School of Social Sciences

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On The Page:


Bill Maurer, Dean
Social & Behavioral Sciences Gateway
Undergraduate Student Affairs: 949-824-6803
Graduate Student Affairs: 949-824-4074
http://www.socsci.uci.edu

Overview

Boundaryless. Google the term – coined by former GE CEO Jack Welch – and you’ll learn that it’s most often applied in business to explain an organization that throws caution to the wind, scrapping boundaries, and bureaucracies in order to tap the internal power of its people to directly enact change.

For the past 50 years, the School of Social Sciences has been putting this approach into practice, breaking down traditional barriers to create change in society, economies, and human well-being. But never has this boundaryless-mindset been more important than today.

The 21st century has brought on profound and previously unthinkable social change. We live longer and face new social, economic, and health challenges brought on by an aging population. Political, ethical, and environmental challenges are marked by ever-increasing uncertainty and, paradoxically, the easy availability of more and more data about us.

These challenges know no boundaries – they stop at no border and they aren’t limited to one discipline.

That’s why social scientists at the University of California, Irvine are facing them head on, together.

Our students, who comprise nearly 20 percent of the entire UCI student body, are in the conflict zones of the Middle East and teaching global awareness in Orange County high schools. They are in our groundbreaking behavioral economics labs, testing new methods to reduce traffic congestion, create better online marketplaces, and prevent the spread of disease. They are in our brain, behavior, and cognitive robotics labs – mapping the structure of the human brain to understand how speech works in order to help restore it in victims of stroke, and building interactive robots aimed at improving social engagement in children with ADHD and autism. Our students are doing fieldwork in India, Africa, China – indeed, everywhere on the planet, exploring fundamental issues of peace, politics, population, migration, and cross-cultural communication.

Our faculty are breaking with convention to forge connections with computer science, engineering, the arts and the humanities. Interdisciplinary work with law, medicine, and environmental science helps our researchers educate policy makers on the social, cultural, and psychological factors impacting regulation and policy adoption, health and human behavior.

Our maverick spirit and openness to new approaches and unexpected collaborations has kept us nimble and at the cutting-edge in a number of fields as different as transportation economics, cultural anthropology, the philosophy of physics and biology, and the sociology of mass movements.

Our world-class professors in our seven top-ranking departments are experts in their fields, consistently sought by national media to provide perspective on innovative discoveries and pressing social problems. Our faculty are teaching courses within the most popular majors on campus and leading more students to successful graduation than any other academic unit at UCI.

Our alumni – numbering more than 45,000 strong – are taking their world-class education from our Irvine classrooms to the halls of justice in D.C. and international relations work in capitals around the world, to entrepreneurial endeavors from Northgate to Northern Africa, to courtrooms across the nation, boardrooms in some of the world’s top companies, and classrooms around the globe where they’re training our next generation of leaders.

And we’re just getting started.

Learn more within these pages about our degree programs, research centers, student programs, and opportunities. Involvement in any one of our endeavors helps us in our continuing effort to push the limits in traditional social sciences work because we believe that solutions to some of society’s greatest challenges lie in our ability to break the mold, to be boundaryless.

Join us in our pursuit. –Dean Maurer

Special Facilities

The school maintains several special facilities for research and education.

The Social Sciences Research Laboratory, used for both faculty and student research, occupies the entire fourth floor of the Social Sciences Laboratory Building. The facility contains 40 experiment and control rooms and several specialized facilities including a virtual reality facility and cognition laboratory.

Three Computer Laboratories provide access to networked systems, where students can work on assignments using full-featured word-processing, database, graphics, and statistical packages. In addition, these computers provide students with access to e-mail and Internet services. The Social Science Plaza facility contains state-of-the-art, high-tech lecture halls and is fully Internet accessible.

The Social Sciences Academic Resource Center (SSARC) was created over a decade ago to help School of Social Sciences students obtain the appropriate information to select a career and/or graduate school program, generate professional contacts, and learn how to gain a competitive edge during their undergraduate years. Centered around the five educational pillars (academics, research, practical experience, leadership, and community service), the SSARC offers valuable services, programming, and resources ranging from resume consultation, internship opportunities, and graduate school guidance, to research and leadership training. Through one-on-one consultations and various co-curricular programs, staff assist students with developing an educational blueprint that will ensure a quality educational experience while developing a strong educational portfolio and transforming each student into successful leaders within their chosen careers. Visit the Social Sciences Academic Resource Center website for more information.

Social Sciences Undergraduate Student Affairs (SSUSA) provides general and detailed information about UCI, the School of Social Sciences, and specific requirements exclusive to the majors and minors in the school to students, faculty, administrators, and the general public. SSUSA is fully staffed with academic counselors who speak one-on-one with students regarding their UCI academic career as well as opportunities beyond the classroom. There are also eight peer academic advisors available to undergraduates for walk-in advising regarding requirements and classes. Visit the Social Sciences Undergraduate Student Affiars website for more information.

The Experimental Social Science Laboratory, launched in fall 2011, is dedicated to experimental studies on individual and interactive decision making in the social sciences. The facility is available to researchers in all social science disciplines and can accommodate up to 40 research subjects at a time for computer-based studies of human behavior. Researchers interested in using the facility, and students interested in participating in paid studies, should visit Experimental Social Science Laboratory website or email essl@ss.uci.edu.

The School of Social Sciences Anechoic Research Facility opened in fall 2011 as a shared school resource for use by all faculty who have an interest in auditory research. The facility includes a large (12.5’ x 12.5’ x 7’ interior) acoustically isolated RF-shielded chamber for free-field research and a second smaller RF-shielded steel booth for research using headphones. The facility has access to state-of-the-art equipment including a harmonizer, function generators, oscilloscopes, mixers/equalizers, amplifiers, ABR setup (auditory brainstem recording), and research-quality vocal microphones and headphones. To learn more about the facility, or to request time for use, visit the School of Social Sciences Anechoic Research Facility website.

Centers for Research

The UC Irvine branch of the California Census Research Data Center is a partnership between the School of Social Sciences and the U.S. Census Bureau. The on-campus site allows UCI researchers access to confidential Census data that is central to high quality research in economics, sociology, health services, public health, transportation, law, and business. With these data, researchers can link information about the policy environment at a detailed geographic level with micro level data on public health, transportation, labor, crime, education and other highly relevant public policy-oriented outcomes. The result? Studies that address pressing policy needs – like how crime impacts local businesses, or how educational attainment effects labor earnings at local and national levels. Data accessible through the center includes U.S. Census records as well as datasets from the National Center for Health Statistics and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and others. Learn more at Census Research Data Center website.

The Center for the Advancement of Logic, its Philosophy, History and Applications (C-ALPHA) provides a formal structure that strengthens extant cross‐disciplinary connections while fostering new ones. Modern logic is the science of valid inference. Not being restricted to any particular subject matter, it applies to all human endeavors that aspire to an understanding of rationality, the discovery of proofs, the assessment of evidence, or the establishing of truths - including the physical sciences, the formal sciences like mathematics and legal theory, as well as the social sciences, whether they follow quantitative or qualitative research paradigms. Learn more at the Center for the Advancement of Logic, its Philosophy, History and Applications website.

The Center for Asian Studies at the University of California, Irvine is comprised of more than 40 interdisciplinary faculty members who study China, Japan, Korea, India, and Southeast Asia and enhance the study of the many countries and cultures of Asia. Housed in the School of Social Sciences, the Center provides a forum for discussions across geographic and disciplinary boundaries both on campus and within the community. Learn more at the Center of Asian Studies website.

The Center for Citizen Peacebuilding at UCI is a distinctive international clearinghouse for research, education, and action on public peace processes. The program focuses on how citizens participate in these activities to prevent violent conflict and, if violence occurs, to promote reconciliation, and sustainable peace. The purpose is to significantly contribute to the theory and practice of conflict resolution. Learn more at the Center for Citizen Peacebuilding website.

The Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Engineering (CENCE) is a multidisciplinary research center aimed at understanding the relation between cognitive abilities and neural systems through brain imaging, brain mapping, computational modeling, informatics, and engineering techniques. The center’s research focus in cognitive neuroscience and engineering spans a wide range of methods involving human and animal work, and engineering techniques, such as BCI, BMI, biorobotics, computational neuroscience, neuroinformatics, neuromorphic engineering, neurorobotics, signal processing, image analysis, and mathematical models of brain data. Learn more at Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Engineering website.

The Center for Decision Analysis, located in the Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences (IMBS) in the School of Social Sciences, is a specialized research center where the objective is to facilitate interaction and common research goals among scientists whose purpose is to formulate precisely and test theories of human behavior. This is to be interpreted in a wide sense as manifested by the membership which spans the following areas: anthropology, cognitive science, economics, engineering, logic and philosophy of science, mathematics, political science, and sociology. Additional faculty come from management science and psychobiology. To describe the focus, consider the fruitful symbiotic relationship that has existed for millennia between mathematics and the physical sciences. A goal of IMBS is to generate a similar relationship between mathematics and the behavioral and social sciences. With high-power social scientists (several are members of the National Academy) providing insights about the field and working with the mathematicians who are involved, new mathematical approaches to analyze these issues are being developed and new kinds of mathematical questions are being raised. For more information, visit the Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences website.

The Center for Demographic and Social Analysis (C-DASA) advances population science by bridging academic units to identify common research interests and exchange new conceptual approaches and analytic methods. Serving 50 UCI faculty members in a dozen departments, as well as their graduate and postgraduate trainees, the Center is committed to research on the critical issues shaping the well-being of local, national, and global populations. Faculty affiliates are recognized for award-winning research, ranging from China’s one-child policy to global influenza epidemics, from programs to raise school achievement to social networks that link local neighborhoods. C-DASA promotes innovative research by fostering multidisciplinary exchange, supporting collaboration, and building the advanced infrastructure essential for demographic research and training in the 21st century. For additional information, including upcoming seminars, visit the Center for Demographic and Social Analysis website.

Established in 2011, the Center for Economics & Public Policy (CEPP) seeks to improve analysis, formulation, and debate on economics-related public policy issues at the international, national, state, and local levels. CEPP brings economics-related public policy research—especially by UCI faculty and students—to policymakers, the public generally, and the UCI community; and strengthens the public policy focus of economics-related research at UCI. Based in the Department of Economics, CEPP provides a focal point for scholars in sociology, social ecology, business, education, law, and engineering who engage in economics-related public policy research. To create lasting impact, CEPP holds policy-related seminars for faculty and graduate students and increases UCI’s interaction with the policy community; increases student and faculty involvement in the new Master of Public Policy program; disseminates policy-related research of Center faculty to the media and the policy community through targeted studies, its Web site, and its network of policymakers; and organizes Universitywide events discussing current policy issues, involving Center faculty and high-profile public figures. CEPP also provides support for policy-oriented faculty and graduate student research. Learn more at the Center for Economic & Public Policy website.

Established in 2006, the Center for Ethnography works to develop a series of sustained theoretical and methodological conversations about ethnographic research practices across the disciplines. It supports innovative collaborative ethnographic research as well as research on the theoretical and methodological refunctioning of ethnography for contemporary cultural, social, and technological transformations. Learn more at the Center for Ethnography website.

The Center for Global Peace and Conflict Studies (CGPACS) is a multidisciplinary research unit housed in the School of Social Sciences. The mission of CGPACS is to promote research on international problems and processes. Current research emphases include weapons of mass destruction, especially biological weapons; international governance, focusing on the evolution of international norms and institutions; citizen peace building; international environmental cooperation; and religion in international affairs. CGPACS also sponsors research conferences and public colloquia on topics of current significance. The Center’s Margolis Lecture brings to UCI high-profile speakers who have played active roles in international affairs. Recent Margolis Lectures have featured Justice Louise Arbour, former chief prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunals; Chinese democracy activist Wei Jinsheng; Congressman Christopher Cox; former Secretary of State Warren Christopher; and former Secretary of Defense William Perry. Visit the Center for Global Peace and Conflict Studies website for more information.

The Center for Language Science is a multidisciplinary, interactive research community aimed at understanding how language is organized in the human mind, how this system of knowledge is learned, how is it understood and expressed, and how it is represented and processed by the brain. This effort spans a wide range of scientific research areas, from basic and clinical hearing research to computational and psychological models of the structure and processing of linguistic knowledge to detailed neuroanatomical models hearing, comprehending, and speaking derived from advanced neuroimaging and clinical-based methods. Accordingly, Center faculty are drawn from several departments and schools at UCI including Cognitive Sciences, Psychology and Social Behavior, Anthropology, Computer Science, Logic and Philosophy of Science, Mathematics, Education, Humanities, Biological Sciences, and Medicine. The Center for Language Science has three specific aims: (1) to promote an integrated, multidisciplinary research program on language from the unique and diverse perspective afforded by UCI’s faculty; (2) to promote and guide training in the field of language science; and (3) to inform and guide the development of new clinical applications for hearing, speech, and language disorders that impact millions of people worldwide. Learn more at the Center for Language Science website.

The purpose of the UCI Center for Research on Immigration, Population, and Public Policy is to foster and conduct basic and policy-relevant research on international migration and other population processes, with a main focus on U.S. immigration. In order to encourage multi-investigator, multidisciplinary, and interdisciplinary research projects, the Center organizes informal discussions of ideas for future research projects, “brainstorming” sessions about research funding opportunities, “brown-bag” presentations of research findings, and workshops and conferences. Much of the Center’s research focuses on the multigenerational incorporation experiences of immigrant groups in the United States, especially those occurring in diverse contexts such as Southern California. Investigations of this type often devote as much attention to what happens to the children and grandchildren of immigrants as to what happens to immigrants themselves. For more information, visit the UCI Center for Research on Immigration, Population, and Public Policy website.

The Center for the Study of Democracy (CSD) continues the work of the UCI Focused Research Program on Democratization that was founded in 1991 and sponsors research and training on the process of democratic transition and the expansion of the democratic process in already established democracies. CSD includes a multidisciplinary faculty from four UC campuses. CSD’s activities are focused on three areas. First, faculty administer a graduate training program on empirical democratic theory. The National Science Foundation selected UCI in 1995 as a national center for the training of doctoral students in democratization issues; the five-year NSF grant provides funding for graduate fellowships and other training activities. Second, the democracy research program aims at improving the democratic process in the United States and other established democracies as we enter the next century. The program focuses on reforms to increase the ability of citizens to express their preferences and have these preferences represented within the democratic process. Third, CSD supports research on the development of sustainable democracies in Eastern Europe, East Asia, and other new democracies. The New Democracies Initiative contributes to the promotion of democracy in these formerly authoritarian systems. For more information visit the Center for the Study of Democracy website.

The Institute for International, Global and Regional Studies (IGARS) was created to be a hub for research and teaching at UCI on the interactions of politics, economics, societies, cultures, and history in global and international affairs. It provides a calendar of events, hosts the bi-weekly International Studies Public Forum and monthly research seminars, collaborates with over 17 other campus centers, and promotes seed funding for collaborative research activities on international and global issues. Faculty associated with IGARS participate in the international studies undergraduate major and honors program and the minor in conflict resolution. Learn more at the Institute for International, Global and Regional Studies website.

The Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion (IMTFI) was formed in 2008. Its mission is to support research on money and technology among the world’s poorest people: those who live on less than $1 per day. IMTFI seeks to create a community of practice and inquiry into the everyday uses and meanings of money, as well as the technological infrastructures being developed as carriers of mainstream and alternative currencies worldwide. Learn more at the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion website.

The UCI Interdisciplinary Center for the Scientific Study of Ethics and Morality was established in 2003 by a group of scholars interested in recent scientific research that yields insight on the origins and causes of morality. In creating the center, UCI faculty both address a topic that is becoming one of the new frontiers in science and reflect critically on the moral implications of this new frontier. The center focuses on the etiology of ethical behavior and differs in several important ways from existing centers dedicated to the discussion of ethics. Traditional academic approaches tend to originate in philosophical, foundational, or religious discussions of ethics. They tend to be humanistic in orientation and emphasize abstract, theoretical considerations of what constitutes ethics and morality. The center complements this traditional approach and explores the scientific and/or the empirically verifiable factors that influence morality, using a variety of methodologies that examine factors contributing to and driving moral action in a variety of social, psychological, and biological contexts. The center encourages ties between scholars interested in ethics in humanities and the sciences—including social science, social ecology, biological sciences, and medicine—building on the interdisciplinary tradition at UCI, complementing, rather than duplicating, existing efforts. Visit UCI Interdisciplinary Center for the Scientific Study of Ethics and Morality website for more information.

Degrees

AnthropologyB.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Business EconomicsB.A.
Chicano/Latino StudiesB.A.
Cognitive SciencesB.S.
EconomicsB.A., M.A., Ph.D.
International StudiesB.A.
Philosophy1M.A., Ph.D.
Political ScienceB.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Philosophy, Political Science, and EconomicsM.A.
PsychologyB.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Public Policy2M.P.P.
Quantitative EconomicsB.A.
Social Policy and Public ServiceB.A.
Social ScienceB.A.3, M.A., Ph.D.
SociologyB.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Within the Ph.D. in Social Science is an optional concentration in Mathematical Behavioral Sciences, supervised by an interdisciplinary group of faculty.

Within the M.A. in Social Science, students may apply directly to the concentration in Demographic and Social Analysis. For those enrolled in a Ph.D. program at another institution, the M.A. concentration in Mathematical Behavioral Sciences is available. A concentration in Medicine, Science, and Technology Studies is available within the M.A. in Social Science.

1

 Jointly administered by the Department of Philosophy in the School of Humanities.

2

 Jointly administered by the School of Social Ecology.

3

 Admission to this program is no longer available.

Honors

Graduation with Honors. No more than 12 percent of the graduating seniors, who have completed at least 72 units in the University of California will receive honors: approximately 1 percent summa cum laude, 3 percent magna cum laude, and 8 percent cum laude. The student’s cumulative record at the end of the final quarter is the basis for consideration for awarding Latin Honors. To be eligible for consideration for honors at graduation, the student must, before the end of winter quarter of the senior year, have submitted an Application for Graduation; be officially declared as a major within the School of Social Sciences; have all corrections to the academic record processed by the Registrar’s Office; if completing the Language Other Than English general education requirement with a language exemption test, pass the test by the end of winter quarter; and be able to verify completion of all course work by the end of the spring quarter of the senior year. Other factors are listed in the Honors Recognition section.

Dean’s Honor List. The quarterly Dean’s Honor List is composed of students who have received a 3.5 grade point average while carrying a minimum of 12 graded units.

Departmental Honors Programs. Most departments in the School of Social Sciences offer an honors program (refer to the departmental information). Upon successful completion of the honors program, students graduate with honors in their respective majors and their transcripts note that they were in the honors program.

Honor Societies. Several departments in the School of Social Sciences belong to a national honor society. Eligibility is based on satisfying the requirements of the specific honor society. In the School of Social Sciences, these national honor societies include Lambda Alpha Kappa (Anthropology), Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics), Pi Omicron of Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science), Psi Chi (Psychology), Pi Gamma Mu (Social Sciences), Sigma Iota Rho (International Studies), and Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology).

Order of Merit. The Dean of the School of Social Sciences’ Order of Merit award recognizes the most outstanding graduating undergraduates and graduate students for their academic achievements, contributions to the School, and service to the campus and community.

Kathy Alberti Award for Graduate Student Excellence. This award recognizes a graduate student who holds truly outstanding promise as a future professor or teacher.

Alumni Academic Excellence Scholarship. This scholarship recognizes an undergraduate for outstanding academic performance and service to the School, campus, and community.

The Ruth Fulton Benedict Prize. This prize recognizes outstanding writing in anthropology by an undergraduate.

Steve Borowski Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded to an exemplary School of Social Sciences student athlete. The award winner is selected from among a pool of Social Sciences student athletes based on academic merit and extracurricular involvement. Coaches may also nominate outstanding Social Sciences student athletes. Athletes interested in being considered should contact their coaches. Administered by Athletics. Award varies.

The Boukai Family Foundation Middle East Studies Student Initiative Research Award. This award recognizes MESSI students for academic excellence. Applicants must be full-time MESSI students with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

James N. Danziger Award for Teaching Excellence. This award recognizes a Political Science graduate student who has advanced to candidacy for teaching excellence.

David Easton Award. This award is given for the outstanding qualifying paper written by a Political Science graduate student during the preceding academic year.

Harry Eckstein Award for the Outstanding Undergraduate Honors Thesis. This award is given annually for the best honors thesis written by a Political Science major.

Harry Eckstein Memorial Fund. The Harry Eckstein Memorial Fund is presented annually to Political Science graduate students conducting research toward the completion of the Ph.D. in Political Science at UCI. Recipients of the award are designated as Eckstein Scholars.

Jean-Claude Falmagne Research Award. This award is given to a Cognitive Sciences graduate student who has advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. The award is to support the student’s summer research activity.

Jeff Garcilazo Scholarship. This award, established in honor and memory of the late Chicano/Latino Studies and History professor Jeff Garcilazo, is awarded annually to the undergraduate student author(s) of the best research paper(s) in Chicano/Latino Studies, to provide opportunities for students to examine the historical and contemporary experiences of Latino communities.

Sheen T. Kassouf Endowed Fellowship. The fellowship is awarded to a student enrolled in the UCI Economics doctoral program. Graduate students in all areas of economics are eligible, with the major criteria for the award being excellence in course work and research.

The Justine Lambert Prize in Foundations of Science. This award is given every other year to the best submitted graduate paper on the foundations of logic, mathematics, and the empirical sciences. The competition is open to all graduate students at UCI, regardless of department or school affiliation.

Charles A. Lave Paper Prize for Creative Modeling in Social Sciences. The prize is awarded to any UCI undergraduate or graduate student and may be in any social or behavioral science discipline, or interdisciplinary. It may be qualitative (with words only) or quantitative (with mathematical expressions). The prize will be awarded to a paper that displays creative modeling; points to or includes data that permits model evaluation; and exhibits the clear writing and brevity that Charles Lave valued.

Alice B. Macy Outstanding Undergraduate Paper Award. This award is given to a Social Sciences undergraduate student in any discipline for a paper that demonstrates original research.

The Malinowski Prize for Undergraduate Research. This award recognizes outstanding original research in the area of anthropology.

Thomas W. McGillin Scholarship. This scholarship is given to an undergraduate who is a first-generation citizen of this country with at least one foreign-born parent.

Outstanding Legal Scholar Scholarship. This scholarship is given to an undergraduate who has achieved outstanding academic achievement as well as contributing to the UCI Law Forum program.

Outstanding Transfer Student Scholarship. This scholarship is given to an outstanding community college transfer student in the School of Social Sciences.

Sanli Pastore & Hill, Inc. Excellence in Economics Writing Award. The Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences (IMBS) awards this paper prize for the top graduate student paper in economics or decision analysis. Students who have written papers in game theory, economic theory, mathematical economics, decision analysis, and related areas are encouraged to submit them for consideration.

Jack and Suzie Peltason Scholarship. This award is given at the discretion of the department chair to support and facilitate the education of undergraduate Political Science majors. All undergraduate political science majors are eligible to apply.

Pi Omicron Award for Outstanding Political Science Major. This award is given annually by UCI’s Pi Omicron Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha to a graduating senior Political Science major who best exemplifies a commitment to academic excellence and public service.

A. Kimball Romney Outstanding Graduate Paper Award. This award is given to a Social Sciences graduate student in any discipline for a paper that demonstrates original research.

David and Kristen Rosten International and Community Service Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded to an undergraduate who is planning a career in public service in either the domestic or international community.

Vicki Ruiz Award. This award is given to graduating seniors in Chicano/Latino Studies who have achieved scholarly excellence and service. Nomination by faculty in the Department of Chicano/Latino Studies is required for this award.

Elena B. and William R. Schonfeld Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded annually in the School of Social Sciences to the outstanding undergraduate who combines excellence in scholarship with dedication to the University community and the highest level of achievement in other fields. The award is available to students with one year remaining prior to graduation.

School of Social Sciences Outstanding Graduate Scholarship Award. This award is for high intellectual achievement by a Social Sciences graduate student.

School of Social Sciences Outstanding Graduate Student Service Award. This award is for contributions to the Social Science community, including the intellectual growth of others.

School of Social Sciences Outstanding Undergraduate Honors Thesis Award. This award is for the outstanding undergraduate honors thesis.

School of Social Sciences Student Athlete Award. This award is given to a Social Sciences student who has demonstrated outstanding academic achievement as well as significant contributions to the UCI Athletics Department.

Gary Singer Scholar Athlete Award. This award is for a student athlete who has outstanding academic achievement as well as contributions to their sport.

Robin M. Williams Award. This award is given to an undergraduate student and a graduate student for the best research paper in the field of sociology.

John I. Yellot Scholar Award. This award is given to a Cognitive Sciences graduate student who has not yet advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. The award is to support the student’s summer research activity.

Community Outreach

The Ambassador’s Council has been created to promote and enrich the school by supporting new and existing school-wide/department projects. It collectively acts as an official student in discussing program development with administrators and department chairs and other faculty.

Global Connect is a university led curriculum program through which UCI social sciences faculty, undergraduate and graduate students bring their knowledge of international issues into high school classrooms in order to better prepare students to become informed global citizens. UCI faculty and students develop global issue-focused lesson plans on topics such as UN millennium development goals, mass media and technology, and the purpose of NGOs – areas of study in which UCI experts are known internationally, but subjects which are not part of the current California state education standards. Lessons are team-taught by UCI students and faculty alongside high school educators in Newport Mesa and Saddleback School Districts. The real-time course content, updated annually, reflects the continually changing global landscape while bringing new and updated university research directly to high school teachers - a challenge that traditional textbook publishing schedules are unable to keep up with.

HABLA is a broad-spectrum Latino-focused educational outreach program based in the School of Social Sciences and created by Professor Virginia Mann in 2000 with the support of the Orange County Children and Families Commission. Its purpose is to increase the school readiness of disadvantaged children ages two–four years, by uniting faculty and students at UCI with the Santa Ana Unified School System, local Families Resource Center, Americorp/VISTA, FACT, and the national Parent Child Home Program (PCHP).

Jumpstart was established on the UCI campus by Professor Virginia Mann in 2003. Students involved as Jumpstart members are paired with children participating in pre-school programs in the local Orange County area. The purpose is to help young students develop language, literacy, and social skills. Social Sciences undergraduates usually serve with Jumpstart for a full school year. The UCI Jumpstart program recruits, trains, and supervises UCI students to work with Head Start and other early-childhood programs in low-income communities of Orange County.

The School of Social Sciences’ Summer Academic Enrichment Program (SAEP) is an intensive, five-week on-campus residential program. It is designed to enhance the academic experience of first-generation, low-income university students. SAEP is a landmark program on the University of California, Irvine campus and represents a successful model to offer a rigorous research experience. Three courses in research methods, statistical analysis, and writing and communications are taught by UC Irvine faculty. SAEP’s goal is to strengthen specific analytical and research skills and to prepare participants for graduate school.

Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree

All students must meet the University Requirements.
School Requirements
  1. Familiarity with basic mathematical, computational, and statistical tools underlying modern social sciences. This requirement is met by passing a three-course sequence in mathematics selected from the following: ANTHRO 10A-ANTHRO 10B-ANTHRO 10C; MATH 2A-MATH 2B and either STATS 7 or MGMT 7 or PUBHLTH 7; POL SCI 10A-POL SCI 10B-POL SCI 10C; PSYCH 10A-PSYCH 10B-PSYCH 10C; SOC SCI 10A-SOC SCI 10B-SOC SCI 10C; or SOCIOL 10A-SOCIOL 10B-SOCIOL 10C. (NOTE: School of Social Sciences majors may not take SOC SCI 9A-B-C to fulfill the mathematics requirement.) Computer education is essential for a complete social science education. This requirement can be satisfied by passing I&C SCI 31, PSYCH 114M, or SOC SCI 3A. Departments may have preferences for specific courses. Students should see their major department for acceptable courses. This course requirement should be taken during the student’s first year.
  2. An understanding of the fundamental concepts, analytical tools, and methods of social science. This requirement is met by taking two four-unit introductory courses in the School of Social Sciences bearing a one-digit course number. (Such courses include ANTHRO 2A, ANTHRO 2B, ANTHRO 2C, ANTHRO 2D, ECON 1, LINGUIS 3, POL SCI 6A, POL SCI 6B, POL SCI 6C, PSYCH 7A, SOC SCI 1A, SOC SCI 5A, SOC SCI 5BSOC SCI 5D, SOCIOL 1, SOCIOL 2, SOCIOL 3). These courses normally should be taken during the student’s first year. (NOTE: This requirement may be fulfilled by the major requirements in Sociology). For students majoring in Cognitive Sciences, the requirements are waived due to the academic rigor of the B.S. curriculum.
  3. An understanding of important advanced areas in social science. This requirement is met by passing satisfactorily nine four-unit upper-division courses in the School of Social Sciences, where at least three of these courses comprise core courses or a module. (NOTE: The major in Social Science requires 11 four-unit upper-division courses.) For modules which are listed with more than three courses, the student may normally elect to take any subset of three courses in the module. Appropriate substitutions may be made upon petition.
  4. Four additional four-unit social science courses from any level.
  5. No more than two courses numbered 198-199 may be used towards a degree requirement (excluding majors in the Department of Cognitive Sciences and Economics which allow three such numbered courses).

Students are reminded that the Pass/Not Pass option is not applicable to course requirements 1 through 4 above or to any additional requirements listed for specific major programs. However, I&C SCI 31 is an exception to this rule and may be taken Pass/Not Pass.

Courses used to meet requirements 2 through 5 above are included in the computation of the grade point average in courses required in the major program.

Maximum Overlap Between Major and Minor Requirements: Students completing both a major and a minor within the School of Social Sciences may count courses taken to fulfill the School’s mathematics and computer science requirement toward satisfaction of both the major and the minor. No other course overlap is allowed. For students completing a major within the School of Social Sciences and a minor outside of the School of Social Sciences, a maximum of two courses may overlap between a major and a minor. For students pursuing a minor in Mathematics, Psychology and Social Behavior, or Statistics, a total of three courses may overlap. No course overlap is permitted between minors.

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Undergraduate Programs

The following majors are offered:

Anthropology, B.A.
Business Economics, B.A.
Chicano/Latino Studies, B.A.
Cognitive Sciences, B.S.
Economics, B.A.
International Studies, B.A.
Political Science, B.A.
Psychology, B.A.
Quantitative Economics, B.A.
Social Policy and Public Service, B.A.
Sociology, B.A.

The following minors are offered:

Anthropology
Chicano/Latino Studies
Conflict Resolution
Economics
Hearing and Speech Sciences
International Studies
Linguistics
Medical Anthropology
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology

Planning a Program of Study

Since there are many alternative ways to plan a program, some of which may require careful attention to specific major requirements, students should consult with the School of Social Sciences Undergraduate Student Affairs to design an appropriate program of study.

Students who select one of the School majors in their freshman year might begin by taking the one-digit courses required by their major and one of the mathematics sequences listed under Part A of the School requirements. It is a good idea to take these courses early since they include fundamental concepts that will be widely applicable in more advanced courses. In addition, the lower-division writing requirement of the general education requirement (category I) should be completed during the first year. In the sophomore year, the student might complete the course on computing, three courses toward the general education requirement, four courses in the social sciences, and four electives. Students who are planning to go on to graduate school can use their freshman and sophomore years to advantage by taking courses in theory, research methods, mathematics, and other areas important to graduate study. In the junior and senior years, the student should take courses in the major area and should create an individualized program of study through a combination of courses and course modules which fall in an area of interest. Particular attention should be paid to planning a program of study that will ensure that major requirements are met prior to graduation.

Change of Major. Students who wish to change their major to one offered by the school should contact the Social Sciences Undergraduate Student Affairs Office for information about change-of-major requirements, procedures, and policies. Information is also available at the UCI Change of Major Criteria website.

Double Majors within Social Sciences

In fulfilling degree requirements for multiple majors, a maximum of two lower-division courses may overlap between any two majors.

Other Double Majors

In fulfilling degree requirements for multiple majors, a maximum of two courses may overlap between any two majors. For students pursuing a major in Psychology and Social Behavior, a total of three courses (PSYCH 9A- PSYCH 9B-PSYCH 9C, same as PSY BEH 11A-PSY BEH 11B-PSY BEH 11C) may be overlapped.

Mathematics and Social Sciences

The mathematics requirement stems from the nature of modern social science. The concepts and terms of mathematics, statistics, and computers are an important part of the social scientist’s vocabulary. Basic knowledge of these tools is necessary to an understanding of current literature in the social sciences, to the analysis of data, and to an intelligent use of social science models. Each candidate for a degree in the School of Social Sciences is expected to have a basic knowledge of probability, statistics, and computing. In addition, for students who are preparing for graduate school in an area of social science, it will be important to supplement the minimal mathematics requirements with additional courses related to mathematics and social science methodology. The particular courses which would be recommended are not specified here, however, since they are highly dependent on the major emphasis of the student. Students who are preparing for graduate study should consult their advisors to determine a program of study which will give them the research skills necessary for successful graduate work.

Transfer Study Recommendations

The School recommends that students wishing to transfer to UCI do the following:

  1. Complete the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) prior to transfer to UCI.
  2. Refer to the ASSIST website for information about community college courses that will fulfill UCI lower-division major requirements.

Specific course recommendations:

Prospective Economics majors: complete the equivalent of UCI’s MATH 4 at a community college (in addition to the courses required for transfer student admission; see the Department of Economics section).

Prospective International Studies majors: complete two semesters of foreign language at the intermediate level.

Prospective Psychology majors: complete a three-course sequence in introductory, physiological, and either social or abnormal psychology.

Transfer Students

Freshmen and Sophomores: Students transferring to UCI as freshmen or sophomores will fulfill the regular requirements of the four-year program either through work at UCI or through transfer credit for comparable work elsewhere.

Juniors: Following review by the School of Social Sciences, it may be determined that junior transfer students electing to major in one of the School’s degree programs, who have good records at other accredited colleges and universities, have satisfied School requirement 2 and the University requirements. However, all transfer students must fulfill the upper-division writing general education requirement (category I) while at UCI. Students anticipating transfer to UCI in their junior year should plan their curriculum so as to anticipate the special mathematics requirement (School requirement 1). Every effort will be made to accommodate individual variation in background, provided students are prepared to commit themselves to intensive work in areas of deficiency. Ordinarily, the typical two-year program for junior transfers is simply the last two years of the regular four-year program, except that students who have not satisfied the mathematics requirements of the School should plan to do so in the junior year and must do so before graduation.

Seniors: Students wishing to graduate with a degree in the School by transferring to UCI in their senior year should plan their work carefully to ensure that the requirements can be met in one year of residence. In general, differences between the program at UCI and programs elsewhere make senior transfers difficult.

Service Learning, Community Service, and Internships

Service learning is a meaningful educational activity that integrates community service within the curriculum. It is an opportunity for students to make positive contributions to underserved and marginalized communities through academic courses, field studies, and internships.

Service learning provides out-of-class experiences to reinforce understanding of academic theory while addressing serious community concerns. When combined with a structured curriculum that includes research components, students can explore the role of the social scientist while seeking solutions to problems affecting society. The School of Social Sciences’ philosophy is to practice research, service, and good citizenship.

The School actively supports service learning through its philosophy of enhancing the learning process by motivating, inspiring, and teaching students how to recognize and accept their civic responsibilities. The goal is to educate students about social issues and provide them with the necessary tools to solve the difficult problems society faces. Under the guidance and supervision of faculty and staff, students are offered the opportunity to experience personal, professional, social, and intellectual growth through the following School of Social Sciences programs: public- and private-sector internships, community service, field studies, and the major in Social Policy and Public Service.

Undergraduate Programs in K–12 Education

Undergraduate students who wish to pursue a career in the field of K–12 education are well-served in the School of Social Sciences and the School of Education. The following interrelated programs provide opportunities for students to gain knowledge and experience in this important area.

Minor in Educational Studies

The minor in Educational Studies allows students to explore a broad range of issues in the field of education and provides a strong foundation for K-12 teaching. Both introductory and advanced courses are included, giving students a solid preparation for later teacher credential programs and many related occupations. NOTE: A Statement of Intent is required of all students wishing to enroll in this minor. See the School of Education section of the Catalogue for more information.

School of Education Programs

The School of Education provides many other opportunities for prospective educators, including a mentoring program which provides students with valuable experience while they work with credentialed teachers; UC Links, a program in which undergraduates tutor K–8 students in after-school settings; and advising services provided by counselors who assist students in planning future careers in education. Further information about these programs is available from the School of Education counselors at 2001 Berkeley Place.

Students interested in obtaining a teaching credential should see the School of Education section of the Catalogue for information.

Special Programs

Campuswide Honors Program

The Campuswide Honors Program is available to selected high-achieving students from all academic majors from their freshman through senior years. For more information contact the Campus­wide Honors Program, 1200 Student Services II; 949-824-5461; honors@uci.edu; or visit the Campuswide Honors Program website.

UC Education Abroad Program

Upper-division students have the opportunity to experience a different culture while making progress toward degree objectives through the University’s Education Abroad Program (EAP). UCEAP is an overseas study program which operates in cooperation with host universities and colleges throughout the world. Visit the Study Abroad Center website for additional information.

Interdisciplinary Minors

A variety of interdisciplinary minors are available to all UCI students. The minor in Chicano/Latino Studies, offered by the School of Social Sciences, is designed to provide an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the language, history, culture, literature, sociology, anthropology, politics, social ecology, health, medicine, and creative (art, dance, film, drama, music) accomplishments of Chicano/Latino communities.

The minor in Conflict Resolution, sponsored by the International Studies program in the School of Social Sciences, provides skills in conflict analysis and resolution and a useful understanding of integrative institutions at the local, regional, and international levels. The curriculum includes training that students may apply toward State of California certification as a mediator.

Information about the following minors is available in the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the Catalogue.

The minor in Civic and Community Engagement seeks to provide students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values to engage as citizens and active community members in the 21st century. The minor is distinguished both by what students learn, and by how they learn it.

The minor in Global Sustainability trains students to understand the changes that need to be made in order for the human population to live in a sustainable relationship with the resources available on this planet.

The minor in the History and Philosophy of Science explores how science is actually done and how it has influenced history, and is concerned with determining what science and mathematics are, accounting for their apparent successes, and resolving problems of philosophical interest that arise in the sciences.

The minor in Native American Studies focuses on history, culture, religion, and the environment. The three core courses serve as an introduction to the Native American experience from the perspective of different historical periods and frameworks of analysis.

Information about the following interdisciplinary minors is available in the School of Humanities section.

The minor in African American Studies offers undergraduate students an opportunity to study those societies and cultures established by the people of the African diaspora and to investigate the African American experience from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and theoretical approaches.

The minor in Archaeology introduces students to modern archaeological theory and practice, to different approaches and theoretical frameworks used in the reconstruction of cultures based on their material remains, and the use of such approaches and frameworks in a comparative context that emphasizes one geographic area.

The minor in Asian American Studies examines the historical and contemporary experiences of Asians after their arrival in the United States and seeks to provide an awareness of the history, culture (e.g., literary and creative art accomplishments), psychology, and social organization of Asian American communities.

The minor in Asian Studies creates opportunities for students to explore Asian topics in a variety of fields, to develop advanced language skills, and to acquire broader perspectives.

The minor in Latin American Studies is designed to develop in students an awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of Latin American issues in the areas of language, history, culture, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, political science, health, folk medicine, and creative (art, dance, film, drama, music) accomplishments.

The minor in Religious Studies focuses on the comparative study of religions in various cultural settings around the world and seeks to provide a wide-ranging academic understanding and knowledge of the religious experience in society.

The minor in Gender and Sexuality Studies fosters critical and creative analysis of the various disciplinary perspectives—historical, political, economic, representational, technological, and scientific—that have (or have not) constituted women, gender, and sexuality as objects of study. Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies also offers a minor in Queer Studies.

Careers in Social Sciences

Business and industry often look to social science graduates to fill positions in management, finance, marketing and advertising, personnel, production supervision, and general administration. In the public sector, a wide variety of opportunities are available in city, county, state, and federal government. Teaching is a frequently chosen career at all levels from elementary school teacher to professor. In addition, many graduates enter professional practice, becoming lawyers, psychologists, researchers, or consultants in various fields.

Because all degrees offered by the School of Social Sciences involve an educational program that is interdisciplinary and that prepares students to understand quantitative methods of data analysis, graduates are well-positioned for research and analysis careers at all levels of government and in private firms. Their solid grounding in contemporary social science methods and their familiarity with a broad spectrum of social scientific thinking gives them an excellent foundation for the pursuit of further training in graduate and professional programs.

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. Additional information is available in the Career Center section.

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Graduate Program

The School of Social Sciences offers graduate training in the following areas: Anthropology (Ph.D. in Anthropology), Cognitive Sciences (Ph.D. in Psychology), Economics (Ph.D. in Economics), Logic and Philosophy of Science (Ph.D. in Philosophy), Mathematical Behavioral Sciences (Ph.D. in Social Science), Politics and Society (Ph.D. in Political Science), and Sociology (Ph.D. in Sociology). In addition, an interdisciplinary concentration in Public Choice is offered within the programs in Economics and Political Science, a concentration in Cognitive Neuroscience is offered within the program in Cognitive Sciences, a specialized concentration in Transportation Economics is offered within the program in Economics, an emphasis in Social Networks is offered within the Mathematical Behavioral Sciences concentration, and a concentration in Political Psychology is offered within the program in Political Science. When an applicant’s interests lie outside of or across these areas, the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, School of Social Sciences, may, on rare occasions, appoint a three-member faculty committee to guide an independent course of study for the Ph.D. degree in Social Science.

The M.A. degree in Anthropology, Economics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science, or Sociology may be conferred upon students in Ph.D. programs after completion of the necessary requirements.

Additionally, the M.A. degree program in Social Science with a concentration in Demographic and Social Analysis is supervised by faculty from the Schools of Social Sciences and Social Ecology. Students may apply directly to this M.A. program.

A concentration in Medicine, Science, and Technology Studies is available within the M.A. degree in Social Science.

A Master of Public Policy (M.P.P.) program is also available and is jointly supervised by faculty from the Schools of Social Sciences and Social Ecology. Students may apply directly to this program.

In cooperation with the UCI School of Education, students enrolled in a School of Social Sciences graduate program may choose to pursue a teaching credential while working toward their degree. After completion of requirements for an M.A. degree, students may apply for admission into the credential program administered by the School of Education. As required by law, the applicant must pass the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST), obtain a Certification of Clearance, and successfully complete the appropriate subject area examination or an approved subject-matter program. A detailed description of the program may be obtained from the Social Sciences Graduate Office or the School of Education.

Admission

Potential graduate students should apply by January 15 to receive fullest consideration for financial aid. Applicants should indicate the title of the degree sought (Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, or Social Science), and the academic area of concentration (see above). All applicants are required to submit Graduate Record Examination General Test scores. Letters of recommendation and the applicant’s statement of interest are important factors in the admission decision.

In addition to the University admission requirements described in the Graduate Division section, individual graduate programs may prescribe special requirements or expectations of applicants, subject to the approval of the Graduate Council. Such requirements are minimum standards only; successful applicants typically must exceed them by a substantial margin.

Financial Support

Many students receive financial support in the form of fellowships, teaching assistantships, or research assistantships available under grants to individual faculty. Before accepting an offer of admission with financial support for the first year, applicants should inquire about the likelihood of such support in future years. Occasionally, a newly admitted student may receive a multiyear commitment of some specified financial support, but this is not the rule. Students are also advised to seek aid from sources external to the University. NOTE: Teaching assistantships do not include remission of fees, tuition, or nonresident supplemental tuition.

Length of Study and Residence

The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. degree is either five, six, or seven years, depending upon the specific program. See the department sections for information.

Students admitted to the M.A. concentration in Demographic and Social Analysis should be able to earn the M.A. within one to two years.

Because the intellectual training offered by the School requires full-time study and constant contact with the faculty, the School does not accept part-time students.

Master of Public Policy

The Master of Public Policy (M.P.P.) program is a two-year professional degree program administered by both the School of Social Ecology and the School of Social Sciences. Students are required to complete 72 units of graduate courses. In the first year, students will attend an introductory conference, participate in a workshop, and take seven core courses and two elective courses. In the summer after the first year, students will participate in a policy-relevant internship in an appropriate government, business, or nonprofit setting. In the second year, students take three core courses and five elective courses.

The core course requirements in year one of the program are Qualitative Methods and Public Policy, Statistical Methods for Public Policy, Information and the Policy Process, Microeconomics and Public Policy, Policy Processes and Institutions of Governance, Collaborative Governance and Public Management, and Social Mobilization, Power, and Justice. The core course requirements in year two are The Economics of Government, Policy and Ethics, and Capstone Research Project and Briefing.

Additional information is available at the Master of Public Policy website.

Anthropology Courses

ANTHRO 2A. Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology. 4 Units.

Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems. Course may be offered online.

(III, VIII)

ANTHRO 2B. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 4 Units.

Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

(III)

ANTHRO 2C. Introduction to Archaeology. 4 Units.

Archaeological theory and cultural processes with emphasis on the American Southwest, Mesoamerica, and Mesopotamia.

(III)

ANTHRO 2D. Introduction to Language and Culture. 4 Units.

Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world.

Same as LINGUIS 68.

(III)

ANTHRO 10A. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines. Course may be offered online.

Same as SOCIOL 10A.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10A, POL SCI 10A, SOC SCI 9A.

Restriction: Anthropology and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

ANTHRO 10B. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 10A.

Same as SOCIOL 10B.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10B, POL SCI 10B, SOC SCI 9B.

Restriction: Anthropology and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

ANTHRO 10C. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 10B.

Same as SOCIOL 10C.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10C, POL SCI 10C, SOC SCI 9C.

Restriction: Anthropology and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Vb)

ANTHRO 20A. People, Cultures, and Environmental Sustainability. 4 Units.

Anthropological consideration of global environmental sustainability from the perspective of human cultures and communities. Causes and consequences of population growth, natural resource management, environmental law, environmental ethics. Case studies emphasize tropical rain forests, arid lands of Africa and North America.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 30A. Global Issues in Anthropological Perspective. 4 Units.

Explores anthropological perspectives on issues of importance in an increasingly global society. Topics include emphases on ethnic conflict; identity; immigration and citizenship; religion and religious diversity; medical anthropology; legal anthropology; development and economic change; gender.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 30B. Ethnography and Anthropological Methods. 4 Units.

Explores ethnography, anthropology's classic method. Students obtain hands-on training in participant observation, interviewing, and other methods, in local communities, and the preparation of research reports. Also provides theoretical and reflexive readings on ethnography.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 30C. Visual Anthropology . 4 Units.

Focusing on the construction of culture through visuality, this course engages traditional ethnographic films, popular media and anthropological texts to analyze ethics, “reality” and fiction; propaganda and documentary, construction of a frame, the responsibility of the filmmaker, photographer, and anthropologist.

ANTHRO 41A. Global Cultures and Society. 4 Units.

Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift. Course may be offered online.

Same as INTL ST 11.

Restriction: Anthropology and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III, VIII)

ANTHRO 50B. Gender and Global Health. 4 Units.

Examines the social forces, life circumstances, and political and economic processes that influence gendered health outcomes. Focuses especially on women located at the economic and political margins of societies throughout the world.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 85A. Cultures in Collision: Indian-White Relations Since Columbus . 4 Units.

An introduction to theories, terms, concepts, and methods used by anthropologists and sociologists to understand Native American cultures. How racial construction of an Indian "other" emerged, how anthropology contributed to Indian invisibility, and the persistence of Indian identity are examined.

Same as SOCIOL 65.

(VII)

ANTHRO 89. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 121AW. Kinship and Social Organization. 4 Units.

Organization of social life primarily in preindustrial societies. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, sexual behavior, and social roles. Comparisons of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic explanations of social organization.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

ANTHRO 121D. Cross-Cultural Studies in Gender. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with the diversity of women's experiences around the world. Gender roles and relations are examined within cultural and historical contexts. A central concern is how class, race, and global inequalities interact with women's status.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B.

Same as INTL ST 153B.

ANTHRO 121G. Political Anthropology. 4 Units.

Utilizes anthropological accounts of Western and non-Western societies to question conventional ways of thinking about power and politics. Classical traditions in political anthropology are critiqued; an alternative view is presented through recent anthropological political analyses of various topics.

ANTHRO 121J. Urban Anthropology. 4 Units.

Cultural roles of urban centers and processes of urbanization in comparative perspective, focusing on both nonwestern, nonindustrial societies of past and present; the relationship between modern urban centers and Third World peoples. Migration, urban poverty, in Africa, Asia, Latin America.

Same as INTL ST 153C.

ANTHRO 125A. Economic Anthropology. 4 Units.

Economic systems in comparative perspective: production, distribution, and consumption in market and non-market societies; agricultural development in the third world.

Prerequisite: One course in general science, anthropology, economics, geography, or sociology.

Same as ECON 152A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, Business Economics, and Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 125B. Ecological Anthropology. 4 Units.

Studies relationships between human communities and their natural environments. The role of environment in shaping culture; effects of extreme environments on human biology and social organization; anthropologist's role in studying global environmental problems, e.g., African famine, tropical rain forests destruction.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2C.

ANTHRO 125C. Environmental Anthropology. 4 Units.

Introduces students to anthropological and qualitative research on the relationship of humans, non-humans, and environments. Focuses on how to analyze and evaluate social and cultural differences in environmental perception, relations, justice, governance, sustainability, and cosmology.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2C or ANTHRO 2D.

(III)

ANTHRO 125F. Humans and Other Animals. 4 Units.

Explores peoples' relationships with other animals, a topic that continues to shape anthropological understandings of humanness, culture, and the social. Subthemes: symbol and matter, nature/culture, ontologies, relations, moralities, ecologies, futures.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2D.

ANTHRO 125S. The Anthropology of Money. 4 Units.

Anthropological approaches to money; impact of money on subsistence economies; cultural history of money; and modern transformations of money. Students conduct ethnographic research on alternative money practices in Southern California, and create an online exhibition and research paper.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 125U. Immigration, Nation, and Media. 4 Units.

Examines media shapes and reflects public opinion on immigration and its representation of immigrants, citizens, and ideas about the nation, and who belongs and who is a potential threat; as well as the relationship between scholars and journalists.

Same as CHC/LAT 123, SPPS 101A.

ANTHRO 125X. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines the movement of people across national borders, governmentality and the role of state practices to control populations, and issues of citizenship, belonging, and identity. Examples are drawn from the United States, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

Same as CHC/LAT 161, INTL ST 117A.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 125Z. Muslim Identities in North America. 4 Units.

Explores multiple identities of Muslims in North America, including indigenous Muslims and immigrants of many national origins. Explores religious, political, cultural, ethnic, class differences among American Muslims, turning to Islamic institutions or events near UCI to conduct fieldwork projects.

Same as ASIANAM 142.

ANTHRO 126A. Elite Cultures. 4 Units.

The distinctive contribution that ethnographic studies have made to the understanding of elites past and present, in particular societies and globally.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 127A. Law and Modernity. 4 Units.

The rise and spread of Enlightenment legal traditions, social contract theory, individual rights, ideologies of "liberty, equality, fraternity"; contradictions of liberal law, its understandings of "primitive" and "civilized"; pervasive myths of property, difference, race, and rights. Reading- and writing-intensive.

Same as CRM/LAW C191.

ANTHRO 127B. Global Migrations, Anthropology, and the Law. 4 Units.

Course explores how cultural contexts and national laws frame migration, and define categories of migrants, families, and people. Topics include illegality, transnational families, refugees and economic migrants, labor conditions, deportation practices, discipline and crime, citizenship controversies, and nativism.

ANTHRO 128A. Science, Technology, Controversy. 4 Units.

Explores ways in which the social sciences conceive of science as a sociocultural practice. Emphasis on literature in Science and Technology Studies (STS), especially writings that concern the relationship of science to space and place, power, and politics.

Restriction: Anthropology majors only.

ANTHRO 128B. Race, Gender, and Science. 4 Units.

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences.

Same as CHC/LAT 176, GEN&SEX 188A.

(VII)

ANTHRO 128C. Digital Cultures . 4 Units.

Explores cultural and political implications of the infotech revolution and the ways new media are used around the world, new cultural practices and spaces (e.g., cybercafes), debates surrounding the meanings of these new technologies, and their implications for transforming society.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 129. Special Topics: Social and Economic Anthropology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Social and Economic Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 132A. Psychological Anthropology. 4 Units.

Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or PSYCH 7A or (PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)

Same as PSYCH 173A.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 134A. Medical Anthropology. 4 Units.

Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world. Course may be offered online.

Same as CHC/LAT 178A.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 134C. Medicine, Food, and Health. 4 Units.

With anthropological studies of edible things as its foundation, this course explores topics related to the relationship between medical knowledge, eating, and health from a medical anthropological perspective. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B or ANTHRO 2D.

ANTHRO 134F. Anthropology of the Body. 4 Units.

Examines human bodies as both biological and,sociocultural entities and explores the relationship among mind, body,and society cross-culturally. Topics include embodiment; race, sex, gender and the body; somatization; control of the body; commodified bodies; and hybrid/cyborg bodies.

ANTHRO 134G. HIV/AIDS in a Global Context. 4 Units.

Examines issues concerning cultural conceptions of HIV infection and disease worldwide. Topics include treatment and prevention, identity and behavior, risk, ethnicity, gender, youth, sexuality, activism, drug use, illness, religion, the clinical encounter, national belonging, and the pharmaceutical industry.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 134GW. HIV/AIDS in a Global Context. 4 Units.

Examines issues concerning cultural conceptions of HIV infection and disease worldwide. Topics include treatment and prevention, identity and behavior, risk, ethnicity, gender, youth, sexuality, activism, drug use, illness, religion, the clinical encounter, national belonging, and the pharmaceutical industry.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib, VIII)

ANTHRO 134H. Anthropology of Food. 4 Units.

Examines how food communicates ideas about ethnocentrism, disgust, privilege, gender, race, labor, social identities and hierarchies, globalization, power, and the "Western diet" and its health consequences.

Same as CHC/LAT 118.

ANTHRO 135A. Religion and Social Order. 4 Units.

An anthropological exploration of religious belief and practices in diverse social and historical contexts. Emphasis placed on selected non-western traditions of the sacred, and on issues of power, ritual, moral order, and social transformation.

ANTHRO 135I. Modern South Asian Religions. 4 Units.

Nineteenth- and twentieth-century developments in Hinduism, Islam, and Sikhism are covered, with emphasis on changing forms as well as contents of religious movements and the state.

Same as INTL ST 158A.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 136A. Nationalism and Ethnicity in the Contemporary World. 4 Units.

An exploration of the concepts of identity, culture, ethnicity, race, and nation through ethnographic cases, with a view to asking larger questions: how do people create nativeness and foreignness? How does "culture" get worked into contemporary racisms and nationalisms.

Same as INTL ST 153E.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 136B. History of Anthropological Theory. 4 Units.

Provides foundational knowledge in the discipline of anthropology by reviewing competing approaches in anthropological theory, from the nineteenth century to the present. Covers historically fundamental approaches—social evolutionism, functionalism—and recent movements such as feminism, cultural studies, poststructuralism, and postmodernism.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 136D. Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Units.

Examines theories of conflict management. Analyzes how conflict is mitigated in diverse cultures: at the interpersonal level, between groups, and on the international scale. Students discuss readings, hear from conflict management practitioners, and simulate negotiations.

Same as POL SCI 154G, SOC SCI 183E, INTL ST 183E.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 136G. Colonialism and Gender. 4 Units.

An anthropological enquiry into the ways colonial relations of power have been structured and gendered throughout the world, and to what effect. Examines the social locations of men and women in the everyday exercise of colonial and imperial power.

Same as INTL ST 153D.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 136K. The Woman and the Body. 4 Units.

Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.

(VII)

ANTHRO 137A. Reading Images Culturally. 4 Units.

Provides analytical tools necessary to undertake research on visual representations. Images, as cultural productions, are steeped in the values, ideologies, and taken-for-granted beliefs of the culture which produced them. Of concern are representations of race, identity, gender, and the "Other.".

Same as CHC/LAT 116.

(VII)

ANTHRO 138J. Music of Japan and Okinawa. 4 Units.

A survey of the musics that developed in the islands of Japan and Okinawa from the perspective of the social, political, and economic forces that played upon the culture and that formed the context of these musical languages.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 138M. Music as Expressive Culture. 4 Units.

Fundamental requirements for development of a musical tradition. Guiding structural principles for new forms of expression to be understood and accepted. How members of society develop individual musical cultures which permit them to interact with the personal cultures of others.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 138Q. Latino Music: A View of Its Diversity and Strength. 4 Units.

A survey of the music of the many Latin cultures of the Americas including Mexico, Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean and of those many Latin cultures which thrive and survive in the United States.

Same as CHC/LAT 115A.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 139. Special Topics in Cultural and Psychological Anthropology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Cultural and Psychological Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 141A. Ancient Civilization of Mexico and the Southwest. 4 Units.

The prehistory and cultural evolution of the civilization which originated in Mexico, including the Olmecs, Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and Zapotec, as well as the Pueblos of the Southwestern U.S. Topics include the origins of food production and of the state.

Same as INTL ST 177I.

ANTHRO 149. Special Topics in Archaeology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Archaeology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 150A. Language and Social Cognition. 4 Units.

Explores the relationship between language and cognition in social and cultural contexts. The overall goal is to think through how language structure and use impact how individuals perceive, think about, and understand the world around them.

Same as LINGUIS 168S.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 151A. Improvisation, Language, and Culture. 4 Units.

Addresses improvisation, both in performance and in everyday life. Examines improvisation as the "flexible regulation" of everyday behavior by exploring different scholarly treatments of language and interaction, and working on developing actual theatrical improvisation skills.

Same as LINGUIS 168J.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

ANTHRO 152A. Language Origins: Evolution, Genetics, and the Brain. 4 Units.

Examines how human language(s) may have originated. Studies pertinent techniques (reconstruction) and addresses related questions, including Is our language faculty inborn (i.e., genetically encoded)? Can brain imaging and population genetics research help to unlock this mystery of human evolution?.

Same as HISTORY 135G, GLBLCLT 105, LINGUIS 175.

ANTHRO 161T. Field Research: Asian Immigrants and Refugees in Orange County. 4 Units.

Instruction in field work methodology via research projects involving the local communities of immigrants and refugees from Asia. Open only to School of Social Sciences majors.

Restriction: Seniors only. School of Social Sciences majors only.

ANTHRO 161TW. Field Research: Asian Immigrants and Refugees in Orange County. 4 Units.

Instruction in field work methodology via research projects involving the local communities of immigrants and refugees from Asia.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Seniors only. School of Social Sciences majors only

(Ib)

ANTHRO 162A. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America. 4 Units.

Surveys the prehistory of Latin America and its indigenous cultures, emphasizing the impact of colonial rule, capitalism, and twentieth-century transformations. Emphasis on communities from several countries. In some years, emphasis on comparisons between the Latin American and Caribbean experiences.

Same as INTL ST 177J, CHC/LAT 120.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 162B. Indian North America. 4 Units.

A survey of indigenous peoples in North America: American Indians, Alaska Natives, First Nations, Native Americans. Tribal populations and geographic distributions, political and social organization, sovereignty, self-determination, intergovernmental relations; cultural continuity and change; management, preservation, development of environments/resources.

(VII)

ANTHRO 162BW. Indian North America. 4 Units.

A survey of indigenous peoples in North America: American Indians, Alaska Natives, First Nations, Native Americans. Tribal populations and geographic distributions, political and social organization, sovereignty, self-determination, intergovernmental relations; cultural continuity and change; management, preservation, development of environments/resources.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib, VII)

ANTHRO 162C. Race and Empire in Colonial Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores how native people of Latin America with enslaved and free African incorporated and defied Spanish and Portuguese colonization. Focuses on religious adaptions, resistance movements, legal systems, and the emergence of multicultural communities to explain how race shaped European empires.

Same as HISTORY 165.

ANTHRO 163A. Peoples of the Pacific. 4 Units.

The cultural history and recent developments among the Pacific peoples of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia.

Same as INTL ST 158B.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 164A. Twenty-First Century Africa. 4 Units.

Comparative studies of the cultures and societies of Sub-Saharan Africa, with emphasis on critical study of colonialism and postcoloniality, social transformation, and the politics of identity.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A.

Same as INTL ST 157A.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 164P. Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia. 4 Units.

Examines the cultures and political conflicts of the more than 130 indigenous ethnic groups in the European and Asian territories of the former U.S.S.R. Emphasis is on the theoretical issues of ethnicity, nationalism, and conflict management.

Same as INTL ST 162B, POL SCI 154F.

(VIII)

ANTHRO 165A. Modern Iran: Cinema and Society. 4 Units.

Exploring modern Iran through film, literature, photography, travel writing, philosophy and social science texts introduces students to important concepts in post-colonial studies, social thought, war culture, religion and media as experienced through the paradigm of a non-Western modernity.

ANTHRO 169. Special Topics in Area Studies. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 179. Special Topics: Methods and Formal Representations. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Methods and Formal Representations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 180AW. Anthropology Majors Seminar. 4 Units.

A course in anthropological theory designed especially for majors in Anthropology. Different issues are considered in different years.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Anthropology majors only.

(Ib)

ANTHRO 190. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Senior thesis with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

ANTHRO H190A. Honors Research Workshop. 4 Units.

Students articulate the goals and significance of their research projects. Written work consists of an eight- to fifteen-page research proposal, due by quarter's end, describing the research question, the relevant literature, and methods of data collection and analysis.

Prerequisite: 3.3 or greater GPA.

Restriction: Anthropology Honors Program students only.

ANTHRO H190B. Honors Field Research. 4 Units.

Students begin or continue ethnographic field research that combines exploratory field research (e.g., participant-observation, interviews, study of archival and documentary materials) with fixed format data collection methods (e.g., standardized interviews, behavioral observations).

Prerequisite: ANTHRO H190A.

ANTHRO H191W. Honors Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Student drafts a senior honor thesis (typically) with the following sections: problem statement, literature review, ethnographic background, description of the methods, results, and conclusions.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO H190A and ANTHRO H190B. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

ANTHRO 197. Field Study. 1-4 Units.

Field study with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ANTHRO 198. Directed Group Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed study with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ANTHRO 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ANTHRO 202A. Proseminar in Anthropology. 4 Units.

Year-long intensive introduction to the history of anthropological thought and reading in classical and contemporary ethnography for first-year graduate students.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 202B. Proseminar in Anthropology. 4 Units.

Year-long intensive introduction to the history of anthropological thought and reading in classical and contemporary ethnography for first-year graduate students.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 202A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 202C. Proseminar in Anthropology. 4 Units.

Year-long intensive introduction to the history of anthropological thought and reading in classical and contemporary ethnography for first-year graduate students.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 202B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 204A. Proseminar in Medicine, Science, and Technology. 4 Units.

Explores the phenomena studied by "medical anthropology" and "science and technology studies" are inextricably linked, and how understanding formations requires moving between disparate fields of inquiry. Required for students pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Anthropoligies of Medicine, Science, and Technology.

Restriction: Students pursuing a Graduate Certification in Anthropoligies of Medicine, Science, and Technology have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 211A. Statistics and Research Design. 4 Units.

Introduces basic concepts of research design for anthropology in conjunction with relevant concepts from the field of statistics, which will be learned in conjunction with the research designs that require use of those methods.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 212A. Research Design and Data Analysis. 4 Units.

Introduces advanced concepts of research design for anthropology, presents statistical models for multivariate analysis and for analysis of systems of relationships, and includes practice in sampling and data analysis.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 213A. Grant and Proposal Writing. 4 Units.

Focuses on production, critique, and revision of student research proposals. A practical seminar designed to improve student proposals, help students through the application processes, and increase students' chances of obtaining support for their research.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 221A. Oral History, Life History. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary and comparative work in oral and life history; methods of interviewing.

Same as SOC SCI 253A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 229A. Anthropology of Knowledge. 4 Units.

Examines the politics of knowledge. Considers the long history of anthropological studies concerning a wide variety of knowledge forms and practices, including more recent feminist and postcolonial studies. Aims to investigate and enlarge normative definitions of knowledge and science.

ANTHRO 230D. Ethnographies. 4 Units.

Surveys changes in the character of ethnographic writing in the face of changing fields and topics of research. The emergence of new research terrains and the comparative contexts of ethnography are emphasized.

ANTHRO 230F. Ethnography. 4 Units.

Explores the theory and practice of ethnography with a focus on anthropology, the discipline most associated with ethnography. Students will be exposed to the theoretical underpinnings of ethnographic work, traditional and innovative practices, and sample ethnographies.

Same as CHC/LAT 217, CRM/LAW C222.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 231C. Technomethods for Sociocultural Research. 4 Units.

An introduction to using particular technologies for conducting contemporary ethnographic fieldwork. Focuses both on the practical use of these tools and the conceptual work that is necessary for successfully integrating them into specific research projects.

ANTHRO 232B. Medical Anthropology. 4 Units.

Explores historical and contemporary theoretical positions and debates in medical anthropology. Topics may include subjectivity, theories of the body, biopolitics, biomedical technologies, sexuality, pharmaceuticals, political economy and health, infectious disease and epidemics, health disparities, and humanitarianism.

Restriction: Students pursuing a Graduate Certification in Anthropoligies of Medicine, Science, and Technology have first consideration for enrollment.

ANTHRO 232C. Ethnographies of Science and Medicine. 4 Units.

Surveys current ethnographic research pertaining to medical anthropology and science and technology studies.

ANTHRO 234C. Anthropology of Food. 4 Units.

Course examines the role of food in culture history and in anthropological thinking about ethnocentrism, disgust, privilege, gender, race, identities, social relationships, kinship, social hierarchies, globalization, production, consumption, food scarcities, body image, health, and power.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 235A. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines borders and boundaries as material and semiotic constructs. Drawing upon an array of literatures, but loosely situated in U.S. geo/biopolitics, explores transformative troublings of places, spaces, borders, and bodies of all sorts.

Same as SOC SCI 254A, CHC/LAT 215.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 240A. Economic Anthropology. 4 Units.

Classic and contemporary theory in economic anthropology. Case studies: Latin America (primarily Mexico and the Andes), Africa, and the Pacific. Substantive topics: non-market exchange, markets and marketplaces, households, gender, management of common property (fisheries, pastoral lands, forests), labor, and development.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 245A. Seminar in Political Anthropology. 4 Units.

Explores anthropological approaches to politics. Covers a range of issues and topics, including: theories of culture, power, and hegemony; approaches to colonial and post-colonial relations of global inequality; and ethnographic approaches to the modern state.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 246C. Nations, States, and Gender. 4 Units.

Explores the ways in which nations, nationalism, states, and citizenship are gendered relations and processes. Questions include: How do women construct themselves as political subjects and how are constructions of citizenship and discourses of rights gendered.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 247A. Structuralism and Post-Structuralism. 4 Units.

Traces recent theoretical discussions and arguments over the philosophical and historical "subject" from structuralist decenterings toward the characteristically "post-structuralist" contemporary concern with the historical and political constitution of subjectivities and subject positions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 248A. Approaches to Globalization. 4 Units.

Historical and contemporary approaches to the world economy, emphasizing anthropological questions of culture, power, identity, inequality. Examines "neo-imperialism," "late capitalism," accumulation, global markets, urban space, the state, business and policy globalization discourse, "local" responses to and instantiations of the "global.".

Same as SOC SCI 254L.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 249A. Humanism and Posthumanism. 4 Units.

Examines alternative forms of human, humanisms, and posthumanisms to explore the inherent ambiguities and shifting boundaries of knowing and being human, and to venture into modes of analysis that problematize the universality and globality of liberal humanism.

ANTHRO 249B. Multispecies Anthropology. 4 Units.

Examines how the co-constituting categories of animal and human in tandem with investigating how engagements with human/animal relations continue to define and alter anthropology. Subthemes: meaning, nature/culture, non-humanism, ontologies, relations, matter, evolutions, ecologies, and futures.

ANTHRO 250A. The Cultural Politics of Visual Representation. 4 Units.

Develops a theoretical framework for analyzing and reading visual images. Images, as cultural productions, are steeped in the values, ideologies, and taken-for-granted beliefs of the culture which produced them and a political economy that is class, race, and gender inflected.

ANTHRO 250B. Digital Technologies, Culture, and Media. 4 Units.

Explores questions of sociality in cyberspace, including what social theories and ethnographic methods are effective in studying online cultures. Topics include general issues like indexicality, reference, temporality, spatiality, and embodiment, and topics such as language, gender, ethnicity, property, and inequality.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 252A. Queer Anthropology. 4 Units.

Explores historical and contemporary scholarship that employs ethnographic approaches to address the discursive construction of sexuality. Also examines how the discipline of anthropology has been shaped by the study of sexuality.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 253A. Design, Aesthetics, and Social Life. 4 Units.

Anthropology has only recently recognized that design demands consideration as a cultural form linked to, yet nonetheless distinct from, other aesthetic endeavors. Course is largely oriented toward collaboratively working out a conceptual basis for a distinctly anthropological approach to design.

ANTHRO 254A. Postcoloniality and the Subject. 4 Units.

Examines key issues regarding postcoloniality and conceptions of selfhood in the context of varied forms of colonial and state power. In particular, explores how technology and desire intersect with these questions of subjectification.

ANTHRO 256A. Ethnographies of Technology. 4 Units.

Surveys current ethnographic research pertaining to technologies, technical systems, and infrastructures.

ANTHRO 257A. Natures and Environments. 4 Units.

Examines social scientific understandings of natural contexts and human milieus via a survey of key analytic categories. Begins by examining historical and ongoing definitions and problems organized around “nature” and “environment” as separate but imbricated concepts.

ANTHRO 259A. Dissertation Writing Seminar. 4 Units.

Intended for advanced, post-fieldwork Anthropology graduate students. Emphasis on the presentation of research design and results, problems of ethnographic writing, and qualitative and quantitative data and analysis. Prerequisites: post-fieldwork; graduate standing in Anthropology or consent of instructor.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 289. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Anthropology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 290. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ANTHRO 299. Independent Study. 4-12 Units.

Independent research with Anthropology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Chicano/Latino Studies Courses

CHC/LAT 61. Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies I. 4 Units.

An introduction to the study of the historical foundations of the Chicano/Latino experience. Addresses such topics as empire, migration, immigrant settlement, economic integration, race, gender, and the formation of group identities.

(III, VII)

CHC/LAT 62. Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies II. 4 Units.

Provides an introduction to the arts, literature, and culture of Chicano/Latino communities. Analyzes representations of and cultural production in Chicano/Latino communities through such media as folklore, literature, art, film, architecture, dance theatre, performance, music, poetry, mass media, and language.

(III, VII)

CHC/LAT 63. Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies III. 4 Units.

Examines contemporary public policy issues in Chicano/Latino communities. Each offering addresses at least three of the following themes: migration, immigrant incorporation, identity construction, language policy, health policy, politics, sexuality, gender, labor, class, and education. Course may be offered online.

(III, VII)

CHC/LAT 64. Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in Political Science. 4 Units.

Examines major theories that attempt to explain the roles of race and ethnicity in U.S. politics. Course may be offered online.

Same as POL SCI 61A.

(III, VII)

CHC/LAT 65. Ethnic and Immigrant America. 4 Units.

Focusing on Asian, Latino, and Black immigrant groups, examines the second generation's experience of straddling two cultures and growing up American. Covers topics such as assimilation, bilingualism, race relations, education, bicultural conflicts, interracial marriage, and multiracial identities.

Same as SOCIOL 68A.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 66. Anthropology of Food. 4 Units.

Examines how food communicates ideas about ethnocentrism, disgust, privilege, gender, race, labor, social identities and hierarchies, globalization, power, and the "Western diet" and its health consequences.

(III, VII)

CHC/LAT 69. Lower-Division Special Topics in Chicano/Latino Studies. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Chicano/Latino Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CHC/LAT H80. Latina/o Childhoods: Comparative Approaches to the Study of Children and Youth. 4 Units.

Students in this seminar compare the experiences of Latina/o children to other young people in the U.S. and around the world, analyzing the historical, political, economic, and sociocultural factors that have differently structured the life stage we understand as “childhood.”.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

CHC/LAT 101. Research in the Latino Community. 4 Units.

Students engage in firsthand research in the local Orange County environment. Students identify a research problem, conduct a literature review, develop questions and/or hypotheses, appropriate methods, and write a proposal.

Prerequisite: Two courses from CHC/LAT 61 or CHC/LAT 62 or CHC/LAT 63 and two courses from CHC/LAT 110-189.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT 101B. Supervised Research for Chicano/Latino Studies Majors. 4 Units.

Students who have designed a research project & begun collecting data in CHC/LAT 101 will continue to collect/analyze data for their research projects. By end of the course, students will be prepared to write up their findings in CHC/LAT 102W.

Prerequisite: CHC/LAT 101.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies majors only.

CHC/LAT 102W. Chicano/Latino Research Seminar. 4 Units.

Taught as a writing and research seminar in Chicano/Latino Studies. Student develops own project; engages in peer editing; drafts, writes, and presents paper at Spring research conference. Prior course work in Chicano/Latino Studies helpful, i.e., CHC/LAT 61, 62, 63.

Prerequisite: CHC/LAT 101. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Chicano/Latino Studies Majors only.

(Ib)

CHC/LAT 110. Topics in Chicano Literature and Culture. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Chicano/Latino Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter. Taught in English.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times as topics vary.

Same as SPANISH 140.

CHC/LAT 114. Film Media and the Latino Community. 4 Units.

Uses film as a resource for understanding contemporary issues and problems facing the Chicano/Latino community. (Does not study cinema as a genre.).

Same as SOC SCI 173G.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 115A. Latino Music: A View of Its Diversity and Strength. 4 Units.

A survey of the music of the many Latin cultures of the Americas including Mexico, Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean and of those many Latin cultures which thrive and survive in the United States.

Same as ANTHRO 138Q.

(VIII)

CHC/LAT 116. Reading Images Culturally. 4 Units.

Provides analytical tools necessary to undertake research on visual representations. Images, as cultural productions, are steeped in the values, ideologies, and taken-for-granted beliefs of the culture which produced them. Of concern are representations of race, identity, gender, and the "Other.".

Same as ANTHRO 137A.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 118. Anthropology of Food. 4 Units.

Examines how food communicates ideas about ethnocentrism, disgust, privilege, gender, race, labor, social identities and hierarchies, globalization, power, and the "Western diet" and its health consequences.

Same as ANTHRO 134H.

CHC/LAT 120. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America. 4 Units.

Surveys the prehistory of Latin America and its indigenous cultures, emphasizing the impact of colonial rule, capitalism, and twentieth-century transformations. Emphasis on communities from several countries. In some years, emphasis on comparisons between the Latin American and Caribbean experiences.

Same as INTL ST 177J, ANTHRO 162A.

(VIII)

CHC/LAT 121. Latina/Latino Pop: Latina/Latino Popular Culture. 4 Units.

With a focus on the politics of language and space/place, prepares students to critically analyze sites of Latina/Latino popular culture including: music, film, performance, sports, media, and varied subcultures.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT 123. Immigration, Nation, and Media. 4 Units.

Examines media shapes and reflects public opinion on immigration and its representation of immigrants, citizens, and ideas about the nation, and who belongs and who is a potential threat; as well as the relationship between scholars and journalists.

Same as ANTHRO 125U, SPPS 101A.

CHC/LAT 129. Special Topics in Literature, Arts, Media, Culture. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Chicano/Latino Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT 130. Introduction to Cuba: History, Culture, and Society. 4 Units.

Introduction to Cuban history, culture, and society using social science texts, visual and musical materials. Examines major historical moments including the historical relationship between the United States and explores evolution of Cuban music from the earliest times to present.

Same as INTL ST 177F, SOC SCI 173Q.

(VIII)

CHC/LAT 132A. Chicana/Chicano History: Pre-Colonial to 1900. 4 Units.

Examines social history of the southwest region from antiquity to 1900. Discusses major questions, theory and research methods pertinent to Chicanas/Chicanos. Themes include: indigenous empires, conquest, colonialism, social stratification, ideology, marriage, sexuality, industrial capitalism, accommodation and resistance.

Same as HISTORY 151A.

CHC/LAT 132B. Chicana/Chicano History: Twentieth Century. 4 Units.

Examines social history of the Southwest with emphasis on Mexican-origin people. Discusses major questions, theory and research methods pertinent to Chicana/Chicano history. Themes explored include: immigration, xenophobia, class struggle, leadership, generational cohorts, unionization, education, barrioization, ethnicity, patriarchy, sexuality.

Same as HISTORY 151B.

CHC/LAT 133B. Twentieth-Century Mexico. 4 Units.

Examines the history of contemporary Mexico beginning with the Mexican Revolution and concluding with the present administration. Social, economic, and political effects of the Revolution; formation of a "one-party democracy"; economic transformation of the nation; the present crisis.

Same as HISTORY 161C.

CHC/LAT 134. U.S. Latino Literature and Cultures. 4 Units.

Focuses on aspects of literature, art, cultural production, and history of the multifaceted Latino cultures that have developed within the United States. Focuses on one group, such as Caribbean Americans, Chicanos, Central Americans, or a comparative perspective of several groups.

Same as SPANISH 110C.

CHC/LAT 135. Latinas in the Twentieth Century U.S.. 4 Units.

Latinas in the U.S. from 1900 to present, offering a diversity of their cultures, regional histories, sexualities, generations, and classes.

Same as HISTORY 151C.

CHC/LAT 139. Special Topics in Chicano/Latino History. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Chicano/Latino History. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino majors only.

CHC/LAT 140A. Latina/Latino Queer Sexualities. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the notion of "queer" in relation to Chicanas/Chicanos and Latinas/Latinos and provides students with theoretical frameworks to explore the shifting categories of sexuality, gender, Chicano, Latino within the scholarship areas of Chicana/Chicano and Latina/Latino Studies.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT 142. Latinos and the Law. 4 Units.

Examines a range of theoretical, empirical, and policy approaches to legal issues affecting the Latino population, with emphasis on California. Discusses topics concerning the purpose of law, the creation of law, and the enforcement of law.

Same as CRM/LAW C171.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 147. Comparative Minority Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the political experiences of Blacks, Latinos, and Asian Americans in the United States from roughly 1950 to the present. Focuses on how each group has pursued political empowerment via both conventional political channels and social movements.

Same as AFAM 151, ASIANAM 132, POL SCI 124C.

CHC/LAT 148. Racial and Ethnic Relations in the United States. 4 Units.

Examines central questions and issues in the field of race and ethnicity; the emergence, maintenance, and consequences of the ethnic and racial stratification system in the United States; the future of racial and ethnic relations; and relevant public policy issues.

Same as SOCIOL 167A.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT 148W. Racial and Ethnic Relations in the United States. 4 Units.

Examines central questions and issues in the field of race and ethnicity; the emergence, maintenance, and consequences of the ethnic and racial stratification system in the United States; the future of racial and ethnic relations; and relevant public policy issues.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as SOCIOL 167AW.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

CHC/LAT 150. U.S. Intervention in Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores political, economic, social, and cultural ties that bind Latin America to the United States. Focuses on U.S. intervention and Latin American response from early nineteenth century to present day. Case studies include Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, and Central America.

Same as POL SCI 142J, INTL ST 177D, HISTORY 166.

CHC/LAT 151. Latinos in U.S. Politics. 4 Units.

Comparing the political issues facing Latino groups by examining their migration histories, voting behavior, nonelectoral participation, and policy issues. Latino issues are examined on the national, state, and local levels, including formal representation, immigration, affirmative action, and language policy.

Same as POL SCI 124B.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 151A. Latin American Politics. 4 Units.

Introduces the main concepts and theoretical approaches underlying the study of Latin American politics, examines recent political dynamics, and explores the challenges the region faces in the twenty-first century and how countries will attempt to address them.

Same as INTL ST 176K, POL SCI 153A.

Restriction: Political Science majors, Chicano/Latino Studies majors, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT 151B. Revolution in Latin America. 4 Units.

Presents a comparative analysis of the causes, development, and consequences of selected revolutionary movements, focusing on outbreaks in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, and Grenada. Explores topics of state formation, economic nationalism, social justice, ethnicity, and role of international affairs.

Same as SOC SCI 173N, HISTORY 166D, INTL ST 177C.

CHC/LAT 152A. Race, Ethnicity, and Social Control. 4 Units.

Provides a historical and sociological survey of racial and ethnic group relations in contexts of crime control, emphasizing the roles of racial ideology, structural racism, and social movements in shaping these dynamic relations, and their significance to American liberal democracy.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Same as CRM/LAW C116.

CHC/LAT 153. Cross-Cultural Research on Urban Gangs. 4 Units.

Taking an urban policy approach, examines the background and contemporary traditions of gangs in several ethnic groups including African-, Asian-, and Mexican-Americans. Cross-cultural exploration of the varied facets of gang life. The major social-control institutions affecting them.

Same as CRM/LAW C156.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 154. Latino Metropolis. 4 Units.

Explores the processes of Latino urbanization in the United States and the spatialization of Latino identities, particularly in the context of Southern California with selected comparisons drawing from other cities.

Same as PP&D 172.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 155. Culture Change and the Mexican People. 4 Units.

Reviews culture contact and colonization, innovation diffusion, acculturation, assimilation, culture conflict and marginality, modernization, urbanization, legal transformations. Mexico and the Southwestern U.S. are reviewed through several centuries to better appreciate the indigenous base of the Mexican people.

Same as CRM/LAW C172.

CHC/LAT 156W. Chicano/Latinos and Labor. 4 Units.

Explores theories that explain the occupational pathways and workplace experiences of Latinos in various work sectors. Investigates jobs such as migrant labor, child street vendors, Latina/Latino professionals, and Latinos migrating to the U.S. South that work in poultry processing plants.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

CHC/LAT 157. Cuban Society and Revolution. 4 Units.

Explores the causes, development, and legacy of the 1959 Revolution. Themes include economic dependency, democracy, race, gender, culture, and the always volatile relations between Cuba and the United States.

Same as POL SCI 153G, HISTORY 166C, INTL ST 177E.

CHC/LAT 158. Feminisms of Color. 4 Units.

Surveys the development of Chicana feminist thought and practice. Focuses on historical contemporary writings by and about Chicana feminists. Draws from interdisciplinary scholarship in order to survey the diversity of Chicana feminisms.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 158W. Feminisms of Color. 4 Units.

Surveys the development of Chicana feminist thought and practice. Focuses on historical contemporary writings by and about Chicana feminists. Draws from interdisciplinary scholarship in order to survey the diversity of Chicana feminisms.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib, VII)

CHC/LAT 159. Special Topics in Society, Labor, Politics, Law, Gender, Race, Ethnicity. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Chicano/Latino Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino majors only.

CHC/LAT 160. Perspectives on the U.S. - Mexican Border. 4 Units.

Economic aspects of the historical development of the United States-Mexican border. The current economic situation in the Southwest and border areas as it affects both Mexico and the Latino/Chicano population is also examined.

Same as SOC SCI 173I, INTL ST 177B.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 161. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines the movement of people across national borders, governmentality and the role of state practices to control populations, and issues of citizenship, belonging, and identity. Examples are drawn from the United States, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

Same as ANTHRO 125X, INTL ST 117A.

(VIII)

CHC/LAT 162A. Urban America . 4 Units.

Students examine the historical, social, political, and economic factors that contributed to the construction of the American urban context, one that is poverty concentrated and racially/ethnically segregated. Students also critically assess the consequence of growing up in America's urban neighborhoods.

Same as PP&D 104, SOC SCI 163A.

CHC/LAT 163. U.S. Immigration Policy. 4 Units.

Examines selected immigration policy debates since the nineteenth century, rationale and consequences of immigration law since 1965, problems of administration, implementation and enforcement, impact of immigration policy on foreign relations, and contemporary debate regarding the future of U.S. policy.

Same as POL SCI 126C.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 166. Chicano Movement. 4 Units.

Explores the history of Mexicans in the U.S. with particular attention paid to their integration into the U.S. capitalist economy. Examines this economic history and the Chicano movement, "El Movimiento," within the wide context of socio-economic change.

Same as PP&D 177.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies, Urban Studies, and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT 167. Latinos in a Global Society. 4 Units.

Examines interconnections between diverse Latino groups in the U.S. and the effects of globalization on their social, cultural, and political realities. Topics include immigration, demographics, socioeconomic differentiation, familial relations, political protest/resistance, law and policy, and links to "homeland" issues.

Same as SOC SCI 173L.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 168. Chicano/Latino Social Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines theories, research, and major issues of relevance to understanding social psychological processes in Chicano/Latino populations. Topics include social development, cultural orientations, gender and sexuality, close relationships, happiness and well-being, stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination, and mental and physical health.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as PSY BEH 192Q.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, and Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 169. Special Topics in Globalization, Transnationalism, Immigration, U.S.-Mexico Border. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Chicano/Latino Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CHC/LAT 170. Chicano/Latino Families. 4 Units.

Introduction to the research, literature, and issues surrounding the topic of Chicano/Latino families including cultural history, contemporary issues, organization of family, traditions, lifestyles, values, beliefs, generational differences, gender issues, ethnic identity, evolution of demographic patterns, current economic and political standings.

Same as SOC SCI 165, PSYCH 174H.

CHC/LAT 171. Chicano/Latino Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines research and literature investigating Chicano/Latino ethnicity as a variable influencing behavior. Explores mental health needs and issues of Chicano/Latinos and discusses competent, sensitive methods of mental health service delivery.

Same as PSYCH 174F.

CHC/LAT 176. Race, Gender, and Science. 4 Units.

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences.

Same as ANTHRO 128B, GEN&SEX 188A.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 177. Culture and Close Relationships. 4 Units.

Examines cultural influences on close relationship processes including attraction, love, friendship, family, social support, and significance of close relationships for health and well-being. National and ethnic sources of cultural variation examined include Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

Same as PSY BEH 192R.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, and Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 177W. Culture and Close Relationships. 4 Units.

Examines cultural influences on close relationship processes including attraction, love, friendship, family, social support, and significance of close relationships for health and well-being. National and ethnic sources of cultural variation examined include Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as PSY BEH 192RW.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, and Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib, VII)

CHC/LAT 178. Health and the Latino Paradox. 4 Units.

Examines research and theories concerning the physical and mental health of U.S. Latino populations. Contemporary accounts, health care implications, and new directions for understanding sources of risks and resilience for health in Latino populations are evaluated and discussed.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as PSY BEH 192S.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, and Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 178A. Medical Anthropology. 4 Units.

Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world. Course may be offered online.

Same as ANTHRO 134A.

(VIII)

CHC/LAT 179. Special Topics in Health, Medicine, and Psychosocial Dynamics. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Chicano/Latino Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CHC/LAT 183. Multicultural Education in K-12 Schools. 4 Units.

Provides a theoretical and empirical overview of educational issues affecting low-income immigrant and U.S.-born minority student populations in an increasingly diverse and changing society.

Same as EDUC 124.

(VII)

CHC/LAT 189. Special Topics in Educational Policy and Issues. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Chicano/Latino Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

CHC/LAT H190A. Honors Research Preparation. 4 Units.

Students write a proposal describing their research question, the relevant background literature, and the method of data collection and analysis. Field work for the project may begin this quarter.

Restriction: Open only to students in the Honors Program in Chicano/Latino Studies.

CHC/LAT H190B. Honors Field Research. 4 Units.

Students begin or continue their research for their senior honors thesis.

Prerequisite: CHC/LAT H190A.

CHC/LAT H190C. Honors Thesis. 4 Units.

Student drafts a senior honor thesis (typically) with the following sections: problem statement, literature review, description of the methods, results, and conclusions.

Prerequisite: CHC/LAT H190A and CHC/LAT H190B.

CHC/LAT H190CW. Honors Thesis. 4 Units.

Student drafts a senior honor thesis (typically) with the following sections: problem statement, literature review, description of the methods, results, and conclusions.

Prerequisite: CHC/LAT H190A and CHC/LAT H190B. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

CHC/LAT 198. Group Directed Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed study with Chicano/Latino faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CHC/LAT 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Chicano/Latino faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

CHC/LAT 200A. Theoretical Issues in Chicano/Latino Research. 4 Units.

Introduction to theoretical issues in the scholarship in Chicano/Latino Studies. Theories from social sciences, humanities, critical theory. Topics: immigration, identity, gender and sexuality, globalization, transnationalism, social, political, and economic integration, race theory, labor market participation, social history, cultural productions.

CHC/LAT 210A. Cultural and Historial Precedents for Latinos and Medical Care. 2 Units.

Introduction to the history of Latinos, focusing on relevant pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern social and cultural developments, including issues of race, gender, sexuality, religious beliefs, and health beliefs and practices.

Grading Option: In progress only.

Overlaps with CHC/LAT 212.

CHC/LAT 210B. Cultural and Historical Precedents for Latinos and Medical Care. 2 Units.

Introduction to the history of Latinos, focusing on relevant pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern social and cultural developments, including issues of race, gender, sexuality, religious beliefs, and health beliefs and practices.

Prerequisite: CHC/LAT 210A.

Overlaps with CHC/LAT 212.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies 210A-B and 212 may not both be taken for credit.

CHC/LAT 211A. Latinos/Latinas and Medical Care: Contemporary Issues. 2 Units.

Introduction to medical anthropological and social science perspectives on Latinos/Latinas in relation to a number of health and medically-related issues, i.e., immigration, gender, reproduction, culture, social structure, political economy, sexuality, utilization of medical services, and health beliefs.

CHC/LAT 211B. Latinos/Latinas and Medical Care: Contemporary Issues. 2 Units.

Introduction to medical anthropological and social science perspectives on Latinos/Latinas in relation to a number of health and medically-related issues, i.e., immigration, gender, reproduction, culture, social structure, political economy, sexuality, utilization of medical services, and health beliefs.

Prerequisite: CHC/LAT 211A.

CHC/LAT 215. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines borders and boundaries as material and semiotic constructs. Drawing upon an array of literatures, but loosely situated in U.S. geo/biopolitics, explores transformative troublings of places, spaces, borders, and bodies of all sorts.

Same as SOC SCI 254A, ANTHRO 235A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CHC/LAT 217. Ethnography. 4 Units.

Explores the theory and practice of ethnography with a focus on anthropology, the discipline most associated with ethnography. Students will be exposed to the theoretical underpinnings of ethnographic work, traditional and innovative practices, and sample ethnographies.

Same as CRM/LAW C222, ANTHRO 230F.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CHC/LAT 221. Race, Ethnicity, and Social Control. 4 Units.

Origins and organization of racialized social control, with emphasis on criminal justice. Racial politics of criminal/juvenile justice considered in comparative (historical and international) perspective. Exploration of theoretical and methodological issues for research on race, ethnicity, and social control.

Same as CRM/LAW C241.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CHC/LAT 289. Special Topics in Chicano/Latino Studies. 1-4 Units.

Current research in Chicano/Latino Studies.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

CHC/LAT 290. Dissertation Research. 4 Units.

Dissertation research with Chicano/Latino faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 10 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CHC/LAT 299. Independent Study. 1-12 Units.

Independent study with Chicano/Latino Studies faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Psychology Courses

PSYCH 7A. Introduction to Psychology. 4 Units.

Introduction to field of psychology, addressing the application of scientific methods to the study of human development, learning, memory, problem solving, perception, biological mechanisms, emotions and motivation, personality, psychopathology, and effects of diverse social and cultural contexts on human behavior. Course may be offered online.

Same as PSY BEH 9.
Overlaps with PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, Urban Studies, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment. PSY BEH 9 and PSYCH 7A may not be taken for credit if taken after PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B, or PSYCH 9C.

(III)

PSYCH 9A. Psychology Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Designed to provide freshman with an in-depth survey of general psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Same as PSY BEH 11A.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Cognitive Sciences, Psychology and Social Behavior, Psychology, Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, Urban Studies, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment. PSY BEH 9 and PSYCH 7A may not be taken for credit if taken after PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B, or PSYCH 9C.

(III)

PSYCH 9B. Psychology Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Designed to provide freshman with an in-depth survey of general psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Same as PSY BEH 11B.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Cognitive Sciences, Psychology and Social Behavior, Psychology, Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, Urban Studies, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment. PSY BEH 9 and PSYCH 7A may not be taken for credit if taken after PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B, or PSYCH 9C.

(III)

PSYCH 9C. Psychology Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Designed to provide freshman with an in-depth survey of general psychology. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology.

Same as PSY BEH 11C.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Cognitive Sciences, Psychology and Social Behavior, Psychology, Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, Urban Studies, Public Health Sciences, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment. PSY BEH 9 and PSYCH 7A may not be taken for credit if taken after PSY BEH 11A, PSY BEH 11B, PSY BEH 11C, PSYCH 9A, PSYCH 9B, or PSYCH 9C.

(III)

PSYCH 10A. Probability and Statistics in Psychology I. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Examples drawn primarily from psychology.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10A, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10A, SOCIOL 10A, POL SCI 10A.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

PSYCH 10B. Probability and Statistics in Psychology II. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Examples drawn primarily from psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 10A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10B, SOCIOL 10B, POL SCI 10B.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

PSYCH 10C. Probability and Statistics in Psychology III. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Examples drawn primarily from psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 10B.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10C, SOCIOL 10C, POL SCI 10C.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Vb)

PSYCH 21A. Adolescent Psychology. 4 Units.

Focuses on psychosocial dynamics of today's adolescents in America emphasizing the quest for identity, independence, values, and sexual orientation. The influence of society, family, school, and peers is analyzed. Strategies for helping troubled adolescents are discussed.

Overlaps with PSY BEH 112D.

(III)

PSYCH 46A. Introduction to Human Memory. 4 Units.

Covers the core concepts of modern research and theorizing about human memory, including structural subdivisions (e.g., perceptual memory, short-term memory, long-term memory), different measures of memory (e.g., recall, reorganization), and some practical applications of memory research (e.g., mnemonics). Course may be offered online.

(III)

PSYCH 56L. Acquisition of Language. 4 Units.

What children say, what they mean, and what they understand. Theories about the learning of language by one-, two-, and three-year olds. Comparison of kinds of data on which these theories are based.

Same as LINGUIS 51.

(III)

PSYCH 78A. Self-Identity and Society. 4 Units.

Studies sociological contributions to theory and research in social psychology, with focus on the social influences on personality, attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; socialization, human groups, and social interaction.

Same as SOCIOL 31.

(III)

PSYCH 89. Special Topics in Lower-Division Psychology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of psychology at the lower-division level. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PSYCH H101A. Honors Seminar in Psychology I. 4 Units.

Focuses on the research activities and honors thesis research projects of each student and the research of various Cognitive Sciences faculty. Students discuss their research interests in the early and later stages of their projects. Research projects and write-ups required.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Honors Program in Psychology students and Cognitive Sciences majors only.

PSYCH H101B. Honors Seminar in Psychology II. 4 Units.

Focuses on the research activities and honors thesis research projects of each student and the research of various Cognitive Sciences faculty. Students discuss their research interests in the early and later stages of their projects. Research projects and write-ups required.

Prerequisite: PSYCH H101A.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Honors Program in Psychology students and Cognitive Sciences majors only.

PSYCH H101C. Honors Seminar in Psychology III. 4 Units.

Focuses on the research activities and honors thesis research projects of each student and the research of various Cognitive Sciences faculty. Students discuss their research interests in the early and later stages of their projects. Research projects and write-ups required.

Prerequisite: PSYCH H101B.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Honors Program in Psychology students and Cognitive Sciences majors only.

PSYCH 111BW. Honors Advanced Experimental Psychology. 4 Units.

Design and analysis of multivalent, factorial, and correlational studies. Students prepare proposals for independent research.

Corequisite: PSYCH H111B.
Prerequisite: PSYCH H111A and (PSYCH H11A or PSYCH 112A). Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Honors Program in Psychology students only.

(Ib)

PSYCH H111A. Honors Experimental Psychology. 4 Units.

Emphasis on design of experiments and analysis of results. Experiments are conducted in laboratory sections.

Prerequisite: ((PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)) and ((PSYCH 10A and 10B and 10C) or (MATH 2A and MATH 2B and (MATH 7 or STATS 7))).

Overlaps with PSYCH 112A.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences Honors Program students only.

PSYCH H111B. Honors Advanced Experimental Psychology Laboratory. 2 Units.

Design and analysis of multivalent, factorial, and correlational studies. Students prepare proposals for independent research.

Corequisite: PSYCH 111BW.

PSYCH H111C. Honors Research in Experimental Psychology. 4 Units.

Each student conducts a research project in experimental psychology. The projects are discussed in a seminar format. Written reports on each project are submitted at the end of the quarter.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 111BW or PSYCH 112B.

Restriction: Honors Program in Psychology students only.

PSYCH 112A. Experimental Psychology. 4 Units.

Emphasis on design of experiments and analysis of results. Experiments are conducted in laboratory sections.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112LA.
Prerequisite: ((PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)) and ((PSYCH 10A and PSYCH 10B and PSYCH 10C) or (MATH 2A and MATH 2B and (MATH 7 or STATS 7))).

Overlaps with PSYCH H111A, PSYCH 112F, PSYCH 112G.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112B. Advanced Experimental Psychology. 4 Units.

Design and analysis of multivalent, factorial, and correlational studies. Students prepare proposals for independent research.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112LB.
Prerequisite: PSYCH 112A and PSYCH 112LA.

Overlaps with PSYCH 112F, PSYCH 112FW, PSYCH 112G, PSYCH 112GW.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112BW. Advanced Experimental Psychology. 4 Units.

Design and analysis of multivalent, factorial, and correlational studies. Students prepare proposals for independent research.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112LB.
Prerequisite: PSYCH 112A and PSYCH 112LA. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Overlaps with PSYCH 112F, PSYCH 112FW, PSYCH 112G, PSYCH 112GW.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

PSYCH 112C. Research in Experimental Psychology. 4 Units.

Each student conducts a research project in experimental psychology. The projects are discussed in a seminar format. Written reports on each project are submitted at the end of the quarter.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 112B and PSYCH 112LB.

Overlaps with PSYCH 112F, PSYCH 112FW, PSYCH 112G, PSYCH 112GW.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112D. Effective Graphical Presentation of Data. 4 Units.

Learn to use MATLAB to produce graphical displays of data based on psychological principles for effective design. Approach is problem-oriented, with emphasis on case-studies using data from psychological experiments and real-world corpora. Assessment via independent individual projects.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112LD.
Prerequisite: ((PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)) and ((PSYCH 10C or SOC SCI 10C or ANTHRO 10C or POL SCI 10C or SOCIOL 10C) or (MATH 2B and STATS 7)).

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112LA. Experimental Psychology Laboratory. 2 Units.

Required laboratory section and co-requisite for Psych 112A.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112A.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112LB. Advanced Experimental Psychology Laboratory. 2 Units.

Required laboratory section and co-requisite for PSYCH 112B and PSYCH 112BW.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112B or PSYCH 112BW.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112LC. Research in Experimental Psychology.

Required laboratory section and co-requisite for PSYCH 112C.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112C.

PSYCH 112LD. Effective Graphical Presentation of Data Lab . 2 Units.

Lab to learn to use MATLAB to produce graphical displays of data based on psychological principles for effective design. Approach is problem-oriented, with emphasis on case-studies using data from psychological experiments and real-world corpora. Assessment via independent individual projects.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112D.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112LM. Research Methods in Psychology Laboratory. 2 Units.

Required laboratory section and co-requisite for PSYCH 112M.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112M.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112LR. Cognitive Robotics Laboratory. 2 Units.

Required laboratory section and corequisite for PSYCH 112R.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112R.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112M. Research Methods in Psychology. 4 Units.

Research methods in psychology for majors who wish to fulfill this requirement separately from upper-division writing. Covers both experimental and descriptive research methods, analysis of results, and reading the psychological literature. Research experience is provided in laboratory sections.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112LM.
Prerequisite: ((PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)) and ((PSYCH 10C or SOC SCI 10C or ANTHRO 10C or POL SCI 10C or SOCIOL 10C) or (MATH 2B and STATS 7)).

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 112R. Cognitive Robotics. 4 Units.

Introduces concepts on experimental design, embodiment, robot construction, and computer programming. Concepts of embodied intelligence and case studies of cognitive robotics are covered in lecture. Simple robots are constructed and programmed to carry out different behavioral experiments in lab.

Corequisite: PSYCH 112LR.
Prerequisite: ((PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)) and ((PSYCH 10C or SOC SCI 10C or ANTHRO 10C or POL SCI 10C or SOCIOL 10C) or (MATH 2B and STATS 7)).

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 113T. Introduction to Psychological Tests and Measurement. 4 Units.

Principles of psychological measurement, including elementary psychophysics, psychometrics, test theory, and the measurement of abilities, attitudes, traits, and interests. Reliability and validity of psychological measurements.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or ((PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)).

Overlaps with PSY BEH 151C.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 114M. MATLAB Programming. 4 Units.

MATLAB is a mathematical software package for solving quantitative problems often encountered in experimental psychology. Topics include rudiments of programming, statistical analysis of data, matrix algebra, signal processing, graphic visualization, and simulated models of cognitive and perceptual processes.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 119. Special Topics in Research Methodologies. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of research methodologies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 120A. Abnormal Psychology. 4 Units.

Introduction to psychopathology and behavioral deviations, and the concepts of theories regarding these conditions.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9C or PSY BEH 11C).

Overlaps with PSY BEH 102C.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 120D. Developmental Psychology. 4 Units.

A general introduction to the study of the physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adulthood.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A).

Overlaps with PSY BEH 111D.

Restriction: Psychology, Cognitive Sciences, and Nursing Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 120H. History of Psychology. 4 Units.

A history of the development of various schools and systems of psychological thought.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9C or PSY BEH 11C).

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 120P. Personality Theories. 4 Units.

A survey of the evolution of personality theory during this century. An overview of major perspectives in the field, with special attention to Freud, Jung, and Adler.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9C or PSY BEH 11C).

Overlaps with PSY BEH 170S.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 121M. Theories of Motivation. 4 Units.

Factors affecting the behavioral performance of organisms. A survey of theoretical and empirical approaches to the physiological, psychological, and social factors which generate behavior.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or ((PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)).

Overlaps with PSY BEH 176S.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 121P. Positive Psychology. 4 Units.

Positive psychology, at the subjective level, is about valued subjective experiences; at the individual level, it is about positive individual traits; and at the group level, it is about the civic virtues and institutions that move individuals toward better citizenship.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C).

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 121S. Psychology of Sleep and Consciousness. 4 Units.

Covers the physiology, neurochemistry, and neuroanatomy associated with sleep, contemporary sleep theory, REM and NREM, phenomenology, sleep disorders, examination of differences between conscious and unconscious cognitive function, the history of sleep and dream theories from ancient time to present day.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 122C. Clinical Psychology. 4 Units.

Provides overview of the clinical psychology field including theories and techniques used in counseling and testing.

Overlaps with PSY BEH 150C.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 122I. Organizational/Industrial Psychology. 4 Units.

Introduction to applied psychology in organizations, including personnel testing, selection, training and evaluation, job and classification analysis, job satisfaction and motivation, organizational development, leadership, market research, and consumer psychology. Potential ethical problems are discussed.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A) or (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B) or (PSYCH 9C or PSY BEH 11C).

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 123P. Topics in Philosophy of Psychology. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of psychology, e.g., the nature of psychological explanation, reductionism, issues in cognitive, behavioral, and neuroscience.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 143, PHILOS 143.

Restriction: Psychology and Philosophy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 124S. Sports Psychology. 4 Units.

Discusses the field of sports psychology with an emphasis on clinical practice including motivation, goal setting, performance skills, and mental skills. Discusses and utilizes a wide range of techniques designed to enhance performance and manage problems among athletes.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9C or PSY BEH 11C).

Overlaps with PSY BEH 139H.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 124V. Psychology of Violence. 4 Units.

Discusses the psychology of violence and aggression with an emphasis on understanding the psychological, social, and physiological roots of violent and aggressive behavior. Psychological treatment techniques and strategies for prevention of aggressive and violent behavior are also discussed.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9C or PSY BEH 11C).

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 129. Special Topics in General Psychology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of general psychology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 130A. Perception and Sensory Processes. 4 Units.

A general introduction to the scientific study of sensory processes and perceptual phonomena, with special emphasis in the visual systems.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A).

Overlaps with PSYCH 131A, PSYCH 131B.

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 131A. Vision. 4 Units.

Visual perception and the anatomy and physiology of the visual system. Topics include the retina and the visual pathway; visual sensitivity; color vision; spatial vision; motion perception; and the development of the visual system.

Same as BIO SCI N182.
Overlaps with PSYCH 130A.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Psychology, Cognitive Sciences, and Biological Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 131B. Hearing. 4 Units.

Auditory perception, the anatomy and physiology of the auditory system, and the physics of sound. Topics include neural transduction of sound, sensitivity, sound localization, complex sound perception, and hearing loss.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A) and (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B).

Overlaps with PSYCH 130A.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 135M. The Mind/Body Problem. 4 Units.

What is consciousness and what is matter and how are the two related? How can brains have minds? This multidisciplinary course draws on information from the fields of computer vision, artificial intelligence, cognition, neurophysiology, philosophy, and psychophysics.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 139. Special Topics in Perception and Sensory Processes. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of perception and sensory processes. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 140C. Cognitive Science. 4 Units.

Introduction to the investigations of the structure and function of the mind, from viewpoints of computation, neuroscience, philosophy, and cognitive psychology. Topics include perception, attention, knowledge representations, learning and memory, action, reasoning, and language.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or ((PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A) and (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B)).

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 140L. Principles of Learning Theory. 4 Units.

Investigation of the learning and memory processes of human and animals. Basic experimental approaches to learning and memory, empirical results, and theoretical interpretations of the evidence are discussed.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A).

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 140M. Human Memory. 4 Units.

Developments in the area of memory; history of memory research; theories of the nature of memory. Visual memory, recognition memory, high-speed scanning, free recall, short-term memory, mnemonics, retrieval, relationship of memory to thinking. Selected theoretical formulations for memory.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B).

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 141J. Jumpstart I: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lectures, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Same as EDUC 141A.

Restriction: Psychology majors and School of Education students have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 141K. Jumpstart I: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lectures, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Same as EDUC 141B.

Restriction: Psychology majors and School of Education students have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 141L. Jumpstart I: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lecture, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Same as EDUC 141C.

Restriction: Psychology majors and School of Education students have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 141M. Jumpstart II: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lectures, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 141J and PSYCH 141K and PSYCH 141L) or (EDUC 141A and EDUC 141B and EDUC 141C).

Same as EDUC 141D.

PSYCH 141N. Jumpstart II: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lectures, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 141J and PSYCH 141K and PSYCH 141L) or (EDUC 141A and EDUC 141B and EDUC 141C).

Same as EDUC 141E.

PSYCH 141O. Jumpstart II: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lectures, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 141J and PSYCH 141K and PSYCH 141L) or (EDUC 141A and EDUC 141B and EDUC 141C).

Same as EDUC 141F.

PSYCH 141P. Jumpstart III: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lectures, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 141M and PSYCH 141N and PSYCH 141O) or (EDUC 141D and EDUC 141E and EDUC 141F).

Same as EDUC 141G.

PSYCH 141Q. Jumpstart III: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lectures, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 141M and PSYCH 141N and PSYCH 141O) or (EDUC 141D and EDUC 141E and EDUC 141F).

Same as EDUC 141H.

PSYCH 141R. Jumpstart III: Early Language, Literacy, and Social Development. 4 Units.

An experiential course integrated with lecture material in the field of child development and education. Students are expected to attend lectures, complete assignments, and commit eight hours per week as mentors of disadvantaged preschool children.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 141M and PSYCH 141N and PSYCH 141O) or (EDUC 141D and EDUC 141E and EDUC 141F).

Same as EDUC 141I.

PSYCH 143P. Human Problem Solving. 4 Units.

Modern developments in the psychology of human problem solving. Topics include concept identification, arithmetic, sets, logic puzzles, story problems, group problem solving, and theorem proving.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B).

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 145P. Attention and Learning Deficits in Children I. 4 Units.

Learning in normal and attention-deficit disordered children. Covers the normal developmental course of learning and a variety of deficits. Includes field work with attention-deficit disordered children.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 145Q. Attention and Learning Deficits in Children II. 4 Units.

Learning in normal and attention-deficit disordered children. Covers the normal developmental course of learning and a variety of deficits. Includes field work with attention-deficit disordered children.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 145P.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 145R. Attention and Learning Deficits in Children III. 4 Units.

Learning in normal and attention-deficit disordered children. Covers the normal developmental course of learning and a variety of deficits. Includes field work with attention-deficit disordered children.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 145Q.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 146MW. Writing about Memory. 4 Units.

Covers a broad range of texts, literary, philosophical, and scientific, each probing the nature of memory and its meaning in human life. Readings are drawn from across many disciplines and many perspectives.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

PSYCH 148A. Cognitive Development Research. 4 Units.

Provides experience in cognitive development research, centered around the child's acquisition of number words and concepts. Students conduct research and review and discuss each other's projects in weekly lab meetings with instructor and graduate students.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Concurrent with PSYCH 228A.

PSYCH 148B. Cognitive Development Research. 4 Units.

Provides experience in cognitive development research, centered around the child's acquisition of number words and concepts. Students conduct research and review and discuss each other's projects in weekly lab meetings with instructor and graduate students.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Concurrent with PSYCH 228B.

PSYCH 148C. Cognitive Development Research. 4 Units.

Provides experience in cognitive development research, centered around the child's acquisition of number words and concepts. Students conduct research and review and discuss each other's projects in weekly lab meetings with instructor and graduate students.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

Concurrent with PSYCH 228C.

PSYCH 149. Special Topics in Cognition and Learning. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of cognition and learning. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 150. Psychology of Language. 4 Units.

Examines language using the tools of experimental psychology. From sounds to words to spoken and written sentences, explores how language is used in real time, and how its use reveals how it is represented in the mind.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B).

Same as LINGUIS 155.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 156A. Acquisition of Language II. 4 Units.

Focuses on native language learning, exploring the way in which infants and very young children unconsciously uncover the rich systematic knowledge of their native language. Examines both experimental and computational studies that quantitatively investigate the "how" of language acquisition.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 56L or LINGUIS 51.

Same as LINGUIS 150.

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 159. Special Topics in Semiotics and Language. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of language sciences. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 160A. Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience. 4 Units.

Introduction to the neural basis of human perceptual, motor, and cognitive abilities. Topics include sensory perception, motor control, memory, language, attention, emotion, frontal lobe function, functional brain imaging, and neuropsychological disorders.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or ((PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A) and (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B)).

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 160D. Brain Disorders and Behavior. 4 Units.

Examines the localization of human brain functions and the effects of neurological disorders on psychological functions such as perception, motor control, language, memory, and decision-making.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or ((PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A) and (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B)) or BIO SCI 35 or BIO SCI N110.

Same as BIO SCI N165.

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences, Psychology, and Biological Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 161. Language and the Brain . 4 Units.

Research analysis on biological bases of human linguistic capacity. Development, focusing on hemispheric specialization, plasticity; localization of specific linguistic functions in adults, with emphasis on study of aphasias; relation of linguistic capacity to general cognitive capacity, considering research on retardation.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A) and (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B)) or BIO SCI 35 or BIO SCI N110.

Same as BIO SCI N160, LINGUIS 158.

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences, Psychology, and Biological Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 161H. Hearing and the Brain. 4 Units.

An overview of brain mechanisms of hearing, including perception of simple sounds, speech, and music. Begins with sound itself, and looks at processing by the ear, auditory pathways, auditory cortex, and beyond. Also auditory development, learning, and clinical issues.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 160A or BIO SCI N110.

Same as BIO SCI N147.

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences, Psychology, and Biological Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 162B. Human Memory Disorders. 4 Units.

Focuses on models and methods of assessing human memory and its disorders. Exposure to conventional and new assessment devices provided.

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 162N. Human Neuropsychology. 4 Units.

A survey of human brain disorders using a clinical case study approach to illustrate fundamental issues in studying brain and behavior. Topics include sensory deficits, attentional neglect, amnesia, cortical organization, clinical psychopathology, and more.

Prerequisite: BIO SCI N110 OR PSYCH 9A OR PSY BEH 11A.

Same as PSY BEH 163C, BIO SCI N173.

Restriction: School of Biological Sciences majors, Cognitive Sciences, Psychology, and Psychology and Social Behavior majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 165A. Visual Neuroscience Research. 4 Units.

Covers a range of cognitive neuroscience research topics with emphasis on cortical organization of visual circuits, object recognition, motion perception, visual attention, and decision making.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Concurrent with PSYCH 263A.

PSYCH 165B. Visual Neuroscience Research. 4 Units.

Covers a range of cognitive neuroscience research topics with emphasis on cortical organization of visual circuits, object recognition, motion perception, visual attention, and decision making.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Concurrent with PSYCH 263B.

PSYCH 165C. Visual Neuroscience Research. 4 Units.

Covers a range of cognitive neuroscience research topics with emphasis on cortical organization of visual circuits, object recognition, motion perception, visual attention, and decision making.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Concurrent with PSYCH 263C.

PSYCH 169. Special Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience . 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of cognitive neuroscience. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 172S. Science and Religion II. 4 Units.

The development of genomics, stem-cell research, robotics, nanotechnology, neuropharmacology raises difficult religious and philosophical questions. Examines interdisciplinary approaches that cut across institutional boundaries, cultural borders, religious traditions. Focuses on relationship between religion and cognitive/affective/social neuroscience. Course may be offered online.

Same as REL STD 112B, SOC SCI 130B, LPS 140B.

PSYCH 173A. Psychological Anthropology. 4 Units.

Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or PSYCH 7A or (PSYCH 9A and PSYCH 9B and PSYCH 9C) or (PSY BEH 11A and PSY BEH 11B and PSY BEH 11C)

Same as ANTHRO 132A.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 174A. Asian American Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines the social and psychological concerns of Asian Americans; e.g., coping with racial prejudice, maintaining bicultural identities, dealing with cross-cultural conflicts in interracial relationships, and trying to reconcile generational differences between immigrant parents and their American-born children.

Same as ASIANAM 141.

PSYCH 174E. African American Psychology. 4 Units.

Historical overview of the development of black psychology and the African American frame of reference. Topics include personality development, psychological assessment, issues in education, black mental health, and the role of the African American psychologist in the community.

Same as AFAM 153.

PSYCH 174F. Chicano/Latino Psychology. 4 Units.

Examines research and literature investigating Chicano/Latino ethnicity as a variable influencing behavior. Explores mental health needs and issues of Chicano/Latinos and discusses competent, sensitive methods of mental health service delivery.

Same as CHC/LAT 171.

PSYCH 174H. Chicano/Latino Families. 4 Units.

Introduction to the research, literature, and issues surrounding the topic of Chicano/Latino families including cultural history, contemporary issues, organization of family, traditions, lifestyles, values, beliefs, generational differences, gender issues, ethnic identity, evolution of demographic patterns, current economic and political standings.

Same as CHC/LAT 170, SOC SCI 165.

PSYCH 176A. Political Psychology. 4 Units.

Examination of how psychological theory and research may be used to better understand political thought and behavior. Drawing on theories of learning, cognition, and personality, discusses such topics as the formation of political attitudes, and the process of political decision-making.

Same as POL SCI 128C.

Restriction: Majors only. POL SCI 128C may not be taken for credit if taken after POL SCI 137C.

PSYCH 177D. Deviance. 4 Units.

Perspectives on deviance and criminality in behavior, institution, community, and myth. The suitability of contemporary theories of deviant behavior.

Same as SOCIOL 156, CRM/LAW C107.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, Sociology, and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 177F. Forensic Psychology: Advanced Seminar. 4 Units.

The focus is on the psychology of criminal offending, particularly violent behavior. Examines violence, sexual offending, and mental disorder related to crime with regard to clinical assessment and treatment; mental health services within forensic institutions.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and PSY BEH 102C and (PSY BEH 178S or CRM/LAW C149).

Same as PSY BEH 156C, CRM/LAW C136.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, Psychology, and Criminology, Law and Society majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 178N. Social Psychology of Networks. 4 Units.

Review of network methods used in small group and organizational research. Discussion of social psychological literature relevant to the network of study of cognitive social structure, exchange/communication, identity negotiation, and social control. Case study of network datasets exemplifies research issues.

Same as SOCIOL 135.

Restriction: Sociology and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 179. Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of interdisciplinary studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PSYCH 190. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Student writes senior thesis on a topic of psychology with guidance from a three-member committee comprised of Cognitive Sciences faculty. Senior thesis includes the following: research statement, literature review, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and a written final thesis.

Grading Option: In progress only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

PSYCH 198. Directed Group Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed study with Cognitive Sciences faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

PSYCH 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Cognitive Sciences faculty.

PSYCH 201A. Cognitive Sciences Research Seminar. 1.3 Unit.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Psychology graduate students only.

PSYCH 201B. Cognitive Sciences Research Seminar. 1.3 Unit.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 201A.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Psychology graduate students only.

PSYCH 201C. Cognitive Sciences Research Seminar. 1.4 Unit.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 201B.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Psychology graduate students only.

PSYCH 202A. Proseminar in the Cognitive Sciences. 1 Unit.

Introduction to the conceptual foundations and basic research results in the cognitive sciences for first-year graduate students.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 203A. Discrete Mathematics and Probability. 4 Units.

Logic and set theory are covered during the first three weeks, using an interactive computer system. The remaining seven weeks are devoted to probability theory and cover elementary concepts from samples spaces to Chebychev's Inequality and the moment generating function.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 203B. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to statistical estimation and statistical inference. Topics include sufficiency and the Rao-Blackwell Theorem, completeness and the Lehmann-Scheffe Theorem. The method of maximum likelihood is explored in some detail. Inference in linear models covers regression and analysis of variance.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 203C. Algorithmic Statistics. 4 Units.

Discussion of the fundamentals of statistical inference and computational implementations of common statistical models.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 203D. Applied Mathematics for Cognitive Sciences Research. 4 Units.

Covers the basics of linear systems analysis, focusing on linear algebra, Fourier analysis, differential equations, and elementary signal processing. Applications in Cognitive Science and Cognitive Neuroscience research will be developed.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 205A.

Restriction: Psychology graduate students only.

PSYCH 204A. Seminar in Professional Development. 1 Unit.

Development of professional skills. Focuses on grant writing and submission process, responsible conduct of research, and ethics training.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Psychology graduate students only.

PSYCH 204B. Seminar in Professional Development. 1 Unit.

Development of professional skills. Focus on scientific presentations and preparation.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Psychology graduate students only.

PSYCH 204C. Seminar in Professional Development. 1 Unit.

Development of professional skills. Focuses on career opportunities, interests and information, and community outreach.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Psychology graduate students only.

PSYCH 205A. Computational and Research Methods with MATLAB. 4 Units.

Introduces rudiments of programming, statistical analysis and probability theory, graphic visualization, GUI design, spectral analysis, and simulation models using MATLAB, a software package for solving quantitative problems often encountered in experimental psychology.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 205B. Running Experiments Using MATLAB. 4 Units.

Provides an in-depth introduction to writing MATLAB programs to run auditory and visual experiments. Topics covered include program structure, stimulus generation, presentation, and data collection.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 205A.

PSYCH 205C. Computational Statistics. 4 Units.

Introduction to a number of computational statistics approaches including exploratory data analysis and modeling using a probabilistic framework with Bayesian graphical models. Emphasis will be on in-class programming using MATLAB.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 210A. Introduction to Cognitive and Brain Sciences I: Perception. 4 Units.

Discusses models of cognition and evidence linking cognition and the brain. Focus is on visual, auditory, and somatic perception and bottom-up mechanisms of attention.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 210B. Introduction to Cognitive and Brain Sciences II: Cognition. 4 Units.

Discusses models of cognition and evidence linking cognition and the brain. Focus is on emotion, top-down attention, goal-directed behavior, categorization, judgment, and decision-making.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 211. Attention and Perception. 4 Units.

Focuses on selective attention, the process of selecting a subset of available information for analysis and representation, and on how stimulus salience, behavioral goals, and expectations influence attentional deployment and perception. Also explores related cognitive processes and applications.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 213. The Mind/Body Problem. 4 Units.

Course is multidisciplinary, drawing on information from the fields of quantum physics, computer vision, artificial intelligence, cognition, neurophysiology, philosophy, and psychophysics.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 214. Bayesian Cognitive Modeling. 4 Units.

Considers a range of statistical methods of data analysis and simple cognitive models using the Bayesian graphical modeling framework.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 215L. Language Acquisition. 4 Units.

Focuses on native language learning, exploring the way in which infants and very young children unconsciously uncover the rich systematic knowledge of their native language. Examines both experimental and computational studies that quantitatively investigate the "how" of language acquisition.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 217. Vision. 4 Units.

Examines visual sensation and perception using psychophysical and neuroscientific perspectives. Covers visual stimulus description and generation; the eye and retinal processing; LGN and cortical visual area function; specialized processing for form, depth, motion, and color perception; and neurological disorders.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 218. Hearing. 4 Units.

Examines auditory sensation and perception using psychophysical and neuroscientific perspectives. Covers physical aspects of sound; subcortical auditory processing; aspects of sensation and perception such as sensitivity, sound localization, and complex-sound recognition; neuroscientific studies of cortical function; and abnormal auditory processing.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 228A. Cognitive Development Research. 4 Units.

Provides experience in cognitive development research, centered around the child's acquisition of number words and concepts. Students conduct research and review and discuss each other's projects in weekly lab meetings with instructor and graduate students.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Concurrent with PSYCH 148A.

PSYCH 228B. Cognitive Development Research. 4 Units.

Provides experience in cognitive development research, centered around the child's acquisition of number words and concepts. Students conduct research and review and discuss each other's projects in weekly lab meetings with instructor and graduate students.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Concurrent with PSYCH 148B.

PSYCH 228C. Cognitive Development Research. 4 Units.

Provides experience in cognitive development research, centered around the child's acquisition of number words and concepts. Students conduct research and review and discuss each other's projects in weekly lab meetings with instructor and graduate students.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Concurrent with PSYCH 148C.

PSYCH 229. Special Topics in Human Cognition. 1.3-4 Units.

Current research in brain/ behavior relationships, human memory, and learning theory is presented.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 231P. Topics in Philosophy of Psychology. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of psychology, e.g., the nature of psychological explanation, reductionism, issues in cognitive, behavioral, and neuroscience.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 243, PHILOS 243.

PSYCH 234A. Mathematical Models of Cognitive Processes I . 4 Units.

Mathematical models of various cognitive processes developed since 1960, including learning, memory, perception, psycholinguistics, and problem solving. Models are formulated in different mathematical languages: calculus, algebra, logic, probability, and computer. Difficulties in testing and validating models discussed.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 236. Multivariate Time Series Analysis. 4 Units.

Introduces multivariate time series analysis theory and methods emphasizing computational methods in spectral analysis, autoregressive modeling, information theory, principal and independent components analysis, and nonlinear dynamics. Applications to human neuroimaging data are extensively discussed.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 205A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 237. Advanced Bayesian Cognitive Modeling. 4 Units.

Considers a range of advanced cognitive process models including models of signal detection, memory retention, category learning, stimulus representation, and reasoning using the Bayesian graphical modeling framework.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 214.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 239. Special Topics in Methodology and Models. 1.3-4 Units.

Current research in cognitive sciences methodologies, concepts, and models is presented.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 245A. Computational Models of Language Learning. 4 Units.

Focuses on computational models of native language learning, exploring how probabilistic learning and inference fare on difficult case studies within language acquisition. In all cases, grounds the learning models in available empirical data and considers their psychological plausibility.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 215L.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 249. Special Topics in Language Science. 1.3-4 Units.

Foundations and current research in theoretical, experimental, and computational linguistics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 254. Human Information Processing. 4 Units.

Detailed introduction to speed-accuracy tradeoff experimental procedures; speed-accuracy tradeoff issues; quantitative modeling of temporal aspects of human information processing.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only or Honors Program in Psychology undergraduate students.

PSYCH 259. Special Topics in Human Performance. 1.3-4 Units.

Current research in the human issues involved with sensation, perception, and cognition.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 261N. Cortical Neuroscience. 4 Units.

Physiology of the cerebral cortex, theoretical neuroscience, and the neural basis of perception.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 216.

PSYCH 262. Functional Neuroanatomy. 4 Units.

It is impossible to truly understand human behavior without some understanding of the physical structure that enables behavior. Examines recent findings in functional neuroantomy through lectures and papers discussing links between particular behaviors and specific brain structures.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 263A. Visual Neuroscience Research. 4 Units.

Covers a range of cognitive neuroscience research topics with emphasis on cortical organization of visual circuits, object recognition, motion perception, visual attention, and decision making.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with PSYCH 165A.

PSYCH 263B. Visual Neuroscience Research. 4 Units.

Covers a range of cognitive neuroscience research topics with emphasis on cortical organization of visual circuits, object recognition, motion perception, visual attention, and decision making.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with PSYCH 165B.

PSYCH 263C. Visual Neuroscience Research. 4 Units.

Covers a range of cognitive neuroscience research topics with emphasis on cortical organization of visual circuits, object recognition, motion perception, visual attention, and decision making.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with PSYCH 165C.

PSYCH 265. Introduction to Functional MRI. 4 Units.

Describes the fundamentals of imaging the human brain function using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Topics include basic fMRI physics, experimental design, and data acquisition and analysis.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 267. Cognitive Neuroscience of Music. 4 Units.

Introduction to cortical mechanisms involved in music perception and production.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 268A. Computational Neuroscience. 4 Units.

Introduction to computational neuroscience. Mathematical models of single neurons, neural circuits, thalamocortical systems, and cortical mass action can stimulate single-unit, local field potential, and EEG dynamics. These models are used to investigate mechanisms of sensation, motor control, attention, and consciousness.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 205A and (PSYCH 216 or PSYCH 261N).

PSYCH 268R. Cognitive Robotics. 4 Units.

Introduces concepts for studying cognitive function by embedding brain models on robotic platforms. Topics include robot construction, computer programming, and the notion of embodiment. Students construct simple robots and program these robots to perform different behaviors.

PSYCH 269. Special Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience. 1.3-4 Units.

Current research in cognitive neuroscience.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 289. Special Topics in Sensation and Perception. 1.3-4 Units.

Current research in the reception and processing of visual and auditory stimuli presented.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

PSYCH 290. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Cognitive Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Psychology graduate students only.

PSYCH 299. Individual Study. 4-12 Units.

Individual research with Cognitive Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Economics Courses

ECON 1. Introduction to Economics. 4 Units.

An analysis of the problems society faces in organizing itself to provide goods and services. How decisions of government, business, and the individual relate to current economic problems such as unemployment, inflation, poverty, and environmental pollution.

Restriction: Non-Economics majors only. ECON 1 may not be taken for credit if taken concurrently or after ECON 20A or ECON 20B.

(III)

ECON 11. The Internet and Public Policy. 4 Units.

How the Internet works. Current public policy issues concerning the Internet. Introductory economics. Communications law. Interactions between information technology, economics, and law. Case studies about Internet and communications policy.

Same as I&C SCI 11.

(II or III ).

ECON 12. Federal Reserve: Past, Present, and Future. 4 Units.

Studies central banking in the United States from colonial times to the present. Focuses on the past, present, and future of the Federal Reserve and precursors to that system, which was established in 1913.

ECON 13. Global Economy. 4 Units.

Acquaints students with the fundamental patterns of the global economy. Emphasizes the historical roots and political implications of economic choices.

Same as INTL ST 13.

Restriction: International Studies, Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III, VIII)

ECON 15A. Probability and Statistics in Economics I. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability, statistics, and econometrics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Examples from economics.

Corequisite: MATH 4.
Prerequisite: MATH 2A and MATH 2B and MATH 4.

Restriction: No credit for MGMT 7 if taken after ECON 15A and ECON 15B. Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

ECON 15B. Probability and Statistics in Economics II. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability, statistics, and econometrics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Examples from economics.

Prerequisite: ECON 15A and MATH 2A and MATH 2B and MATH 4.

Restriction: No credit for MGMT 7 if taken after ECON 15A OR 15B. Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

ECON 17. An Economic Approach to Religion. 4 Units.

Introduction to how basic economic concepts such as demand, supply, consumption, production, competition, free-riding, innovation, regulation, and rent-seeking can be applied to understand observed religious behavior.

Same as REL STD 17.

(III)

ECON 20A. Basic Economics I. 4 Units.

The fundamentals of microeconomics. The behavior of firms and consumers: markets, supply/demand, utility maximization, resource allocation, and efficiency. Course may be offered online.

Overlaps with MGMT 4A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, Business Economics, and Business Info Management majors have first consideration for enrollment. For School of Social Sciences majors, MGMT 4A may not be used as a substitute for ECON 20A.

(III)

ECON 20B. Basic Economics II. 4 Units.

The fundamentals of macroeconomics. Government behavior: monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, and unemployment. Effective fall 2006, the content of Economics 20B is macroeconomics. This course cannot be taken to repeat Economics 20B taken prior to fall 2006. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A or ECON 13 or ECON 23.

Overlaps with MGMT 4B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, Business Economics, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, Business Info Management, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment. For School of Social Sciences majors, MGMT 4B may not be used as a substitute for ECON 20B.

(III)

ECON 23. Basic Economics for Engineers. 4 Units.

The fundamentals of microeconomics. The behavior of firms and of consumers: markets, supply/demand, utility maximization, resource allocation, and efficiency. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Engineering majors only. Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering only.

(III)

ECON 25. The Economics of Accounting Decisions. 4 Units.

Introduction to accounting concepts and principles, including the accounting model and accounting style, transaction analysis, and preparation of financial statements. An analysis of the similarities and differences between accounting and economic concepts (e.g., value, profits).

Prerequisite: ECON 20A.

Overlaps with MGMT 30A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 26A. Managerial Accounting. 4 Units.

An introduction to the fundamentals of management accounting, including the study of terms and concepts, comparisons of different costing systems, analysis of cost-volume profit relationships, preparation of information for planning, control, and evaluation of performance, and decision analysis.

Prerequisite: MATH 2A and MATH 2B and MATH 4.

Overlaps with MGMT 30B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 100A. Intermediate Economics I. 4 Units.

Determinants of supply and demand; operation of competitive and monopolistic markets; imperfections of the market system, explanations of unemployment, inflation, recessions; public policy for macroeconomic problems.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A and ECON 20B and MATH 2A and MATH 2B.

Overlaps with ECON 105A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 100B. Intermediate Economic II. 4 Units.

Determinants of supply and demand; operation of competitive and monopolistic markets; imperfections of the market system, explanations of unemployment, inflation, recessions; public policy for macroeconomic problems.

Prerequisite: ECON 100A.

Overlaps with ECON 105B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 100C. Intermediate Economic III. 4 Units.

Determinants of supply and demand; operation of competitive and monopolistic markets; imperfections of the market system, explanations of unemployment, inflation, recessions; public policy for macroeconomic problems.

Prerequisite: ECON 100B.

Overlaps with ECON 105C.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 105A. Intermediate Quantitative Economics I . 4 Units.

An advanced and mathematical version of ECON 100A for students in the Quantitative Economics major.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A and ECON 20B and MATH 2A and MATH 2B and MATH 3A and MATH 4.

Overlaps with ECON 100A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 105B. Intermediate Quantitative Economics II . 4 Units.

An advanced and mathematical version of ECON 100B for students in the Quantitative Economics major.

Prerequisite: ECON 105A.

Overlaps with ECON 100B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 105C. Intermediate Quantitative Economics III . 4 Units.

An advanced and mathematical version of ECON 100C for students in the Quantitative Economics major.

Prerequisite: ECON 105B.

Overlaps with ECON 100C.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 107. Economics of Asymmetric Information. 4 Units.

Focuses on the effects of asymmetric information in the markets for traditional economic goods and resources, such as labor, insurance, used cars, credit, and in auctions and bargaining problems. Prerequisite:.

Prerequisite: ECON 100A or ECON 105A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 109. Special Topics in Economic Theory. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Economics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 115. Behaviorial Economics. 4 Units.

Studies the behavioral and psychological biases in economics settings. Both individual decisions and games are discussed.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A and ECON 20B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 116A. Game Theory I. 4 Units.

Extensive form games with perfect information, and coalitional games. The key solution concepts are Nash Equilibrium, Backward Induction, and the Core. Substantive examples include public good production, oligopoly, electoral competition, auctions, holdup, market entry, and voting.

Prerequisite: (ECON 15B or STATS 120B) and (ECON 100A or ECON 105A).

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 116B. Game Theory II. 4 Units.

Two-quarter sequence on game theory. Bayesian games, extensive form games with imperfect information, zero-sum games.

Prerequisite: ECON 116A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 122A. Applied Econometrics I. 4 Units.

Introduction to econometrics emphasizing practical applications in microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Prerequisite: ECON 15A and (ECON 15B or MATH 130B or MATH 133A or MATH 131C or STATS 120C) and ECON 20B.

Overlaps with ECON 123A, ECON 123B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 122B. Applied Econometrics II. 4 Units.

Introduction to econometrics emphasizing practical applications in microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Prerequisite: ECON 122A.

Overlaps with ECON 123B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 122CW. Data Analysis Writing. 4 Units.

Research writing course in econometrics focusing on individual research projects. Students employ econometric analysis to address an economic question in a 20-page paper and present their findings to the class in a short presentation.

Prerequisite: ECON 15A and ECON 15B and ECON 122A and ECON 122B. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ECON 123A. Econometrics I. 4 Units.

Specification, estimation, and testing of econometric models. Applications in various areas of microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Prerequisite: (MATH 2A and MATH 2B and MATH 4) or (MATH 3A and STATS 120A and STATS 120B and (STATS 120C or MATH 131C)) and ((ECON 100A and ECON 100B and ECON 100C) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B and ECON 105C)).

Overlaps with ECON 122A, ECON 122B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 123B. Econometrics II. 4 Units.

Specification, estimation, and testing of econometric models. Applications in various areas of microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Prerequisite: ECON 123A

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 123C. Econometrics III. 4 Units.

Seminar course in which students do an original econometric research project.

Prerequisite: ECON 123B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 123CW. Econometrics III. 4 Units.

Seminar course in which students do an original econometric research project.

Prerequisite: ECON 123B. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ECON 124. Advances in Econometrics I. 4 Units.

Aims to supplement the training in econometrics for students who have completed either Economics 122A-B or 123A-B-C by covering chapters in the two texts used in these sequences which were not covered.

Prerequisite: (ECON 122A and ECON 122B) or (ECON 123A and ECON 123B).

ECON 125. Business Forecasting. 4 Units.

Students learn how to produce forecasts of the behavior of economic (and other) variables. The techniques examined are linear regression, nonlinear regression, and nonparametric kernel regression; AR, MA, ARMA, ARIMA, and Box-Jenkins.

Prerequisite: ECON 122A.

Overlaps with MGMT 180.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 127A. Experimental Economics . 4 Units.

Students will learn what constitutes proper experimental design and what laboratory experiments teach us about human behavior and the economy. Students will participate in a sample experiment, evaluate the results, and discuss experiment design and larger issues. Formerly ECON 117.

Prerequisite: ECON 15B and ECON 100B.

ECON 129. Special Topics in Quantitative Methods. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Quantitative Methods. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 131A. The Economics of Risk and Uncertainty. 4 Units.

The theory of insurance and joint-ownership of risky enterprises; optimal procedures for the allocation of uncertain payoffs.

Corequisite: ECON 100C or ECON 105C.
Prerequisite: ECON 15A and ECON 15B and ((ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B) or (MATH 131A and MATH 131B and STATS 120A and STATS 120B and STATS 120C) or (MATH 130B or MATH 133A or MATH 131C)).

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 132A. Introduction to Financial Investments. 4 Units.

Modern theories of investment and their application to the study of financial markets. The relation between risk and return, diversification, asset pricing, efficient markets hypothesis, and the market valuation of stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Prerequisite: (ECON 15A and ECON 15B and ECON 122A and ECON 100A and ECON 100B and ECON 100C) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B and ECON 105C) or (MATH 131A and MATH 131B and STATS 120A and STATS 120B and STATS 120C) or (MATH 130B or MATH 133A or MATH 131C). Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 100C or ECON 105C.

Overlaps with MGMT 141.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 134A. Corporate Finance. 4 Units.

Provides an overview of the modern theory and practice of corporate finance and focuses on two fundamental financial decisions; investment as well as financing. Beginning with discounted cash flow analysis, basic theory will be applied to the valuation of stocks.

Prerequisite: ((ECON 100A and ECON 100B and ECON 100C) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B and ECON 105C)) and (ECON 15A or MATH 131A or STATS 120A) and (ECON 15B or MATH 131B or STATS 120B)

Overlaps with MGMT 109.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 135. Mathematics of Finance. 4 Units.

After reviewing tools from probability, statistics, and elementary differential and partial differential equations, concepts such as hedging, arbitrage, Puts, Calls, the design of portfolios, the derivation and solution of the Blac-Scholes, and other equations are discussed.

Prerequisite: MATH 3A.

Same as MATH 176.

Restriction: Mathematics, Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 139. Special Topics in Financial Economics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Financial Economics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 140. Managerial Economics. 4 Units.

A collection of concepts and methods for effective decision making. Explores how the tools of microeconomics, including game theory and industrial organization theory, can be used to make better managerial decisions, particularly those involving allocation of resources within firms.

Prerequisite: (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B).

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 141A. Public Economics I. 4 Units.

Examines the role of the government in the economy and its impact on individuals and firms.

Prerequisite: (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B).

ECON 141B. Public Economics II. 4 Units.

Theory of public goods, externalities, voting models, analysis of bureaucracy, the Tiebout model, income redistribution, intergovernmental grants.

Prerequisite: (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B).

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 142A. Industrial Organization I. 4 Units.

The theory of market structure. Imperfect markets, government policies, and industry performance.

Prerequisite: (ECON 15A and ECON 15B) and (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B).

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 142B. Industrial Organization II. 4 Units.

Regulation, antitrust theory, and performance in industries.

Prerequisite: (ECON 15A and ECON 15B) and (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B).

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 142CW. Industrial Organization III. 4 Units.

Research in industrial organization. Satisfies the honors research requirement.

Prerequisite: (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B). Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ECON 143. Energy Economics. 4 Units.

The economics of markets for oil, natural gas, electricity, and renewable energy, and their interactions with each other and the rest of the economy. Effects of government intervention, policy measures, economic policy issues arising between energy use and the environment.

Prerequisite: ECON 15A and (ECON 100A or ECON 105A).

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 144A. Urban Economics I. 4 Units.

Why cities exist, economics of urban land-use, housing demand and tenure choice, traffic congestion.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A and ECON 20B. Recommended: ECON 100A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 144B. Urban Economics II. 4 Units.

Housing policy analysis, urban public goods and services, crime, pollution, urban amenities.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A and ECON 20B. Recommended: ECON 100A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 145. Health Economics. 4 Units.

Considers why some people are healthier than others, why health outcomes differ across countries, the problems of moral hazard and of adverse selection that appear in health insurance, and how hospitals and physicians behave.

Prerequisite: ECON 100A.

ECON 145E. Economics of the Environment. 4 Units.

Surveys economic aspects of natural resources, pollution, population, and the environment. Examines the causes of pollution; analysis of public policies regarding these problems. Emphasis on microeconomic aspects of environmental problems.

Prerequisite: ECON 100A or ECON 105A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 145FW. Economics of the Environment II. 4 Units.

Applications of the tools covered in ECON 145E to topics such as global warming, destruction of the ozone layer, and emissions trading. Emphasis on independent research papers. Syllabus and classes include writing technique.

Prerequisite: ECON 145E. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ECON 147A. Corporate Governance. 4 Units.

Studies topics in the internal organization of firms, including rent seeking, incentive contracts, principal-agent problems, internal labor markets, contests, and herd behavior.

Prerequisite: ECON 100A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 147B. Economics of Strategy. 4 Units.

Uses of tools of economics, game theory in particular, to develop an understanding of business decision making. Deals with questions such as how the firm decides what kind of business to be in, how large should it be, and others.

Prerequisite: (ECON 100A and ECON 100B and ECON 100C) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B and ECON 105C).

Overlaps with MGMT 110, MGMT 168.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 148. Business Decisions. 4 Units.

Surveys normative and descriptive models of decision-making behavior, with an emphasis on organizational and policy contexts. Topics include rational choice theory, biases and heuristics, framing effects, and overconfidence. Management fads, panics, and herd behavior are also discussed.

Prerequisite: (ANTHRO 10A and ANTHRO 10B and ANTHRO 10C) or (SOCIOL 10A and SOCIOL 10B and SOCIOL 10C) or (SOC SCI 10A and SOC SCI 10B and SOC SCI 10C) or (MATH 2A and MATH 2B and (STATS 7 or MGMT 7)).

Same as SOCIOL 138.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 149. Special Topics in Economics of Public and Private Organizations. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Economics of Public and Private Organizations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 149W. Special Topics in Economics of Public and Private Organizations. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Economics of Public and Private Organizations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ECON 151A. Labor Economics and Human Resources I. 4 Units.

Labor demand, labor supply, human capital, personnel economics, and other topics.

Prerequisite: (ECON 15A and ECON 15B) and (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B).

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 152A. Economic Anthropology. 4 Units.

Economic systems in comparative perspective: production, distribution, and consumption in market and non-market societies; agricultural development in the third world.

Prerequisite: One course in general science, anthropology, economics, geography, or sociology.

Same as ANTHRO 125A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, Business Economics, and Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 153W. Political Institutions, Legal Systems, and Economic Development. 4 Units.

Studies a variety of empirical papers analyzing how institutions affect economic development. The topics include cross-country studies of institutions as well as narrower topics such as corruption, regulation of entry, political connections, and pork barrel politics.

Prerequisite: ECON 15A and ECON 15B and ECON 100A and ECON 100B and ECON 100C and ECON 122A. Satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement.

(Ib)

ECON 154. Voting and Political Manipulation. 4 Units.

Introduction to social choice and cooperative games. Topics include majority rule, types of voting methods, apportionment and proportional representation, agenda manipulation, coalition formation, voting power, political consequences of electoral laws.

Same as INTL ST 156A, SOC SCI 121T, POL SCI 151H.

Restriction: International Studies, Political Science, Social Science and Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON H155. Current Issues in Political Economy. 4 Units.

Political economy seeks explanations that combine insights from both economics and politics. Topics include the interaction of government and markets, the causes of the Great Recession, and the sources of income and wealth inequality.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A or ECON 20B or ECON 13 or INTL ST 13.

Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Honors Program in Economics.

ECON 157. Economic Development. 4 Units.

Considers the process of economic development across the globe and why some countries are rich and others poor. Discusses the major problems facing developing countries, such as population growth, education, capital formation, environmental protection, and international trade.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A and ECON 20B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 158. Economics of Education. 4 Units.

Arms students with tools, concepts, and evidence that can be used to analyze complex policy questions in education, enabling students to arrive at their own reasoned judgments about how to improve education.

Prerequisite: ECON 15A and ECON 100A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 159. Special Topics in Economics in Human Resources. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Economics in Human Resources. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 161A. Money and Banking. 4 Units.

Basic elements of money and banking: institutional features and economics of financial markets and, in particular, the U.S. banking system; determinants of interest rates; the Federal Reserve and its role in money supply; effects of money on output and inflation.

Prerequisite: (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B). Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 100C OR ECON 105C.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 161B. International Money. 4 Units.

Open economy macroeconomics and determination of exchange rates. Asset-market approach to the balance of payments. Internal and external balance in the economy. Macroeconomic policies under fixed and floating exchange rates. The international monetary system and institutions.

Prerequisite: (ECON 100A and ECON 100B) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B) and ECON 161A. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 100C.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 161D. Advanced Money and Banking. 4 Units.

Studies business cycles in the United States during the last century. The first portion of the course reviews the theoretical models employed to study economic fluctuations and empirical methods used to measure fluctuations.

Prerequisite: ECON 161A and ECON 100C or ECON 105C.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 162. Poverty, Growth, and Development. 4 Units.

Examines India as a case study for each of the topics studied: growth experience of India along with its poverty eradication record, aspects of poverty, and the policies that have been undertaken to tackle poverty.

Prerequisite: (ECON 15A and ECON 15B) and (ECON 100A and ECON 100B and ECON 100C) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B and ECON 105C).

ECON 164A. The Industrial Revolution in Western Europe. 4 Units.

How do economists explain the process of economic development during the past three centuries? How has the process of industrialization affected living standards? In focusing on these questions, students will learn how to apply economic theory and quantitative methods.

Prerequisite: ((ECON 100A and ECON 100B and ECON 100C) or (ECON 105A and ECON 105B and ECON 105C)) and ECON 122A and ECON 122B.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 164AW. The Industrial Revolution in Western Europe. 4 Units.

How do economists explain the process of economic development during the past three centuries? Has the process of industrialization affected living standards? Focusing on these questions, students will learn how to apply economic theory and quantitative methods.

Corequisite: ECON 100C.
Prerequisite: ECON 100C or ECON 105C. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 100C. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ECON 164C. American Economic History from Colonization to the Present. 4 Units.

Examines how the American economy evolved from colonization to the post-war era. Topics include relations with foreign countries, the emergence of manufacturing and big business, railroads, slavery, war, the Great Depression, the rise of fiscal and monetary policies.

Prerequisite: ECON 20A and ECON 20B.

ECON 165. Economics of International Business . 4 Units.

Students learn to understand and analyze the principal economic issues in the international business arena. Covers topics such as trade theory, foreign direct investment, foreign exchange market, and strategy of international business.

Corequisite: ECON 100C or ECON 105C.
Prerequisite: ECON 100C or ECON 105C. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECON 100C or ECON 105C.

ECON 167. International Trade and Commercial Policy. 4 Units.

Determination of trade flows and the relative prices. Gains from trade, the terms of trade, and income distribution. Imperfect competition and international trade. The effect of tariffs, export subsidies, and import quotas. The effects of free and restricted trade.

Prerequisite: ECON 100A or ECON 105A.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 169. Special Topics in Development Economics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Development Economics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ECON 190. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Students work with faculty to complete their honors thesis.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

ECON 190BW. Economics Honors Colloquium II. 4 Units.

Colloquium required for honors students in Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics. Introduces students to independent research. Helps students plan a research program. Students complete their thesis.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement. Must be enrolled in the honors program in Economics.

(Ib)

ECON H190A. Economics Honors Colloquium I. 4 Units.

Colloquium required for honors students in economics, quantitative economics, and business economics. Introduces students to independent research. Helps students plan a research program. Prepares students for thesis writing.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement. Must be enrolled in the honors program in economics.

ECON 192. Tutoring in Economics. 2 Units.

Enrollment limited to participants in the Economics Peer Tutoring Program. No more than eight units earned in this course may be counted toward the 180 units required for graduation. Satisfies no degree requirement other than contribution to the 180-unit total.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

ECON 197. Field Study. 4 Units.

Not listed in Catalogue.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Authorization required or Enrollment by add card only

ECON 198. Directed Group Study. 4 Units.

Not listed in Catalogue.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Authorization required or Enrollment by add card only

ECON 199. Independent Study. 1-5 Units.

Independent research with Economics faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ECON 200A. Graduate Colloquium for Economics I. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors. Supplemented by class discussion of these presentations and other material on current research methodology.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Economics graduate students only.

ECON 200B. Graduate Colloquium for Economics II. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors. Supplemented by class discussion of these presentations and other material on current research methodology.

Prerequisite: ECON 200A.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Economics graduate students only.

ECON 200C. Graduate Colloquium for Economics III. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors. Supplemented by class discussion of these presentations and other material on current research methodology.

Prerequisite: ECON 200B.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Economics graduate students only.

ECON 202. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

Provides lectures on probability theory and the beginning of mathematical statistics (continued in ECON 220A-ECON 221A) necessary to prepare students for the required econometrics sequence. Topics include probability, distributions, mathematical expectation, sampling, and point estimation.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 203A. Mathematics for Economists. 4 Units.

Gives students the mathematical background required for graduate work in economics. Topics covered include multivariate calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 206. How to Write a Paper. 2 Units.

A course on writing. Also discusses how to make an oral presentation, how to go about doing research, and how academic journals operate. Grade based on two written assignments in which student edits and revises a paper.

ECON 210A. Microeconomic Theory I. 4 Units.

Theoretical microeconomics. Emphasis on the meaning and empirical interpretation of theoretical models. Topics include theory of the firm, theory of the market, theory of the consumer, duality theory, application to econometrics, general equilibrium and welfare economics, uncertainty, game theory.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 210B. Microeconomic Theory II. 4 Units.

Theoretical microeconomics. Emphasis on the meaning and empirical interpretation of theoretical models. Topics include theory of the firm, theory of the market, theory of the consumer, duality theory, application to econometrics, general equilibrium and welfare economics, uncertainty, game theory.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 210C. Microeconomic Theory III. 4 Units.

Theoretical microeconomics. Emphasis on the meaning and empirical interpretation of theoretical models. Topics include theory of the firm, theory of the market, theory of the consumer, duality theory, application to econometrics, general equilibrium and welfare economics, uncertainty, game theory.

Prerequisite: ECON 210B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 210D. Macroeconomic Theory I. 4 Units.

Advanced macroeconomic theory including alternative macroeconomic models, microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics, investment and growth theory, inflation and unemployment, rational expectations and macroeconomic policy, wealth effects, crowding out and fiscal policy, money and interest, open economy models.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 210E. Macroeconomic Theory II. 4 Units.

Advanced macroeconomic theory including alternative macroeconomic models, microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics, investment and growth theory, inflation and unemployment, rational expectations and macroeconomic policy, wealth effects, crowding out and fiscal policy, money and interest, open economy models.

Corequisite: ECON 211L.
Prerequisite: ECON 210D.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 210F. Macroeconomic Theory III. 4 Units.

Advanced macroeconomic theory including alternative macroeconomic models, microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics, investment and growth theory, inflation and unemployment, rational expectations and macroeconomic policy, wealth effects, crowding out and fiscal policy, money and interest, open economy models.

Prerequisite: ECON 210E.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 211L. Macroeconomics Theory II Lab. 2 Units.

Overview of stochastic processes; introduction to dynamic programming; two equilibrium concepts; Ricardian equivalence; real business cycle model; complete versus incomplete markets; asset pricing and the equity premium puzzle.

Corequisite: ECON 210E.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 219. Special Topics in Economic Theory. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Economic Theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ECON 220A. Statistics & Econometrics I. 4 Units.

Covers probability mathematical statistics necessary to prepare students for econometric study and empirical work. Topics include probability theory, distributions, sampling, and classical point estimation. A likelihood perspective is emphasized.

Restriction: Grad students only or Consent of instructor to enroll

ECON 220B. Statistics & Econometrics II. 4 Units.

Begins with Bayesian point estimation. Then covers interval estimation and hypothesis testing from both classical and Bayesian perspectives, followed by a general discussion of prediction. Finally, all these techniques are applied to the standard linear regression model under ideal conditions, and Generalized Least Squares (GLS) is introduced.

Prerequisite: ECON 220A

Restriction: Prerequisite required and (Grad students only or Consent of instructor to enroll)

ECON 220C. Statistics & Econometrics III. 4 Units.

Begins by relaxing the ideal conditions of the standard regession model. Potential topics include kernel density estimation, instrucmental variables (IV), two stage least squares (2SLS), panel data models, and simulation-based Bayesian methods, including Gibbs sampling, the bootstrap, econometric time series, discrete choice and count models, sample selection, and duration models. Covers both Bayesian and classical asymptotic methods.

Prerequisite: ECON 220B and SOC SCI 213A

Restriction: Prerequisite required and Grad students only

ECON 221A. Statistics and Econometrics Laboratory I. 2 Units.

Discussion of problems in statistics and econometrics, and their relationships to statistical and econometrics theory. Instruction in the use of computers for applied econometric work.

Corequisite: ECON 220A.

ECON 221B. Statistics and Econometrics Laboratory II. 2 Units.

Discussion of problems in statistics and econometrics, and their relationships to statistical and econometrics theory. Instruction in the use of computers for applied econometric work.

Corequisite: ECON 220B.

ECON 221C. Statistics and Econometrics Laboratory III. 2 Units.

Discussion of problems in statistics and econometrics, and their relationships to statistical and econometrics theory. Instruction in the use of computers for applied econometric work.

Corequisite: ECON 220C.

ECON 222. Replication and Applied Economics Writing. 4 Units.

Before the course begins, students choose a published empirical economics article and obtain the necessary data to replicate it. Students will replicate and extend the economic analysis and write a paper describing their work.

Prerequisite: ECON 220A and ECON 220B and ECON 220C.

ECON 223A. Discrete Choice Econometrics. 4 Units.

Specification, estimation, and testing of discrete choice models, with emphasis on cross-sectional and panel data models and applications. Students use computer packages to apply models and techniques to real data.

Prerequisite: ECON 220A and ECON 220B and ECON 220C.

ECON 224A. Time Series Econometrics. 4 Units.

Econometric analysis of time series data. Moving average and autoregressive series, regression analysis, Box-Jenkins techniques, computational methods, and causality conditions.

Prerequisite: ECON 220A and ECON 220B and ECON 220C.

ECON 227A. Experimental Econ I . 4 Units.

An introduction to experimental social science. Students learn experimental methodology, design, and analysis, and be exposed to active research areas. Each student writes a proposal for their own experiment and presents the design in class.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 227B. Experimental Econ II. 4 Units.

Focuses on implementing experimental projects in a laboratory environment. Subjects learn about human subjects protection, program experimental software for their own projects, and conduct live experiment sessions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 229. Special Topics in Social Dynamics Seminar. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Social Dynamics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ECON 232. Business Cycles in Historical Perspective. 4 Units.

Investigates business cycles in the United States and worldwide during the last two centuries. Topics include causes and consequences of business fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, models of fluctuations, and empirical macroeconomics.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A and ECON 210B and ECON 210C and ECON 210D and ECON 210E and ECON 210F.

ECON 233. European Economic History. 4 Units.

Focuses on European economic history between 1500 and 1910. Examines the causes of the Industrial Revolution and globalization. Particular topics: productivity growth, transport improvements, technological change, capital markets, property rights, international trade.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A and ECON 210B and ECON 210C and ECON 210D and ECON 210E and ECON 210F.

ECON 234. American Economic History. 4 Units.

Focuses on American economic history from colonization onwards. Topics include the development of legal systems, transport systems, financial markets, industrialization, migration, immigration, technological change, and the consequences of slavery.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A and ECON 210B and ECON 210C and ECON 210D and ECON 210E and ECON 210F.

ECON 239. Special Topics in Financial Economics. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Financial Economics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ECON 241A. Industrial Organization I. 4 Units.

Analysis of the structure and economic performance of markets, and the impact of public policy and their efficiency and equity. Effects of information structure. Oligopoly, cartels, mergers, vertical integration, patents, innovation, antitrust, and regulation.

Prerequisite: ECON 100B and ECON 203A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 241B. Industrial Organization II. 4 Units.

Analysis of the structure and economic performance of markets, and the impact of public policy and their efficiency and equity. Effects of information structure. Price flexibility and dispersion, auctions, search and industrial structure, intrafirm organization.

Prerequisite: ECON 241A and ECON 100B and ECON 203A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 243A. Game Theory. 4 Units.

A formal introduction to non-cooperative game theory. Topics include properties of Nash Equilibrium and equilibrium refinements, games with imperfect information, and games with incomplete information.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A and ECON 210B and ECON 210C.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 243B. Advanced Game Theory. 4 Units.

Provides advanced instruction in game theory. The topics covered will be (i) the theory of repeated games and (ii) evolutionary game theory. Applications include bargaining, collusion, reputation, social norms, and the evolution of preferences via natural selection and cultural transmission.

Prerequisite: ECON 243A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 245. Empirical Methods in Applied Microeconomics. 4 Units.

Focuses on the empirical methods used in modern applied microeconomics. Teaches methods that can be applied to produce original research in applied fields using cross-sectional and panel data. Applications will be drawn heavily from labor, public, health and development economics.

ECON 249. Special Topics in Microeconomics. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Microeconomics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ECON 251A. Labor Economics I . 4 Units.

Analysis of the relationships between education and the labor market (human capital theory), between resources devoted to education and the return to education (the education production function) and between education and labor market inequality (the theory of skill-biased technical change).

Prerequisite: ECON 203A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 251B. Labor Economics II. 4 Units.

Analysis of core topics in labor economics, with an emphasis on empirical methods. Topics may include minimum wages, discrimination, gender, aging and retirement, labor market networks, personnel economics, and employment policy.

Prerequisite: ECON 203A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 251C. Labor Economics III . 4 Units.

Discussion of treatment effect/program evaluation in labor economics, emphasizing identification. Classical labor topics, including human capital, technology, wages, labor supply, and migration are discussed in the context of causal inference. A unified framework is used in analyzing identification strategies.

Prerequisite: ECON 203A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 255. Microeconomics and Public Policy. 4 Units.

Introduces the fundamental principles of microeconomics that are required for applied policy analysis. Provides students with an intuitive understanding of the microeconomic approach, and familiarizes them with concepts used in applied public policy analysis.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PUB POL 240.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 259. Special Topics in Labor Economics. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Labor Economics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ECON 260A. Monetary Economics I. 4 Units.

Focuses on the derivation and estimation of state-of-the-art Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) models, with particular emphasis on models useful for monetary policy.

ECON 260B. Monetary Economics II. 4 Units.

Surveys recent issues on monetary policy in uncertain environments. Examines settings where both the policy makers and the private sector are uncertain of future outcomes or the underlying economic structure.

ECON 261A. International Trade I. 4 Units.

Covers theoretical models, empirical methods, and policy issues in international trade. Following the conventional treatment of the Richardian model, the Heckscher-Ohlin model and the specific factors model, new trade models which incorporate scale economics and imperfect competition will be discussed.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A and ECON 210B.

ECON 263A. Advanced Macroeconomics I. 4 Units.

Students build Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) macroeconomic models from microeconomic foundations. This approach emphasizes intertemporal optimization by firms and households and typically incorporates nominal rigidities such as sluggish price and/or wage adjustment.

ECON 263B. Advanced Macroeconomics II. 4 Units.

Extensively studies policy in dynamic models. Topics: rule versus discretionary-based policy and its implications for macroeconomic stability and multiple equilibria; the design of optimal monetary policy; economic policy with model uncertainty and when the economic model is unknown.

Prerequisite: ECON 263A.

ECON 269. Special Topics in Macroeconomics. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Macroeconomics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ECON 270A. Political Economy I. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Same as POL SCI 270A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 270B. Political Economy II. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 270A.

Same as POL SCI 270B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 270C. Political Economy III. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 270B.

Same as POL SCI 270C.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 272A. Public Economics I. 4 Units.

Covers welfare economics and the theory of optimal taxation. Also presents applications of the theory, including measurement of the distortionary cost of taxation and principles of environmental policy (instrument choice and the debate on the double dividend of environmental taxation).

Prerequisite: ECON 210A and ECON 210B and ECON 210C.

ECON 272B. Public Economics II. 4 Units.

Covers the theory of public goods and models of decentralized provision of such goods, including voluntary provision, voting, bureaucratic provision, and preference relevation mechanisms.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A and ECON 210B and ECON 210C.

ECON 272C. Public Economics III. 4 Units.

Covers two broad categories of government expenditure policies, redistribution programs and social insurance, from a theoretical and empirical perspective as well as the effects on individuals of the income tax system.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A and ECON 210B and ECON 210C.

ECON 275. Economics of Government. 4 Units.

Prepares students to analyze public policy questions with tools from economics. By the end, students should be able to identify important economic issues in public policy debates and consume and critique economic research on these topics.

Same as PUB POL 227.

ECON 279. Special Topics in Political Economy. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Political Economy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ECON 281A. Urban Economics I. 4 Units.

Economic reasons for the existence of cities, analysis of urban spatial structure, urban sprawl, Third World urbanization, hedonic price analysis, housing tenure choice.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A.

ECON 281B. Urban Economics II. 4 Units.

Housing in the portfolio, land-use controls, rent control, homelessness, neighborhood effects, urban quality-of-life measurement, and subcenters.

Prerequisite: ECON 210A.

ECON 282A. Transportation Economics I. 4 Units.

Applies microeconomic concepts of demand, costs, pricing, investment, and project evaluation to analyze transportation activities. Empirical studies include travel demand using discrete models, and cost functions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 282B. Transportation Economics II. 4 Units.

Economics of the airline industry. Hub-and-spoke networks, the effects of competition on airfares, price dispersion, airline alliances, airport congestion, product unbundling.

Prerequisite: ECON 282A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 285A. Colloquium for Transportation Science I. 2 Units.

Selected perspectives on transportation based on the study of human behavior. Organized by Interdisciplinary Program in Transportation Science. Research presentations by faculty, students, and visitors supplemented by class discussion.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ECON 289. Special Topics in Urban and Transportation Economics. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Urban and Transportation Economics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ECON 290. Dissertation Research. 2-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Economics faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ECON 299. Independent Study. 2-4 Units.

Independent research with Economics faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

International Studies Courses

INTL ST 11. Global Cultures and Society. 4 Units.

Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift. Course may be offered online.

Same as ANTHRO 41A.

Restriction: Anthropology and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III, VIII)

INTL ST 13. Global Economy. 4 Units.

Acquaints students with the fundamental patterns of the global economy. Emphasizes the historical roots and political implications of economic choices.

Same as ECON 13.

Restriction: International Studies, Economics, Quantitative Economics, and Business Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III, VIII)

INTL ST 14. Introduction to International Relations. 4 Units.

Analysis of political relations between and among nations with emphasis on explanations of conflict and cooperation. The role of ideologies and their relation to international problems are also examined. Course may be offered online.

Same as POL SCI 41A.

Restriction: International Studies and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III, VIII)

INTL ST 32A. Dilemmas of Diversity. 4 Units.

Focuses on racial, ethnic, and gender diversity, multiculturalism, and their impact on our social and political ideals. Traces the sources of ideas about difference, equality, and toleration, and examines tensions that occur when forms of identity conflict with one another.

Same as POL SCI 32A.

(VII)

INTL ST 105A. Game Theory and Politics I. 4 Units.

Introduction to game theory and a survey of its political applications. Examples of topics covered include voting in small committees, legislatures, and mass elections; interest group activities and environmental issues; institutional design, and the evolution of cooperative behavior.

Same as POL SCI 130A, SOC SCI 103A, SOCIOL 134.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, Sociology, Political Science, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 105B. Game Theory and Politics II. 4 Units.

More advanced game theory and its political applications, beginning where Game Theory and Politics I ends. Examples of topics covered include revolutions; arms race; spatial models of party competition; political manipulation; political coalitions and their power.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 130A or ECON 116A.

Same as POL SCI 130B, SOC SCI 103B.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, International Studies, and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 111B. World of Coffee . 4 Units.

History of consumption and production of coffee over the centuries, and coffee's cultural, economic, social, political consequences. Coffee's social life as a drug, symbol of hospitality, religious rite, sociability and bourgeois lifestyle, commodity, source of livelihoods, imperial revenues, corporate profits.

Same as HISTORY 163.

INTL ST 111C. Global Economics and Security. 4 Units.

Analyzes U.S. economic strategy, the impact of U.S. foreign policy on economic strategy, the rise and the challenge of future Great Powers, and focuses on theories of growth, hegemonic stability, and the rise of interdependence in the economic field.

INTL ST 112A. International Business. 4 Units.

Introduction to conducting business in the international arena, decision making in the organization, and globalization of markets and production. Topics covered range from tax and finance to ethics, marketing, and more. Continuing corporate regulatory scandals discussed.

Same as SOC SCI 115D.

INTL ST 114A. International Political Economy. 4 Units.

Examination of problems in global political-economic relations through competing conceptual lenses or grand theories: mercantilism, liberalism, and Marxism. Surveys North-North and North-South issues relating power and wealth.

Same as POL SCI 141B.

(VIII)

INTL ST 114D. Political Economy of Japan. 4 Units.

Surveys postwar developments in the politics and political economy of Japan. Topics include the political and institutional context of policy making; pressures for change which Japan's political economy has faced in the last decade; Japan's past and present foreign policies.

Same as POL SCI 155F.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 117A. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines the movement of people across national borders, governmentality and the role of state practices to control populations, and issues of citizenship, belonging, and identity. Examples are drawn from the United States, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

Same as CHC/LAT 161, ANTHRO 125X.

(VIII)

INTL ST 117B. Migration Destinations. 4 Units.

Examines the migration patterns to the three largest nations that receive immigrants (i.e., permanent settlers): Australia, Canada, and the United States.

Same as ASIANAM 171A, SOCIOL 175D.

INTL ST 121. Social Ecology of Peace. 4 Units.

Examination of differing definitions of the problem of achieving peace and the special problems of seeking peace in the nuclear age.

Same as SOCECOL E113.

INTL ST 122. Nuclear Environments. 4 Units.

Understanding the impact of the nuclear age on the environment and human health through interrelated developments of nuclear power and nuclear weapons. The early years of weapon development, catastrophic environmental pollution, perils of nuclear power in the U.S. and Russia.

Same as SOCECOL E127, PUBHLTH 168.

INTL ST 124A. Introduction to the Comparative Study of Legal Cultures. 4 Units.

Traces the anthropological and comparative cultural study of law from the nineteenth century to the present; briefly surveys the diversity of recorded legal cultures and critically examines key concepts which have been used to describe and classify them.

Same as CRM/LAW C102.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 124B. New Democracies. 4 Units.

Examines what democracy is; considers competing theories about its causes; explores multiple democratic institutions; discusses several types of democracy; and analyzes various aspects of democratic quality and stability, focusing on Eastern Europe, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Same as POL SCI 155A.

INTL ST 130. Transnational Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines the internationalization of U.S. domestic street gangs. The relationship between California gangs Mara Salvatrucha and 18th Street and Mexico/Central American gangs is assessed. Specified topics include: mobilization, migration, territorialism, culture, organization, and use of technology. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Same as SOC SCI 120.
Overlaps with SOC SCI XI120, INTL ST XI130.

INTL ST 131A. Just War Revisited. 4 Units.

Examines the evolution of the doctrine of the just war across the history of Western political thought, the importance of changes in the doctrine and whether it applies today; examines international relations case studies to determine today's relevancy.

Same as POL SCI 135B.

INTL ST 135. California and Global Economy. 4 Units.

Presents the nature of the State's economy and the current and projected role of California in the world economy.

Same as SOC SCI 115E.

INTL ST 140A. Approaches to International Relations. 4 Units.

Reviews theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of international relations using contending perspectives to analyze power and influence, capabilities, interdependence, reciprocity, international regimes, anarchy, cooperation, imperialism, and hegemony.

Same as POL SCI 144A.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 141A. Intelligence in International Politics. 4 Units.

Intelligence agencies, activities, and functions—their impact on international politics; how governments and societies seek to control intelligence agencies and activities; and how intelligence agencies work—their techniques, resources, technology, problems, successes, and failures.

Same as POL SCI 143F.

Restriction: Political Science and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 141B. Homeland Security . 4 Units.

Examines the 9/11 origins of the concept of homeland security; assess the evolution, structure, and operations of the Department of Homeland Security; critically examines the evolution of threat assessment to the U.S. and the utilization of risk management methodologies.

Same as POL SCI 143G.

INTL ST 142A. U.S. Foreign Policy I: Globalism and Cold War. 4 Units.

Looks at changing international perspectives, policy responses, and military strategies of presidential administrations from Truman to Reagan. In assessing the motives and objectives of U.S. foreign policy leaders during the “Cold War” era, the concept of “national interest” is examined.

Same as POL SCI 142D.

Restriction: International Studies and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 142B. U.S. Foreign Policy II: Cold War Decline & After. 4 Units.

Deals with U.S. foreign policy from the post-Vietnam War era through the collapse of the Cold War and into the emergence of the post-Cold War era, roughly from 1972 to the present.

Same as POL SCI 142E.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 142C. U.S. Foreign Policy III: National Security Decision-Making. 4 Units.

Concept of "national security" from 1947-1990s is reviewed. Organizational and psychological factors that influence decision-making, the dangers of "groupthink," and the issue of accountability are analyzed. National security agenda (military, economic, environmental, and social) for the 1990s is discussed.

Same as POL SCI 142F.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 142D. The International Relations of East Asia. 4 Units.

Surveys various aspects of relations between the nations of East Asia. Topics include the historical development of the region; current political and security relations, including the impact of the American military presence.

Same as POL SCI 142B.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 142E. U.S. Coercive Diplomacy. 4 Units.

Examines the theory of compellence and the U.S. practice of coercive diplomacy--the power to change behavior of other governments. Specific case examples: the Cuban missile crisis, bombing of North Vietnam, the Nicaraguan Contras, Desert Shield/Desert Storm, and Libya.

Same as POL SCI 142G.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 142G. U.S. Foreign Policy Toward Asia. 4 Units.

U.S. policy toward the countries of East Asia: bilateral and regional security relationships, U.S. economic relations with the major Asian countries, the development of regional institutions, and human rights.

Same as POL SCI 141E.

INTL ST 143A. Vietnam War. 4 Units.

Examines social structures and social changes in Vietnamese and U.S. societies through the study of the Vietnam War.

Same as SOCIOL 170A.

INTL ST 144A. Comparative Politics: Four Nations, Three Continents. 4 Units.

Studies four countries in a comparative fashion: their respective political histories and cultural traditions; actual differences among their superficially similar party, parliamentary, and executive institutions; contemporary economic policy. The countries represent three continents and varying levels of economic development.

Same as POL SCI 154C.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 145A. International Law. 4 Units.

Examination of the origin, changing structure, application of international law, and the role of legal norms in regulating the behavior of states and maintaining international order.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as POL SCI 172A.

(VIII)

INTL ST 145C. Constitution and Rights. 4 Units.

How are constitutions crafted, maintained, and changed? Does constitutionalism support or undermine democracy? What difference do rights and constitutional courts make? Explores these questions through a comparative examination of the theory and practice of constitutionalism in developing democracies.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as POL SCI 172C.

INTL ST 145D. Courts in New Democracies . 4 Units.

Examines the conceptual, theoretical, and empirical foundations of the study of courts and politics in new democracies, introducing students to a variety of contemporary debates about how political dynamics shape courts, and how courts shape politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as POL SCI 172D.

INTL ST 151B. Religion and World Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the relationship between religion and world politics historically and today, focusing on connections with peace/war, democracy, human rights, secularism(s), and globalization. Covers major debates, scholarship, concepts, and theories through class exercises, exams, and essays.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 41A or INTL ST 11 or INTL ST 12 or REL STD 5A or REL STD 5B or REL STD 5C.

Same as POL SCI 146B, REL STD 115.

INTL ST 152A. Non-Government Organization (NGO) Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Introduction to non-governmental organizations, including their role in U.S. society and the international community. Explores varying definitions of NGOs and the characteristics held in common by all NGOs.

Same as SOC SCI 152A.

INTL ST 153B. Cross-Cultural Studies in Gender. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with the diversity of women's experiences around the world. Gender roles and relations are examined within cultural and historical contexts. A central concern is how class, race, and global inequalities interact with women's status.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A or ANTHRO 2B.

Same as ANTHRO 121D.

INTL ST 153C. Urban Anthropology. 4 Units.

Cultural roles of urban centers and processes of urbanization in comparative perspective, focusing on both nonwestern, nonindustrial societies of past and present; the relationship between modern urban centers and Third World peoples. Migration, urban poverty, in Africa, Asia, Latin America.

Same as ANTHRO 121J.

INTL ST 153D. Colonialism and Gender. 4 Units.

An anthropological enquiry into the ways colonial relations of power have been structured and gendered throughout the world, and to what effect. Examines the social locations of men and women in the everyday exercise of colonial and imperial power.

Same as ANTHRO 136G.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 153E. Nationalism and Ethnicity in the Contemporary World. 4 Units.

An exploration of the concepts of identity, culture, ethnicity, race, and nation through ethnographic cases, with a view to asking larger questions: how do people create nativeness and foreignness? How does "culture" get worked into contemporary racisms and nationalisms.

Same as ANTHRO 136A.

(VIII)

INTL ST 153F. Militarism and Gender. 4 Units.

Examination of feminist approaches to militarism, war, and political violence; drawing on representations of women as both victims of and participants in military violence; effects of militarism on formations of gender; effects of military industrial complex on nationalism and identity.

Same as GEN&SEX 167A.

INTL ST 154. Ethics and Justice in International Affairs. 4 Units.

Analyzes choices regarding the use of force, resolving conflict, and promoting human rights and social justice. Special attention is given to the American experience as a principal case study of ethics and statecraft.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 154B. Human Rights. 4 Units.

Examines the causes and consequences of human rights violations with a focus on Latin America. What are human rights? When and where are they violated? What political mechanisms are available to deal with human rights problems? How effective are they.

Same as POL SCI 153E.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 154C. Ethics in an Age of Terror and Genocide. 4 Units.

Original sources document personal impact of wars on genocides, from World War II to the Bosnian and Rwandan genocides and current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Students train for and conduct personal interviews with someone who lived through a war.

Same as POL SCI 145A.

INTL ST 154W. Ethics and Justice in International Affairs. 4 Units.

Analyzes choices regarding the use of force, resolving conflict, and promoting human rights and social justice. Special attention is given to the American experience as a principal case study of ethics and statecraft.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

INTL ST 155A. International Journalism. 4 Units.

Studies and critically analyzes how the media covers international issues that have reshaped. American foreign coverage and the implications for Americans and U.S. foreign policy. Focuses on international reporting as a way of developing fundamental skills of journalism.

Same as SOC SCI 184F.

INTL ST 155BW. Media Writing. 4 Units.

Designed to teach reporting and news writing basics. Students learn how to gather and organize information, ask effective questions, develop story ideas, research facts, and write stories on deadline. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as SOC SCI 184GW.
Overlaps with INTL ST XI155B, SOC SCI XI184G.

Restriction: International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

INTL ST 156A. Voting and Political Manipulation. 4 Units.

Introduction to social choice and cooperative games. Topics include majority rule, types of voting methods, apportionment and proportional representation, agenda manipulation, coalition formation, voting power, political consequences of electoral laws.

Same as POL SCI 151H, SOC SCI 121T, ECON 154.

Restriction: International Studies, Political Science, Social Science and Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 157A. Twenty-First Century Africa. 4 Units.

Comparative studies of the cultures and societies of Sub-Saharan Africa, with emphasis on critical study of colonialism and postcoloniality, social transformation, and the politics of identity.

Prerequisite: ANTHRO 2A.

Same as ANTHRO 164A.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 158A. Modern South Asian Religions. 4 Units.

Nineteenth- and twentieth-century developments in Hinduism, Islam, and Sikhism are covered, with emphasis on changing forms as well as contents of religious movements and the state.

Same as ANTHRO 135I.

(VIII)

INTL ST 158B. Peoples of the Pacific. 4 Units.

The cultural history and recent developments among the Pacific peoples of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia.

Same as ANTHRO 163A.

(VIII)

INTL ST 158D. China in the Global Age. 4 Units.

Chinese society from 1949 to present. Social change in the context of political control and ideological considerations. Focus on the power structure, political decision processes, and ideological legitimation, and interplay with the Chinese community and its culture.

Same as SOCIOL 175B.

INTL ST 161A. Political Islam. 4 Units.

Political Islamd is a diverse phenomenon. While noticeable barriers exist to "Islamist democracy," it is the Islamists who will define the political future of much of the Muslim world. Reviews the experience of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Pakistan, Turkey, and Indonesia.

Same as SOC SCI 188K.

INTL ST 162. Afghanistan. 4 Units.

Provides an examination of Afghanistan's traditional social organization, economy, political organization, and relationship among ethnic groups as a basis for discussing the consequences of domestic political turmoil and foreign interventions over the last 20 years. Current situation and future addressed.

Same as SOC SCI 188I, POL SCI 158C.

INTL ST 162B. Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia. 4 Units.

Examines the cultures and political conflicts of the more than 130 indigenous ethnic groups in the European and Asian territories of the former U.S.S.R. Emphasis is on the theoretical issues of ethnicity, nationalism, and conflict management.

Same as POL SCI 154F, ANTHRO 164P.

(VIII)

INTL ST 165. Introduction to Contemporary Middle East Politics. 4 Units.

An overview of basic issues that shape the politics of the Middle East and North Africa. Themes include implication of the colonization era, nation-state formation, inter-Arab relations, nationalism, Arab-Israel conflict, Islamic resurgence, and more.

Same as SOC SCI 188A, POL SCI 158D.

INTL ST 166. Psychology of the Middle East Conflict. 4 Units.

Explores how emotions guide actions; political movements and social identity factors in ethnic, religious, or other group conflicts; psycho-biographies of political leaders and effects on foreign policy making; decisions to go to war; psychological dimensions of conflict and conflict resolution.

Same as SOC SCI 188M.

INTL ST 168. Iran: Past and Present. 4 Units.

Pre-revolutionary Iran; and Iran since the revolution. History, oil and politics: domestic and international.

Same as SOC SCI 188D.

INTL ST 170. Israel and the World: An Introduction. 4 Units.

Examines the founding of Israel, its relationship with the Arab world, the role of the international community, and the challenges it faces today.

Same as SOC SCI 188E.

INTL ST 174. Middle East Narratives. 4 Units.

Explores various narratives of peoples living in the Middle East: Bedouins, Jews, Muslims, Christians, Druze, Baha’i; looks at how their identities were formed and altered over time through empire, religion, exodus, war, democracy, diasporas; focus is philosophical and historical.

Same as POL SCI 136D.

INTL ST 175A. U.S. War on Terrorism. 4 Units.

Analyzes the United States war on terrorism by focusing on terrorism, the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and changes in police powers through the Patriot Act, as well as the political leadership which directs the war.

Same as SOCIOL 170B.

INTL ST 176A. African Politics. 4 Units.

An overview of African politics in comparative perspective. Central themes include the analysis of state-nation building in Africa, Africa’s economy, and its civil society as this relates to implications for development prospects on the continent.

INTL ST 176B. East Asian Politics. 4 Units.

Explores the recent history and political systems of China, Japan, and Korea, comparing the three countries with each other and with occasional reference to the United States, British, and French systems.

Same as POL SCI 151A.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 176C. Introduction to Chinese Politics. 4 Units.

Background to the Chinese revolution, rise of the communist party; and institutions, ideology, and structure of Communist party rule from 1949-present.

Same as POL SCI 151B.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 176D. Chinese Politics: Policy, Leadership, and Change. 4 Units.

Examines major policies from 1949 to the present, and considers the changing role of the Communist Party and its shifting treatment of various social groups; the era of Mao Zedong, reforms under Deng, and post-Deng politics.

Same as POL SCI 151C.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 176G. German Politics and Society. 4 Units.

Concentrates on twentieth-century German politics and society, focusing on the contemporary political system of democratic West Germany. Study of the historical legacies of Weimar and the Nazi period, the postwar division between the two states and their reunification.

Same as POL SCI 152C.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 176I. West European Politics. 4 Units.

Explores four main themes: (1) thinking scientifically about politics; (2) understanding the linkages between different political structures and spheres of activity; (3) evaluating some theories about politics; (4) learning about three countries: Britain, France, and Germany.

Same as POL SCI 152F.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 176K. Latin American Politics. 4 Units.

Introduces the main concepts and theoretical approaches underlying the study of Latin American politics, examines recent political dynamics, and explores the challenges the region faces in the twenty-first century and how countries will attempt to address them.

Same as POL SCI 153A, CHC/LAT 151A.

Restriction: Political Science majors, Chicano/Latino Studies majors, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 176L. Canadian Politics. 4 Units.

Addresses the basic structures and processes of contemporary Canadian government and politics. Additional topics may include regionalism, federalism, western alienation and oil, Canadian solutions to social welfare policy questions, developments in Quebec, and other issues associated with French-English relations.

Same as POL SCI 153B.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 177B. Perspectives on the U.S. - Mexican Border. 4 Units.

Economic aspects of the historical development of the United States-Mexican border. The current economic situation in the Southwest and border areas as it affects both Mexico and the Latino/Chicano population is also examined.

Same as SOC SCI 173I, CHC/LAT 160.

(VII)

INTL ST 177C. Revolution in Latin America. 4 Units.

Presents a comparative analysis of the causes, development, and consequences of selected revolutionary movements, focusing on outbreaks in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, and Grenada. Explores topics of state formation, economic nationalism, social justice, ethnicity, and role of international affairs.

Same as CHC/LAT 151B, HISTORY 166D, SOC SCI 173N.

INTL ST 177D. U.S. Intervention in Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores political, economic, social, and cultural ties that bind Latin America to the United States. Focuses on U.S. intervention and Latin American response from early nineteenth century to present day. Case studies include Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, and Central America.

Same as POL SCI 142J, HISTORY 166, CHC/LAT 150.

INTL ST 177E. Cuban Society and Revolution. 4 Units.

Explores the causes, development, and legacy of the 1959 Revolution. Themes include economic dependency, democracy, race, gender, culture, and the always volatile relations between Cuba and the United States.

Same as POL SCI 153G, HISTORY 166C, CHC/LAT 157.

INTL ST 177F. Introduction to Cuba: History, Culture, and Society. 4 Units.

Introduction to Cuban history, culture, and society using social science texts, visual and musical materials. Examines major historical moments including the historical relationship between the United States and explores evolution of Cuban music from the earliest times to present.

Same as CHC/LAT 130, SOC SCI 173Q.

(VIII)

INTL ST 177G. Revolution and Reaction in Cold War Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores Latin American experiences of revolutionary change and military dictatorship during the Cold War (1945-1990). Pays particular attention to the lives of women, peasants, workers, and the urban middle classes. Case studies include Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, Argentina, Nicaragua, and Mexico.

Same as HISTORY 166B.

INTL ST 177H. Gender, Race, and Nation in Latin America. 4 Units.

Addresses the importance of gender and race to nation-making in Latin America during the 19th and 20th centuries (1810-1945). Considers how hierarchies between men and women shaped ideas about family, the state, and modernity.

Same as HISTORY 166A, GEN&SEX 172.

INTL ST 177I. Ancient Civilization of Mexico and the Southwest. 4 Units.

The prehistory and cultural evolution of the civilization which originated in Mexico, including the Olmecs, Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and Zapotec, as well as the Pueblos of the Southwestern U.S. Topics include the origins of food production and of the state.

Same as ANTHRO 141A.

INTL ST 177J. Peoples and Cultures of Latin America. 4 Units.

Surveys the prehistory of Latin America and its indigenous cultures, emphasizing the impact of colonial rule, capitalism, and twentieth-century transformations. Emphasis on communities from several countries. In some years, emphasis on comparisons between the Latin American and Caribbean experiences.

Same as ANTHRO 162A, CHC/LAT 120.

(VIII)

INTL ST 178A. Immigration Politics in Western Europe. 4 Units.

Examines immigration politics in Western Europe, analyzing trends and policy from the postwar period through to today. Topics include citizenship, immigrant integration, asylum, the far-right, and a rotating focus on contemporary issues, e.g., terrorism, Islamophobia.

Same as POL SCI 152K.
Overlaps with POL SCI 141D.

INTL ST 179. Regional Topics in International Studies. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of international studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

INTL ST H180. International Studies Honors Research Seminar. 4 Units.

Assists students to prepare a thesis prospectus for the Honors Program in International Studies. Students choose a topic, learn writing and research methods, write a prospectus and orally present and defend it, and conduct a literature review.

Restriction: International Studies Honors Program students only. International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 183A. International Studies Forum. 2 Units.

A faculty-student forum featuring lectures from a variety of institutions with discussion issues related to International Studies. Course may be offered online.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

Same as SOC SCI 183A, SOCECOL 183A.

INTL ST 183B. Seminar in Mediation. 4 Units.

Student develop mediation skills and refine knowledge in the practice and theory of conflict resolution. Students who complete this course may serve as mediators in the Campus Mediation Program. Course is a prerequisite to completing Indep Study as an intern.

Same as SOC SCI 183B, SOCECOL 183B.

Restriction: School of Humanities, School of Social Ecology, International Studies, and Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

INTL ST 183C. Seminar in Conflict Resolution . 4 Units.

Designed for students pursuing the minor in Conflict Resolution and/or International Studies majors. Provides a forum in which students will refine skills and theory in the study of cooperation and conflict, from local to global arenas. Students write research paper.

Same as SOCECOL 183C, SOC SCI 183C.

INTL ST 183CW. Seminar Conflict Resolution. 4 Units.

Designed for seniors who are pursuing the minor in Conflict Resolution and/or International Studies major. Provides a forum in which students will refine skills and theory in the study of cooperation and conflict, from local to global arenas.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as SOCECOL 183CW, SOC SCI 183CW.

(Ib)

INTL ST 183E. Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Units.

Examines theories of conflict management. Analyzes how conflict is mitigated in diverse cultures: at the interpersonal level, between groups, and on the international scale. Students discuss readings, hear from conflict management practitioners, and simulate negotiations.

Same as ANTHRO 136D, SOC SCI 183E, POL SCI 154G.

(VIII)

INTL ST 189. Special Topics in International Studies. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of international studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

INTL ST 190. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Students work with faculty to complete their honors thesis.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

INTL ST 197. Internship. 2-4 Units.

Provides an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills to an internship experience in the non-profit sector. Students gain new skills outside the classroom environment by participating in an off-campus, supervised internship for a total of 50 or 100 hours.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

INTL ST 199. Individual Study. 2-4 Units.

Students participate in planned research and study under written contract with a supervising UCI instructor. Students may enroll for only one individual study course each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Linguistics Courses

LINGUIS 1. Languages of the World. 4 Units.

The world has over 6,000 languages, with an exuberant variety of sounds, words, grammars. Introduction to a representative(about eight), drawn from every continent. Students not expected to learn these languages, but rather to explore and study their structure and complexity.

(VIII)

LINGUIS 2. Discovering Language. 4 Units.

Explores language's pervasiveness and diversity; demonstrates ways linguistics illuminates language's crucial--albeit hidden--societal role. Issues: self-and group-identification, language death, language in legal and educational settings. Illustrations: spoken and signed languages, varieties of English, Native American languages.

(VII)

LINGUIS 3. Introduction to Linguistics. 4 Units.

Emphasis on the notion that language is a remarkable achievement of the human mind. Current insights into the nature of language. Survey of various subfields of linguistics. Introduction to linguistic analysis.

(III, Vb)

LINGUIS 10. Introduction to Phonology. 4 Units.

Basic concepts in phonetic description and phonological analysis.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 3.

(III, Vb)

LINGUIS 20. Introduction to Syntax. 4 Units.

Basic concepts in syntactic description and grammatical analysis.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 3.

(III, Vb)

LINGUIS 43. Introduction to Symbolic Logic. 4 Units.

An introduction to the symbolism and methods of the logic of statements, including evaluation of arguments by truth tables, the techniques of natural deduction, and semantic tableaux.

Same as LPS 30, PHILOS 30.

(Vb)

LINGUIS 51. Acquisition of Language. 4 Units.

What children say, what they mean, and what they understand. Theories about the learning of language by one-, two-, and three-year olds. Comparison of kinds of data on which these theories are based.

Same as PSYCH 56L.

(III)

LINGUIS 68. Introduction to Language and Culture. 4 Units.

Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world.

Same as ANTHRO 2D.

(III)

LINGUIS 99. Special Topics in Linguistics. 4 Units.

Special Topics at lower-division level.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 102. Formal Languages and Automata. 4 Units.

Formal aspects of describing and recognizing languages by grammars and automata. Parsing regular and context-free languages. Ambiguity, nondeterminism. Elements of computability; Turning machines, random access machines, undecidable problems, NP-completeness.

Prerequisite: (I&C SCI 23 or CSE 23 or I&C SCI 46 or CSE 46) and MATH 2A and MATH 2B and I&C SCI 6B and I&C SCI 6D. I&C SCI 23 with a grade of C or better. CSE 23 with a grade of C or better. I&C SCI 46 with a grade of C or better. CSE 46 with a grade of C or better.

Same as COMPSCI 162.

LINGUIS 109. Special Topics in Computational Linguistics. 4 Units.

Topics in Computational Linguistics.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 111. Intermediate Phonology. 4 Units.

Fundamentals of phonological theory. Intensive practice in phonological analysis.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 100.

Concurrent with LINGUIS 211.

LINGUIS 112. Advanced Phonology. 4 Units.

Overview of recent developments in phonological theory.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 111.

Concurrent with LINGUIS 212.

LINGUIS 119. Special Topics in Phonetics/Phonology. 4 Units.

Topics in Phonetics/Phonology. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 121. Intermediate Syntax. 4 Units.

Examines various phenomena within a generative theory of syntax, focusing on the nature of syntactic rules, representations, and constraints. Introduces methods of experimental syntax, providing students hands-on opportunity to recognize the connection(s) between theory and experiential results.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 20.

LINGUIS 124. Current Topics in Syntactic Theory. 4 Units.

Research seminar in syntax. Intensive study of a small number of well-defined topics which have had significant impact on the development of syntactic theory. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Concurrent with LINGUIS 224.

LINGUIS 129. Special Topics in Syntax. 4 Units.

Topics in Syntax. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 139. Special Topics in Morphology. 4 Units.

Topics in Morphology. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 141. Topics in Philosophy of Language. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of language, e.g., the nature of meaning, mechanisms of reference, speech acts.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 145, PHILOS 145.

LINGUIS 142. Introduction to Logic. 4 Units.

Introduction to sentence logic, including truth tables and natural deduction; and to predicate logic, including semantics and natural deduction.

Same as LPS 104, PHILOS 104.

LINGUIS 143. Introduction to Formal Semantics. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the analytical tools used in the investigation of natural language semantics. Topics include the truth-conditional approach to meaning, compositionality, scope and anaphora, generalized quantifier theory, and intensionality.

Prerequisite: LPS 30 or PHILOS 30 or LPS 104 or PHILOS 104. LPS 30 with a grade of A- or better. PHILOS 30 with a grade of A- or better. LPS 104 with a grade of A- or better. PHILOS 104 with a grade of A- or better.

LINGUIS 145A. Elementary Set Theory. 4 Units.

An introduction to the basic working vocabulary of mathematical reasoning. Topics include sets, Boolean operations, ordered n-tuples, relations, functions, ordinal and cardinal numbers.

Same as LPS 105A, PHILOS 105A.

LINGUIS 145C. Undecidability and Incompleteness. 4 Units.

Introduction to the formal theory of effective processes, including recursive functions, Turing machines, Church's thesis, and proofs of Göedel's incompleteness theorem for arithmetic, and Church's undecidability theorem for first-order logic.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 105B.

Same as LPS 105C, PHILOS 105C.
Overlaps with MATH 152.

LINGUIS 149. Special Topics in Semantics. 4 Units.

Topics in Semantics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 150. Acquisition of Language II. 4 Units.

Focuses on native language learning, exploring the way in which infants and very young children unconsciously uncover the rich systematic knowledge of their native language. Examines both experimental and computational studies that quantitatively investigate the "how" of language acquisition.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 56L or LINGUIS 51.

Same as PSYCH 156A.

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LINGUIS 155. Psychology of Language. 4 Units.

Examines language using the tools of experimental psychology. From sounds to words to spoken and written sentences, explores how language is used in real time, and how its use reveals how it is represented in the mind.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B).

Same as PSYCH 150.

Restriction: Psychology and Cognitive Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LINGUIS 158. Language and the Brain . 4 Units.

Research analysis on biological bases of human linguistic capacity. Development, focusing on hemispheric specialization, plasticity; localization of specific linguistic functions in adults, with emphasis on study of aphasias; relation of linguistic capacity to general cognitive capacity, considering research on retardation.

Prerequisite: (PSYCH 7A or PSY BEH 9) or (PSYCH 9A or PSY BEH 11A) and (PSYCH 9B or PSY BEH 11B)) or BIO SCI 35 or BIO SCI N110.

Same as BIO SCI N160, PSYCH 161.

Restriction: Cognitive Sciences, Psychology, and Biological Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LINGUIS 159. Special Topics in Psycholinguistics. 4 Units.

Topics in Psycholinguistics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 164A. Topics in Romance Languages. 4 Units.

Topics in Romance Languages. May be repeated as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 164B. French Phonetics. 4 Units.

Study of the sound structure of French. Introduction to elements of general phonetics, contrastive (French/English) phonetics, and French phonetics and phonology. Designed to help students improve their pronunciation. Also serves as a preparatory course for language teaching.

Prerequisite: FRENCH 1C.

LINGUIS 168J. Improvisation, Language, and Culture. 4 Units.

Addresses improvisation, both in performance and in everyday life. Examines improvisation as the "flexible regulation" of everyday behavior by exploring different scholarly treatments of language and interaction, and working on developing actual theatrical improvisation skills.

Same as ANTHRO 151A.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

LINGUIS 168S. Language and Social Cognition. 4 Units.

Explores the relationship between language and cognition in social and cultural contexts. The overall goal is to think through how language structure and use impact how individuals perceive, think about, and understand the world around them.

Same as ANTHRO 150A.

Restriction: Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LINGUIS 169. Special Topics in Language Studies. 4 Units.

Topics in Language Studies. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 175. Language Origins: Evolution, Genetics, and the Brain. 4 Units.

Examines how human language(s) may have originated. Studies pertinent techniques (reconstruction) and addresses related questions, including Is our language faculty inborn (i.e., genetically encoded)? Can brain imaging and population genetics research help to unlock this mystery of human evolution?.

Same as HISTORY 135G, ANTHRO 152A, GLBLCLT 105.

LINGUIS 176. Introduction to Pidgins and Creoles. 4 Units.

Explores the linguistic structures of pidgin and creole languages and examines major theories for the surprisingly high degree of similarity found across pidgin and creole languages. Includes sociolinguistic and field methods.

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 3 or SPANISH 113A.

LINGUIS 179. Special Topics in Historical Linguistics. 4 Units.

Topics in Historical Linguistics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 189. Special Topics in Cognitive Semiotics. 4 Units.

Topics in Cognitive Semiotics. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 198. Directed Group Study. 4 Units.

Directed study with Linguistics faculty. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LINGUIS 199. Independent Study. 4 Units.

Independent research with Linguistics faculty. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Students may enroll for only one 199 each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Logic and Philosophy of Science Courses

LPS 29. Critical Reasoning. 4 Units.

Introduction to analysis and reasoning. The concepts of argument, premise, and conclusion, validity and invalidity, consistency and inconsistency. Identifying and assessing premises and inferences. Deductive versus inductive reasoning, and introduction to the probability calculus. Evaluating definitions. Informal fallacies. Course may be offered online.

Same as PHILOS 29.

(II, Vb)

LPS 30. Introduction to Symbolic Logic. 4 Units.

An introduction to the symbolism and methods of the logic of statements, including evaluation of arguments by truth tables, the techniques of natural deduction, and semantic tableaux.

Same as PHILOS 30, LINGUIS 43.

(Vb)

LPS 31. Introduction to Inductive Logic. 4 Units.

Philosophical questions concerning the foundations of scientific inference, e.g., the traditional problem of induction, the Goodman paradox, the concept of cause, Mill's method of inductive reasoning, probability calculus, different interpretations of probability, and their interaction in inductive reasoning.

Same as PHILOS 31.

(II, Va)

LPS 40. The Nature of Scientific Inquiry. 4 Units.

Investigates the nature, scope, and status of scientific knowledge and the methods used to acquire it. Uses concrete historical examples from a variety of scientific fields to identify distinctive features of the scientific enterprise and explore their significance.

(II)

LPS 60. The Making of Modern Science. 4 Units.

Surveys the history of science and mathematics since the Scientific Revolution, examining central developments both chronologically and thematically, as well as investigating their significance for contemporary philosophical debates about the role and status of current scientific theories.

Same as HISTORY 60.

(GE II or GE IV ).

LPS H80. Scientific Realism and Instrumentalism. 4 Units.

Explores competing views of the character and status of theoretical knowledge in science, including challenges to and defenses of the view that contemporary scientific theories offer straightforwardly accurate descriptions of how things stand in otherwise inaccessible domains of nature.

(II)

LPS H81. What is Space? . 4 Units.

Historical, philosophical, scientific exploration of the concept of "space." Questions of interest include: What kind of a thing is space? How can we know what space is like? How is space different from time.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(II)

LPS H91. The Philosophy and Biology of Sex. 4 Units.

Covers the origins of biological sex, dynamics of sexual selection, the evolution and cultural creation of sexual behavior in humans, and the construction of gender in human societies.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(II and III ).

LPS H95. Jurisprudence and Constitutional Law. 4 Units.

Applies competing theories of the nature of law and legal reasoning to evaluate decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court in controversial areas of constitutional law such as free speech, privacy, sexual conduct, affirmative action, and political campaign contributions.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

LPS 100W. Writing Philosophy. 4 Units.

Discussion of those aspects of writing of special importance in philosophy, e.g., philosophical terminology, techniques for evaluating arguments, philosophical definitions and theories. At least 4,000 words of assigned composition based on philosophical readings.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as PHILOS 100W.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

LPS 102. Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. 4 Units.

A study of one or more of the basic issues in epistemology, e.g., the role of perception in the acquisition of knowledge, the nature of evidence, the distinction between belief and knowledge, and the nature of truth and certainty.

Same as PHILOS 102.

LPS 104. Introduction to Logic. 4 Units.

Introduction to sentence logic, including truth tables and natural deduction; and to predicate logic, including semantics and natural deduction.

Same as PHILOS 104, LINGUIS 142.

LPS 105A. Elementary Set Theory. 4 Units.

An introduction to the basic working vocabulary of mathematical reasoning. Topics include sets, Boolean operations, ordered n-tuples, relations, functions, ordinal and cardinal numbers.

Same as PHILOS 105A, LINGUIS 145A.

LPS 105B. Metalogic. 4 Units.

Introduction to formal syntax (proof theory) and semantics (model theory) for first-order logic, including the deduction, completeness, compactness, and Löewenheim-Skolem theorems.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 105A.

Same as PHILOS 105B, LING 145B.
Overlaps with MATH 150.

LPS 105C. Undecidability and Incompleteness. 4 Units.

Introduction to the formal theory of effective processes, including recursive functions, Turing machines, Church's thesis, and proofs of Göedel's incompleteness theorem for arithmetic, and Church's undecidability theorem for first-order logic.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 105B.

Same as PHILOS 105C, LINGUIS 145C.
Overlaps with MATH 152.

LPS 106. Topics in Logic . 4 Units.

Selected topics in mathematical or philosophical logic.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 105B or LPS 105B.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 106.

LPS 108. Topics in Induction, Probability, and Decision Theory. 4 Units.

Selected topics in induction, probability, and decision theory.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 108.

LPS 113. Topics in Modern Philosophy. 4 Units.

Focuses on the works of central philosophical figures of modern Philosophy (e.g., Descartes, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Kant) or on the treatment of one or more central philosophical problems by a number of these figures.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 113.

LPS 115. Topics in History of Analytic Philosophy. 4 Units.

Review of central theories or figures in the history of analytic philosophy. Emphasis on writings of Frege, Russell, Schlick, Carnap, and Quine. Topics include the nature of meaning and truth, the synthetic/analytic distinction, and scientific knowledge.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 115.

LPS 120. Topics in Metaphysics. 4 Units.

Examines central philosophical questions concerning our own fundamental nature and that of the world around us (e.g., causation and necessity, determination, free will, personal identity, the mind-body problem).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 120.

LPS 121. Topics in the Theory of Knowledge . 4 Units.

One or more topics in the theory of knowledge, e.g., the nature of rational justification, of perceptual knowledge, of a priori knowledge.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 121.

LPS H125. What Is Time? . 4 Units.

Engages the question "what is time?" by drawing on physics, philosophy, fiction, film, and psychology. Organized around understanding and addressing the tension between time as represented in physics and our immediate temporal experience.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

LPS 140. Topics in Philosophy of Science. 4 Units.

Selected topics in contemporary philosophy of science, e.g., the status of theoretical entities, the confirmation of theories, the nature of scientific explanation.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 140.

LPS 140B. Science and Religion II. 4 Units.

The development of genomics, stem-cell research, robotics, nanotechnology, neuropharmacology raises difficult religious and philosophical questions. Examines interdisciplinary approaches that cut across institutional boundaries, cultural borders, religious traditions. Focuses on relationship between religion and cognitive/affective/social neuroscience. Course may be offered online.

Same as REL STD 112B, PSYCH 172S, SOC SCI 130B.

LPS 141A. Topics in Philosophy of Physics. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of physics, e.g., the interpretation of quantum mechanics, the nature of spacetime, the problem of quantum field theories.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 141A.

LPS 141B. Geometry and Spacetime. 4 Units.

An examination of the foundations of the special theory of relativity, with emphasis on the geometry of Minkowski spacetime, and its relation to both Euclidean and non-Euclidean (hyperbolic) plane geometries.

Prerequisite: MATH 2D and (MATH 3A or MATH 6G).

Same as PHILOS 141B.

LPS 141C. Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. 4 Units.

An examination of the standard von Neumann-Dirac formulation of quantum mechanics. The quantum measurement problem is discussed along with several proposed solutions, including GRW, many-worlds, man-minds, and Bohm's theory.

Same as PHILOS 141C.

LPS 141D. Probability and Determinism. 4 Units.

An examination of a cluster of interrelated issues concerning probability, determinism, logic, and the foundations of quantum mechanics.

Prerequisite: MATH 2D and (MATH 3A or MATH 6G).

Same as PHILOS 141D.

LPS H141. Honors Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. 4 Units.

An examination of the standard von Neumann-Dirac formulation of quantum mechanics. The quantum measurement problem is discussed along with several proposed solutions, including GRW, many-worlds, man-minds, and Bohm's theory.

Overlaps with LPS 141C.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

LPS 142. Writing/Philosophy of Biology. 4 Units.

Philosophy of biology, e.g., scientific method in biology, the structure of evolutionary theory, teleology, ethics, and evolution. Course work includes one 4,000-word and four 1,000-word papers.

LPS 142W. Writing/Philosophy of Biology. 4 Units.

Philosophy of biology, e.g., scientific method in biology, the structure of evolutionary theory, teleology, ethics, and evolution. Course work includes one 4,000-word and four 1,000-word papers.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as PHILOS 142W, BIO SCI E142W.

Restriction: Juniors only.

(Ib)

LPS 143. Topics in Philosophy of Psychology. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of psychology, e.g., the nature of psychological explanation, reductionism, issues in cognitive, behavioral, and neuroscience.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 143, PSYCH 123P.

Restriction: Psychology and Philosophy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LPS 144. Topics in Philosophy of Social Science. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of the social sciences, e.g., is their goal to understand behavior or to predict and control it?; are they normative and the natural sciences not?; do they incorporate philosophical doctrines about language and mind?.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 144.

LPS 145. Topics in Philosophy of Language. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of language, e.g., the nature of meaning, mechanisms of reference, speech acts.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 145, LINGUIS 141.

LPS 146. Topics in Philosophy of Logic. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of logic, e.g., the nature of logical truth and our knowledge of it, the status of propositions, definite descriptions, and existential presuppositions.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 146.

LPS 147. Topics in Philosophy of Mathematics. 4 Units.

Selected historical and contemporary topics in the philosophy of mathematics, e.g., mathematical truth and ontology, mathematical knowledge, the nature and role of proof, the workings of mathematics in application.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 147.

LPS 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Logic and Philosophy of Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

LPS 200. Topics in Logic and Philosophy of Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Logic and Philosophy of Science. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LPS 205A. Set Theory. 4 Units.

The basic working vocabulary of mathematical reasoning. Topics include: sets, Boolean operations, ordered n-tuples, relations, functions, ordinal and cardinal numbers.

Same as PHILOS 205A.

LPS 205B. Metalogic. 4 Units.

Formal syntax (proof theory) and semantics (model theory) for first-order logic, including the deduction, completeness, compactness, and Loewenheim-Skolem theorems.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 205A or LPS 205A.

Same as PHILOS 205B.

LPS 205C. Undecidability and Incompleteness. 4 Units.

Formal theory of effective processes, including recursive function, Turing machines, Church's thesis, and proofs of Goedel's incompleteness theorem for arithmetics, and Church's undecidability for first-order logic.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 205B or LPS 205B.

Same as PHILOS 205C.

LPS 206. Topics in Logic . 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of logic. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 206.

LPS 213. Topics in Modern Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of modern philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 213.

LPS 215. Topics in Analytic Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of analytic philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 215.

LPS 220. Topics in Metaphysics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of metaphysics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 220.

LPS 221. Topics in Epistemology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of epistemology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 221.

LPS 232. Topics in Political and Social Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of political and social philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 232.

LPS 240. Topics in Philosophy of Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of science. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 240.

LPS 241. Topics in Philosophy of Physics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of physics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 241.

LPS 242. Topics in Philosophy of Biology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of biology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 242.

LPS 243. Topics in Philosophy of Psychology. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of psychology, e.g., the nature of psychological explanation, reductionism, issues in cognitive, behavioral, and neuroscience.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 243, PSYCH 231P.

LPS 244. Topics in Philosophy of Social Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy and social science. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 244.

LPS 245. Topics in Philosophy of Language. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of language. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 245.

LPS 246. Topics in Philosophy of Logic. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of logic. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 246.

LPS 247. Topics in Philosophy of Mathematics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of mathematics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as PHILOS 247.

LPS 289. Logic and Philosophy of Science Workshop. 1-4 Units.

A two- or three-quarter-long workshop on selected topics in logic and philosophy of science.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

LPS 298. Independent Study. 4-12 Units.

Independent research with Logic and Philosophy of Science Faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

LPS 299. Directed Research. 1-12 Units.

Directed study with Logic and Philosophy of Science Faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

LPS 399. University Teaching. 4-12 Units.

Required of and limited to Teaching Assistants.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

Political Science Courses

POL SCI 6A. Introduction to Political Science: Political Analysis. 4 Units.

Presents various modes of understanding politics. Emphasis on basic approaches to political analysis, their uses in constructing theories, and their application to particular national political systems.

(III, VIII)

POL SCI 6B. Introduction to Political Science: Macropolitics. 4 Units.

An overview of macro-political inquiry, emphasizing the various determinants of political life in a political community. We also explore the origins and challenges of democratic governance focusing on the tension between liberty and equality in a democratizing nation.

(III)

POL SCI 6C. Introduction to Political Science: Micropolitics. 4 Units.

Introduction to political behavior of individuals and groups within national systems. Three questions addressed: How do individuals come to understand the political world? How do individuals behave within this world? How do groups and individuals engage in the political process.

(III)

POL SCI 10A. Probability and Statistics in Political Science I. 4 Units.

Introduction to the variety of statistical applications in the social sciences. Descriptive statistics. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Percentile ranks. Standardization and normal approximation. Basic probability theory focuses on application to statistical inference and binomial distribution. Laboratory required.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 3A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10A, ECON 15A, PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9A, SOCIOL 10A.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(Va)

POL SCI 10B. Probability and Statistics in Political Science II. 4 Units.

Introduction to statistical inference, sampling distribution, standard error. Hypothesis tests for proportions and means. Inferential techniques for nominal variables including chi-square, study measures of strengths, significance of relationships between variables, assumptions, data requirements, and types of error in significance tests.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 10A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10B, ECON 15B, PSYCH 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9B, SOC SCI 10B.

(Va)

POL SCI 10C. Probability and Statistics in Political Science III. 4 Units.

Focus on correlation, regression, and control for effects of variables. One-way and two-way factorial analysis of variance. A priori and a posteriori comparisons. Introduction to repeated measures design and non-parametric statistics. Discusses use of statistics in newspapers and popular magazines.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 10B.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10C, PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9C, SOC SCI 10C, SOCIOL 10C.

(Vb)

POL SCI 21A. Introduction to American Government. 4 Units.

Introduction to American political processes and institutions. Topics include elections, political participation, parties, interest groups, the Presidency, Congress, the bureaucracy, and the judiciary. Course may be offered online.

(III)

POL SCI 29. Special Topics in American Politics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of American politics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 31A. Introduction to Political Theory. 4 Units.

Types of questions: What is politics? What are the theoretical and philosophical bases for different types of political arrangements? How do these perspectives get translated into reality? Among others, the works of Rousseau, Locke, Mill, and Marx are read.

(III)

POL SCI 32A. Dilemmas of Diversity. 4 Units.

Focuses on racial, ethnic, and gender diversity, multiculturalism, and their impact on our social and political ideals. Traces the sources of ideas about difference, equality, and toleration, and examines tensions that occur when forms of identity conflict with one another.

Same as INTL ST 32A.

(VII)

POL SCI 39. Lower-Division Special Topics in Political Theory. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of political theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 41A. Introduction to International Relations. 4 Units.

Analysis of political relations between and among nations with emphasis on explanations of conflict and cooperation. The role of ideologies and their relation to international problems are also examined. Course may be offered online.

Same as INTL ST 14.

Restriction: International Studies and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III, VIII)

POL SCI 49. Lower-Division Special Topics in International Relations. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of international relations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 51A. Introduction to Politics Around the World. 4 Units.

Introduces comparative politics. Compares political systems in a variety of countries. Includes elections, parties, parliaments, presidents, protest movements, and other aspects of national politics. Addresses how to make meaningful comparisons across countries.

(III, VIII)

POL SCI 61A. Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in Political Science. 4 Units.

Examines major theories that attempt to explain the roles of race and ethnicity in U.S. politics. Course may be offered online.

Same as CHC/LAT 64.

(III, VII)

POL SCI 69. Lower Division Special Topics in Minority Politics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of minority politics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 71A. Introduction to Law. 4 Units.

An introduction to the study of judicial politics. Questions include: what is law?; what is a court?; who are the judges? Analysis of a wide range of judicial decisions illustrates the political importance of courts in the U.S. and elsewhere.

(III)

POL SCI 79. Lower-Division Special Topics in Law. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of law. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI H80. Globalization and Human Security. 4 Units.

Emerging issues of human security in the globalized world, including personal human security, physical integrity, human trafficking, global climate change, food. Challenges of these complex human security problems for a multi-scalar system (international, national, local).

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III, VIII)

POL SCI 120. Public Opinion. 4 Units.

Theories concerning sources of public opinion, processes by which it is altered, organization of citizens’ belief systems, and role of public opinion in government policy. Students analyze survey data as a research project.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 120W. Public Opinion. 4 Units.

Theories concerning sources of public opinion, processes by which it is altered, organization of citizens’ belief systems, and role of public opinion in government policy. Students analyze survey data as a research project.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 121A. The American Presidency. 4 Units.

Presents a comprehensive survey of the American presidency and considers the question of political power.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 121C. U.S. Elections and Voting Behavior. 4 Units.

Examines how voters evaluate political parties, candidates, and issues in electoral campaigns to reach their decisions. Numerous controversies concerning the degree of issue voting, sophistication of candidate evaluations, and the decline of political parties are discussed.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 121E. Public Policy Analysis. 4 Units.

Examines different approaches to the analysis of public policy, what constitutes good policy, the role of government, and citizen participation in policy-making. Suggests a policy-design perspective which builds upon other frameworks but concentrates on goals, implementation structures, tools, and rationales.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL E8 and (PP&D 4 or PP&D 166).

Same as PP&D 169.

Restriction: Urban Studies, Social Ecology, and Public Health Policy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 121F. Presidents Since World War II. 4 Units.

Reviews the actions and character of presidents from Harry Truman through Bill Clinton. Each week a different president is examined from a variety of perspectives. Students are expected to write a substantial original research paper.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 21A.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 121G. American Public Policy. 4 Units.

Focuses on the development and implementation of public policy in the United States. Lectures cover theoretical models of the policy process as well as significant problems facing contemporary American decision-makers.

Same as PP&D 129, PUBHLTH 132, SOC SCI 152C.

POL SCI 122A. American Metropolitan Politics. 4 Units.

Explores the politics of urban and suburban America, including the policy making process; the exercise of political power; local politics, federalism and the problems of metropolitanism; and major policy problems facing urban areas.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 122B. California Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the structure and function of California government, traces historical development of political power, with constantly changing casts of power-brokers and seekers. Explores California exceptionalism and the roles played by the electorate, legislature, executive, and organized interests in policy making.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 122BW. California Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the structure and function of California government, traces historical development of political power, with constantly changing casts of power-brokers and seekers. Explores California exceptionalism and the roles played by the electorate, legislature, executive, and organized interests in policy making.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 123B. Representation and Redistricting. 4 Units.

Deals with classical theories of representation: issues of racial and political representation in U.S. legislatures and city councils; proportional representation models; and comparative election systems.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 3A or SOC SCI 10A or SOC SCI 10B.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 124A. The Politics of Protest. 4 Units.

Examines the Civil Rights, Black Power, and women’s movements in relationship to the Asian American movement. Uses social movement theories to illuminate the cases, and the cases to critique and revise the theories.

Same as ASIANAM 144.

(VII)

POL SCI 124B. Latinos in U.S. Politics. 4 Units.

Comparing the political issues facing Latino groups by examining their migration histories, voting behavior, nonelectoral participation, and policy issues. Latino issues are examined on the national, state, and local levels, including formal representation, immigration, affirmative action, and language policy.

Same as CHC/LAT 151.

(VII)

POL SCI 124C. Comparative Minority Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the political experiences of Blacks, Latinos, and Asian Americans in the United States from roughly 1950 to the present. Focuses on how each group has pursued political empowerment via both conventional political channels and social movements.

Same as AFAM 151, CHC/LAT 147, ASIANAM 132.

POL SCI 124E. African American Politics. 4 Units.

Examines politics of African Americans in order to gain a broader perspective of the American political process. Major developments in African American politics (including the civil rights movement, Black presidential bids), continuing problem of racism, responsiveness of key governing institutions.

Same as AFAM 152.

POL SCI 125A. The United States Congress. 4 Units.

Does the Congress do a good job of representing the American citizenry? Is it the most appropriate mechanism for the creation, resolution, and implementation of public policy.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 125AW. The United States Congress. 4 Units.

Does the Congress do a good job of representing the American citizenry? Is it the most appropriate mechanism for the creation, resolution, and implementation of public policy.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 125B. Congress:The New Institutionalist Approach. 4 Units.

Study of the U.S. Congress emphasizing how rules and institutions (filibuster, veto, the committee system, party caucuses) structure how the Congressional game is played. Combines theoretical study of procedures with the practical study of actual bills.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 125CW. Constitutional Convention. 4 Units.

Analyzes the Constitution, its amendments, and periods of Constitutional reform as a foundation for a critical evaluation of the Constitution with an eye both to necessary reforms and to elements of the Constitution that should be maintained.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 21A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

POL SCI 126C. U.S. Immigration Policy. 4 Units.

Examines selected immigration policy debates since the nineteenth century, rationale and consequences of immigration law since 1965, problems of administration, implementation and enforcement, impact of immigration policy on foreign relations, and contemporary debate regarding the future of U.S. policy.

Same as CHC/LAT 163.

(VII)

POL SCI 126D. Urban Politics and Policy. 4 Units.

Examines economic limits of cities and welfare policy. Addresses such issues as why are the poor concentrated in the central cities? Which anti-poverty programs will work best in cities? Which level of government can best combat poverty in the U.S.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 126F. Politics of Animal Rights. 4 Units.

Examines animal rights/welfare movement’s efforts to transform moral, practical, and legal standing of nonhuman animals in contemporary U.S. Explores intersection of racism, sexism, and speciesism informed by theories of race and ethnicity, including Asian American Studies.

Same as ASIANAM 168.

Restriction: Political Science majors and Asian American Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 128C. Political Psychology. 4 Units.

Examination of how psychological theory and research may be used to better understand political thought and behavior. Drawing on theories of learning, cognition, and personality, discusses such topics as the formation of political attitudes, and the process of political decision-making.

Same as PSYCH 176A.

Restriction: Majors only. POL SCI 128C may not be taken for credit if taken after POL SCI 137C.

POL SCI 129. Special Topics in American Politics and Society. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of American politics and society. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 130A. Game Theory and Politics I. 4 Units.

Introduction to game theory and a survey of its political applications. Examples of topics covered include voting in small committees, legislatures, and mass elections; interest group activities and environmental issues; institutional design, and the evolution of cooperative behavior.

Same as INTL ST 105A, SOC SCI 103A, SOCIOL 134.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, Sociology, Political Science, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 130B. Game Theory and Politics II. 4 Units.

More advanced game theory and its political applications, beginning where Game Theory and Politics I ends. Examples of topics covered include revolutions; arms race; spatial models of party competition; political manipulation; political coalitions and their power.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 130A or ECON 116A.

Same as INTL ST 105B, SOC SCI 103B.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, International Studies, and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 131C. Modern Political Theory. 4 Units.

Examines major thinkers and intellectual movements in the political thought of the 17th and 18th centuries.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 131F. Twentieth Century Political Theory. 4 Units.

Examines major thinkers and intellectual movements in the political thought of the 20th Century.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 31A.

POL SCI 134F. Social and Political Theory. 4 Units.

Focus is on recent major work in social and political theory. An in-depth analysis of a relatively small body of writing. Authors discussed include Jurgen Habermas, Anthony Giddens, and Richard Rorty.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 135A. Origins of Liberalism. 4 Units.

Examines the ideals, social forces, and historical events that gave rise to liberal political theory. Topics include patriarchal authority, the divine right of kings, religious toleration, slavery, colonialism, political economy, the evolution of law, and tensions between liberty and equality.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 31A

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 135B. Just War Revisited. 4 Units.

Examines the evolution of the doctrine of the just war across the history of Western political thought, the importance of changes in the doctrine and whether it applies today; examines international relations case studies to determine today's relevancy.

Same as INTL ST 131A.

POL SCI 136A. Logical Models in Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Science asks two questions. "How things are?" leads to measurement and statistical analysis. But we see only what we look for. "How things should be, on logical grounds?" leads to quantitative logical models which tell us what to look for.

Same as SOCIOL 112.

POL SCI 136B. Cannibals and Conquistadores: The Philosophy of the Other. 4 Units.

Examines critically the notion of the "other" by looking at the philosophical challenges difference poses in the context of the European discovery of the New World. Seeks to understand the naissance of the concept of human rights and tolerance.

POL SCI 136D. Middle East Narratives. 4 Units.

Explores various narratives of peoples living in the Middle East: Bedouins, Jews, Muslims, Christians, Druze, Baha’i; looks at how their identities were formed and altered over time through empire, religion, exodus, war, democracy, diasporas; focus is philosophical and historical.

Same as INTL ST 174.

POL SCI 137B. Types of Political Representation. 4 Units.

Political representation plays an important role in democratic systems, but is elusive once examined closely. Students delve into the concept and relate different views to political life. Half of the course is spent on writing instruction.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-Division students. Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 137BW. Types of Political Representation. 4 Units.

Political representation plays an important role in democratic systems, but is elusive once examined closely. Students delve into the concept and relate different views to political life. Half of the course is spent on writing instruction.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-Division students. Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 138A. The Moral of the Story: Introductory Seminar in Ethics. 4 Units.

Introduces major theories and classic texts in ethics, from Plato and Aristotelian virtue ethics to utilitarianism and Kant and contemporary moral psychology.

POL SCI 138C. Ethics of Difference. 4 Units.

Examines differences traditionally judged politically salient—race, ethnicity, religion, gender. Personal interviews with an elderly person encourage students to understand the social construction of difference and to reexamine their own attitudes by putting themselves in the place of another.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 138CW. Ethics of Difference. 4 Units.

Examines differences traditionally judged politically salient—race, ethnicity, religion, gender. Personal interviews with an elderly person encourage students to understand the social construction of difference and to reexamine their own attitudes by putting themselves in the place of another.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 139. Special Topics in Political Theory and Methods. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of political theory and methods. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 141B. International Political Economy. 4 Units.

Examination of problems in global political-economic relations through competing conceptual lenses or grand theories: mercantilism, liberalism, and Marxism. Surveys North-North and North-South issues relating power and wealth.

Same as INTL ST 114A.

(VIII)

POL SCI 141C. International Political Economy of East Asia. 4 Units.

Integration of theoretical perspectives in international political economy with the study of economic development in East Asia, with special emphasis on regional integration.

(VIII)

POL SCI 141E. U.S. Foreign Policy Toward Asia. 4 Units.

U.S. policy toward the countries of East Asia: bilateral and regional security relationships, U.S. economic relations with the major Asian countries, the development of regional institutions, and human rights.

Same as INTL ST 142G.

POL SCI 142B. The International Relations of East Asia. 4 Units.

Surveys various aspects of relations between the nations of East Asia. Topics include the historical development of the region; current political and security relations, including the impact of the American military presence.

Same as INTL ST 142D.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142D. U.S. Foreign Policy I: Globalism and Cold War. 4 Units.

Looks at changing international perspectives, policy responses, and military strategies of presidential administrations from Truman to Reagan. In assessing the motives and objectives of U.S. foreign policy leaders during the “Cold War” era, the concept of “national interest” is examined.

Same as INTL ST 142A.

Restriction: International Studies and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142E. U.S. Foreign Policy II: Cold War Decline & After. 4 Units.

Deals with U.S. foreign policy from the post-Vietnam War era through the collapse of the Cold War and into the emergence of the post-Cold War era, roughly from 1972 to the present.

Same as INTL ST 142B.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142F. U.S. Foreign Policy III: National Security Decision-Making. 4 Units.

Concept of "national security" from 1947-1990s is reviewed. Organizational and psychological factors that influence decision-making, the dangers of "groupthink," and the issue of accountability are analyzed. National security agenda (military, economic, environmental, and social) for the 1990s is discussed.

Same as INTL ST 142C.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142G. U.S. Coercive Diplomacy. 4 Units.

Examines the theory of compellence and the U.S. practice of coercive diplomacy--the power to change behavior of other governments. Specific case examples: the Cuban missile crisis, bombing of North Vietnam, the Nicaraguan Contras, Desert Shield/Desert Storm, and Libya.

Same as INTL ST 142E.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 142J. U.S. Intervention in Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores political, economic, social, and cultural ties that bind Latin America to the United States. Focuses on U.S. intervention and Latin American response from early nineteenth century to present day. Case studies include Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, and Central America.

Same as HISTORY 166, INTL ST 177D, CHC/LAT 150.

POL SCI 143F. Intelligence in International Politics. 4 Units.

Intelligence agencies, activities, and functions—their impact on international politics; how governments and societies seek to control intelligence agencies and activities; and how intelligence agencies work—their techniques, resources, technology, problems, successes, and failures.

Same as INTL ST 141A.

Restriction: Political Science and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 143G. Homeland Security . 4 Units.

Examines the 9/11 origins of the concept of homeland security; assess the evolution, structure, and operations of the Department of Homeland Security; critically examines the evolution of threat assessment to the U.S. and the utilization of risk management methodologies.

Same as INTL ST 141B.

POL SCI 144A. Approaches to International Relations. 4 Units.

Reviews theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of international relations using contending perspectives to analyze power and influence, capabilities, interdependence, reciprocity, international regimes, anarchy, cooperation, imperialism, and hegemony.

Same as INTL ST 140A.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 145A. Ethics in an Age of Terror and Genocide. 4 Units.

Original sources document personal impact of wars on genocides, from World War II to the Bosnian and Rwandan genocides and current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Students train for and conduct personal interviews with someone who lived through a war.

Same as INTL ST 154C.

POL SCI 146B. Religion and World Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the relationship between religion and world politics historically and today, focusing on connections with peace/war, democracy, human rights, secularism(s), and globalization. Covers major debates, scholarship, concepts, and theories through class exercises, exams, and essays.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 41A or INTL ST 11 or INTL ST 12 or REL STD 5A or REL STD 5B or REL STD 5C.

Same as REL STD 115, INTL ST 151B.

POL SCI 149. Special Topics in International Relations. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of international relations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151A. East Asian Politics. 4 Units.

Explores the recent history and political systems of China, Japan, and Korea, comparing the three countries with each other and with occasional reference to the United States, British, and French systems.

Same as INTL ST 176B.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151B. Introduction to Chinese Politics. 4 Units.

Background to the Chinese revolution, rise of the communist party; and institutions, ideology, and structure of Communist party rule from 1949-present.

Same as INTL ST 176C.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151C. Chinese Politics: Policy, Leadership, and Change. 4 Units.

Examines major policies from 1949 to the present, and considers the changing role of the Communist Party and its shifting treatment of various social groups; the era of Mao Zedong, reforms under Deng, and post-Deng politics.

Same as INTL ST 176D.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151E. Are Chinese Politics Changing?. 4 Units.

There’s been speculation about whether the Chinese political system is fundamentally changing. This upper-division writing seminar reviews new books on this topic and considers the question from a range of angles. Four two-page papers and one 8–10-page paper required.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 151EW. Are Chinese Politics Changing?. 4 Units.

There’s been speculation about whether the Chinese political system is fundamentally changing. This upper-division writing seminar reviews new books on this topic and considers the question from a range of angles. Four two-page papers and one 8–10-page paper required.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 151H. Voting and Political Manipulation. 4 Units.

Introduction to social choice and cooperative games. Topics include majority rule, types of voting methods, apportionment and proportional representation, agenda manipulation, coalition formation, voting power, political consequences of electoral laws.

Same as INTL ST 156A, SOC SCI 121T, ECON 154.

Restriction: International Studies, Political Science, Social Science and Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 152C. German Politics and Society. 4 Units.

Concentrates on twentieth-century German politics and society, focusing on the contemporary political system of democratic West Germany. Study of the historical legacies of Weimar and the Nazi period, the postwar division between the two states and their reunification.

Same as INTL ST 176G.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 152F. West European Politics. 4 Units.

Explores four main themes: (1) thinking scientifically about politics; (2) understanding the linkages between different political structures and spheres of activity; (3) evaluating some theories about politics; (4) learning about three countries: Britain, France, and Germany.

Same as INTL ST 176I.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 152K. Immigration Politics in Western Europe. 4 Units.

Examines immigration politics in Western Europe, analyzing trends and policy from the postwar period through to today. Topics include citizenship, immigrant integration, asylum, the far-right, and a rotating focus on contemporary issues, e.g., terrorism, Islamophobia.

Same as INTL ST 178A.
Overlaps with POL SCI 141D.

POL SCI 153A. Latin American Politics. 4 Units.

Introduces the main concepts and theoretical approaches underlying the study of Latin American politics, examines recent political dynamics, and explores the challenges the region faces in the twenty-first century and how countries will attempt to address them.

Same as INTL ST 176K, CHC/LAT 151A.

Restriction: Political Science majors, Chicano/Latino Studies majors, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 153B. Canadian Politics. 4 Units.

Addresses the basic structures and processes of contemporary Canadian government and politics. Additional topics may include regionalism, federalism, western alienation and oil, Canadian solutions to social welfare policy questions, developments in Quebec, and other issues associated with French-English relations.

Same as INTL ST 176L.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 153E. Human Rights. 4 Units.

Examines the causes and consequences of human rights violations with a focus on Latin America. What are human rights? When and where are they violated? What political mechanisms are available to deal with human rights problems? How effective are they.

Same as INTL ST 154B.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 153G. Cuban Society and Revolution. 4 Units.

Explores the causes, development, and legacy of the 1959 Revolution. Themes include economic dependency, democracy, race, gender, culture, and the always volatile relations between Cuba and the United States.

Same as INTL ST 177E, HISTORY 166C, CHC/LAT 157.

POL SCI 154C. Comparative Politics: Four Nations, Three Continents. 4 Units.

Studies four countries in a comparative fashion: their respective political histories and cultural traditions; actual differences among their superficially similar party, parliamentary, and executive institutions; contemporary economic policy. The countries represent three continents and varying levels of economic development.

Same as INTL ST 144A.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 154F. Peoples and Cultures of Post-Soviet Eurasia. 4 Units.

Examines the cultures and political conflicts of the more than 130 indigenous ethnic groups in the European and Asian territories of the former U.S.S.R. Emphasis is on the theoretical issues of ethnicity, nationalism, and conflict management.

Same as INTL ST 162B, ANTHRO 164P.

(VIII)

POL SCI 154G. Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Units.

Examines theories of conflict management. Analyzes how conflict is mitigated in diverse cultures: at the interpersonal level, between groups, and on the international scale. Students discuss readings, hear from conflict management practitioners, and simulate negotiations.

Same as ANTHRO 136D, SOC SCI 183E, INTL ST 183E.

(VIII)

POL SCI 155A. New Democracies. 4 Units.

Examines what democracy is; considers competing theories about its causes; explores multiple democratic institutions; discusses several types of democracy; and analyzes various aspects of democratic quality and stability, focusing on Eastern Europe, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Same as INTL ST 124B.

POL SCI 155C. Organizations. 4 Units.

How bureaucracies, formal organizations, and voluntary associations work, how/why they grow, and where they are going. History and structure of organizational rationality; dynamics of organized groups; behavior in organizations; limits of bureaucratization and attempts to overcome these limits through decentralization.

Same as SOCIOL 141.

Restriction: Sociology and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 155F. Political Economy of Japan. 4 Units.

Surveys postwar developments in the politics and political economy of Japan. Topics include the political and institutional context of policy making; pressures for change which Japan's political economy has faced in the last decade; Japan's past and present foreign policies.

Same as INTL ST 114D.

Restriction: Political Science majors and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 156A. Political Participation. 4 Units.

The ways in which people in various political systems take part in politics, especially in activities directed toward affecting outcomes. Who is active, what they do, why they do it, and what difference it makes.

POL SCI 156C. Citizen Politics. 4 Units.

Study of the role of public opinion in the political process. Reviews some key research approaches and findings on which our current understanding of public opinion is based. Provides an opportunity to conduct research and to analyze public opinion surveys.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 156D. Protests, Movements, and Revolutions. 4 Units.

A survey of models of collective action drawn from sociology, economics, psychology, and political science. Focus on areas such as social movements, strikes, crowd psychology, cults, fads, fashions, public opinion, and symbolic and mythical elements in collective culture.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 1 or POL SCI 6A or ECON 1.

Same as SOCIOL 174.

Restriction: Political Science and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 157B. International Divided Cities. 4 Units.

Investigates urban divisions in international cities where deep-seated nationalistic ethnic differences create pressures for intergroup conflicts, autonomy, or territorial separation, and can incite violence. Urban political polarization as it is manifest in the urban setting.

Same as SOCIOL 176, PP&D 178.

POL SCI 158C. Afghanistan. 4 Units.

Provides an examination of Afghanistan's traditional social organization, economy, political organization, and relationship among ethnic groups as a basis for discussing the consequences of domestic political turmoil and foreign interventions over the last 20 years. Current situation and future addressed.

Same as SOC SCI 188I, INTL ST 162.

POL SCI 158D. Introduction to Contemporary Middle East Politics. 4 Units.

An overview of basic issues that shape the politics of the Middle East and North Africa. Themes include implication of the colonization era, nation-state formation, inter-Arab relations, nationalism, Arab-Israel conflict, Islamic resurgence, and more.

Same as SOC SCI 188A, INTL ST 165.

POL SCI 159. Special Topics in Comparative Politics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of comparative politics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 169. Conflict Management. 4 Units.

Special Instance.

POL SCI 171A. Law and Society. 4 Units.

Law and its various roles in society. The nature and meaning of law; legality and power in the American system; law as a mechanism for social change; the role of law in dispute processing, social control, compliance with judicial decisions.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 171AW. Law and Society. 4 Units.

Law and its various roles in society. The nature and meaning of law; legality and power in the American system; law as a mechanism for social change; the role of law in dispute processing, social control, compliance with judicial decisions.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 171B. Jurisprudence. 4 Units.

A survey of legal philosophies. Explores jurisprudence from the ancient Greeks to the present, including natural law philosophy; legal positivism and realism; sociological jurisprudence; and liberal, radical, and conservative thought.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 171CW. Comparative Constitutional Politics. 4 Units.

Examines the impact of constitutional courts on politics and policy-making in Canada, France, Germany, and the United States. Cases may focus on the constitutional politics of free speech, abortion, rights to property, and the conduct of foreign relations.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 171D. American Constitutional Law. 4 Units.

American constitutional interpretation of cases involving separation of powers, federal-state relations, rights of property, free expression, privacy, criminal due process, political participation, and equality. Includes legal research methods, development of judicial review, legal reasoning, and impact of Supreme Court decisions.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Overlaps with CRM/LAW C122.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 171F. Law in the Twenty-First Century. 4 Units.

Examines the complex relationship between law, the social sciences, and modern society. Lectures explore such issues as the interplay between technology and constitutional rights, the impact of science on law, and the evolving roles of attorneys and judges.

Same as SOC SCI 172D.

Restriction: Political Science and Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 171G. Legal Implications of the Drug Trade. 4 Units.

Examines United States policy to combat domestic and international narcotics trafficking. Analyzes the national drug policy and program implementation by federal and state agencies. Considers the effects of these policies on our individual constitutional rights and the criminal justice system.

POL SCI 172A. International Law. 4 Units.

Examination of the origin, changing structure, application of international law, and the role of legal norms in regulating the behavior of states and maintaining international order.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as INTL ST 145A.

(VIII)

POL SCI 172C. Constitution and Rights. 4 Units.

How are constitutions crafted, maintained, and changed? Does constitutionalism support or undermine democracy? What difference do rights and constitutional courts make? Explores these questions through a comparative examination of the theory and practice of constitutionalism in developing democracies.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as INTL ST 145C.

POL SCI 172D. Courts in New Democracies . 4 Units.

Examines the conceptual, theoretical, and empirical foundations of the study of courts and politics in new democracies, introducing students to a variety of contemporary debates about how political dynamics shape courts, and how courts shape politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Same as INTL ST 145D.

POL SCI 174A. Civil Liberties. 4 Units.

Political analysis of selected Supreme Court cases involving claims under the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Topics include: race, sex, and other forms of discrimination; criminal justice; privacy; freedom of speech and related claims.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 71A.

Overlaps with CRM/LAW C122.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 174C. U.S. Supreme Court. 4 Units.

Overview and analysis of the role played by the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. Judicial review, appointment of justices, judicial activism and judicial restraint, process of case selection, court deliberation, land decision-making, impact of Supreme Court decisions.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 174CW. U.S. Supreme Court. 4 Units.

Overview and analysis of the role played by the U.S. Supreme Court in the American political system. Judicial review, appointment of justices, judicial activism and judicial restraint, process of case selection, court deliberation, land decision-making, impact of Supreme Court decisions.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

POL SCI 175. The Bill of Rights in Film. 4 Units.

Focuses on ways American cinema has portrayed, represented, and analyzed U.S. Bills of Rights. Juxtaposes cinematic presentations on specific Bill of Rights clauses, treating films as cultural texts, with pertinent judicial decisions and more scholarly appraisals of those same provisions.

POL SCI 179. Special Topics in Public Law. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of public law. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI H180D. Honors Seminar in Political Science. 2-4 Units.

Course for students enrolled in the Honors Program in Political Science.

Prerequisite: Only open to students in the Political Science Honors Program.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

POL SCI H182A. Honors Thesis Workshop. 4 Units.

A weekly seminar/workshop to facilitate the exchange of ideas and research strategies among students and to review their progress in writing the thesis.

Restriction: Open only to students in the Political Science Senior Thesis program.

POL SCI 190. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Thesis research with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

POL SCI 190W. Senior Thesis. 4 Units.

Thesis research with Political Science faculty.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

(Ib)

POL SCI 197. Field Study. 1-4 Units.

Field study with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 198. Directed Group Study. 1-4 Units.

Directed group study with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent study or research with a Political Science faculty member.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

POL SCI 209A. Study of Democracy Colloquium. 1.33 Unit.

Skills critical to professional success. Students learn and practice professional presentation skills, develop substantive knowledge in the field by attending talks and panels, and interact with scholars and professionals in the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only. POL SCI 209A may not be taken for credit if taken after SOCIOL 229.

POL SCI 209B. Study of Democracy Colloquium. 1.33 Unit.

This colloquium teaches students skills critical to professional success. Students learn and practice professional presentation skills and develop substantive knowledge in the field by attending talks and panels and interacting with scholars and professionals in the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only. POL SCI 209B may not be taken for credit if taken after SOCIOL 229 Democracy.

POL SCI 209C. Study of Democracy Colloquium . 1.34 Unit.

This colloquium teaches students skills critical to professional success. Students learn and practice professional presentation skills and develop substantive knowledge in the field by attending talks and panels and interacting with scholars and professionals in the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only. POL SCI 209C may not be taken for credit if taken after SOCIOL 229 Democracy.

POL SCI 210A. Colloquium. 1.3 Unit.

Doctoral training requires more than learning substantive debates and research methods; it also requires students learn professional practices, routines, and expectations. This year-long workshop offers students a mix of professional development, outside speakers, and casual conversations with departmental faculty.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 210B. Colloquium. 1.3 Unit.

Doctoral training requires more than learning substantive debates and research methods; it also requires students learn professional practices, routines, and expectations. This year-long workshop offers students a mix of professional development, outside speakers, and casual conversations with departmental faculty.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 210A.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 210C. Colloquium. 1.4 Unit.

Doctoral training requires more than learning substantive debates and research methods; it also requires students learn professional practices, routines, and expectations. This year-long workshop offers students a mix of professional development, outside speakers, and casual conversations with departmental faculty.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 210B.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 212A. Public Opinion. 4 Units.

Introduction to the study of U.S. public opinion. Provides an overview of the theories regarding opinion formation, the methodologies employed, and the role of public opinion in democratic governments.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 212B. Ethics Workshop. 4 Units.

Students find an important question in ethics, search literature to assess topic's importance, post question to be researched, propose method of analysis and type of data, analyze data, and note how their works contribute to knowledge in the field.

POL SCI 219. Special Topics in Politics and Society. 4 Units.

Current research in politics and society.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 221A. Public Policy . 4 Units.

Explores different approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Same as PUB POL 221.

Restriction: Master of Public Policy graduate students have first consideration for enrollment.

POL SCI 222A. Collaborative Governance and Public Management. 4 Units.

Introduction to inclusive management. To make effective use of public resources, public managers are inventing ways of managing that alter relationships within organizations, between organizations, between sectors, and with the public. Requires rethinking fundamentals such as leadership and motivation.

Same as PP&D 283.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 223A. Theories of Power and Empowerment. 4 Units.

Studies different ways of thinking about power and its uses. Explores theories of power that inform various notions of empowerment, including resistance, participatory democracy, and workplace empowerment.

Same as PP&D 279, MGMTPHD 297R.

Restriction: Ph.D. students only.

POL SCI 229. Advanced Research Methods: Varied Topics. 4 Units.

Topics in advanced research methods. Topics will vary.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 231A. Political Epistemology. 4 Units.

Focuses on fundamental issues of knowledge in the study of politics, especially interconnections and tensions between politics and knowledge. Counts as the Field Seminar in Political Theory.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 232A. Introduction to Voting Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to voting modules. Substantive topics include majority rule, voting methods and their properties, apportionment and proportional representation, agenda manipulation, coalition formation, voting power, political consequences of electoral laws.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 234A. Research Logic and Design in Political Science. 4 Units.

An introduction to standard research techniques in political science. Issues of epistemology, research design, and approaches to empirical analysis.

Prerequisite: Upper-division or graduate-level statistics.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 239. Special Topics in Political Theory. 4 Units.

Current research in political theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 241B. Seminar in International Relations Theory. 4 Units.

Overview of the major theories guiding research and scholarship in international relations. Focus on major conceptual approaches (realism, neoliberalism, marxism) and levels of analysis (systemic, state, and subnational), as well as on methodological/epistemological debates engulfing the field.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 241E. Research Design in International Relations. 4 Units.

Surveys research design primarily through substantive readings in international relations. The purpose is to familiarize students with choices/dilemmas relevant to IR-specific research. Students at various stages in the graduate program and with different methodological orientations are welcome.

POL SCI 252A. The State in Comparative Perspective. 4 Units.

Seminar examining the state from theoretical, empirical, comparative perspectives. How the state came into being, the state’s role in the economy, toward society and internationally, and in policy-making in Western Europe, East Asian newly industrialized countries, the Third World.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 252F. Political Culture and Democracy. 4 Units.

Examines the political culture literature and its relationship to democratic development. What are the cultural prerequisites of democracy, what aspects of political culture facilitate democratic politics and governmental performance, and what forms and reforms a political culture.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 252G. Theories and Practice of Migration and Citizenship. 4 Units.

Examines theories of migration and citizenship. In examining these themes, the course includes discussion of theory development, multi-method testing, and case study comparison with a focus on Western Europe and other advanced democratic receiving states.

POL SCI 253B. Regime Change in East Asia. 4 Units.

Regime change from authoritarianism to democracies (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan); gradual political change (China). Uses theories from comparative literature on regime transition; combines theory with historical institutions, political culture, prior regimes, elements in the transition process in the four countries.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 254A. Introduction to Game Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to non-cooperative games. The prisoner's dilemma, Nash equilibrium, sequential games, subgame perfection. Applications include collective action, agenda-setter models, spatial competition of political parties, models of revolution and arms race.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 260B. Political Participation. 4 Units.

Examines theoretical approaches to the explanation of the pattern of participation and consideration of the results of empirical studies of such activity by mass publics (mainly in Europe and North America). Addresses issues in both comparative politics and political behavior.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 270A. Political Economy I. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Same as ECON 270A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 270B. Political Economy II. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 270A.

Same as ECON 270B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 270C. Political Economy III. 4 Units.

Political Economy lies at the intersection of economics and political science. Course studies effects of politics on the economy and uses tools derived from economics to understand the behavior of governments and of citizens when they deal with politics.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 270B.

Same as ECON 270C.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

POL SCI 273A. Advanced Qualitative Methods: Analyzing Qualitative Data. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the theory and practice of analyzing qualitative data. Student must have already learned about data collection and research design for qualitative research and they must have qualitative data they can analyze.

Same as MGMTPHD 297K, PP&D 213.

Restriction: Grad students only

POL SCI 276. Predictive Models in Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Basic numeracy (logarithms, fixed-exponent and exponential formats, graphing). Models based on ignorance and logical constraints. Logical quantitative models (how things should be) to complement and guide statistical analysis (how things are).

POL SCI 285A. Introduction to Political Psychology I. 4 Units.

Reviews theoretical questions regarding the relationship between the analytical and normative and the polity. Considers relationships between the analytical and normative concerns of psychology and political science, addressing empirical literatures on political socialization, ideology and public opinion, identity and nationality.

POL SCI 290. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

POL SCI 299. Independent Study. 1-12 Units.

Independent research with Political Science faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Social Science Courses

SOC SCI 1A. Principles in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Introduction to various disciplines within the social sciences. Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on understanding human behavior and social institutions, including interpersonal, economic, and cultural activities. Course may be offered online.

(III)

SOC SCI H1E. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Same as SOCECOL H20A.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOC SCI H1F. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H1E or SOCECOL H20A.

Same as SOCECOL H20B.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOC SCI H1G. Honors: Critical Issues on the Social Sciences. 6 Units.

Major themes, methods, and works in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Each quarter focuses on a different topic. Weekly seminars emphasizing development of critical thinking skills and quantitative analysis through written work are integral to the course.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H1F or SOCECOL H20B.

Same as SOCECOL H20C.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(III)

SOC SCI 2A. Introduction to Social Science Analysis. 4 Units.

Introduction to social science research and analytical models. Theory construction and use of research methods in an interdisciplinary context. Discussion of the application of social science research to public policy. Computer laboratories develop creative thinking, graphing, and data presentation skills.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

SOC SCI 3A. Computer-Based Research in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Focuses on the data manipulation, data visualization, and information searching techniques. Hands-on experience in hypothesis testing, mapping, graphics, and data arrays. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: School of Social Sciences majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 5A. Introduction to Human Geography. 4 Units.

Human behavior in a geographical context. Spatial patterns and organization of the cultural, social, and economic activities of man as imposed on and influenced by the earth's physical setting.

(III)

SOC SCI 5B. Introduction to Physical Geography. 4 Units.

An introduction to the physical world we live in. Distribution and dynamics of the earth's air, water, and solid crust. Concepts and principles from climatology and geology. Selected examples from North America and beyond.

SOC SCI 5D. US & World Geography. 4 Units.

Survey of general geographical principles and facts on a world scale, as well as introduction to the broad regional and resource geography of the U.S., emphasizing in particular the interactions of physical and cultural factors.

(III, VIII)

SOC SCI 9A. General Statistics and Probability I. 4 Units.

Introduction to the variety of statistical applications in many fields, including the humanities, physical and social sciences, business, forensic and health sciences. Descriptive statistics, including percentile ranks, standardization, and normal approximation. Estimation and the measurement of error.

Overlaps with ECON 10A, PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10A, SOCIOL 10A, POL SCI 10A.

Restriction: Non-Social Sciences majors only.

(Va)

SOC SCI 9B. General Statistics and Probability II. 4 Units.

Introduction to statistical inference, sampling distributions, standard error. Hypothesis tests for proportions and means. Inferential techniques for nominal variables including chisquare. Selected applications in fields such as ecology, forensic science, and quantitative stylistics are based on student interests.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 9A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10B, POL SCI 10B, PSYCH 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10B, SOCIOL 10B.

Restriction: Non-Social Sciences majors only.

(Va)

SOC SCI 9C. General Statistics and Probability III. 4 Units.

Focus on correlation and regression. One-way and two-way factorial analysis of variance. Introduction to repeated measures designs and non-parametric statistics. Critiquing the use of statistics in newspapers and popular magazines. Locating, accessing, and evaluating statistical data.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 9B.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10C, POL SCI 10C, PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10C, SOCIOL 10C.

Restriction: Non-Social Sciences majors only.

(Vb)

SOC SCI 10A. Probability and Statistics in Social Sciences I. 4 Units.

Introduction to the variety of statistical applications in the social sciences. Descriptive statistics. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Percentile ranks. Standardization and normal approximation. Basic probability theory focuses on application to statistical inference and binomial distribution. Laboratory required.

Corequisite: SOC SCI 3A.
Prerequisite: SOC SCI 3A.

Overlaps with PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, POL SCI 10A, SOC SCI 9A, SOCIOL 10A, ECON 15A.

Restriction: Lower-division students only. Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment. SOC SCI 10A may not be taken for credit if taken after or concurrently with ECON 15A.

(Va)

SOC SCI 10B. Probability & Statistics in Social Sciences II. 4 Units.

Introduction to statistical inference, sampling distribution, standard error. Hypothesis tests for proportions and means. Inferential techniques for nominal variables including chi-square, study measures of strengths, significance of relationships between variables, assumptions, data requirements, and types of error in significance tests. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 10A.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10B, POL SCI 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9B, SOCIOL 10B, PSYCH 10B.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

SOC SCI 10C. Probability & Statistics in Social Sciences III. 4 Units.

Focus on correlation, regression, and control for effects of variables. One-way and two-way factorial analysis of variance. A priori and a posteriori comparisons. Introduction to repeated measures design and non-parametric statistics. Discuss use of statistics in newspapers and popular magazines.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 10B.

Overlaps with ANTHRO 10C, POL SCI 10C, PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 9C, SOCIOL 10C.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Vb)

SOC SCI 11A. Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money. 4 Units.

Digital money has captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. Course puts this change in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? Course may be offered online.

Same as IN4MATX 12.

(II, III)

SOC SCI 20. Model United Nations. 2 Units.

Focuses on simulations of the foreign policy pursuits of selected countries in the international community. Emphasis placed on understanding the rules of debate, as well as the policy positions of the student's selected country in the United Nations.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 6 times.

SOC SCI 40. Social Policy and Public Service. 4 Units.

An introduction to the basic theories and principles of public policy. Students examine various influences on the development of public policy and the principle actors in the process, and learn to identify tools and techniques employed in policy making.

Same as SPPS 40.

(III)

SOC SCI 66. Introduction to Gangs . 4 Units.

Introduces students to street gang subculture and explores risk factors associated with gang membership. Students develop a working definition for street gang and understand the difference between social and legal definitions. Also explores the connection between prison and street gangs.

SOC SCI 70C. Comparing Cultures. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the scope of cross-cultural comparisons by analyzing the theories, methodologies, and facts utilized by anthropologists, sociologists, social psychologists, political scientists, and historians in comparing cultures.

(III, VII)

SOC SCI 78A. Asian American Histories. 4 Units.

Examines and compares diverse experiences of major Asian American groups since the mid-nineteenth century. Topics include origins of emigration; the formation and transformation of community; gender and family life; changing roles of Asian Americans in American society. Formerly ASIANAM 60A.

Same as ASIANAM 50, HISTORY 15C.

((III or IV) and VII ).

SOC SCI 78B. Asian American Communities. 4 Units.

Examines the renewal of Asian immigration following World War II. Explores contemporary Asian American populations and communities in the U.S., and the impact of contemporary Asian immigration on the U.S. political economy and social order.

Same as ASIANAM 52.

(III, VII)

SOC SCI 78C. Asian Americans and Comparative Race Relations. 4 Units.

Analyzes the Asian American experience in comparative perspective, which includes comparisons of different ethnic and racial groups, and across gender and class. Possible topics include labor, economy, politics, migration, nation, popular culture, gender, family, sexuality, and multiraciality.

Same as ASIANAM 53.

(III, VII)

SOC SCI 89. Special Topics in Social Sciences. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Social Sciences. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 102A. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Hands-on laboratory course introduces students to the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology using social science applications. Students will learn to organize, manipulate, and display spatial data leading to the design of their own GIS research project.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 102B. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Expands Geographic Information Systems (GIS) skills to more advanced theories and concepts in the spatial analysis of social science issues and particularly to analyzing and interpreting spatial data. Students develop and complete a GIS research project of their own choosing.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 102A.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 103A. Game Theory and Politics I. 4 Units.

Introduction to game theory and a survey of its political applications. Examples of topics covered include voting in small committees, legislatures, and mass elections; interest group activities and environmental issues; institutional design, and the evolution of cooperative behavior.

Same as INTL ST 105A, POL SCI 130A, SOCIOL 134.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, Sociology, Political Science, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 103B. Game Theory and Politics II. 4 Units.

More advanced game theory and its political applications, beginning where Game Theory and Politics I ends. Examples of topics covered include revolutions; arms race; spatial models of party competition; political manipulation; political coalitions and their power.

Prerequisite: POL SCI 130A or ECON 116A.

Same as INTL ST 105B, POL SCI 130B.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, International Studies, and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 115D. International Business. 4 Units.

Introduction to conducting business in the international arena, decision making in the organization, and globalization of markets and production. Topics covered range from tax and finance to ethics, marketing, and more. Continuing corporate regulatory scandals discussed.

Same as INTL ST 112A.

SOC SCI 115E. California and Global Economy. 4 Units.

Presents the nature of the State's economy and the current and projected role of California in the world economy.

Same as INTL ST 135.

SOC SCI 118G. Regional Geography of California. 4 Units.

Geographical analysis of selected regions of California, in particular geomorphological, hydrological, and climatic conditions, as well as economic and social strengths and weaknesses. May include some fieldwork in Orange County on environmental, social and residential problems, with legislative background information.

SOC SCI 119. Special Topics in Geography. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of geography. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 120. Transnational Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines the internationalization of U.S. domestic street gangs. The relationship between California gangs Mara Salvatrucha and 18th Street and Mexico/Central American gangs is assessed. Specified topics include: mobilization, migration, territorialism, culture, organization, and use of technology. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Same as INTL ST 130.
Overlaps with SOC SCI XI120, INTL ST XI130.

SOC SCI 121T. Voting and Political Manipulation. 4 Units.

Introduction to social choice and cooperative games. Topics include majority rule, types of voting methods, apportionment and proportional representation, agenda manipulation, coalition formation, voting power, political consequences of electoral laws.

Same as INTL ST 156A, POL SCI 151H, ECON 154.

Restriction: International Studies, Political Science, Social Science and Economics majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 130B. Science and Religion II. 4 Units.

The development of genomics, stem-cell research, robotics, nanotechnology, neuropharmacology raises difficult religious and philosophical questions. Examines interdisciplinary approaches that cut across institutional boundaries, cultural borders, religious traditions. Focuses on relationship between religion and cognitive/affective/social neuroscience. Course may be offered online.

Same as REL STD 112B, PSYCH 172S, LPS 140B.

SOC SCI 152A. Non-Government Organization (NGO) Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Introduction to non-governmental organizations, including their role in U.S. society and the international community. Explores varying definitions of NGOs and the characteristics held in common by all NGOs.

Same as INTL ST 152A.

SOC SCI 152C. American Public Policy. 4 Units.

Focuses on the development and implementation of public policy in the United States. Lectures cover theoretical models of the policy process as well as significant problems facing contemporary American decision-makers.

Same as PP&D 129, PUBHLTH 132, POL SCI 121G.

SOC SCI 163A. Urban America . 4 Units.

Students examine the historical, social, political, and economic factors that contributed to the construction of the American urban context, one that is poverty concentrated and racially/ethnically segregated. Students also critically assess the consequence of growing up in America's urban neighborhoods.

Same as PP&D 104, CHC/LAT 162A.

SOC SCI 164B. Domestic Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines the history and development of California street gangs and the role of historical events in that development. Students will be able to contrast and compare gang cohort behaviors between some of the major gangs in California.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 164C. Prison Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines the growth and spread of prison gangs throughout the country. Relationships between prison and street gangs, and possible relationships with foreign drug trafficking organizations studied. Violence examined as the standard to establish dominance in and out of prison. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 164D. Juvenile Gangs. 4 Units.

Examines risk factors that can be used to predict gang membership. Compares generational with non-generational gangs and develops a working sociological definition that can be used to identify street gangs. Myths about juveniles, street gangs. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 66.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 165. Chicano/Latino Families. 4 Units.

Introduction to the research, literature, and issues surrounding the topic of Chicano/Latino families including cultural history, contemporary issues, organization of family, traditions, lifestyles, values, beliefs, generational differences, gender issues, ethnic identity, evolution of demographic patterns, current economic and political standings.

Same as CHC/LAT 170, PSYCH 174H.

SOC SCI 168B. Immigration and Inequality. 4 Units.

Explores immigration, ethnicity, and inequality as interconnected social forces. International migration, propelled by global inequalities, plays a central role in the formation of multinational societies, shapes inter-group relations and patterns of ethnic inequality, and transforms the immigrants themselves.

Same as SOCIOL 166.

SOC SCI 169AZ. Special Topics: Sociology. 4 Units.

No description.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 170A. Research Methods in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Examines how interdisciplinary social science research questions are formulated and studies several research methods including: experimental method, quasi-experimental methods, survey research, field research, evaluation research, and meta-analysis. Parametric and non-parametric statistical methods are illustrated using the SPSS program.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 1A and SOC SCI 3A and SOC SCI 10C and SOC SCI 2A.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 172A. American Culture. 4 Units.

A survey of the historical development of dominant American culture and society; emphasis on a close reading of key cultural texts, with weekly text as a model of writing examining its use of language and rhetoric.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 172AW. American Culture. 4 Units.

A survey of the historical development of dominant American culture and society; emphasis on a close reading of key cultural texts, with weekly text as a model of writing, examining its use of language and rhetoric. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 172D. Law in the Twenty-First Century. 4 Units.

Examines the complex relationship between law, the social sciences, and modern society. Lectures explore such issues as the interplay between technology and constitutional rights, the impact of science on law, and the evolving roles of attorneys and judges.

Same as POL SCI 171F.

Restriction: Political Science and Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 173G. Film Media and the Latino Community. 4 Units.

Uses film as a resource for understanding contemporary issues and problems facing the Chicano/Latino community. (Does not study cinema as a genre.).

Same as CHC/LAT 114.

(VII)

SOC SCI 173I. Perspectives on the U.S. - Mexican Border. 4 Units.

Economic aspects of the historical development of the United States-Mexican border. The current economic situation in the Southwest and border areas as it affects both Mexico and the Latino/Chicano population is also examined.

Same as CHC/LAT 160, INTL ST 177B.

(VII)

SOC SCI 173L. Latinos in a Global Society. 4 Units.

Examines interconnections between diverse Latino groups in the U.S. and the effects of globalization on their social, cultural, and political realities. Topics include immigration, demographics, socioeconomic differentiation, familial relations, political protest/resistance, law and policy, and links to "homeland" issues.

Same as CHC/LAT 167.

(VII)

SOC SCI 173N. Revolution in Latin America. 4 Units.

Presents a comparative analysis of the causes, development, and consequences of selected revolutionary movements, focusing on outbreaks in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, and Grenada. Explores topics of state formation, economic nationalism, social justice, ethnicity, and role of international affairs.

Same as CHC/LAT 151B, HISTORY 166D, INTL ST 177C.

SOC SCI 173Q. Introduction to Cuba: History, Culture, and Society. 4 Units.

Introduction to Cuban history, culture, and society using social science texts, visual and musical materials. Examines major historical moments including the historical relationship between the United States and explores evolution of Cuban music from the earliest times to present.

Same as INTL ST 177F, CHC/LAT 130.

(VIII)

SOC SCI 175B. Ethnic and Racial Communities. 4 Units.

Examines various theoretical analyses of race and ethnicity, particularly as they apply to Asian Americans. Also explores the relationship of Asian Americans to other racialized minorities in the U.S.

Same as ASIANAM 161.

SOC SCI 177B. Asian American Women. 4 Units.

Examines the representations and experiences of Asian American women from diverse perspectives. Explores the commonalities and differences among various groups of Asian American women, with particular focus on history, culture, values, and family roles.

Same as ASIANAM 162.

SOC SCI 178C. The Korean American Experience. 4 Units.

Explores the factors that have distinctly shaped the Korean American experience, including patterns of racial domination, the profile of immigrant flow, immigrant roles in the urban political economy, politics in Korea, and the role of the church.

Same as ASIANAM 151C.

SOC SCI 178D. The Vietnamese American Experience. 4 Units.

Studies the resettlement of Vietnamese in the United States following their exodus from Southeast Asia. Topics discussed include the Vietnam War, the 1975 evacuation, boat and land refugees, the shaping of Vietnamese communities, and Vietnamese American literature.

Same as ASIANAM 151D.

SOC SCI 178E. The Japanese American Experience. 4 Units.

Studies the settlement of Japanese in Hawaii and the continental United States since the late nineteenth century. Topics covered include sugar plantations, development of rural Japanese America, World War II internment, post-War community development, and persistence of Japanese American identity.

Same as ASIANAM 151E.

SOC SCI 178F. South Asian American Experience. 4 Units.

Examines and compares the experiences of South Asian immigrants in the U.S. over time. Looks at the economic, political, and social positions of the immigrants, with special emphasis on religious changes and the changes in the second and later generations.

Same as ASIANAM 151F.

Restriction: Asian American Studies and Social Policy and Public Service majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 178H. Southeast Asian American Experience. 4 Units.

Analyzes experiences of refugees and immigrants from Southeast Asia, which may include those from Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, and the Philippines. Examines political and economic factors for their exodus and how they reconstruct their identities, histories, and communities.

Same as ASIANAM 151H.

SOC SCI 178J. Chinese American Experience. 4 Units.

Analyzes the experiences of Chinese in the United States. Immigration, Chinese exclusion, racial and gender identity. Historical overview and contemporary issues covered.

Same as ASIANAM 151J.

SOC SCI 178K. Filipina/Filipino American Experience. 4 Units.

Explores the experience of Filipina/Filipino Americans from the era of Spanish colonization of the Philippines to present-day community formations in the United States, with special emphasis on the twentieth century. Topics include colonialism, nation, migration, gender, and culture.

Same as ASIANAM 151K.

SOC SCI 179. Special Topics in Asian American Studies. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Asian American Studies. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 180X. Research Methods . 4 Units.

Develops an understanding of major research methods emphasizing quantitative research techniques; identifies techniques for research questions; applies understanding in relation to contemporary issues by way of a written a proposal for a quantitative research project.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: SAEP students only.

SOC SCI 180Y. Statistical Methods . 4 Units.

Covers the following topics: measurement, data screening procedures, descriptive statistics, the chi-square statistic, logistic regression, bivariate correlation and regression, and multiple correlation and regression. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of applied statistics.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: SAEP participants only.

SOC SCI 181A. Ethical Leadership. 4 Units.

Explores historical and contemporary theories of ethical and unethical leadership. Examines models of "good leadership" such as cardinal and monastic virtues; and models of "bad leadership," such as Machiavelli's Prince. Explores the philosophies, styles, and accomplishments of leaders.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 183A. International Studies Forum. 2 Units.

A faculty-student forum featuring lectures from a variety of institutions with discussion issues related to International Studies. Course may be offered online.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

Same as INTL ST 183A, SOCECOL 183A.

SOC SCI 183B. Seminar in Mediation. 4 Units.

Student develop mediation skills and refine knowledge in the practice and theory of conflict resolution. Students who complete this course may serve as mediators in the Campus Mediation Program. Course is a prerequisite to completing Indep Study as an intern.

Same as INTL ST 183B, SOCECOL 183B.

Restriction: School of Humanities, School of Social Ecology, International Studies, and Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI 183C. Seminar in Conflict Resolution . 4 Units.

Designed for students pursuing the minor in Conflict Resolution and/or International Studies majors. Provides a forum in which students will refine skills and theory in the study of cooperation and conflict, from local to global arenas. Students write research paper.

Same as SOCECOL 183C, INTL ST 183C.

SOC SCI 183CW. Seminar Conflict Resolution. 4 Units.

Designed for seniors who are pursuing the minor in Conflict Resolution and/or International Studies major. Provides a forum in which students will refine skills and theory in the study of cooperation and conflict, from local to global arenas.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as SOCECOL 183CW, INTL ST 183CW.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 183E. Conflict Resolution in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Units.

Examines theories of conflict management. Analyzes how conflict is mitigated in diverse cultures: at the interpersonal level, between groups, and on the international scale. Students discuss readings, hear from conflict management practitioners, and simulate negotiations.

Same as ANTHRO 136D, POL SCI 154G, INTL ST 183E.

(VIII)

SOC SCI 184A. Sage Leader Research I. 2 Units.

Participants in the SAGE Scholars Program learn to define leadership concepts, discover various leadership styles, and develop strong leadership and communication skills resulting in strengthened ability to contribute to and interact with UCI and the Orange County community.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: SAGE Scholars Program students only.

SOC SCI 184B. Sage Leader Research II. 4 Units.

Provides a survey of contemporary topics and challenges in the fields of management and leadership. Case studies and text by leading authors are used to analyze key leadership issues in twenty-first century, with particular emphasis on current events.

Restriction: SAGE Scholars Program students only.

SOC SCI 184F. International Journalism. 4 Units.

Studies and critically analyzes how the media covers international issues that have reshaped. American foreign coverage and the implications for Americans and U.S. foreign policy. Focuses on international reporting as a way of developing fundamental skills of journalism.

Same as INTL ST 155A.

SOC SCI 184GW. Media Writing. 4 Units.

Designed to teach reporting and news writing basics. Students learn how to gather and organize information, ask effective questions, develop story ideas, research facts, and write stories on deadline. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as INTL ST 155BW.
Overlaps with INTL ST XI155B, SOC SCI XI184G.

Restriction: International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 185W. People in Society. 4 Units.

Through readings about people in distinctly different societies throughout history, students learn concepts that cross the boundaries of the social science disciplines. Such themes as democracy, elitism, power, social class, and gender as the basis for discussion and writing.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: School of Social Sciences majors only.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 187. Twenty-First-Century Graduate Education. 2 Units.

Graduate and professional education in twenty-first century United States. Examines strategies for admission to postbaccalaureate programs and success in graduate study culture. Introduction to processes including planning and preparation, school selection, entrance examination preparation, submission of applications, writing personal statements.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

SOC SCI 188A. Introduction to Contemporary Middle East Politics. 4 Units.

An overview of basic issues that shape the politics of the Middle East and North Africa. Themes include implication of the colonization era, nation-state formation, inter-Arab relations, nationalism, Arab-Israel conflict, Islamic resurgence, and more.

Same as INTL ST 165, POL SCI 158D.

SOC SCI 188D. Iran: Past and Present. 4 Units.

Pre-revolutionary Iran; and Iran since the revolution. History, oil and politics: domestic and international.

Same as INTL ST 168.

SOC SCI 188E. Israel and the World: An Introduction. 4 Units.

Examines the founding of Israel, its relationship with the Arab world, the role of the international community, and the challenges it faces today.

Same as INTL ST 170.

SOC SCI 188I. Afghanistan. 4 Units.

Provides an examination of Afghanistan's traditional social organization, economy, political organization, and relationship among ethnic groups as a basis for discussing the consequences of domestic political turmoil and foreign interventions over the last 20 years. Current situation and future addressed.

Same as INTL ST 162, POL SCI 158C.

SOC SCI 188K. Political Islam. 4 Units.

Political Islamd is a diverse phenomenon. While noticeable barriers exist to "Islamist democracy," it is the Islamists who will define the political future of much of the Muslim world. Reviews the experience of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Pakistan, Turkey, and Indonesia.

Same as INTL ST 161A.

SOC SCI 188M. Psychology of the Middle East Conflict. 4 Units.

Explores how emotions guide actions; political movements and social identity factors in ethnic, religious, or other group conflicts; psycho-biographies of political leaders and effects on foreign policy making; decisions to go to war; psychological dimensions of conflict and conflict resolution.

Same as INTL ST 166.

SOC SCI 189. Special Topics in Social Sciences. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social sciences. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Social Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOC SCI H190A. Honors Research Workshop. 4 Units.

Student develops a 10–15-page prospectus of research for the honors thesis which includes: the research question, literature review, methods of investigation, and bibliography. Student selects a faculty mentor who will supervise thesis research and writing in winter and spring.

Same as SPPS H190A.

Restriction: Honors Program for Social Science majors students and Social Policy and Public Service majors only.

SOC SCI H190B. Honors Thesis Research. 4 Units.

The student initiates and completes data collection for the honors thesis. A faculty mentor provides supervision and feedback on thesis chapters.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H190A or SPPS H190A.

Same as SPPS H190B.

SOC SCI H190C. Honors Thesis. 4 Units.

The student completes, with the approval of the faculty mentor, an honors thesis containing: statement of the problem, literature review, research hypotheses, methods of investigation, results, discussion, and bibliography.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI H190B. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

SOC SCI 191. Graduate-Mentored Study in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Offers a hands-on research experience while increasing awareness of the various disciplines in the social sciences and of the requirements of graduate school. Features graduate-mentored study under the supervision of the Associate Dean.

Prerequisite: Identification of a graduate student (who is in good standing) as a mentor.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

SOC SCI 193A. Field Studies in Public and Community Service. 4 Units.

Advanced training in qualitative and ethnographic research centered on community service. Students pursue field studies at nonprofit agencies (200 hours) to understand current social problems in underrepresented and underserved communities. Through field placement, students apply theory to practice.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 70C or SOCIOL 63. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service majors only.

SOC SCI 193B. Field Studies in Public and Community Service. 4 Units.

Advanced training in qualitative and ethnographic research centered on community service. Students pursue field studies at nonprofit agencies (200 hours) to understand current social problems in underrepresented and underserved communities. Through field placement, students apply theory to practice.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 193A.

SOC SCI 193C. Field Studies in Public and Community Service. 4 Units.

Advanced training in qualitative and ethnographic research centered on community service. Students pursue field studies at nonprofit agencies (200 hours) to understand current social problems in underrepresented and underserved communities. Through field placement, students apply theory to practice.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 193B.

SOC SCI 194A. Public Service Internship. 2-4 Units.

Introduces the role of etiquette and leadership in the professional environment. With a two-unit (50 hours) or four-unit (100 hours) credit option, students intern at a nonprofit agency exploring their roles as community leaders and improving their professional skills. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service majors only.

SOC SCI 194B. Community Internship. 2-4 Units.

Required to complete 50 (two units) or 100 (four units) hours at a nonprofit organization, students engage in lectures related to the formation and maintenance of nonprofit organizations. Grant writing, funding issues, and effective service delivery are addressed.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 194A.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Social Science majors only.

SOC SCI 194C. Management and Leadership Practicum-Social Science . 2-4 Units.

Social Sciences Academic Resource Center (SSARC) Resource Mangers (RMs) report directly to the Director and Associate Director, serving as frontline resource consultants, assisting visitors with resume development, graduate and professional school planning, internship placement, and professional development.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

SOC SCI 195A. Educational Policy Field Studies. 4 Units.

Integrates academic course work with experiential learning; examines the effects of educational policy on urban and suburban schools; explores the relationship between community service and personal academic interests; and develops awareness about the challenges of public education.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

SOC SCI 195B. Educational Policy Field Studies. 4 Units.

Integrates academic course work with experiential learning; examines the effects of educational policy on urban and suburban schools; explores the relationship between community service and personal academic interests; and develops awareness about the challenges of public education.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 195A.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

SOC SCI 195C. Educational Policy Field Studies . 4 Units.

Integrates academic course work with experiential learning; examines the effects of educational policy on urban and suburban schools; explores the relationship between community service and personal academic interests; and develops awareness about the challenges of public education.

Prerequisite: SOC SCI 195B.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

SOC SCI 196. Global Connect. 2-4 Units.

Identifies factors of change that influence the twenty-first century. Students serve as mentors at high schools to introduce globalization issues through workshops and lectures. Students must submit an application and have a 3.0 or higher overall GPA.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

SOC SCI 197. Professional Internship. 2-4 Units.

Students apply classroom knowledge through research projects in nonprofit agencies (local, state, and government) and the private sector. They pose solutions to agency-posed questions. Students gain field experience through 50 hours (for 2 units) or 100 (for 4 units). Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

Restriction: School of Social Sciences majors only.

SOC SCI 198. Directed Group Study. 2-4 Units.

Directed study with Social Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

SOC SCI 199. Individual Study. 2-4 Units.

Opportunities to do research and learn new skills outside the normal classroom environment. Students participate in planned research and study activities under a written contract with a supervising UCI instructor. Students may enroll for only one 199 each quarter.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 16 units.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

SOC SCI 209. Special Topics in Mathematical Social Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of mathematical social science. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 211A. Mathematical Behavioral Sciences Colloquium. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOC SCI 211B. Mathematical Behavioral Sciences Colloquium. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOC SCI 211C. Mathematical Behavioral Sciences Colloquium. 2 Units.

Weekly reports and colloquia by faculty, students, and visitors.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOC SCI 249A. Special Topics in Social Networks. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social networks. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253A. Oral History, Life History. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary and comparative work in oral and life history; methods of interviewing.

Same as ANTHRO 221A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253F. Population. 4 Units.

Introduces the interrelationships between population and social organization. Considers measurement and explanation of historical and contemporary trends in birth rates, death rates, migration, and marriage and divorce. Case material is drawn primarily from the U.S. and other industrialized nations.

Same as SOCIOL 262A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253J. Social Movements. 4 Units.

A survey of the field of Social Movements, oriented around critical themes in the major theoretical traditions and contemporary exemplars.

Same as SOCIOL 240A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253N. Classical Social Theory. 4 Units.

Examines the development of classical sociological theory through the writings of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Georg Simmel, and George Herbert Mead.

Same as SOCIOL 210A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 253R. Contemporary Social Theory. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with twentieth-century developments in social thought that have influenced sociological research, suggesting "what is living and what is dead" in the "classics" and offering an overview of the main outlines of recent sociological theorizing.

Same as SOCIOL 210B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 254A. Transnational Migration. 4 Units.

Examines borders and boundaries as material and semiotic constructs. Drawing upon an array of literatures, but loosely situated in U.S. geo/biopolitics, explores transformative troublings of places, spaces, borders, and bodies of all sorts.

Same as ANTHRO 235A, CHC/LAT 215.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 254J. Global Urbanization. 4 Units.

Examines the spread of cities worldwide in the twentieth century. What are the political and economic causes of this process? What are the social-cultural, political, and economic effects? How is contemporary urbanization linked to global restructuring of other kinds.

Same as PP&D 273, SOCIOL 252A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 254L. Approaches to Globalization. 4 Units.

Historical and contemporary approaches to the world economy, emphasizing anthropological questions of culture, power, identity, inequality. Examines "neo-imperialism," "late capitalism," accumulation, global markets, urban space, the state, business and policy globalization discourse, "local" responses to and instantiations of the "global.".

Same as ANTHRO 248A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 259A. Special Topics in Social Relations. 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social relations. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 272A. Origin and Evolution of Marxist Social Thought. 4 Units.

Focuses on the genesis and evolution of Marxist social thought The "systemic" method of Marx and Engels to questions of economic production and reproduction is compared and contrasted with modern world-system grand visions, feminist-theoretic approaches, and postmodern critiques.

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in political theory or equivalent.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 289. Special Topics in Social Science. 4 Units.

Current research in Social Science.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOC SCI 290. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Social Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOC SCI 299. Independent Study. 1-12 Units.

Independent research with Social Science faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOC SCI 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Sociology Courses

SOCIOL 1. Introduction to Sociology. 4 Units.

Considers major sociological concepts, theories, and research findings illuminating processes of interpersonal interaction, social differentiation and stratification, integration and conflict, and change, with attention to variation in class, race/ethnic, gender, multicultural, and cross-national perspectives and experiences.

(III, VII)

SOCIOL 2. Globalization and Transnational Sociology. 4 Units.

Examines globalization and international issues from the perspective of sociology and related fields. Issues include economic globalization and global inequality, international environmental problems, international politics, trends in global culture, and global conflict.

(III, VIII)

SOCIOL 3. Social Problems. 4 Units.

Focuses on how institutional and organizational features of societies generate problems for people. Particular attention directed at a set of problems related to political and economic inequality: poverty, racism, sexism, urban and population problems, the environment, the criminal justice system.

(III, VII)

SOCIOL 10A. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines. Course may be offered online.

Same as ANTHRO 10A.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10A, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10A, POL SCI 10A, SOC SCI 9A.

Restriction: Anthropology and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

SOCIOL 10B. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 10A.

Same as ANTHRO 10B.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10B, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10B, POL SCI 10B, SOC SCI 9B.

Restriction: Anthropology and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Va)

SOCIOL 10C. Probability and Statistics. 4 Units.

An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 10B.

Same as ANTHRO 10C.
Overlaps with PSYCH 10C, SOCECOL 13, SOC SCI 10C, POL SCI 10C, SOC SCI 9C.

Restriction: Anthropology and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Vb)

SOCIOL 19. Special Topics: Methods. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of methods. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOCIOL 29. Special Topics: Theory. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOCIOL 31. Self-Identity and Society. 4 Units.

Studies sociological contributions to theory and research in social psychology, with focus on the social influences on personality, attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; socialization, human groups, and social interaction.

Same as PSYCH 78A.

(III)

SOCIOL 39. Special Topics: Social Psychology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social psychology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOCIOL 41. Small Group Dynamics. 4 Units.

Deals with models for understanding behavior in small groups, including coalition formation, socialization, group norms and decision rules, leadership, conformity, group structure, and communication processes.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 43. City and Community. 4 Units.

Examines nature, causes, and consequences of urbanization along with changing scale and complexity, demographic/ecological city growth patterns, quality of life in urban areas, processes of decision-making, and bearing of sociological investigation on public policy concerns in contemporary urban society.

Overlaps with PP&D 40.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 44. Births, Deaths, and Migration. 4 Units.

Introduction to the analysis of human population including fertility, mortality dispersion, sex distribution. Attention is focused on the effects of these variables on, e.g., over-population, social disorganization, and the stability of social institutions.

(VIII)

SOCIOL 49. Special Topics: Structures. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of structures. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOCIOL 51. Asian American Family & Community. 4 Units.

Briefly examines the history of different Asian American groups and provides an in-depth analysis of issues related to family composition, mate selection, changing gender roles, and intergenerational conflict.

(VII)

SOCIOL 55. Media and Society. 4 Units.

Examines social implications of changes in American mass media since World War II, including demise of big-city newspapers, rise of broadcast television, fragmentation of radio and magazine markets. Explores potential implications on culture and institutions of emerging technologies.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 56. Religion and Society. 4 Units.

A critical and personal examination of the varieties of religious and spiritual experiences human beings are undergoing in contemporary society. The role of conscious understanding and unconscious conditioning regarding religion and spirituality.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 59. Special Topics: Social Institutions and Culture. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social institutions and culture. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOCIOL 62. Families and Intimate Relations. 4 Units.

Sociological theories/research on marriage, kinship, intimacy, and divorce. Emphasis on comparing family patterns in different social classes, ethnic groups, and societies, and on relating family life to the economy and other social institutions. Topics include gender roles, child-rearing, historical change. Course may be offered online. Materials fee.

(III)

SOCIOL 63. Race and Ethnicity. 4 Units.

Focuses on racial and ethnic relations in the United States and compares them with those found in other societies. Analyzes the conditions that favor either cooperation and integration or rivalry, tension, and conflict. Appraises strategies for reducing and resolving conflicts.

Same as SPPS 70A.

(VII)

SOCIOL 64. Sociology of Sexuality. 4 Units.

Explores how and why sexuality matters in society, affecting our expectations, experiences, and opportunities. Provides the conceptual and theoretical tools to analyze the personal and institutional consequences of different social constructions of sexuality.

(VII)

SOCIOL 65. Cultures in Collision: Indian-White Relations Since Columbus . 4 Units.

An introduction to theories, terms, concepts, and methods used by anthropologists and sociologists to understand Native American cultures. How racial construction of an Indian "other" emerged, how anthropology contributed to Indian invisibility, and the persistence of Indian identity are examined.

Same as ANTHRO 85A.

(VII)

SOCIOL 68. Gender and Race Inequality in the Workplace. 4 Units.

Analysis of current state and trends in major inequality measures including the wage gap, occupational segregation, and access to managerial positions. Theories that purport to explain such differences, and the related empirical evidence, are also covered.

SOCIOL 68A. Ethnic and Immigrant America. 4 Units.

Focusing on Asian, Latino, and Black immigrant groups, examines the second generation's experience of straddling two cultures and growing up American. Covers topics such as assimilation, bilingualism, race relations, education, bicultural conflicts, interracial marriage, and multiracial identities.

Same as CHC/LAT 65.

(VII)

SOCIOL 69. Special Topics: Age, Gender, Race, and Ethnicity. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOCIOL 79. Special Topics: Societies and Social Inequality. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of societies and social inequality. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

SOCIOL 110. Research Methods. 4 Units.

Methods of data collection and analysis used by sociologists. Experimental methods, surveys, and interviews, field research and participant observation, demographic methods, historical and comparative approaches. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 112. Logical Models in Social Sciences. 4 Units.

Science asks two questions. "How things are?" leads to measurement and statistical analysis. But we see only what we look for. "How things should be, on logical grounds?" leads to quantitative logical models which tell us what to look for.

Same as POL SCI 136A.

SOCIOL 119. Special Topics: Methods. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of methods. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 120. Sociological Theory. 4 Units.

What a theory of society is and is not. Historical and contemporary models, perspectives, and schools.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 120W. Sociological Theory. 4 Units.

What a theory of society is and is not. Historical and contemporary models, perspectives, and schools.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 129. Special Topics: Theory. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 134. Game Theory and Politics I. 4 Units.

Introduction to game theory and a survey of its political applications. Examples of topics covered include voting in small committees, legislatures, and mass elections; interest group activities and environmental issues; institutional design, and the evolution of cooperative behavior.

Same as INTL ST 105A, SOC SCI 103A, POL SCI 130A.

Restriction: Social Policy and Public Service, Sociology, Political Science, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 135. Social Psychology of Networks. 4 Units.

Review of network methods used in small group and organizational research. Discussion of social psychological literature relevant to the network of study of cognitive social structure, exchange/communication, identity negotiation, and social control. Case study of network datasets exemplifies research issues.

Same as PSYCH 178N.

Restriction: Sociology and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 136. Religious Traditions of Asian Americans. 4 Units.

Studies the religious traditions of Asian Americans, focusing on the transplantation of religious institutions, establishment of sacred spaces, celebration of religious holidays, socialization of children, as well as birth, marriage, gender relations, death, family.

Same as ASIANAM 143.

SOCIOL 138. Business Decisions. 4 Units.

Surveys normative and descriptive models of decision-making behavior, with an emphasis on organizational and policy contexts. Topics include rational choice theory, biases and heuristics, framing effects, and overconfidence. Management fads, panics, and herd behavior are also discussed.

Prerequisite: (ANTHRO 10A and ANTHRO 10B and ANTHRO 10C) or (SOCIOL 10A and SOCIOL 10B and SOCIOL 10C) or (SOC SCI 10A and SOC SCI 10B and SOC SCI 10C) or (MATH 2A and MATH 2B and (STATS 7 or MGMT 7)).

Same as ECON 148.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 139. Special Topics: Social Psychology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social psychology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 141. Organizations. 4 Units.

How bureaucracies, formal organizations, and voluntary associations work, how/why they grow, and where they are going. History and structure of organizational rationality; dynamics of organized groups; behavior in organizations; limits of bureaucratization and attempts to overcome these limits through decentralization.

Same as POL SCI 155C.

Restriction: Sociology and Political Science majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 142. White-Collar Crime. 4 Units.

Examines criminal activity in business and corporate enterprise, organizations, and the professions. Theories regarding the causes and control of white-collar and corporate crime are covered as well as the numerous definitions of these terms.

Same as CRM/LAW C142.

Restriction: Sociology, Criminology, Law and Society, and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 143. Social Networks and Social Support. 4 Units.

Examines the manner in which behaviors/attitudes of individuals are affected by their network ties to others. How are peoples' opportunities and well-being increased/decreased by their social networks? May include studies in mental/physical health, job seeking, separation and loss, and aging.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 144. Politics, Power, and Society. 4 Units.

Includes an examination of the major theoretical approaches to political sociology, and the application of these ideas to the politics of advanced capitalist societies. Also considers stability and change in power structures.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 145. Occupations and Professions. 4 Units.

What makes some jobs satisfying and others boring? How does technology influence the workplace? What changes are coming in the U.S. job market? Sociology and psychology of occupations. Students interview workers and study aspects of their occupations.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

SOCIOL 145W. Occupations and Professions. 4 Units.

What makes some jobs satisfying and others boring? How does technology influence the workplace? What changes are coming in the U.S. job market? Sociology and psychology of occupations. Students interview workers and study aspects of their occupations.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 147A. Cities and Social Change. 4 Units.

Focuses on comparative urban political economy and the way cities and urban process are linked to changes in the global system. Attempts to draw on a diverse interdisciplinary literature that includes sociology, geography, and urban planning.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

SOCIOL 147AW. Cities and Social Change. 4 Units.

Focuses on comparative urban political economy and the way cities and urban process are linked to changes in the global system. Attempts to draw on a diverse interdisciplinary literature that includes sociology, geography, and urban planning.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 149. Special Topics: Structures. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of structures. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 150. Sociological Lens on Religion. 4 Units.

Examines the effects of religious beliefs, belonging, and institutions on social dynamics, including class, gender, and racial stratification, politics, and social movements. Additional topics: the sociological significance of conversion, commitment, and secularization/sacralization.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 152. Sociology and Psychology of the Arts. 4 Units.

Explores the relationship between artists and the "art world" through which artistic activity is defined, supported, and consumed. Empirical studies in the plastic arts, performing arts, and literature are used to examine varieties of aesthetic expressions.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

SOCIOL 152W. Sociology of Art and Popular Culture. 4 Units.

Explores the relationship between artists and the "art world" through which artistic activity is defined, supported, and consumed. Empirical studies in the plastic arts, performing arts, and literature are used to examine varieties of aesthetic expressions.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 154. Medical Sociology. 4 Units.

Current problems in U.S. health-care system and proposals for reform. Examines financial barriers to access; problem of patient dumping; underinsurance; prenatal and perinatal care; child services; preventative care and needs of the elderly; minorities; low-income people; undocumented.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 154W. Medical Sociology. 4 Units.

Current problems in U.S. health-care system and proposals for reform. Examines financial barriers to access; problem of patient dumping; underinsurance; prenatal and perinatal care; child services; preventative care and needs of the elderly; minorities; low-income people; undocumented.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 155B. Baseball and Society. 4 Units.

An examination of baseball's role in American social life over the last 150 years. Issues of fraternal organizations, national development, capitalism, rationalization, race and ethnicity, gender, economic organization, labor relations, and politics are discussed.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 155BW. Baseball and Society. 4 Units.

An examination of baseball's role in American social life over the last 150 years. Issues of fraternal organizations, national development, capitalism, rationalization, race and ethnicity, gender, economic organization, labor relations, and politics are discussed.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 156. Deviance. 4 Units.

Perspectives on deviance and criminality in behavior, institution, community, and myth. The suitability of contemporary theories of deviant behavior.

Same as CRM/LAW C107, PSYCH 177D.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, Sociology, and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 158C. Money, Work, and Social Life . 4 Units.

Sociological perspective on issues related to money and work. Consumption practices and lifestyles, jobs and organizations, issues of money in intimate relations, marriage, and households, illegal work, discrimination, economic globalization are discussed.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 158CW. Money, Work, and Social Life. 4 Units.

Sociological perspective on issues related to money and work. Consumption practices and lifestyles, jobs and organizations, issues of money in intimate relations, marriage, and households, illegal work, discrimination, economic globalization are discussed.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 159. Special Topics: Social Institutions and Culture. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social institutions and culture. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 161. Sociology of Sex and Gender. 4 Units.

Explores complex processes contributing to social construction of gender and sexuality in the U.S. with focus on intersection of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class; evaluates how men and women are differentially constituted in family, education, work, politics, media, language.

SOCIOL 161W. Sociology of Sex and Gender. 4 Units.

Explores complex processes contributing to social construction of gender and sexuality in the U.S. with focus on intersection of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class; evaluates how men and women are differentially constituted in family, education, work, politics, media, language.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 164. Sociology of Aging . 4 Units.

Introduction to sociology of age, aging, and the aged. Problems posed by aging population. Life course transitions. How social organizations influence the life course. Work, health, family in later life.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

SOCIOL 164W. Sociology of Aging . 4 Units.

Introduction to sociology of age, aging, and the aged. Problems posed by aging population. Life course transitions. How social organizations influence the life course. Work, health, family in later life.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 166. Immigration and Inequality. 4 Units.

Explores immigration, ethnicity, and inequality as interconnected social forces. International migration, propelled by global inequalities, plays a central role in the formation of multinational societies, shapes inter-group relations and patterns of ethnic inequality, and transforms the immigrants themselves.

Same as SOC SCI 168B.

SOCIOL 167A. Racial and Ethnic Relations in the United States. 4 Units.

Examines central questions and issues in the field of race and ethnicity; the emergence, maintenance, and consequences of the ethnic and racial stratification system in the United States; the future of racial and ethnic relations; and relevant public policy issues.

Same as CHC/LAT 148.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 167AW. Racial and Ethnic Relations in the United States. 4 Units.

Examines central questions and issues in the field of race and ethnicity; the emergence, maintenance, and consequences of the ethnic and racial stratification system in the United States; the future of racial and ethnic relations; and relevant public policy issues.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as CHC/LAT 148W.

Restriction: Chicano/Latino Studies and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 169. Special Topics: Age, Gender, Race, and Ethnicity. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of age, gender, race, and ethnicity. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 170A. Vietnam War. 4 Units.

Examines social structures and social changes in Vietnamese and U.S. societies through the study of the Vietnam War.

Same as INTL ST 143A.

SOCIOL 170B. U.S. War on Terrorism. 4 Units.

Analyzes the United States war on terrorism by focusing on terrorism, the U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and changes in police powers through the Patriot Act, as well as the political leadership which directs the war.

Same as INTL ST 175A.

SOCIOL 171. Environment and Society. 4 Units.

Examines society's changing relationship to the natural world. Delineates different models of "nature" and then explores their institutional roots, the social responses they have generated, and their implications for social inequality.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 172. Revolution and Post-Revolution China. 4 Units.

Introduces the major political events in Mao’s communist revolution and the social transformations afterward. The goal is to help students understand the historic and political landscape from which China is now departing.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 173. Social Inequality. 4 Units.

Sources, functions, and dynamics of the unequal distribution of wealth, prestige, knowledge, and power in American and other societies. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 174. Protests, Movements, and Revolutions. 4 Units.

A survey of models of collective action drawn from sociology, economics, psychology, and political science. Focus on areas such as social movements, strikes, crowd psychology, cults, fads, fashions, public opinion, and symbolic and mythical elements in collective culture.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 1 or POL SCI 6A or ECON 1.

Same as POL SCI 156D.

Restriction: Political Science and Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 175B. China in the Global Age. 4 Units.

Chinese society from 1949 to present. Social change in the context of political control and ideological considerations. Focus on the power structure, political decision processes, and ideological legitimation, and interplay with the Chinese community and its culture.

Same as INTL ST 158D.

SOCIOL 175D. Migration Destinations. 4 Units.

Examines the migration patterns to the three largest nations that receive immigrants (i.e., permanent settlers): Australia, Canada, and the United States.

Same as ASIANAM 171A, INTL ST 117B.

SOCIOL 176. International Divided Cities. 4 Units.

Investigates urban divisions in international cities where deep-seated nationalistic ethnic differences create pressures for intergroup conflicts, autonomy, or territorial separation, and can incite violence. Urban political polarization as it is manifest in the urban setting.

Same as PP&D 178, POL SCI 157B.

SOCIOL 177. Immigration and Social Policy. 4 Units.

Explains how people decide to migrate and how they are incorporated into a host society (both historically and currently), examines the effects of immigration on the U.S., analyzes how the framing of immigration shapes the discourse about the issue.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 177W. Immigration and Social Policy. 4 Units.

Explains how people decide to migrate and how they are incorporated into a host society (both historically and currently), examines the effects of immigration on the U.S., analyzes how the framing of immigration shapes the discourse about the issue.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 179. Special Topics: Societies and Social Inequality. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of societies and social inequality. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 180A. Sociology Majors Seminar. 4 Units.

Students learn sociology by doing it. A modest-sized research project is planned and implemented by each student.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 110.

Restriction: Sociology majors only.

SOCIOL 180AW. Sociology Majors Seminar. 4 Units.

Students learn sociology by doing it. A modest-sized research project is planned and implemented by each student.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 110. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Sociology majors only.

(Ib)

SOCIOL 188BW. Honors Research and Thesis. 4 Units.

Focuses on the design and implementation of individual research projects undertaken by senior Sociology majors. Writing projects consist of a proposal and paper on some empirical research.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL H188A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

(Ib)

SOCIOL H188A. Honors Research and Thesis. 4 Units.

Focuses on the design and implementation of individual research projects undertaken by senior Sociology majors. Writing projects consist of a proposal and paper on some empirical research.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

SOCIOL 189. Special Topics: Honors Sequence. 4 Units.

Independent honors research with Social Sciences faculty.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites vary.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Sociology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

SOCIOL 197. Field Study. 4 Units.

Field study with Sociology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOCIOL 198. Directed Group Study . 4 Units.

Directed study with Sociology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOCIOL 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

Independent research with Sociology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

SOCIOL 202A. Proseminar I in Sociology. 1 Unit.

Introduces first-year graduate students in Sociology to the current research interests of Sociology faculty, as well as to other aspects of graduate life at UCI and to the profession of sociology more generally.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 202B. Proseminar II in Sociology. 4 Units.

Focus is on second-year research projects, design, development, data gathering, analysis, and preparing oral and written presentations of the results. Students learn analytic and writing skills, gain experience with research processes, and become socialized about professional standards, customs, and institutions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 210A. Classical Social Theory. 4 Units.

Examines the development of classical sociological theory through the writings of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Georg Simmel, and George Herbert Mead.

Same as SOC SCI 253N.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 210B. Contemporary Social Theory. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with twentieth-century developments in social thought that have influenced sociological research, suggesting "what is living and what is dead" in the "classics" and offering an overview of the main outlines of recent sociological theorizing.

Same as SOC SCI 253R.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 211A. Sociology of Gender. 4 Units.

An introduction to the sociology of gender in the U.S. and globally. The social construction of gender and sexuality; theoretical perspectives and feminist frameworks. Theories of economy, patriarch, and race, and the social positions of women and men.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 212. Network Theory. 4 Units.

An introduction to theoretical work in the field of social networks. Topics include baseline models, homphily, and propinquity, exchange and power, balance theory, diffusion and social influence, equivalence, and cohesion. Deductive use of theory to make novel predictions is emphasized.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 219. Special Topics: Theory. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 220A. Research Design. 4 Units.

Data collection, organization, and analysis in ethnographic or quasi-experimental settings, including interviewing, participant observations, behavior observations, and questionnaires. Research design issues include sampling, longitudinal research, and comparative research. Emphasis on the integration of qualitative and quantitative data.

Overlaps with SOCIOL 265.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 221A. Graduate Statistics I. 4 Units.

Statistics with emphasis on applications in sociology and anthropology. Examines exploratory uses of statistical tools in these fields as well as univariate, bivariate, and multivariate applications in the context of the general linear model.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 221B. Graduate Statistics II. 4 Units.

Statistics with emphasis on applications in sociology and anthropology. Examines exploratory uses of statistical tools in these fields as well as univariate, bivariate, and multivariate applications in the context of the general linear model.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 221A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 221C. Graduate Statistics III. 4 Units.

Statistics with emphasis on applications in sociology and anthropology. Examines exploratory uses of statistical tools in these fields as well as univariate, bivariate, and multivariate applications in the context of the general linear model.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 221A and SOCIOL 221B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 222A. Comparative and Historical Sociological Methods. 4 Units.

Topics include the logic of comparative and historical analysis techniques and the examination of exemplar works in representative problem areas.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 223. Advanced Qualitative Methods: Analyzing Qualitative Data. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the theory and practice of analyzing qualitiative data. Student must have already learned about data collection and research design for qualitative research and they must have qualitative data they can analyze.

Same as POL SCI 273A, MGMTPHD 297K, PP&D 213.

Restriction: Grad students only

SOCIOL 224. Interview Methods . 4 Units.

Hands-on introduction to the use of interviews in social scientific research. Topics include when to use interviews and/or focus groups; how to design an interview-based study, how to conduct interviews, analyze interview data, and write up and publish interview-based results.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 226A. Methods of Demographic Analysis. 4 Units.

Introduces basic demographic methods used in social science and public health research. Topics include sources and limitations of demographic data; components of population growth; measures of nuptiality, fertility, mortality, and population mobility projection methods; and demographic models.

Same as PUBHLTH 209.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 227A. Seminar Ethnographic & Qualitative Field Methods. 4 Units.

Comprehensive and critical discussion of the traditions of qualitative fieldwork; detailed examination of the collection, coding, analysis, and presentation of ethnographic/qualitative field data; and close mentoring of student projects culminating in an original research paper.

Grading Option: In progress only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 227B. Seminar Ethnographic & Qualitative Field Methods. 4 Units.

Comprehensive and critical discussion of the traditions of qualitative fieldwork; detailed examination of the collection, coding, analysis, and presentation of ethnographic/qualitative field data; and close mentoring of student projects culminating in an original research paper.

Prerequisite: SOCIOL 227A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 229. Special Topics: Methods . 1-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of methods. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 230A. Race and Ethnicity. 4 Units.

An examination of central questions and issues in the field of race and ethnicity through a critical analysis and discussion of the principal theoretical perspectives and paradigms that have framed much of the scholarship in the area.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 232. Inequality. 4 Units.

Theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of social and economic inequality, with special attention to race/ethnicity, class, and gender.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 233. Immigration and the New Second Generation. 4 Units.

Investigates how the children of today's immigrants incorporate into the United States social structure. Covers topics such as assimilation, immigrant families and communities, education, language, racial and ethnic identities, gender, education, and the changing U.S. racial structure.

SOCIOL 234. Ethnic America. 4 Units.

Examines critically the meaning and measurement of ethnicity, race, and nation in sociological theory and research. Theories of ethnicity are explored, along with empirical studies of the construction of ethnic and pan-ethnic identities in historical and contemporary contexts.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 235. Poverty and Development . 4 Units.

Critical examines competing conceptualizations, methods of measurement, and poverty alleviation strategies widely used in developing countries. Focuses on poverty conceptualized as economic deprivation, well-being, vulnerability, and social exclusion.

Same as PP&D 251.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 236. Immigrant Incorporation. 4 Units.

Focuses on the conceptual and theoretical ideas on immigrant adaptation and identity to a new country; frameworks that emphasize incorporation as a melting pot; synthesizing the theoretical and empirical literature on incorporation in order to develop better models.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 237. Educational Inequality. 4 Units.

Focuses on macro-level explanations of inequality of schooling, particularly in the U.S. context. Explores traditional models, such as conflict, functionalism, status-attainment, cultural reproduction, and newer synthetic accounts. Emphasis on higher education access and the intersection of education and work.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 239. Special Topics: Social Inequality. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social inequality. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 240A. Social Movements. 4 Units.

A survey of the field of Social Movements, oriented around critical themes in the major theoretical traditions and contemporary exemplars.

Same as SOC SCI 253J.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 241A. Political Sociology. 4 Units.

Begins with an examination of the three major orientations to the State (Pluralist, Elitist, and Class). Next considers current topics in political sociology including the Welfare State, the New Deal, political behavior, social movements, participation, and democracy.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 242. Sociology of Culture. 4 Units.

Major perspectives in the sociology of culture. Topics include the role of cultural dynamics in the reproduction of inequality, collective action, political and organizational decision making, emotional experience, and the social impacts of new technologies.

SOCIOL 249. Special Topics: Political Sociology and Social Movements. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of political sociology and social movements. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 252A. Global Urbanization. 4 Units.

Examines the spread of cities worldwide in the twentieth century. What are the political and economic causes of this process? What are the social-cultural, political, and economic effects? How is contemporary urbanization linked to global restructuring of other kinds.

Same as SOC SCI 254J, PP&D 273.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 259. Special Topics: Global Studies and Comparative Development. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of global studies and comparative development. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 260A. Family and Households . 4 Units.

Families and households as a fundamental unit of social organization. Concepts and controversies. U.S. demographic trends and global changes in marriage, divorce, fertility, living arrangements. Housework and paid work. Gender and generational inequalities. How families reproduce stratification systems.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 261A. Life Course Sociology. 4 Units.

Age is a central organizing principle of individual lives, social institutions, and human populations. Considers how age is socially defined and how developmental transitions between ages (i.e., growing up and growing older) are accomplished.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 262A. Population. 4 Units.

Introduces the interrelationships between population and social organization. Considers measurement and explanation of historical and contemporary trends in birth rates, death rates, migration, and marriage and divorce. Case material is drawn primarily from the U.S. and other industrialized nations.

Same as SOC SCI 253F.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 263. The Sociology and Demography of Health and Illness. 4 Units.

Health from a population perspective. Topics include pandemics; the "McKeown debate" (standard of living vs. public health vs. medicine); long-term health changes in developed countries; health and socio-economic status; immigrant health. Not a course in medical sociology as such.

SOCIOL 264. Immigrant America. 4 Units.

The study of the causes and consequences of international migration has become one of the most vital fields of sociological theory and research. Examines principal theoretical perspectives and empirical research on contemporary immigration flows and the processes of incorporation.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 265. DASA Research Design. 4 Units.

Data collection, organization, and analysis in population studies and demography. Research design issues include sampling, longitudinal research, and comparative research.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in DASA program.

Overlaps with SOCIOL 220A.

Restriction: Graduate standing only.

SOCIOL 269. Special Topics: Social Demography. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social demography. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 271. Theories of Power and Empowerment. 4 Units.

Studies different ways of thinking about power and its uses. Explores theories of power that inform various notions of empowerment, including resistance, participatory democracy, and workplace empowerment.

Same as POL SCI 223A, PP&D 279, MGMTPHD 297R.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 272A. Work and Industrial Relations. 4 Units.

Explores the nature, causes, and results of workplace conflict in American Society. Considers topics such as "American Exceptionalism," sex segregation in the workplace, strikes and the role of unions in American society.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 279. Special Topics: Social Organizations and Institutions. 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social organizations and institutions. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 280. Analysis of Social Network Data. 4 Units.

Overview and application of methods for analyzing social network data. Topics include: data structures, visualization, graph theory, centrality, subgroups, positions, blockmodels, local properties, and statistical models. Social network analysis software is used to analyze a range of examples.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 281. Introduction to Social Network Analysis. 4 Units.

Designed to provide a broad overview of social network analysis. At the same time, students will have an opportunity to delve deeply into applications of the network approach in their individual areas of interest.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 289. Special Topics . 2-4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Social Sciences. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 290. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Sociology faculty.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 10 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

SOCIOL 299. Independent Study. 1-12 Units.

Independent research with Sociology faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

Neerja Aggarwal, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Economics
Nurudeen O. Alao, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Lecturer of Social Sciences; International Studies
Edwin Amenta, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Sociology; Political Science (political sociology, historical and comparative sociology, social movements, social policy)
Mohammad Amirkhizi, Ph.D. University of Denver, Lecturer of International Studies
Olufunmilayo B. Arewa, J.D., Ph.D. Harvard University, University of California, Berkeley, Professor of School of Law; Anthropology
Richard Arum, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Education; Sociology
Jacob P. Avery, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Assistant Professor of Sociology (poverty and inequality, culture and interaction, city and community, human service organizations, sociology of knowledge, ethnography)
Francisco J. Ayala, Ph.D. Columbia University, Donald Bren Professor and University Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Logic and Philosophy of Science
Stephen D. Bach, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of International Studies
Stanley Bailey, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Sociology (race and ethnicity, religion, immigration, Latin America)
Nina Bandelj, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of Sociology; European Languages and Studies (economic sociology, culture, organizations, social networks, political economy, globalization, social change, central and eastern Europe)
Jeffrey A. Barrett, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Philosophy
William H. Batchelder, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences (mathematical models of learning and memory, mathematical psychology and measurement)
Frank D. Bean, Ph.D. Duke University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Sociology; Economics; Education (international migration, demography, Mexican immigration, racial and ethnic relations, economic sociology, family)
Matthew N. Beckmann, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Political Science
D. Bell, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Economics
Bruce G. Berg, Ph.D. Indiana University, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences (audition, auditory attention, psychophysics of complex sounds, computational models of hearing)
Victoria Bernal, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Anthropology; Culture and Theory
Susan C. Bibler Coutin, Ph.D. Stanford University, Associate Dean of the Graduate Division and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Anthropology; Culture and Theory (law, culture, immigration, human rights, citizenship, political activism, Central America)
Thomas D. Boellstorff, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Anthropology (virtual worlds, sexuality, postcoloniality, HIV/AIDS, mass media and popular culture, language and culture, Indonesia, Southeast Asia)
Daniel E. Bogart, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Economics
Catherine I. Bolzendahl, Ph.D. Indiana University, Associate Professor of Sociology (gender, gender and sexuality studies, the welfare state, political sociology, comparative sociology, family, quantitative methodology)
Graeme T. Boushey, Ph.D. University of Washington, Assistant Professor of Political Science; Planning, Policy, and Design
Geoffrey C. Bowker, Ph.D. University of Melbourne, Professor of Informatics; Anthropology; Visual Studies (values in design, social studies of databases, science and technology studies)
John P. Boyd, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology
William A. Branch, Ph.D. University of Oregon, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Economics
Alyssa Brewer, Ph.D. Stanford University, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences (neuroimaging of visual perception, visual deficits, neurological disorders)
Susan K. Brown, Ph.D. University of Washington, Associate Professor of Sociology (immigration, inequality, urban sociology)
David Brownstone, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Economics
Jan K. Brueckner, Ph.D. Stanford University, Department Chair and UCI Chancellor's Professor of Economics; Planning, Policy, and Design
Daniel R. Brunstetter, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Associate Professor of Political Science; European Languages and Studies (political theory, international relations, French political thought)
Jennifer Buher-Kane, Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University, Assistant Professor of Sociology (fertility, population health, social inequality, family, demography, quantitative methods)
Michael L. Burton, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology; Economics
Carter Butts, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University, Professor of Sociology; Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Statistics (mathematical sociology, social networks, quantitative methodology, human judgment and decision making, economic sociology)
Alejandro E. Camacho, J.D., LL.M. Harvard University, Georgetown University, Professor of School of Law; Political Science
Belinda Campos, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; Psychology and Social Behavior (culture, relationships, positive emotion, health)
Francis A. Cancian, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology; Economics
David O. Carter, J.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Lecturer of Political Science
Jean-Paul Carvalho, Ph.D. Oxford University, Assistant Professor of Economics; Logic and Philosophy of Science
Anita Casavantes Bradford, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Associate Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; History (20th century U.S., U.S. in the world, Cuba and the Caribbean; history of childhood; history of immigration, race and ethnicity; transnational and comparative Latina/o history; religion, politics and social movements)
Jeanett Castellanos, Ph.D. Washington State University, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Social Sciences
Simone Chambers, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Political Science
Leo Chavez, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Anthropology
Ricardo Chavira, M.A. California State University, Northridge, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Erwin Chemerinsky, J.D. Harvard University, Dean of the School of Law, Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law and Distinguished Professor of School of Law; Political Science
Jiawei Chen, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Associate Professor of Economics
Natalia Chernyshoff, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Lecturer of Economics
Joanne Christopherson, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Charles F. Chubb, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences (visual perception, mathematical modeling, histogram contrast analysis)
Damon Clark, Ph.D. Oxford University, Assistant Professor of Economics; Planning, Policy, and Design
Benjamin N. Colby, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology
Gilberto Q. Conchas, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Education; Sociology (urban education, sociology of education, comparative race and ethnicity)
Thomas M. D'Zmura, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Professor of Cognitive Sciences (vision, hearing, language, brain-computer interfaces)
James N. Danziger, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Arthur S. De Vany, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Economics
Louis Desipio, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; Political Science (ethnic politics, Latino politics, immigration, naturalization, U.S. electoral politics)
John D. Dombrink, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (crime and criminal justice, deviance and social control)
Yingying Dong, Ph.D. Boston College, Assistant Professor of Economics
Barbara A. Dosher, Ph.D. University of Oregon, UCI Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Sciences (human information processing, memory retrieval, attention, visual perception)
Thomas J. Douglas, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Anthropology
Christopher E. Drover, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Lecturer of Anthropology
John Duffy, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Economics
Greg Duncan, Ph.D. University of Michigan, UCI Distinguished Professor of Education; Economics; Psychology and Social Behavior (economics of education, program evaluation, child development)
Robert Henry Duncan, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of International Studies
Nikil D. Dutt, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Computer Science; Cognitive Sciences; Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (embedded systems, computer architecture, electronic design automation, software systems, brain-inspired architectures and computing)
James A. Egan, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Anthropology
Julia Elyachar, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Anthropology; Culture and Theory; Economics
Laura Enriquez, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; Sociology (undocumented 1.5 generation young adults, immigration, citizenship, Latino families)
George Farkas, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Education; Sociology (social ethnic minority education, cognition, behavior)
Katherine Faust, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Sociology (social networks, animal social organization, population processes and social networks, research methods)
David Feldman, Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science
Martha S. Feldman, Ph.D. Stanford University, Roger W. and Janice M. Johnson Chair in Civic Governance and Public Management and Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Paul Merage School of Business; Political Science; Sociology (organization theory and behavior, stability and change in organizations, decision-making and information processing, public management, qualitative research methods)
Paul Feldstein, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor Emeritus of Paul Merage School of Business; Economics
Cynthia Feliciano, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Sociology; Chicano/Latino Studies; Education (race/ethnicity/minority relations, migration and immigration, education)
Raúl A. Fernández, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, Director of the UC-Cuba Academic Initiative and Professor Emeritus of Chicano/Latino Studies; Culture and Theory; Social Sciences
Gordon J. Fielding, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Economics
Mark J. Fisher, M.D. University of Cincinnati, Professor of Neurology; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Political Science
James J. Flink, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences
Glenda M. Flores, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Assistant Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; Sociology (Latina/o sociology, gender and work, middle-class minorities, education, urban enthnography)
Matthew Foreman, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Mathematics; Logic and Philosophy of Science (ergodic theory and dynamical systems, logic and foundations)
Charless C. Fowlkes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Computer Science; Cognitive Sciences; Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (computer vision, machine learning, computational biology)
David John Frank, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Sociology; Education; Political Science (globalization, sexuality, the natural environment, higher education)
Steven A. Frank, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Logic and Philosophy of Science
Paula Garb, Ph.D. Russian Academy of Sciences, Lecturer of Social Sciences; International Studies; Undergraduate Education
Robert Garfias, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology
Michelle Garfinkel, Ph.D. Brown University, Professor of Economics
Howard A. Gillman, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Chancellor and Professor of Political Science; Criminology, Law and Society; History
Samuel L. Gilmore, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Lecturer of Sociology (sociology of art and popular culture, symbolic interaction, research methods)
Amihai Glazer, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Economics
Peter Gluck, J.D. Franklin Pierce College, Lecturer of International Studies
David Theo Goldberg, Ph.D. The Graduate Center, City University of New York, Director of the UC Humanities Research Institute and Professor of Comparative Literature; Anthropology; Criminology, Law and Society; Culture and Theory (race, racism, race and the law, political theory, South Africa, digital humanities)
Rachel E. Goldberg, Ph.D. Brown University, Assistant Professor of Sociology (health, social demography, family, children and youth, gender, migration)
Gilbert G. Gonzalez, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Chicano/Latino Studies; Culture and Theory; Social Sciences
Sara Goodman, Ph.D. Georgetown University, Associate Professor of Political Science
Michael R. Gottfredson, Ph.D. University at Albany, State University of New York, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law; Sociology (criminology, juvenile delinquency, crime theory, public policy)
Susan M. Greenhalgh, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emerita of Anthropology
Teresa A. Griffith, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Linguistics
Bernard N. Grofman, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Political Science; Economics
Emily D. Grossman, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences (visual perception, neuroimaging)
Heidi Hardt, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Richard L. Hasen, J.D. University of California, Los Angeles, UCI Chancellor's Professor of School of Law; Political Science
Jeremy Heis, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Philosophy
Gregory S. Hickok, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Linguistics (neuroanatomy of language, neural plasticity, neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience)
John R. Hipp, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (community context of crime, household decisions and neighborhood change, research methods)
Ann Hironaka, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Sociology (political sociology, war and peace, environmental sociology, ethnic and racial conflict)
David Hirshleifer, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Paul Merage Chair in Business Growth and Professor of Paul Merage School of Business; Economics
Donald D. Hoffman, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Logic and Philosophy of Science (machine and human vision, visual recognition, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, consciousness and cognition, shape from motion)
Nura Hossainzadech, M.A. University of California, Berkeley, Lecturer of International Studies
Matthew L. Huffman, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Sociology (inequality, organizations, work and employment, research methods)
James R. Hull, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Social Sciences; Sociology (social networks and social exchange, monetization, barter, multidimensional poverty measures, migration outcomes at origin, classroom technologies and scaling, student engagement, scholarship of teaching and learning)
Simon Huttegger, Ph.D. University of Salzburg, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science
Mizuko Ito, Ph.D. Stanford University, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning and Professor in Residence of Anthropology; Education; Informatics (ethnography, game studies, youth culture, learning sciences, online communities)
Geoffrey J. Iverson, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences (mathematical psychology, psychophysics, statistics)
Mireille Jacobson, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Paul Merage School of Business; Economics
Ivan G. Jeliazkov, Ph.D. Washington University, Associate Professor of Economics; Statistics
Brian C. Jenkins, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Economics
Angela C. Jenks, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Anthropology
Valerie Jenness, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (links between deviance and social control [especially law], the politics of crime control and criminalization, social movements and social change, corrections and public policy)
Kent E. Johnson, Ph.D. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Linguistics
Philippe Jorion, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Paul Merage School of Business; Economics
Marek Kaminski, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Associate Professor of Political Science; Economics
Pamela A. Kelley, J.D. Yale University, Lecturer of Political Science
Claire J. Kim, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Asian American Studies; Culture and Theory; Political Science
Eleana Kim, Ph.D. New York University, Associate Professor of Anthropology
Sharon Koppman, Ph.D. University of Arizona, Assistant Professor of Paul Merage School of Business; Sociology (work and occupations, sociology of culture, creative industries)
Jeffrey Kopstein, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Department Chair and Professor of Political Science
Igor Kopylov, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Associate Professor of Economics
Jeffrey L. Krichmar, Ph.D. George Mason University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Computer Science (computational neuroscience, robotics)
Charis E. Kubrin, Ph.D. George Washington University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (crime, neighborhood effects and social processes, race/ethnicity and violence, immigration and crime)
Arthur D. Lander, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Donald Bren Professor and Professor of Developmental and Cell Biology; Biomedical Engineering; Logic and Philosophy of Science; Pharmacology (systems biology of development, pattern formation, growth control)
Jennifer Lee, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Sociology; Asian American Studies (immigration, race/ethnicity, social inequality, culture, Asian American studies)
Michael D. Lee, Ph.D. University of Adelaide, Professor of Cognitive Sciences (mathematical and computational models of stimulus representation, categorization, memory, decision-making, problem solving)
Karen Leonard, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Professor Emerita of Anthropology
Mimi Liljeholm, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Cognitive Sciences (neural and computational bases of cognition, perception, and action)
Elizabeth F. Loftus, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Cognitive Sciences; Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law (cognitive psychology, human memory, psychology and law)
Radhika Lunawat, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor of Paul Merage School of Business; Economics
Cecelia M. Lynch, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Political Science
David C. Lyon, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Department Vice Chair and Associate Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Cognitive Sciences (long range cortical circuits)
G. Craig MacAndrew, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology
Penelope J. Maddy, Ph.D. Princeton University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Mathematics; Philosophy (philosophy of mathematics and logic, meta-philosophy)
Lilith Mahmud-Abdelwahab, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies; Anthropology (elites, race and nationalism, cultural capital, secrecy and conspiracy, feminist ethnography, critical studies of Europe)
David B. Malament, Ph.D. The Rockefeller University, Professor Emeritus of Logic and Philosophy of Science
John Manchak, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science
Virginia Mann, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Education; Linguistics (reading ability: phenome awareness, developmental dyslexia, phonological skills, early intervention, precocious readers; speech perception: context effects, cross-linguistic comparisons)
George E. Marcus, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Anthropology
Raffaele Mari, M.A. San Diego State University, Lecturer of Economics
Richard Matthew, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science
William M. Maurer, Ph.D. Stanford University, Dean of the School of Social Sciences and Professor of Anthropology; Criminology, Law and Society; Culture and Theory (anthropology of law, globalization, Caribbean, anthropology of money and finance, gender and kinship)
Shampa Mazumdar, Ph.D. Northeastern University, Lecturer of Sociology (religion, immigration, Asian American, urban sociology)
Michael T. McBride, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Economics; Logic and Philosophy of Science
James L. McGaugh, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Research Professor and Professor Emeritus of Neurobiology and Behavior; Logic and Philosophy of Science
Martin C. McGuire, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Endowed Chair and Professor Emeritus of Economics
James W. Meeker, J.D., Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (sociology of law, criminal justice, research methodology, statistics, access to civil justice)
Richard Mendelsohn, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Adjunct Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science
Carrie Menkel-Meadow, J.D. University of Pennsylvania, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of Political Science; School of Law
David S. Meyer, Ph.D. Boston University, Professor of Sociology; Planning, Policy, and Design; Political Science (social movements, public policy, peace and war, social justice)
John Middlebrooks, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor of Otolaryngology; Biomedical Engineering; Cognitive Sciences; Neurobiology and Behavior (hearing research, neurophysiology, psychophysics, auditory prosthesis, computational neuroscience)
Fabio Milani, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of Economics
Kristen R. Monroe, Ph.D. University of Chicago, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Political Science
Michael J. Montoya, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Associate Professor of Anthropology; Chicano/Latino Studies; Culture and Theory; Program in Public Health (social inequality and health, race and ethnicity, social and cultural studies of science, technology, and medicine, participation of ethnic populations in biomedical research, the U.S./Mexican border, critical bioethics)
Alejandro Morales, Ph.D. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; Spanish and Portuguese (Latin American and Chicano literature, film studies)
Patrick M. Morgan, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Keith Murphy, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Anthropology; Linguistics
Sylvia Nam, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Anthropology; Planning, Policy, and Design
Louis E. Narens, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Logic and Philosophy of Science (measurement, logic, metacognition)
Emre Neftci, Ph.D. University of Zurich, Assistant Professor of Cognitive Sciences (computational neuroscience, neuromorphic engineering, machine learning)
David Neumark, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Economics; Paul Merage School of Business
Riley D. Newman, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Physics and Astronomy; Logic and Philosophy of Science; Physics and Astronomy
Walter Nicholls, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (urban sociology, politics and policy, social movements, immigration, comparative urbanism, theory, planning conflicts)
Nick R. Noviello, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Charles T. O'Connell, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Lecturer of International Studies; Sociology (Vietnam War, race/ethnicity/nationality, international relations/imperialism, political sociology, science and knowledge, social movements, African-American political history, fascism and the Holocaust, Soviet Union, Israel-Palestine conflict, labor studies)
Cailin O'Connor, B.A. Harvard University, Assistant Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science
Sheila G. O'Rourke, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Anthropology
Kevin E. Olson, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Associate Professor of Political Science; Culture and Theory (contemporary European political theory, cultural politics, politics of diversity, popular sovereignty, citizenship, nineteenth- and twentieth-century political theory)
Valerie A. Olson, Ph.D. William Marsh Rice University, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Lisa Pearl, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Linguistics; Logic and Philosophy of Science (linguistics, computational linguistics, language development, language change, Bayesian models)
Andrew Penner, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Sociology (gender, inequality, education, family, race)
Kristin Peterson, Ph.D. William Marsh Rice University, Associate Professor of Anthropology; Culture and Theory
Mark P. Petracca, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Political Science; Planning, Policy, and Design
Bojan M. Petrovic, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Davin Phoenix, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Dale J. Poirier, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor of Economics; Statistics
Andrew Policano, Ph.D. Brown University, Director of Center for Investment and Wealth Management and Dean's Leadership Circle Endowed Professorship and Professor of Paul Merage School of Business; Economics
Francesca Polletta, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Sociology (social movements, democracy, culture, sociology of law, political sociology, social theory)
Henry N. Pontell, Ph.D. State University of New York at Stony Brook, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (white-collar and corporate crime, criminology, criminal justice, deviance and social control, sociology of law)
Charles C. Ragin, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Sociology (comparative and historical sociology, social inequality, political sociology, quantitative methodology, qualitative methodology)
Priya Ranjan, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Economics
Maria G. Rendón, Ph.D. Harvard University, Assistant Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (urban sociology, immigration, race/ethnicity, sociology of education and social policy)
Virginia Richards, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Cognitive Sciences (auditory perception and cognition, human psychophysics)
Gary Richardson, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Economics; European Languages and Studies
Tyson Roberts, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Lecturer of International Studies
Belinda Robnett, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Sociology; Culture and Theory (social movements, race and ethnicity, gender, social change, African Americans)
Guillaume Rocheteau, Ph.D. University of Paris, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Economics
Jose Antonio Rodriguez Lopez, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Economics
A. K. Romney, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emerita of Anthropology
Rocio Rosales, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Sociology (international migration, immigrant and ethnic economics, urban sociology, enthnography, Latino/a studies, race and ethnicity, immigrant detention)
Maria F. Rosales Rueda, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Assistant Professor of Education; Economics
Ana Rosas, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Associate Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; History (Chicana/o comparative history, immigration, ethnicity)
Shawn W. Rosenberg, M.S. Oxford University, Professor of Political Science (political psychology, deliberative democracy, ideology, social theory, social and development psychology)
Kevin Roth, M.S. Cornell University, Assistant Professor of Economics
Vicki L. Ruiz, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Distinguished Professor of History; Chicano/Latino Studies (Chicana/Latina history, U.S. labor, immigration, gender)
Ruben G. Rumbaut, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Distinguished Professor of Sociology; Criminology, Law and Society; Education (international migration, immigration laws, criminalization, incarceration, social inequality and mobility, race and ethnicity)
Donald G. Saari, Ph.D. Purdue University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Economics; Logic and Philosophy of Science; Mathematics
Kourosh Saberi, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Cognitive Sciences (signal detection, psychophysics, cortical neuroscience, sensory genetics)
Kamal Sadiq, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Political Science
Jean-Daniel M. Saphores, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Economics; Planning, Policy, and Design (transportation economics, planning and policy, environmental and natural resource economics and policy, quantitative methods)
Barbara W. Sarnecka, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Logic and Philosophy of Science (cognitive development, language development, number concepts, conceptual change, individual cognitive development, historical development of science and mathematics)
George Sarraf, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, Lecturer of Economics
Seymour A. Schlosser, M.A. University of California, Los Angeles, Lecturer of International Studies
Evan Schofer, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Sociology (comparative political sociology, sociology of education, quantitative methods and statistics, globalization, sociology of the environment, organizations, sociology of science)
William R. Schonfeld, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Jonas Schultz, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emeritus of Physics and Astronomy; Logic and Philosophy of Science
Tonya L. Schuster, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Lecturer of Sociology; Program in Public Health (sociology of medicine and alternative medicine, social relationships and health, social psychology, research design)
Gabriele J. Schwab, Ph.D. University of Konstanz, Department Chair and UCI Chancellor's Professor of Comparative Literature; Anthropology; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (modern literature, critical theory, psychoanalysis, comparative literature)
Carl E. Schwarz, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Lecturer of Political Science
Armin Schwegler, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese; Linguistics
Sherilyn K. Sellgren, MB.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Political Science
Caesar D. Sereseres, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Associate Professor of Political Science
Carroll S. Seron, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (sociology of law, sociology of professions, law and society, sociology of legal profession, methods and police misconduct)
Nilopa Shah, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Economics
Paul R. Shirey, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Social Sciences; Economics
Stergios Skaperdas, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Clifford S. Heinz Chair and Professor of Economics
Brian Skyrms, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Economics; Philosophy
Kenneth A. Small, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Economics
Steven L. Small, M.D. University of Rochester, Dr. Stanley van den Noort Endowed Chair and Professor of Neurology; Cognitive Sciences; Neurobiology and Behavior
Charles Smith, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Associate Professor of Political Science
David A. Smith, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professor of Sociology; Planning, Policy, and Design (world systems analysis, urbanization, development, comparative-historical sociology, dependent development in east Asia)
David A. Snow, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, UCI Distinguished Professor of Sociology (collective behavior, protest and social movements, framing processes, social psychology and culture, homelessness and social problems, qualitative methods)
Etel Solingen, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Thomas T. and Elizabeth C. Tierney Chair in Global Peace and Conflict Studies and Professor of Political Science
Dorothy J. Solinger, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
George Sperling, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Neurobiology and Behavior (empirical studies of human information processing: short-term visual memory systems, attention, visual perception, 3-D object recognition; mathematical, computational, and neural models of visual processes: light adaptation, temporal sensitivity, contrast-D)
Ramesh Srinivasan, Ph.D. Tulane University, Department Chair and Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Biomedical Engineering (cognitive neuroscience, brain development, consciousness, perception, EEG, brain dynamics)
P. Kyle Stanford, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Philosophy
Judith Stepan-Norris, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Sociology (labor unions, sociology of work, political sociology, American society, research methods, historical-comparative methods, class formation)
Hal S. Stern, Ph.D. Stanford University, Dean of the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences, Ted and Janice Smith Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Information and Computer Science, and Professor of Statistics; Cognitive Sciences
Mark Steyvers, Ph.D. Indiana University, Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Computer Science; Psychology and Social Behavior (higher-order cognition, cognitive neuroscience, computational modeling, collective intelligence)
Sabrina Strings, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Sociology (race, gender, embodiment, sociology of medicine, sociology of media)
Wylie Strout, J.D. Fordham University School of Law, Lecturer of International Studies
Yang Su, Ph.D. Stanford University, Associate Professor of Sociology (social movements and collective action, political sociology, China's political transition)
Naomi Sugie, Ph.D. Princeton University, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (sociology of crime and punishment, inequality, families, demography, methods, new technologies for data collection)
Eric Swanson, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Economics
Bryan Sykes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Program in Public Health; Sociology (demography, criminology, research methods, health, social inequality, statistics)
Rein Taagepera, Ph.D. University of Delaware, Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Shauhin A. Talesh, J.D., Ph.D. University of Connecticut, University of California, Berkeley, Acting Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (civil procedure, consumer law, insurance, business organizations, empirical legal studies, law and society)
Michael Tesler, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Keith Topper, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Political Science; Culture and Theory (political theory, critical theory, poststructuralism, theories of power, language and politics, theory and politics of interpretation, politics of culture, philosophy of the social sciences)
Rodolfo D. Torres, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design; Culture and Theory; Political Science
Bernard H. Tranel, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Linguistics
Judith Treas, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Sociology (gender, inequality, family, aging and life course, social demography)
Kristin E. Turney, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Associate Professor of Sociology; Criminology, Law and Society (social inequality, family demography, population health, incarceration and punishment, intergenerational transmission of disadvantage, child well-being)
Carole J. Uhlaner, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Political Science
Robert M. Uriu, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of Political Science
Alfonso Valdez, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Joachim S. Vandekerckhove, Ph.D. University of Leuven, Assistant Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Statistics (response time modeling, model fitting, computational statistics, psychometrics, Bayesian statistics)
Roxanne Varzi, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of Anthropology; Culture and Theory; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (Iran, media, war, visual anthropology, film studies, ethnographic and fiction writing)
Linda T. Võ, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Asian American Studies; Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (race and ethnic relations, immigrants and refugees, gender relations, community and urban studies)
Wilima Wadhwa, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Economics
Roger Walsh, Ph.D. University of Queensland, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; Anthropology
Sean P. Walsh, Ph.D. University of Notre Dame, Assistant Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Mathematics (philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of logic and mathematical logic)
Feng Wang, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Sociology (contemporary demographic, economic, and social processes, social inequality in state socialisms, contemporary China)
Geoff Ward, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (racial politics of social control, legal profession, youth justice, racial violence, transitional justice)
Martin P. Wattenberg, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Political Science
James O. Weatherall, Ph.D. Stevens Institute of Technology, Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science
Kai Wehmeier, Ph.D. University of Münster, Director, Center for the Advancement of Logic, its Philosophy, History, and Applications and Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Philosophy
Douglas R. White, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology
Joseph L. White, Ph.D. Michigan State University, Professor Emeritus of Social Sciences
Daniel Whiteson, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy; Logic and Philosophy of Science
Christopher A. Whytock, J.D. Georgetown University, Professor of School of Law; Political Science
Charles E. Wright, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences (cognitive psychology, human motor control, fitts task, aimed movements, handwriting, immersive virtual reality, 1/f noise, quantitative models)
Valerie L. Wright, Ph.D. Fuller Theological Seminary, Lecturer of Social Sciences
Martin Zeman, Ph.D. Humboldt University of Berlin, Professor of Mathematics; Logic and Philosophy of Science (logic and foundations)
Fan-Gang Zeng, Ph.D. Syracuse University, Professor of Otolaryngology; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Biomedical Engineering; Cognitive Sciences (cochlear implants and auditory neuroscience)
Mei Zhan, Ph.D. Standford University, Associate Professor of Anthropology; Culture and Theory (medical anthropology, cultural and social studies of science, globalization, transnationalism, gender, China and United States)
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