human subjects, citing scholarly work, building measures, estimating sample size, interview and presentation skills.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10 and SOCECOL 13. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

SOCECOL E127. Nuclear Environments. 4 Units.

Understanding the impact of the nuclear age on the environment and human health through interrelated developments of nuclear power and nuclear weapons. The early years of weapon development, catastrophic environmental pollution, perils of nuclear power in the U.S. and Russia.

Same as INTL ST 122, PUBHLTH 168.

SOCECOL 183A. International Studies Forum. 2 Units.

A faculty-student forum featuring lectures from a variety of institutions with discussion issues related to International Studies.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

Same as INTL ST 183A, SOC SCI 183A.

SOCECOL 183B. Seminar in Mediation. 4 Units.

Student develop mediation skills and refine knowledge in the practice and theory of conflict resolution. Students who complete this course may serve as mediators in the Campus Mediation Program. Course is a prerequisite to completing Indep Study as an intern.

Same as INTL ST 183B, SOC SCI 183B.

Restriction: International Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment. School of Humanities students have first consideration for enrollment. School of Social Ecology students have first consideration for enrollment. School of Social Sciences students have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCECOL 183C. Seminar in Conflict Resolution . 4 Units.

Designed for students pursuing the minor in Conflict Resolution and/or International Studies majors. Provides a forum in which students will refine skills and theory in the study of cooperation and conflict, from local to global arenas. Students write research paper.

Same as SOC SCI 183C, INTL ST 183C.

SOCECOL 183CW. Seminar Conflict Resolution. 4 Units.

Designed for seniors who are pursuing the minor in Conflict Resolution and/or International Studies major. Provides a forum in which students will refine skills and theory in the study of cooperation and conflict, from local to global arenas.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as SOC SCI 183CW, INTL ST 183CW.

(Ib)

SOCECOL 186A. Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability I. 2 Units.

Students attend weekly seminar to discuss current issues in global sustainability. Weekly attendance at Global Sustainability Forum is also required. Seminar utilized to analyze forum presentations. Prepare bibliography.

Same as BIO SCI 191A, EARTHSS 190A.

Restriction: Seniors only. Global Sustainability Minors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCECOL 186B. Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability II. 2 Units.

Students attend weekly seminar to discuss current issues in global sustainability. Weekly attendance at Global Sustainability Forum is also required. Seminar utilized to analyze forum presentations. Prepare research proposal.

Prerequisite: BIO SCI 191A or SOCECOL 186A or EARTHSS 190A

Same as BIO SCI 191B, EARTHSS 190B.

Restriction: Seniors only.

SOCECOL 186CW. Writing/Senior Seminar on Global Sustainability III. 4 Units.

Students attend weekly seminar to discuss current issues in global sustainability. Weekly attendance at Global Sustainability Forum also is required. Seminar utilized to analyze Forum presentations and to prepare senior research paper. Prepare/write research paper under direction of faculty member.

Prerequisite: BIO SCI 191B or EARTHSS 190B or SOCECOL 186B. BIO SCI 191B or EARTHSS 190B or SOCECOL 186B. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as BIO SCI 191CW, EARTHSS 190CW.

Restriction: Seniors only.

(Ib)

SOCECOL 189. Global Service Scholars Advanced Seminar. 4 Units.

For students who are accepted into the Global Service Scholars Program. Provides advanced training in empathy and compassion, and prepares students for their summer international field experience.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 192B

SOCECOL 190. Applied Statistics in Social and Behavioral Research. 4 Units.

Covers statistical techniques used to describe and make generalizations about phenomena represented by data. Hands-on experience in data analysis and interpretation using statistical software (SPSS, STATA) is emphasized. Topics include data visualization, ANOVA, multiple regression, and categorical data analyses.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 13

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Social Ecology Majors have first consideration for enrollment. Urban Studies Majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCECOL H190A. Honors Research. 4 Units.

Independent work on an individual research project in addition to participation in a mini proseminar in which faculty discuss their ongoing research. Students prepare a written proposal for a research project.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only. Upper-division students only.

SOCECOL H190B. Honors Research. 4 Units.

Independent work on an individual research project in a addition to participation in a mini proseminar in which faculty discuss their ongoing research. Students prepare a written proposal for a research project.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL H190A

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only. Upper-division students only.

SOCECOL H190W. Honors Research. 4 Units.

Students write up their honors research project (H190A-B) and prepare an oral report which is presented at the honors seminar.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL H190B

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only. Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

SOCECOL 194W. Naturalistic Field Research. 4 Units.

Introduction to alternative models of experiential learning and to various methods of observation, assessment, and evaluation. Introduction to the nature of organizations and ethical issues that emerge from research and intervention in natural settings.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: School of Social Ecology students only.

(Ib)

SOCECOL 195. Field Study. 2-8 Units.

Naturalistic observation and analysis of social issues and problems in combination with experiential learning in field placement sites in the areas of psychology and social services, criminology, and environmental studies.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10 and SOCECOL 13

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 24 units.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. School of Social Ecology students only.

SOCECOL 195A. Advanced Field Study. 4 Units.

While completing 10 hours of field work per week, students become acquainted with the goals and activities of their placement and will work closely with the placement supervisor and AFS instructor to identify the scope of a research project.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10 and SOCECOL 13. Acceptance to Advanced Field Study required.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. School of Social Ecology students only.

SOCECOL 195B. Advanced Field Study. 4 Units.

While completing 10 hours of field work per week, students implement their research project through data collection and observations which allow them to reflect on, apply, and synthesize their academic training through observations and experiences at the placement.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 195A. Acceptance to Advanced Field Study required.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. School of Social Ecology students only.

SOCECOL 195CW. Advanced Field Study. 4 Units.

While completing 10 hours per week of field work, students write and finalize their AFS Client Project in consultation with the placement and the FS instructor, and make a final written and oral presentation to the placement and invited guests.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 195B. Acceptance to Advanced Field Study required. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. School of Social Ecology students only.

(Ib)

SOCECOL 195W. Field Study Writing Seminar. 4-8 Units.

Community engagement to promote civic education through field research experience, and the opportunity to study social issues and the environments where they occur. Develop discipline-specific writing and communication skills, methodology, and integrate information from multiple sources. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10. Cumulative UC GPA of 2.0. Authorization is required. Successful completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Criminology, Law and Society Majors only. Psychology and Social Behavior Majors only. Social Ecology Majors only. Urban Studies Majors only.

(Ib)

SOCECOL 198. Directed Study. 2-4 Units.

Directed study with Social Ecology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOCECOL 199. Special Studies. 1-4 Units.

Special Studies with Social Ecology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

SOCECOL 200. Seminar in Social Ecology. 4 Units.

Students are introduced to the classic and contemporary literature of human and social ecology and are expected to use the ecological paradigm to analyze social phenomena of interest to the differing subprograms.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 261. Strategies of Theory Development. 4 Units.

Examines key issues and controversies facing the development of social ecological theory, and encourages students to develop their own abilities as theorists. Strategies for enhancing creative hypothesis formation are emphasized.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 264A. Data Analysis. 4 Units.

Provides an appreciation and understanding of statistics necessary to conduct applied research. Topics include approaches to and presentation of data, robust statistics, standardization techniques, multivariate regression, and analysis of variance.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 264B. Data Analysis. 4 Units.

Provides an appreciation and understanding of statistics necessary to conduct applied research. Topics include approaches to and presentation of data, robust statistics, standardization techniques, multivariate regression, and analysis of variance.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 264A

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 266D. Analysis of Survival Data. 4 Units.

Provides an introduction to survival analysis methods for the analysis of change in discrete dependent variables. Focuses on data collection strategies for obtaining longitudinal data and continuous-time hazards models. Communicates the variety and power of multivariate hazard models.

SOCECOL 266E. Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis. 4 Units.

Longitudinal data feature measurements over a continuum and are often conceptualized as a trajectory describing the evolution of the response "over time." Course emphasizes use of the linear mixed model for the analysis of normally distributed, longitudinal responses.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 264B or PSY BEH P264B

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 272A. Structural Equation Modeling I. 4 Units.

The general structural equation model is developed including path models, recursive and nonrecursive structural models, multiple indicator models, and confirmatory factor models. Use of LISREL and other software for estimating model parameters is covered.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 264A and SOCECOL 264B

SOCECOL 272B. Structural Equation Modeling II: Longitudinal and Advanced Topics. 4 Units.

Provides hands-on experience with longitudinal and advanced structural equation models and is of interest to students from a range of disciplines. Topics covered include confirmatory factor, latent growth curve, general growth mixture, and multi-level modeling.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 272A

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 275. Special Topics in Social Ecology. 2-4 Units.

Topics covered vary with interests of the instructor.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 291. Program Evaluation. 4 Units.

Students are introduced to the use of research techniques and statistical methods in assessing the effectiveness of social programs. Different evaluative models are discussed using examples of actual program evaluations.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 295. Masters Thesis Research & Writing. 1-8 Units.

Independent research with Social Ecology faculty.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 296. Doctoral Dissertation Research & Writing. 1-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Social Ecology faculty.

Prerequisite: Advancement to Candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 297. Field Study. 2-4 Units.

Field studies in Social Ecology.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 298. Directed Studies. 2-4 Units.

Directed study with Social Ecology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 299. Independent Study. 1-8 Units.

Independent study with Social Ecology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCECOL 399. University Supervised Teaching. 2-4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

Richard Arum, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Education; Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology
Dean B. Baker, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor Emeritus of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health
Scott Bartell, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences; Social Ecology; Statistics
Hillary Berk, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Lecturer of Criminology, Law and Society (sociology of law/law and society, gender, family, reproduction and surrogacy, law and emotion, civil rights, dispute resolution)
Arnold Binder, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (research methodology, juvenile delinquency, police organization and methods)
Bruce Blumberg, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Developmental and Cell Biology; Biomedical Engineering; Environmental Health Sciences; Pharmaceutical Sciences (gene regulation by nuclear hormone receptors in vertebrate development physiology, endocrine disruption)
Stephen C. Bondy, Ph.D. University of Birmingham, Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Pharmacology; Program in Public Health
Jessica Borelli, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (developmental, psychopathology, parent-child relationships and child anxiety, attachment relationships)
Lee Cabatingan, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (Caribbean law and sovereignty; construction of authority at the Caribbean Court of Justice)
Lawrence F. Cahill, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior; Psychology and Social Behavior
Vincent J. Caiozzo, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor in Residence of Orthopaedic Surgery; Environmental Health Sciences; Physiology and Biophysics
Kitty C. Calavita, Ph.D. University of Delaware, Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society (sociology of law, criminology, social deviance, immigration, inequality)
Belinda Campos, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; Psychology and Social Behavior (culture, relationships, positive emotion, health)
Elizabeth E. Cauffman, Ph.D. Temple University, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Criminology, Law and Society; Education; School of Law (adolescent development, mental health, juvenile justice, legal and social policy)
Jefferson Chan, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences
Susan T. Charles, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (emotional processes across the adult life span, subjective experience and cognitive processes, health and emotion)
Chuansheng Chen, Ph.D. University of Michigan, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Education (cross-cultural psychology, adolescent development, cognitive neuroscience, genes and behavior)
Jacqueline Chen, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (experimental social psychology, diversity and intergroup relations, social cognition, cultural psychology)
Bongkyoo Choi, Sc.D. University of Massachusetts, Assistant Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health
Simon A. Cole, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; History; School of Law (science, technology, law, criminal justice)
Susan C. Coutin, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Anthropology; Religious Studies (law, culture, immigration, human rights, citizenship, political activism, Central America)
Thomas J. Crawford, Ph.D. Harvard University, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of Psychology and Social Behavior (attitude theory and social problems research)
Elliott P. Currie, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (criminal justice policy in the U.S. and other countries, causes of violent crime, social context of delinquency and youth violence, etiology of drug abuse and assessment of drug policy, race and criminal justice)
Teresa A. Dalton, Ph.D. University of Denver, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Criminology, Law and Society (quantitative methodology, criminology, law and social sciences)
Amy Dent, Ph.D. Duke University, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Psychology and Social Behavior (theoretical and methodology approaches to self-regulation in academic contexts)
Joseph DiMento, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; Paul Merage School of Business; Urban Planning and Public Policy (planning, land use and environmental law, use of social science in policy making, legal control of corporate behavior)
Peter H. Ditto, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (social psychology, judgment and decision making, political and moral reasoning)
John D. Dombrink, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (crime and criminal justice, deviance and social control)
C. David Dooley, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Social Behavior (community psychology, epidemiology, economic change)
Greg Duncan, Ph.D. University of Michigan, UCI Distinguished Professor of Education; Economics; Psychology and Social Behavior (economics of education, program evaluation, child development)
Derek Dunn-Rankin, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Department Chair and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Civil and Environmental Engineering; Environmental Health Sciences (combustion, optical particle sizing, particle aero-dynamics, laser diagnostics and spectroscopy)
Jacquelynne S. Eccles, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, UCI Distinguished Professor of Education; Psychology and Social Behavior (academic motivation and achievement, school and family influences on adolescent development, gender and ethnicity in STEM fields)
Rufus D. Edwards, Ph.D. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences; Epidemiology
Michelle Fortier, Ph.D. University of Nebraska, Assistant Professor in Residence of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Psychology and Social Behavior (pediatric pain management, pediatric oncology, family-centered medicine, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), health information technology, coping with illness-related Stress)
Howard A. Gillman, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Chancellor and Professor of Political Science; Criminology, Law and Society; History; School of Law
David Theo Goldberg, Ph.D. The Graduate Center, City University of New York, Director of the UC Humanities Research Institute and Professor of Comparative Literature; Anthropology; Criminology, Law and Society (race, racism, race and the law, political theory, South Africa, digital humanities)
Wendy A. Goldberg, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Education (developmental psychology, work and family, infant sleep, transition to parenthood, autism)
Michele B. Goodwin, J.D. Boston College, Director, Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy and UCI's Chancellor's Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Program in Public Health
Michael R. Gottfredson, Ph.D. University at Albany, State University of New York, Chancellor's Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law; Sociology (criminology, juvenile delinquency, crime theory, public policy)
Douglas A. Granger, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Director of the Institute for Interdisciplinary Salivary Bioscience and Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (psychoneuroendocrinology, salivary bioscience, hormone-behavior relationships across the lifespan, in high- and low-risk populations)
Ellen Greenberger, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emerita of Psychology and Social Behavior (developmental psychology, social and cultural influences on adolescent and young adult development, family relationships and consequences throughout the lifespan)
Nancy Guerra, Ed.D. Harvard University, Dean of the School of Social Ecology and Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Criminology, Law and Society (childrens' aggression and behavior problems, prevention of youth violence, promotion of healthy youth development)
Sora Han, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; African American Studies; Culture and Theory; School of Law (law and popular culture, critical race theory, philosophies of punishment, feminism and psychoanalysis)
Jutta Heckhausen, Ph.D. University of Strathclyde, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (life-span developmental psychology, motivation, individual agency and social context)
John R. Hipp, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology; Urban Planning and Public Policy (community context of crime, household decisions and neighborhood change, research methods)
Clarence Ronald Huff, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (criminology and public policy, wrongful convictions, gangs)
Larry D. Jamner, Ph.D. State University of New York at Stony Brook, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (health psychology, psychophysiology, pain, mHealth)
Valerie Jenness, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (links between deviance and social control [especially law], the politics of crime control and criminalization, social movements and social change, corrections and public policy)
Paul D. Jesilow, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (healthcare regulation, in particular the role of fraud; the police, in particular police-community relations)
C. Sunny Jiang, Ph.D. University of South Florida, Department Chair and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Environmental Health Sciences (water pollution microbiology, environmental biotechnology, aquatic microbial ecology)
Virginia Kimonis, M.B.B.S., D.C.H., M.R.C.P. University of Southampton, Professor of Pediatrics; Environmental Health Sciences; Genetic Counseling
Masashi Kitazawa, Ph.D. Iowa State University, Associate Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences (impact of neuroinflammation on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and how aging and/or environmental exposure perturb physiological functions of astrocytes and microglia and disrupt inflammatory microenvironment in the brain)
Michael T. Kleinman, Ph.D. New York University, Adjunct Professor of Community & Environ Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health
J. Zoe Klemfuss, Ph.D. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (narrative development, children's autobiographical memory, sociocontextual influences on children's narrative, memory and well-being, children's eyewitness abilities)
Charis E. Kubrin, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (crime, neighborhood effects and social processes, race/ethnicity and violence, immigration and crime)
Kate Kuhlman, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (developmental psychopathology, psychoneuroimmunology, psychoneuroendocrinology, early life stress, and adolescent depression)
Charles E. Lambert, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Environmental Health Sciences
Linda J. Levine, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (bias in predicted and remembered emotion, memory and emotion, the development of children’s ability to regulate emotion)
Charles L. Limoli, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Radiation Oncology; Environmental Health Sciences
Elizabeth F. Loftus, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Cognitive Sciences; Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law (cognitive psychology, human memory, psychology and law)
Ulrike Luderer, M.D., Ph.D. Northwestern University, Director of the Environmental Health Sciences Graduate Program and Professor of Medicine; Developmental and Cell Biology; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health (reproductive toxicology, developmental toxicology, developmental basis of ovarian toxicity, ovarian cancer)
Angela F. Lukowski, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (memory development in infancy and early childhood, individual differences in long-term memory in infancy, the impact of sleep on cognitive functioning from infancy to adulthood)
Mona Lynch, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law (law and society, psychology and law, punishment and society, race and criminal justice)
Salvatore R. Maddi, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Social Behavior (personality, psychopathology, health psychology, creativity)
Elizabeth Martin, Ph.D., University of Missouri, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (transdiagnostic emotional and social functioning, affective control and regulation, relations between affect and cognition)
William M. Maurer, Ph.D. Stanford University, Dean of the School of Social Sciences and Professor of Anthropology; Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law (anthropology of law, globalization, Caribbean, anthropology of money and finance, gender and kinship)
Cheryl Lee Maxson, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (crime and delinquency, youth violence, street gangs, juvenile justice system and policing)
Richard D. McCleary, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Urban Planning and Public Policy (criminal justice, research methodology, statistics)
James W. Meeker, J.D., Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (sociology of law, criminal justice, research methodology, statistics, access to civil justice)
Ana Muñiz, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (gang profiling, youth justice, gang injunctions and databases, immigration enforcement, policing, race, state violence)
Raymond W. Novaco, Ph.D. Indiana University, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (anger, violence, stress, trauma, and interventions)
Candice Odgers, Ph.D. University of Virginia, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (effects of social inequalities and early adversity on children's future health and well-being, role of technology on children's development)
Oladele A. Ogunseitan, Ph.D. University of Tennessee, Department Chair and Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences
Kathryn Osann, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Adjunct Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences
Emily Owens, Ph.D. University of Maryland at College Park, Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Economics (how government policies affect the prevalence of criminal activity as well as how agents within the criminal justice system, particularly police, prosecutors, and judges, respond to policy changes)
Joan R. Petersilia, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society (program evaluation, public policy, juvenile justice)
Robert F. Phalen, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences
Paul Piff, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (social hierarchy, emotion, uncertainty, nature, groups, prosocial behavior, ethics, morality)
Henry N. Pontell, Ph.D. State University of New York at Stony Brook, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (white-collar and corporate crime, criminology, criminal justice, deviance and social control, sociology of law)
Joann Prause, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Senior Lecturer Emerita of Psychology and Social Behavior (statistics, quantitative epidemiology, employment typology)
Sarah D. Pressman, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University, Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (health psychology, positive emotions, stress physiology, psychosocial effects on physiology and health)
Jodi A. Quas, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (memory development, children's involvement in the legal system)
John L. Redpath, Ph.D. University of Newcastle, Professor Emeritus of Radiation Oncology; Environmental Health Sciences
Stephanie Reich, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Associate Professor of Education; Informatics; Psychology and Social Behavior (child development, parenting, peer interactions, media, program evaluation)
Keramet A. Reiter, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law (prisons, legal history, criminal justice policy, criminal and civil rights law, law and society)
L. Song Richardson, J.D. Yale Law School, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society
Jenna Riis, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (early life adversity; stress; salivary bioscience; neuroendocrine-immune relations; program implementation and evaluation)
Jenny K. Rinehart, Ph.D. University of New Mexico, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Psychology and Social Behavior (health psychology, clinical psychology, sexual victimization prevention, risk perception)
Nancy Rodriguez, Ph.D. Washington State University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (race, crime, and justice; juvenile justice; collateral consequences of imprisonment; criminal justice policy)
Karen S. Rook, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (gerontology, social relationships and health)
Ruben G. Rumbaut, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Distinguished Professor of Sociology; Chicano/Latino Studies; Criminology, Law and Society; Education (international migration, immigration laws, criminalization, incarceration, social inequality and mobility, race and ethnicity)
Sabrina E. Schuck, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics; Education; Psychology and Social Behavior (ADHD, autistic spectrum disorders, disorders of reading and written language, human-animal intervention, non-pharmacological treatment of disruptive behavior, cognitive-behavioral school-based and family-based interventions)
Nicholas I. Scurich, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law (judgment and decision making, juridical proof, violence risk assessment)
Carroll S. Seron, Ph.D. New York University, Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law; Sociology (sociology of law, sociology of professions, law and society, sociology of legal profession, methods and police misconduct)
Ronald C. Shank, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor Emeritus of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences
Azim Shariff, Ph.D. University of British Columbia, Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (social/personality psychology, religion, morality, cultural and evolutionary psychology)
Roxane C. Silver, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Program in Public Health (coping with traumatic life events (personal losses and collective traumas), stress, social psychology, health psychology)
Dara H. Sorkin, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor in Residence of Medicine; Program in Public Health; Psychology and Social Behavior (close relationships, behavioral lifestyle interventions for chronic disease management, health disparities, program evaluation)
Ann Southworth, J.D. Stanford University, Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society
Eric Spangenberg, Ph.D. University of Washington, M.B.A. Portland State University, Dean of The Paul Merage School of Business and Professor of Paul Merage School of Business; Psychology and Social Behavior (sensory cues in the retail environment and the effects of self-prediction on behavior)
Mark Steyvers, Ph.D. Indiana University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Computer Science; Psychology and Social Behavior (higher-order cognition, cognitive neuroscience, computational modeling, collective intelligence)
Daniel Stokols, Ph.D. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Social Behavior; Program in Public Health; Religious Studies; Urban Planning and Public Policy
Naomi Sugie, Ph.D. Princeton University, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (sociology of crime and punishment, inequality, families, demography, methods, new technologies for data collection)
Bryan Sykes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Program in Public Health; Sociology (demography, criminology, research methods, health, social inequality, statistics)
Shauhin A. Talesh, J.D., Ph.D. University of Connecticut, University of California, Berkeley, Director, Law and Graduate Studies Program and Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (civil procedure, consumer law, insurance, business organizations, empirical legal studies, law and society)
William C. Thompson, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society; Psychology and Social Behavior; School of Law (psychology and law, criminal justice, forensic science, expert evidence, human judgment and decision making, use of social science in appellate litigation)
Kara L. Thorsen, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Ecology
George E. Tita, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Urban Planning and Public Policy (criminology, community context of violence, urban youth gangs, homicide studies)
Susan F. Turner, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (sentencing and corrections, applied research methods)
Kristin E. Turney, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Associate Professor of Sociology; Criminology, Law and Society (social inequality, family demography, population health, incarceration and punishment, intergenerational transmission of disadvantage, child well-being)
Deborah Lowe Vandell, Ph.D. Boston University, Professor of Education; Psychology and Social Behavior (longitudinal studies of development, early childhood education, after-school programs, summer learning, child development, adolescent development)
Veronica M. Vieira, D.Sc. Boston University, Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences
James D. Vigil, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (urban research, urban poverty, culture change, socialization and education, psychological anthropology, street gangs in cross-cultural perspective, Mexico and U.S. southwestern ethnohistory, comparative ethnicity)
Geoff Ward, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law; Sociology (racial politics of social control, legal profession, youth justice, racial violence, transitional justice)
Kirk Williams, Ph.D. University of Arizona, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (family violence, youth violence, homicide studies, risk assessment, violence prevention program evaluation)
Jun Wu, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences
Ilona S. Yim, Ph.D. University of Trier, Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior (stress, pregnancy and postpartum depression, biopsychology of stress, developmental psychobiology)
Joanne F. Zinger, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Psychology and Social Behavior (expressive writing, meta-analysis, positive psychology, health psychology, preventive medicine, educational psychology)
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