School of Medicine

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Michael J. Stamos, M.D., Interim Dean
Irvine Hall
Admissions and Outreach: 949-824-5388
http://www.som.uci.edu/

School of Medicine Overview

The UC Irvine School of Medicine became part of the University of California in 1965. Prior to this time it was known as the California College of Medicine which traces its roots to a private institution founded in 1896.

Mission Statement

The mission of the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine is to promote biomedical sciences and medicine in Orange County, California, and beyond, through excellence in research, patient care, education, and community service. This mission is achieved through programs of excellence in the following:

Education: The School of Medicine is committed to provide educational programs of the highest quality to medical students, M.D./Ph.D. and M.D./M.B.A. students, residents, fellows, allied health, graduate academic students, practicing physicians and other health care professionals. Educational programs are offered along the continuum of medical education with programs in undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. These programs emphasize the most current knowledge in the health sciences and reflect the changing practice of medicine. Further, the School of Medicine’s educational programs are designed to stimulate life-long self-learning and critical inquiry and to exemplify those human values necessary to fulfill the professional commitments of a career in the health sciences.

Research: Excellence in research is an essential feature of the School of Medicine. Therefore, the School is committed to develop and maintain research programs in the health sciences which seek to advance basic scientific knowledge and the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human illness.

Clinical Care: Recognizing its responsibility to meet the educational needs of students and the diverse needs of the patient community, the School of Medicine is committed to programs of clinical excellence across the spectrum of patient care disciplines.

Service to the Public: As a publicly assisted institution, the School of Medicine is committed to serve the community as a vital resource of expertise and knowledge. The School further serves the public through the training of health professionals whose backgrounds reflect California’s ethnic and cultural diversity and whose professional careers address California’s health care needs.

Degrees

Biomedical and Translational ScienceM.S.
Biomedical Sciences1M.S., Ph.D.
Environmental Health SciencesM.S., Ph.D.
EpidemiologyM.S., Ph.D.
Genetic CounselingM.S.
MedicineM.D.
Pharmacological Sciences2M.S., Ph.D.
1

The School of Medicine’s basic medical science departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biological Chemistry, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and Physiology and Biophysics offer graduate instruction leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biomedical Sciences.

2

Offered in conjunction with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

The School of Medicine also offers the Medical Scientist Training Program (M.D./Ph.D.), the Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC), an M.D./M.B.A. program in cooperation with The Paul Merage School of Business, an M.D./M.P.H. program in cooperation with the Program in Public Health, medical residency and fellowship programs, and continuing medical education for physicians and other health care professionals.

Vision Statement

The University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine will achieve preeminence through the creation, application, and dissemination of new knowledge in the biomedical sciences and medicine. This will be accomplished through international leadership in biomedical research, development of new therapies, delivery of state-of-the-art medical care, and innovative biomedical education.

Health Sciences Complex

The Health Sciences Complex is a 121-acre site that houses UCI’s medical school facilities. Twenty-nine acres have been developed to provide space for teaching, research, and patient care as well as offices for departmental administration.

The School’s basic science instructional programs are located in modern, well-equipped, medical sciences buildings. These units provide space for first- and second-year classes, lecture halls (including the Dr. S. Jerome and Judith D. Tamkin Student Lecture Hall), offices and laboratories for various basic and clinical departments. Other buildings house the School’s administration and laboratories.

The Medical Education building symbolizes the University’s ongoing commitment to high-quality medical education and innovation. The $40-million, 65,000-square-foot building serves as the hub for nearly all non-hospital related educational activities for UC Irvine medical students, and incorporates the latest technology to help prepare tomorrow’s doctors for healthcare in the digital age. The School of Medicine Educational Affairs Office is located in the Medical Education building, as well as the innovative Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC), an acclaimed program to improve healthcare for the Latino community by training medical students to care for this underserved population in a linguistically competent, culturally sensitive way.

The Medical Education building’s telemedicine center includes a 60-seat interactive televideo auditorium where students watch UC Irvine physicians provide expert care over the Internet to patients in rural or other remote locations. Located on the second floor, the Clinical Skills Center is a cutting-edge facility for teaching and assessment of clinical skills, communication, and professionalism. The Center includes 17 fully equipped patient exam rooms, a central control room for exam administration and recording of all activities, and a computer software system that focuses on the capture, debriefing, and assessment of medical training. The building also features an advanced simulation learning center. The Simulation Lab is a four-suite lab that utilizes high-fidelity human patient simulators with physiologically accurate responses to stimuli to enhance learning and assess competency. The lab is equipped with a fully operational anesthesia suite, a trauma suite, and a general ward environment. The Simulation Lab has two debriefing rooms for immediate feedback on performance as well as a large central control room for all simulation activities.

In addition, the 40,000-square-foot Plumwood House is devoted to basic research in the fields of neurological disorders, diagnostic systems and reagents, and industrial bioreactors. In this facility, faculty from the Department of Biological Chemistry share laboratory space with corporate researchers.

Outpatient services are available on campus through the Louis A. and Helen C. Gottschalk Medical Plaza and the Beckman Laser Institute. The Plaza capitalizes upon the broad range of diagnostic and therapeutic programs of the School as well as the extensive clinical expertise of the faculty. The facility offers primary care and specialty services. Special programs in diabetes, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and inflammatory bowel diseases also are offered. The Plaza also houses UC Irvine Corporate Health Services and the Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, which offers the latest in diagnostic health care for eye diseases, including computerized refraction analysis, glaucoma diagnosis, and ultrasound analysis of eye disorders.

Housing one of the world’s leading programs in medical laser technology, the Beckman Laser Institute offers state-of-the-art treatment for cancer and dermatological conditions. The Institute specializes in the development and application of laser and other optical technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

Biomedical Research Center

UC Irvine’s Biomedical Research Center (BRC) is a landmark public-private collaboration between UCI and businesses involved in biomedical, biotechnological, and healthcare services. The Center enables UCI researchers and participating companies to work alongside one another, combining basic science, clinical study, and product development to find new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The William J. Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility, the first of several BRC buildings, is the home of a core group of prominent scientists investigating the causes and cures for neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and spinal cord injury. The second building is the Robert R. Sprague Family Foundation Hall, where scientists work to reveal the role of genetics in cancer treatment and prevention. The third building, the Dottie and George Hewitt Research Hall, is home to a state-of-the-art General Clinical Research Center and internationally recognized investigators studying infectious diseases, molecular medicine, immunology, and complementary and alternative medicine. The Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center is the fourth building in UCI’s Biomedical Research Center. Opened in 2010, this state-of-the art research and clinical building fosters a multi-pronged approach to neurodegenerative repair and basic stem cell biology by supporting basic research, regenerative medicine, and drug-development programs.

Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

The Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center is the only National Cancer Institute-designated facility in Orange County and one of only 41 such centers in the country. Overall, more than 100 faculty members at the Cancer Center are involved in several major research programs, encompassing everything from basic research that looks at how cancer cells grow to bone marrow transplantation. Located at the UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange, the 56,000-square-foot facility provides an ideal setting for the practice of all the basic and clinical subspecialties involved in adult and pediatric oncology, including the application of the latest techniques for diagnosis and management of patients with cancer.

University of California, Irvine Health

UC Irvine Health comprises the clinical, medical education and research enterprise of the University of California, Irvine. As the only university-based care provider in Orange County, the multifaceted organization is dedicated to the discovery of new medical frontiers, to the teaching of future healers and to the delivery of the finest evidence-based care. UC Irvine Medical Center is a 411 bed acute care hospital providing tertiary and quaternary care, ambulatory and specialty medical clinics, behavioral health and rehabilitation. It is the primary teaching hospital for UC Irvine School of Medicine.

  • UC Irvine School of Medicine, one of the top U.S. medical schools for research, is where our groundbreaking research and treatment advances are imparted to the rising practitioners of tomorrow.
  •  UC Irvine Medical Center has been rated among the nation's best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report for 14 years. It is also ranked among the top 50 U.S. medical centers in ear, nose, and throat, geriatric, and nephrology care.
  • The Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center is one of only 41 in the nation — and the only one in Orange County — designated for excellence by the National Cancer Institute.
  • UC Irvine Medical Center is Orange County's only Level I adult and Level II pediatric trauma center, which means trauma and critical care physicians are fully equipped to treat life-threatening injuries 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • The Comprehensive Stroke & Cerebrovascular Center is the first in Orange County to be certified as a Comprehensive Stroke Center by the nation's preeminent healthcare standard-setting organization.
  • Numerous health providers throughout Orange County apply the most advanced medical knowledge — for diabetes, neuromuscular disease, women’s health, and more.
  • This union of discovery, teaching and healing has enabled UC Irvine Health to pioneer new therapies and techniques that have been adopted by institutions across the nation.

More information is available at the UC Irvine Health website.

UCI Family Health Center-Santa Ana

The UCI Family Health Center-Santa Ana is a state-of-the-art primary care facility, conveniently located near the Santa Ana Civic Center. The Center has two missions—healthcare delivery and medical education.

As a community clinic, the Family Health Center’s multilingual physicians and staff are committed to providing quality health care to patients, including the medically under-served. It provides primary care services to people of all ages including family medicine, preventive care for children and adults, and specialty care in pediatrics and obstetrics and gynecology.

As an integral part of the UCI School of Medicine, the Family Health Center provides educational and training opportunities for medical and nurse practitioner students, including the UCI Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology residency training programs.

UCI Family Health Center-Anaheim

The UCI Family Health Center-Anaheim provides care for more than 20,000 outpatient visits annually and training programs for resident physicians in primary care, general internal medicine, and general and adolescent pediatrics. There are additional programs in gynecology, dermatology, general surgery, podiatry, neurology, ophthalmology, optometry, orthopedics, psychiatry, and multispecialty faculty practice. The Center provides training for medical students in their primary care, general pediatric, adolescent medicine, and geriatric medicine rotations and electives.

Affiliated Hospitals and Clinics

Additional major teaching and research programs of the School of Medicine are conducted at the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, and Miller Children's Hospital (Long Beach). Other academic programs are conducted in affiliation with Kaiser Foundation Hospital (Anaheim, Bellflower, Irvine, and Riverside), Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, Western Medical Center (Tustin/Santa Ana), and St. Jude's Hospital (Fullerton).

School of Medicine Alumni Relations

The UCI School of Medicine is an outgrowth of what began in 1896 as the Pacific College of Osteopathy (PSO). Some years later it became the College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons, which then evolved into the California College of Medicine in 1962 and subsequently joined the UC system in 1965. The Office of Alumni Relations provides programs and services for nearly 5,000 alumni of the School as well as for students. From financial support to Honor’s Night awards, mentorship to reunions, the Office of Alumni Relations seeks to provide a cornerstone from which students and alumni can benefit from their relationships to one another and in so doing, strengthen the School of Medicine.

The M.D. Program

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Admissions

All inquiries regarding the UC Irvine School of Medicine’s admission programs and procedures should be directed to:

University of California, Irvine
School of Medicine
Office of Admissions and Outreach
Medical Education Building
Irvine, CA 92697-4089

949-824-5388 or 800-UCI-5388
http://www.meded.uci.edu/admissions/

The UC Irvine School of Medicine is a member of the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS). All students who seek entrance to the UC Irvine School of Medicine must complete the AMCAS application. Applications must be submitted between June 1 and November 1 of the year preceding anticipated admission.

Additional information for the following programs is included below: Medical Scientist Training Program (M.D./Ph.D.), the M.D./M.B.A Program,  Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC, and the MD/MPH program

Selection Factors

The UC Irvine School of Medicine seeks to admit students who are highly qualified to be trained in the practice of medicine and whose backgrounds, talents, and experiences contribute to a diverse student body. The Admissions Committee carefully reviews all applicants whose academic record and MCAT scores indicate that they will be able to handle the rigorous medical school curriculum. In addition to scholastic achievement, applicants are evaluated on their extent and level of research involvement, exposure and involvement in a health care setting, and community service. Dedication, reliability altruism, and leadership as well as interpersonal communication skills are attributes that are given high regard when considering applicants for a position in the class. Careful consideration is given to applicants from disadvantaged backgrounds and those that have demonstrated the potential to work with the medically underserved, in particular the Latino population in California.

After receipt of the AMCAS application, applicants will be invited to complete a secondary application and will be required to submit a nonrefundable application fee of $90. Upon further review by the Admissions Committee, approximately 600 applicants will be invited to interview. Regional interviews are not available. UC Irvine School of Medicine does not accept transfer students.

Requirements for Admission

Students can be considered for admission to the School of Medicine if they meet the following requirements:

  1. All applicants must complete the American Medical Colleges Application Service (AMCAS) application between June 1 - November 1, of the application year. Applicants must have a minimum of three years (90 semester units) of undergraduate coursework at an accredited U.S. college or university at the time the application is submitted. All course work must be verified by AMCAS before an applicant can be advanced to the admissions process. For purposes of evaluation, letter or numerical grades are preferred for course work, particularly for the required subjects listed below. All prerequisite courses listed as “in progress” on the AMCAS application and UC Irvine School of Medicine Secondary Application must be successfully completed by matriculation. Failure to meet the requirements or falsification of information are grounds for rejection or dismissal.
  2. Applicants must complete the following college course requirements prior to matriculation:
    Subject Requirement Comments
    Biology1.5 Years: 3 semesters or 5 quarters.
    Must include one upper-division Biology course.
    Chemistry2 Years: 4 semesters or 6 quarters.
    Must include biochemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry courses.
    Physics1 Year: 2 semesters or 3 quarters.
  3. Applicants are strongly encouraged to have completed their basic science requirements at the time they submit their application. No specific major is required, however, demonstrated ability in the sciences is of great importance. In addition, applicants are advised to take advantage of the intellectual maturation afforded by a well-rounded liberal arts education. English, the humanities, and the social and behavioral sciences are considered particularly important. The following courses are also recommended but not required: molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, vertebrate embryology, psychology, biostatistics, calculus, English composition, and Spanish.
  4. Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) must have been taken within the three years preceding June 1 of the application year and no later than September 30 of the application year.
  5. Three to six letters are suggested. We recommend that at least two of the letters be from senior professors who can evaluate your academic abilities. If you have been involved in research, clinical, community service, or other significant extracurricular activities, it is recommended that you submit a letter from your mentor, supervisor or advisor. The Admissions Committee will only be reviewing letters of recommendation from those applicants who received a secondary application.
  6. A criminal background check is conducted on all accepted applicants.
  7. All students matriculating to the UC Irvine School of Medicine must be able to meet the Technical Standards available at the School of Medicine Admissions website.

Outreach

Outreach efforts coordinated by this office are designed to introduce students to the medical profession during their high school and undergraduate education. An additional goal of this office is to build a pipeline of potential candidates for medical school and recruit students from socioeconomically disadvantaged groups who those that have a desire to serve in the medically underserved communities in California. To reach these goals, programs are developed and implemented for students in high school, community colleges, and four-year undergraduate institutions. Examples of these activities include a Post Baccalaureate Program, Premedical Conferences, and Summer Outreach Programs. Outreach staff conduct academic advising related to the medical school admissions process and develop liaisons with UC Irvine undergraduate academic programs and pre-health advisors.

Medical Student Advisor System

The School of Medicine provides a comprehensive academic advising and assistance program that spans the full duration of the students’ educational program.

Academic Skills Assessment

All entering students undergo an academic skills assessment during the new student orientation. Students then meet individually with the associate dean for student affairs, the academic skills coordinator, and the School of Medicine psychologist to discuss study skills, early performance, and overall adjustment to medical school. Additional services are provided on an as-needed basis by the academic skills coordinator and the SOM psychologist.

Academic Advisors

Julianne Toohey, M.D., Associate Dean Student Affairs; 949-824-5283

Student academic performance during the first two years is monitored on a monthly basis by the Educational Support Committee. The committee develops specific action plans for each student experiencing academic difficulty. All students are also assigned a faculty advisor beginning early in their first year. This faculty advisor serves as the student’s Clinical Foundations course small-group leader during years one and two. For years three and four, academic advisement occurs primarily via continuing interactions with the student’s faculty advisor and the associate dean for student affairs. Also during years three and four, the Educational Support Committee consisting of the Clinical Clerkship Directors periodically reviews student performance. The faculty advisor provides semi-annual reviews and formative feedback regarding student performance as well as general counseling relating to emerging career preferences and year-four scheduling. Students also have access to a group of faculty from various departments who have agreed to provide specialty-specific academic advice in their disciplines. Several workshops are conducted during the second half of year three and early in year four to prepare students for the residency application process. All students also meet individually with the associate dean for student affairs to review their Medical Student Performance Evaluation (dean’s letter) and discuss individual residency application strategies. Additional resources are involved on an as-needed basis by the associate dean for student affairs.

Career Advisors

Julianne Toohey, M.D., Associate Dean Student Affairs; 949-824-5283

A four-year Career Advising Curriculum has been developed for all medical students. During the new student orientation, the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs leads a “Career Perspectives” workshop, which provides an overview of the career curriculum and introduces the AAMC Careers in Medicine program to the students. Monthly specialty workshops are provided to the first and second year classes during lunch at the Irvine campus and a two-year rotating schedule of specialties has been developed. Similarly, workshops are given at the Medical Center in Orange for the third year students. Each student entering their third year is assigned a Medical Education Dean to provide more individualized and personal mentorship and career guidance. All students will meet with this mentor at least three times during each of their third and fourth years. In addition, several workshops are provided throughout the third and fourth year to prepare students for the residency application and Match process.  

Peer Review and Peer Counseling Program

Julianne Toohey, M.D., Associate Dean Student Affairs; 949-824-5283

The School of Medicine has an informal peer review process, aimed at early detection and assistance for medical students who are experiencing difficulty such as professional conduct problems, suspected impairment, violation of the honor code, or violation of any University policy, regulation, or rule. The Peer Review Committee is comprised of two representatives from each class, the student body co-presidents, and two advisory faculty members. The committee operates within guidelines set jointly by the School of Medicine administration and the student body. Cases involving serious professional misconduct are referred to the Dean’s Office. The Peer Review Committee conducts hearings and may impose sanctions or provide assistance to the student.

Medical Scientist Training Program (M.D./Ph.D.)

Alan Goldin, M.D., Ph.D., Director; 949-824-5334

Exceptionally well-qualified students interested in careers in academic medicine and with demonstrated research accomplishments may be considered for admission to the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). Students in this program pursue a combined curriculum for an M.D. degree from the School of Medicine and a Ph.D. degree from any of the graduate programs at UCI. The normative time for completion of the program is eight years, and students holding either degree are not eligible for MSTP. The maximum time for completion of the program is 10 years. Additional information is available from the MSTP Administrator's Office, 949-824-5264; mstp@uci.edu; or visit the Medical Scientist Training Program website.

Applicants must submit a supplementary application (available from the School of Medicine Office of Admissions) to the Medical Scientist Training Program when they are submitting their secondary application information to the School of Medicine. Students accepted into the program have the option of pursuing graduate study in any of the graduate programs at UCI. Although a specific graduate department need not be chosen at the time of admission, students are expected to have selected a field for their graduate studies. Financial support in the form of a fellowship, which includes a stipend as well as tuition and fees, is provided. Applicants not accepted into MSTP may be considered separately for admission to the School of Medicine.

M.D./M.B.A. Degree Program

Maria Chandler, M.D./M.B.A., Faculty Advisor; 949-824-7133

The M.D./M.B.A. program requires five or six years for completion. It is aimed at individuals who are exceptional in ability and motivation and who seek a career as physicians with major responsibility for administration and management in health care organizations and institutions. Students in this program pursue a combined curriculum for an M.D. degree from the School of Medicine and an M.B.A. degree from The Paul Merage School of Business.

Students must be currently enrolled in the M.D. program in order to apply to the combined M.D./M.B.A. program. During their second or third year of medical school, interested students submit an application to The Paul Merage School of Business Admissions Committee, after review by the School of Medicine. Final acceptance to the program is granted by The Paul Merage School of Business, and M.B.A. course work begins following completion of the student’s third year of medical school. Students should be aware that enrollment in the M.D. program does not guarantee acceptance into the M.B.A. program.

The MCAT, along with the completion of three years of medical school training in good standing and passage of USMLE Step 1, currently serve as a waiver for the GMAT entrance examination usually required for application to the M.B.A. program. The total number of units required to graduate from each program separately are satisfied in the M.D./M.B.A. program.

Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC)

Charles Vega, M.D., Director; 949-824-7136

A carefully selected group of students from diverse backgrounds and with superior academic credentials, proven commitment to service, and solid conversational Spanish will be considered for acceptance to the Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC) at the UCI School of Medicine. PRIME-LC responds to the increasing demand for physician-leaders who are culturally and linguistically competent to address the health care delivery, research, and policy needs of underserved Latino communities in California. Students in PRIME-LC complete additional value-added curriculum in addition to their medical training in order to reach their goals of leading communities, and they also complete a Master’s degree program of their choice. The first residency positions in any UC PRIME opened in the UCI Family Medicine program in 2010.

The PRIME-LC supplemental application is part of the UCI School of Medicine secondary application and must be completed to be considered for acceptance. Applicants selected for faculty and student interviews are required to undertake a third interview in Spanish to evaluate conversational skills and commitment to service. All interested applicants, including those who are not currently California residents, are encouraged to complete the PRIME-LC application. All PRIME-LC students receive a substantial financial award in their fifth year of training. Applicants not accepted into PRIME-LC may be considered separately for admission to the regular School of Medicine M.D. program. For more information contact 949-824-7136; primelc@uci.edu; or visit the PRIME-LC website.

M.D./M.P.H. Program

Bharath Charkravarthy, M.D., M.P.H., Director 

The M.D./M.P.H. program requires five years for completion. It is aimed at individuals who are seeking a career as physicians concerned about making a significant difference in community disease prevention. Students in this program pursue a combined curriculum for an M.D. degree from the School of Medicine and an M.P.H. degree from the Program in Public Health.

Students must be currently enrolled in the M.D. program in order to apply to the dual M.D./M.P.H. program. During their second or third year of medical school, interested students submit both the Application for Graduate Admission and the School of Public Health Application Service (SOPHAS) application in order to be considered for admission. Final acceptance to the program is granted by the Program in Public Health, and M.P.H. coursework begins following the student's third year of medical school. Students should be aware that enrollment in the M.D. program does not guarantee acceptance into the M.P.H. program.

The MCAT, along with the completion of three years of medical school training in good standing, currently serve as a waiver for the GRE entrance examination usually required for application to the M.P.H. program. The total number of units required to graduate from each program separately are satisfied in the M.D./M.P.H. program. 

Contact the M.D./M.P.H. Student Affairs Officer at 949-824-7095 for more information.

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The M.D. Curriculum

The UCI medical curriculum continues to meet the changing needs of medical education within all four years of instruction. Indeed, the School of Medicine faculty views curriculum development as a continual process and feels that medical education and teaching innovations must be encouraged and supported. The curriculum is designed to encourage medical students to become participants in their education process, to be active rather than passive learners, to become lifelong learners, and to use cooperative and team-learning principles.

UCI is dedicated to the nurturing of humanistic, caring physicians with top-notch clinical expertise and skills. The School strives for this through a curriculum that is not only anchored in the science of medicine but also provides meaningful experiences in the humanistic dimensions of medicine. In this context, the faculty endeavors to provide students with experiences in areas such as communication and empathy, ethics and professionalism, diversity awareness, and cultural sensitivity and medical humanities. The faculty also feels that the curriculum should strive to integrate basic and clinical sciences by bringing substantial clinical material into the early phases of medical education.

The School has achieved vertical integration of the curriculum with the development of a series of “Clinical Foundations” courses. The courses are longitudinal multidisciplinary experiences broadly designed to prepare students for their future careers in medicine through the application of experiential and self-directed learning principles. First-and second-year students begin to prepare for their clerkships through clinical exposures featuring standardized patients and clinical shadowing experiences. These courses also utilize small group learning sessions to reinforce core concepts of patient-physician interactions and introductory clinical reasoning skill development. During the Clinical Foundations course in the third and fourth years, students explore many of the crucial issues first presented during the introductory courses. During this segment greater emphasis is placed on advanced skill acquisition and more mature professional role development.

To satisfy the requirement for the M.D. degree, each medical student must successfully complete the full curriculum. Students must also pass both Step 1 and Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and successfully pass a Clinical Practice Examination (CPX) prior to graduation.

An ongoing academic monitoring program is coordinated by the Office of Student Affairs, which identifies students early who might be experiencing academic difficulty and provides them with resources to successfully complete their course work. Faculty advisors are assigned to students during their first and second years. Students have advisory sessions with M.D. faculty prior to the scheduling of their fourth-year course work. A Learning Resources Program is available to provide tutorial assistance and study skills training. 

Curricular Policies

The curricular policies of the School of Medicine are the responsibility of the Curriculum and Educational Policy Committee and the Promotions and Honors Committee. A listing of these policies, as well as information regarding registration, rules and regulations, grading procedures, and requirements for academic advancement, are contained in the School of Medicine Handbook, which is available at the School of Medicine Office of the Medical Education website.

First and Second Years:
Basic Science and Pre-clinical Course Work
First Year
Clinical Foundations I
Anatomy and Embryology
Behavioral Science and Ethics 1
Histology
Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Medical Genetics
Neuroscience
Patient-Centered 1 Clerkship
Physiology/Pathophysiology
Second Year
Clinical Foundations II
Behavioral Science and Ethics II
Clinical Pathology
General and Systemic Pathology
Immunology
Medical Microbiology
Medical Pharmacology
Patient-Centered 2 Clerkship
Third and Fourth Years1:
Clinical Science Course Work
Third Year
Clinical Foundations III
Ambulatory Medicine Clerkship
General Surgery Clerkship
Family Medicine Clerkship
Inpatient Medicine Clerkship
Neuroscience Clerkship
Obstetrics and Gynecology
Pediatrics Clerkship
Psychiatry Clerkship
Radiology Clerkship
Fourth Year
Clinical Foundations IV
Emergency Medicine
Intensive Care Unit
Senior Subinternship
Electives
1

The sequence of third and fourth years varies.

Curricular Descriptions

First-Year Curriculum
Clinical Foundations I

Clinical Foundations I, first of the four-part Clinical Foundations series, serves as the introductory clinical medicine course for first-year medical students. Participating students learn core skills in physician-patient communication, medical interviewing, physical examination, and health promotion. The course is horizontally integrated with the basic science curriculum. The series includes a variety of small and large group sessions taught by two types of faculty: core teachers and community preceptors. Students complete multiple medical interviews, physical examinations, and patient write-ups for which they receive feedback designed to improve proficiency. (Med Ed 554A-B-C)

Anatomy and Embryology

The structure of the human body is taught in Anatomy and Embryology. Emphasis is placed on normal structure as it relates to function, with consideration of abnormal structures that may be revealed in a clinical setting. Anatomy is taught through a regional approach, with an emphasis on laboratory dissections and demonstrations, augmented by lectures, radiographic films, discussions, and clinical correlate material. The course includes a detailed consideration of the embryologic aspects of human development. (Med Ed 500A-B))

Behavioral Science & Ethics I

This clinically oriented course will cover foundation topics in behavioral science and medical ethics, and will introduce clinically relevant social issues such as dealing with domestic violence as it presents clinically, treating minority or under-served populations and cultural competence.  (Med Ed 505A)

Histology

Histology is designed to provide students with knowledge of the major features of the structural organization of cells, tissues and organs, and how that organization is related to function. Emphasis is placed on normal structure and function, with consideration of abnormalities in clinical cases. (Med Ed 503A-B)

Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Covers the following topics from a biomedical perspective: protein and nucleic acid biochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines, genome structure, molecular mechanisms of development, and signal transduction. (Med Ed 522)

Medical Genetics

Medical Genetics reviews the basic principles of human genetics related to disease. Assessment of patterns of genetic risk, screening for genetic diseases, and cytogenetics and biochemical diagnosis are presented. Utilization of the human gene map and DNA sequence information for molecular genetic diagnosis are discussed. Students are introduced to the use of genetic databases and bioinformatics. Approaches to treatment of genetic diseases are presented. Legal, ethical,and social aspects of diagnosis and management of genetic disease are discussed. (Med Ed 511)

Neuroscience

The objective of this course is to provide students with the fundamental concepts, vocabulary, and learning strategies to attain a level of proficiency in basic integrative neurosciences so that they will develop an understanding in the clinical neurosciences throughout their careers as physicians. The course is integrative in the sense that the underlying knowledge of molecular, cellular, physiological, developmental, and neuroanatomical organization of the nervous system is brought together in each lecture block with clinical themes and examples in lectures, and which is further reinforced by clinical correlates given by clinicians. The course emphasizes knowledge of the nervous system using lessons from clinical neuroanatomy, systems neurosciences, and regional and developmental neuroanatomy. (Med Ed 502A)

Patient-Centered 1 (PACE-1) Clerkship

This course is designed to introduce clinical skills to students and integrate basic science training through early exposure to the clinical setting.  Training will be accomplished with weekly clinic sessions with a specific preceptor, with reflection sessions to reinforce clinical lessons. Students will be expected to achieve learning objectives in patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and medical knowledge.  (Med Ed 557)

Physiology/Pathophysiology

This course consists of lectures, clinical correlates, hands-on workshops, small group discussions, and exercises in the simulation center covering the classical concepts of medical physiology. Specific topics include hemostasis, blood, neurophysiology, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, exercise, temperature regulation, and sexual physiology. (Med Ed 543A-B)

Second-Year Curriculum
Clinical Foundations II

Clinical Foundations II, second of the Clinical Foundations series, builds second-year medical students’ clinical skills. Students learn advanced skills in history-taking, physical diagnosis, and clinical reasoning. Clinical didactics sessions synthesize learning in the clinical and basic sciences. The course is comprised mostly of small-group sessions taught primarily by two types of faculty: core clinical teachers, and community clinical teachers. With these faculty, students work on focused, guided practice of clinical skills that integrates basic science course work. (Med Ed 555A-B)

Behavioral Science & Ethics II

This clinically oriented course will cover foundational topics in behavioral science and medical ethics, and will introduce clinically relevant social issues such as dealing with domestic violence as it presents clinically, treating minority or underserved populations and cultural competence.  (Med Ed 505B)

Clinical Pathology

This course consists of lectures and laboratories covering the areas of hematology, blood bank, clinical chemistry, and microbiology. It provides students with a foundation for understanding the pathogenesis of a variety of disease states, as well as a foundation for the proper use of the laboratory for diagnosis and optimum patient management. (Med Ed 509A-B)

General and Systemic Pathology

This course deals with basic causes, mechanisms, and consequences of disease processes and with some applications of these considerations to clinical medicine. After an introduction to general types of disease processes, these processes are studied further as they affect specific organs and organ systems. (Med Ed 508A-B-C)

Immunology

Immunology covers the cellular and molecular basis of immune responsiveness and the roles of the immune system in both health and disease. The material presented in lectures and clinical correlates.  (Med Ed 544)

Medical Microbiology

This course covers the biology of infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites, to provide the foundation in microbiology for the subsequent study of infectious diseases. Lectures, small group sessions with clinicians, and laboratory sessions are used to teach the molecular bases of microbial pathogenesis, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial therapy, and prevention strategies. (Med Ed 507A, B)

Medical Pharmacology

This course covers the various classes of drugs that are used in medicine, particularly those used in specific or symptomatic treatment of disease states. Drugs of abuse are also covered. Emphasis is on the mechanisms of action of drugs at the organ and system level and on their use in medicine. The course includes lectures that illustrate pharmacologic principles, supplemented by small group problem-solving sessions. (Med Ed 517A-B-C)

Patient-Centered 2 (PACE-2) Clerkship

This course continues the processes of PACE-1 to build students’ clinical skills and create a bridge between the basic and clinical sciences. Training will be accomplished with weekly clinic sessions with a specific preceptor, with reflection sessions to reinforce clinical lessons. Students will be expected to achieve learning objectives in patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning and improvement, and medical knowledge. (Med Ed 558 A and B)

Third-Year Curriculum 
Clinical Foundations III

Clinical Foundations III, held at the beginning of the third year, provides further preparation for third-year clinical rotations. Additionally, intersessions are planned during the third year to provide integration of clinical material across longitudinal topics that cross several disciplines. This preparation includes, but is not limited to clinical IT training with access to Electronic Medical Records, obtaining privileges at all of the primary clinical sites, discussions on team care, leadership, professionalism, management of assault behavior training, infection prevention, and basic life support.  (Med Ed 550)

Ambulatory Medicine Clerkship

The Ambulatory Medicine clerkship occurs in a highly structured clinical environment in both in-patient and ambulatory settings. Students gradually assume responsibility for the care of patients, thereby enhancing their clinical, diagnostic, and procedural skills. (Med Ed 527B)

General Surgery Clerkship

The General Surgery clerkship provides students, as members of the surgical team, with an opportunity to study surgical patients in outpatient and hospital settings. Students acquire surgical knowledge, as well as develop skills in taking surgical histories and conducting physical examinations. Emphasis is placed on the clinical evaluation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of surgical diseases.  (Med Ed 526)

Family Medicine Clerkship

This clerkship matches students with a family physician for a four-week block. Students are assigned to a UCI-affiliated clinic where the principles of family medicine and primary care are taught. Emphasis is placed upon exposing students to the most common health care problems seen in family medicine. Students are exposed to the principles of community health and epidemiology, as practically applied in an ambulatory care setting. Students develop an awareness of the current health care delivery environment, including issues such as health care costs and the lifestyle of a family physician. Special tracks are available for interested students in geriatrics, integrative medicine, and under-served care. Special teaching sessions on family centered maternity care, health maintenance and nutrition, and musculoskeletal joint exams are part of the experience. A curriculum in ophthalmology is also part of the clerkship. (Med Ed 597)

Inpatient Medicine Clerkship

The eight-week Inpatient Medicine Clerkship occurs in a highly structured clinical environment in-patient setting. Students gradually assume responsibility for the care of patients, thereby enhancing their clinical, diagnostic, and procedural skills. Clinical vignettes and bedside teaching serve to round out the experience.  (Med Ed 527B)

Neuroscience Clerkship

The four-week Neuroscience clinical clerkship emphasizes the development of skills in taking a neurological history, performing a neurological examination, formulating a differential diagnosis, and proposing a course of management for neurological disorders. Students have the option of further training in Neurosurgery or pediatric sub-specialty rotations. (Med Ed 532)

Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship

During the six-week clinical clerkship, students are given the opportunity to observe and handle problems in the obstetrical and gynecologic wards, outpatient clinic, labor and delivery suite, and in the operating room. (Med Ed 524)

Pediatrics Clerkship

This clinical clerkship serves as an introduction to general pediatrics. Students rotate on the pediatric inpatient service, pediatric ambulatory settings, and the newborn nursery. During the clerkship, students develop their knowledge and skills in conducting age-appropriate patient histories and physical examinations and developing differential diagnoses and management plans. (Med Ed 528)

Psychiatry Clerkship

This six-week clinical clerkship provides an opportunity for hands-on experience in the process of recognizing, diagnosing, and treating mental illness using the latest neuropharmacological advances, as well as more traditional psychotherapeutic approaches. Each student participates fully in patient care, clinical teaching, and conferences.  (Med Ed 529)

Radiology Clerkship

Emphasis is given to correlate clinical findings and use the imaging modalities for problem-solving and diagnosis and treatment, including an understanding of risk/cost/benefit ration involved in daily clinical practices.  (Med Ed 533)

Fourth-Year Curriculum 
Clinical Foundations IV

This is a two-week required course that all fourth-year students take during the final quarter in medical school in preparation for residency training. Intersessions are also planned during the fourth year to help prepare students further for residency. The course includes a resuscitation boot camp and provides an opportunity to obtain an ACLS certification. (Med Ed 535)

Emergency Medicine

This two-week clinical clerkship introduces students to principles of acute care medicine while caring for acutely ill and injured patients. Students have the opportunity to evaluate patients, expand their directed history and physical making skills, create a broad differential diagnosis, and formulate effective testing and treatment strategies. Active participation in patient care through refinement of procedural skills is largely emphasized and encouraged.  (Med Ed 547)

Intensive Care Unit

This is a four-week clinical clerkship offered at one of several UC Irvine affiliated sites. ICU is offered in medicine, surgery,neurology, and pediatrics. Students function as subinterns, becoming integral members of the ICU team, and serve as primary caregivers under supervision. (Med Ed 605B, 630K, 633M, 640E, 660S or 685U)

Senior Subinternship

Students spend four weeks as subinterns during which time they carry the full ward responsibility of an intern on one-half the number of patients usually carried by an intern. The subinternship is designed to improve clinical competence and to prepare the students for the challenges and demands of the internship. Students may choose between subinternships in family medicine, medicine, pediatrics or surgery. (Med Ed 536, 537, 538, 539, or 625Q)

Electives

Depending upon their particular interests, needs, and goals, students may take a variety of elective courses  during the third and fourth years at UC Irvine Health facilities, VA Long Beach Healthcare System, Children's Hospital of Orange County, Long Beach Miller Children's Hospital, or Long Beach Memorial. Students may also take their fourth-year elective course work at other approved institutions. .

A listing of elective courses and descriptions can be found online at http://www.meded.uci.edu/undergraduate-meded/course-catalog.asp.

All questions regarding the curriculum, electives, or matters of records should be directed to:

University of California, Irvine
School of Medicine
Office of Medical Education
Medical Education Building
Irvine, CA 92697-4089

General information/records: 949-824-6138; scheduling: 714-456-8462; curriculum: 949-824-4609.

On This Page:


Office of Medical Education

Shyrl Sistrunk, M.D., FACP, Senior Associate Dean of Medical Education: 949-824-8405
Khanh-Van Le-Bucklin, M.D., Associate Dean of Education Accreditation and Compliance: 949-824-3293
Shaun Langer, Chief Administrative Officer: 949-824-1567

The Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education, in cooperation with the Academic Senate faculty, has responsibility for administrative oversight of the educational program leading to the M.D. degree, postgraduate residency and fellowship programs, and continuing medical education programs provided for practicing physicians and allied health personnel. Housed within the Office of Medical Education are the divisions of Admissions and Outreach, Curricular Affairs, Student Affairs, Instructional Technologies, Graduate Medical Education, and Continuing Medical Education. Medical Education provides services for the M.D. program, which include curriculum development, implementation, management, and evaluation. The Office of Medical Education offers student support services, which include academic advisement, learning skills counseling, psychological counseling, career counseling, and student records. It also coordinates additional services offered through general University offices, which include housing, student health, and disabled student services.

Student Affairs

Julianne Toohey, M.D., Associate Dean of Student Affairs: 949-824-1772
John Christian Fox, M.D., Assistant Dean of Student Affairs: 949-824-1129
Nicholas Cheung, Registrar: 949-824-5283
Geraldine Codd, Academic Skills Coordinator: 949-824-3415
Anju Hurria, M.D., School of Medicine Psychiatrist: 714-456-7473 

The mission of the Office of Student Affairs is to create an environment within the School of Medicine community that fosters student attainment of the School of Medicine educational objectives. This is accomplished through assuring that student participation in the educational program occurs in a manner consistent with School of Medicine policies and regulations, and through the provision of support services that facilitate optimal student participation in the educational program. To accomplish the educational assurance mission, the Office of Student Affairs disseminates information regarding academic policies and regulations, provides administrative and executive support for the faculty Committee on Promotions and Honors, and facilitates the institutional recognition of student achievement through the conduct of various School of Medicine events. To accomplish the educational support mission, the Office of Student Affairs provides academic, personal, psychological, career, and financial counseling; academic skills assessment and learning resources support, student wellness programs, student facilities support, initiatives to enhance the learning environment, and support for a variety of student organizations and informal activities.

Financial Aid

Luis Medina, Director; 949-824-6476
Scott Brandos, Counselor; 949-824-6476

The UCI School of Medicine Financial Aid Office provides financial assistance and financial counseling services to entering and continuing medical students. The office secures, manages, and provides funds in the form of scholarships, grants, and loans to assist in meeting students’ educational expenses.

The office coordinates financial aid application materials; tracks documents needed to complete an application; reviews and evaluates information provided by applicants; awards financial aid programs; and conducts research to determine basic educational expense budgets. It also provides students with information on policies and procedures, cost of attendance, and eligibility criteria.

In providing counseling services, the office advises students, reviews their individual circumstances, and provides financial assistance within financial aid program guidelines. It presents financial aid workshops for prospective and enrolled students to enhance their knowledge about financial aid programs and the application process, provides financial literacy and debt management counseling, and conducts entrance and exit interviews.

Curricular Affairs

Warren Wiechmann, MD, Associate Dean of Curricular Affairs - Clinical Sciences: 949-824-8358
Jeffrey Suchard, MD., Associate Dean of Curricular Affairs - Basic Sciences: 949-824-1129
Terri Dean, Director: 949-824-4609
 

This office provides support related to curricular issues for the School of Medicine, departments, faculty, and students; initiates curriculum review and innovation to meet the challenges of contemporary medical education; establishes and reviews the objectives of the School of Medicine and ensures individual courses are teaching to meet the objectives; serves as facilitators of new programs and curriculum and supports working committees during curriculum development; facilitates and monitors curriculum content theme integration; and maintains records on course materials and grading policies. This office is responsible for curriculum documentation for review by the Curriculum and Educational Policies committee; the collection of course evaluations by students; maintaining accurate information on core and elective curriculum; and assessing the success of the current programs.

Educational Technology Group

Warren Wiechmann, M.D., Associate Dean of Educational Technology: 949-824-6138
Julie Youm, Ph.D., Director

The Educational Technology Group is tasked with providing top-quality technology, innovation and support for UC Irvine School of Medicine faculty, students, and staff. We work closely with Medical Education to develop novel uses of technology within the medical school setting that will enhance the overall educational experience for our students.

Continuing Medical Education

Ellen Seaback, CMP, CAE, CHCP, Executive Director; 949-824-1150

The Office of Continuing Medical Education provides educational activities to physicians and other health care professionals to reinforce basic medical knowledge, improve competency, enhance performance-in-practice, and improve the outcomes of patient care. Additionally, these activities impart updated information on clinical practice and health care delivery; introduce new ideas, skills, and technologies; and disseminate pertinent research findings. The program encompasses a broad and comprehensive range of topics based on identified gaps in the learning needs of the communities served. As an academic center of excellence that includes the UC Irvine Medical Center, emphasis is placed on the identification of areas for improvement through the system’s Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Department for which CME is a change-agent. UCI School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME with commendation. 

Graduate Medical Education

Danielle Perret Karimi, M.D., Associate Dean; 714-456-3526
Courtney Strayer, Director, Graduate Medical Education; 714-456-3526

The UCI School of Medicine Graduate Medical Education Training Programs attract medical students from prestigious medical schools nationwide. UCI offers 55 ACGME-approved residency and fellowship training programs. There are approximately 665 residents and fellows in these training programs. UC Irvine Medical Center, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center and Miller Children's Hospital are the integrated training sites for the residency programs. Other affiliations such as Kaiser (Anaheim, Downey, Irvine, and Riverside), Orange County Global Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Orange County, St. Jude's Hospital, and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles offer additional residents training in specialized fields.

Postgraduate Educational Programs

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Residency Programs

The School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals offer approximately 700 residency positions in almost all areas of medicine. Training levels range from first-year residencies through seventh-year-level subspecialty fellowships. Inquiries about specific programs should be directed to the Program Director as listed in the Directory of Residency Training Programs, published each year by the American Medical Association, or to the chair of the appropriate School of Medicine department.

All ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs meet the formal standards of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the appropriate specialty boards. The University of California, Irvine (UCI) adheres to the Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976, P.L. 94-484, Section 709, regarding shared-schedule residency training positions.

Residents in all programs rotate to UC Irvine Medical Center at some time. Residents in dermatology, diagnostic radiology, medicine, neurology, ophthalmology, pathology, surgery, physical medicine and rehabilitation, radiation oncology, family medicine, subspecialties of medicine, orthopaedics, otolaryngology, urology, and psychiatry also rotate to the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System. Residents in medicine, medicine sub-specialties, anesthesiology, radiation oncology, psychiatry, obstetrics and gynecology, pathology, pediatrics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, plastic surgery, and surgery also rotate to the Memorial Hospital Medical Center/Miller Children’s Hospital in Long Beach. UCI also has an established affiliation with the Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), which is a major training site for the combined program in pediatrics and other specialties. Residents and fellows may also spend periods of time at other affiliated hospitals and clinics.

Allergy/Immunology

The Allergy & Immunology Fellowship Program is a two-year accredited program. It offers training for fellows at the postgraduate PGY-4 to PGY-5 levels. The Fellowship training involves clinical training at the UC Irvine Medical Center and Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System as well as rotations in affiliates at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, Breath Mobile at Children’s Hospital Orange County, and Miller Children’s Hospital, Long Beach. Electives in subspecialty training in Rheumatology, ENT Larnyx, ENT Sinus, Sinus Radiology, General Dermatology, Dermatology patch testing, Dermatopath, Pulomary function testing, Ophthalmology and research opportunities are available. 

Anesthesiology

The Anesthesiology Residency Program is a four-year categorical program with ten year accreditation offering. The residents spend a PGY-1/Clinical Base Year in intensive medical/surgical training at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Long Beach Healthcare System, and UC Irvine Medical Center. The PGY-2 through PGY-4 years involve broad clinical training at the UC Irvine Medical Center as well as rotations in affiliates at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles (two months), Long Beach Memorial (two months), Kaiser Sunset. Residents also have the opportunity for a cardiac rotation in Lyon, France. Training is offered in general anesthesia as well as the sub-specialties of regional/Acute Pain, cardiac, pediatric, trauma, neurosurgical, ambulatory, obstetric, intensive care, and chronic pain management. Our Board pass rate is 100 percent. For more than seven years, more than 50 percent of our residents enter fellowships after graduation.

Anesthesiology Critical Care

The fellowship in Anesthesiology Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) is designed to provide fellows with the opportunity to fulfill the American Board of Anesthesiology subspecialty requirements for certification in anesthesiology critical care medicine (ACCM). This 12-month ACGME accredited fellowship commences after successful completion of residency in Anesthesiology. The ACCM fellow takes an active role in all aspects of the profession and practice of Critical Care Medicine including didactic teaching, presenting, and conducting rounds. In addition, the ACCM fellow is required to actively participating in research projects and other scholarly activities. The major focus and uniqueness of the ACCM Fellowship is to train the fellow in bedside echocardiography and ultrasonography. In addition, the ACCM fellow will have the opportunity to participate in the cutting edge research in minimally invasive and non-invasive hemodynamic monitorings to predict fluid responsiveness and to guide goal-directed therapy for fluid resuscitation.

Cardiology

The three year teaching program provided by the University of California, Irvine’s ACGME-approved Cardiovascular Disease fellowship program is comprised of 15 general cardiology trainees. These fellows rotate through three institutions: UC Irvine Medical Center, Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital, and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, which provides additional training and experience in various cardiology subspecialties.

UCI’s program in cardiovascular disease adheres to training standards according to ACGME core competencies. Cardiovascular Disease program is dedicated to teaching using didactic lectures/conferences four to five times a week by visiting cardiology physicians, faculty or fellows on recent developments in catheterization methods, electrophysiology, ECG case studies, nuclear cardiology, cardiac CT and MRI, and other subspecialty topics. The fellows also take part in weekly outpatient clinics offering direct interaction between fellows with faculty members. All cardiology fellows have six-months of protected research time during their three-year fellowship.  

During their training, many fellows will achieve advanced competencies. Many of the UCI fellows pass the nuclear cardiology and echocardiography board exams during the training period. At the end of their training, fellows function as independent and competent consultants, with level II certification in core areas of cardiology.

Child Neurology

The child neurology program offers a traditional three year training program in child neurology for pediatric residents who have completed two or three years of pediatric training, or have participated in the specialized child neurology research track as per the training guidelines of the ABPN. Our program offers a clinically focused curriculum with extensive didactic and bedside teaching. As per ACGME requirements, residents have 12 months of adult neurology training, 12 months of clinical child neurology, and approximately 12 months of elective rotations. Our residents complete the majority of their training at the UCI Medical Center and Children's Hospital of Orange County as well as rotations at various locations including outpatient subspecialty clinics, Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, and Miller Children's Hospital in Long Beach. Our faculty is all board certified in child neurology and many of the faculty have subspecialty training and board certification in specialties such as epilepsy, clinical neurophysiology, sleep medicine, and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In addition to clinical emphasis residents have significant exposure to areas of active research in child neurology conducted by faculty focusing on a variety of projects including epilepsy, brain plasticity, Downs syndrome, sleep disturbances, muscular dystrophies. 

Child Psychiatry 

The Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Training Program is a two-year program that builds on the training already completed in a General Psychiatry Residency. It provides subspecialty training in how to specifically evaluate and treat individuals younger than 18 years old by accounting for this population’s unique characteristics. Fellows are able to complement their developing knowledge base and clinical decision-making skills with a compassionate, humanistic approach. Our program emphasizes training in biological, psychological, and social modalities, as we strongly believe that a multidisciplinary approach is vital to providing excellent psychiatric care to children, adolescents and their families. Clinical experiences have been developed to provide exposure to the wide variety of psychiatric diagnoses and issues facing children and adolescents, as well as prepare our fellows for the diverse populations they may encounter post-graduation. Training opportunities include: acute inpatient treatment, partial hospitalization, consult-liaison service, emergency psychiatry, trauma-focused therapy clinic for victims of child abuse, school consultation at UCI’s Child Development Center, and juvenile forensic rotations. 

Clinical Neurophysiology 

UC Irvine offers two one-year fellowship programs in clinical neurophysiology, both of which are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The first track focuses on the training of adult neurologists who are specializing in epilepsy and clinical neurophysiology. The second track is a joint fellowship with the Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC) that trains pediatric epilepsy specialists. Both the adult and pediatric track emphasize core skills including routine and inpatient video EEG as well as electrocorticography, functional brain mapping and intraoperative monitoring. Clinical research opportunities are available for both tracks.

Colorectal Surgery

The Colon and Rectal Surgery Residency Program is a one-year accredited fellowship program available for residents who have previously completed General Surgery training. Fellowship interviews are held during the Fall of the year prior to the anticipated July/August start date. The Colon and Rectal Surgery fellowship program participates in the NRMP match program. Presently, the fellow spends the entire year on the UC Irvine Medical Center campus rotating with the four colon and rectal surgeons who practice there. In addition, the fellow works with Gastroenterology attending physicians during the year regarding additional endoscopy training. Fellows participate in weekly conferences that include selected educational topics, Quality Improvement, journal club, and multidisciplinary conference regarding complex cancer and inflammatory bowel disease management. In addition, travel to meetings is supported for a selected research project during the year. The fellow will undergo extensive training in diseases of the colon, rectum, pelvic floor and anus. Advanced surgical training will include inflammatory bowel disease, colon and rectal cancer, diverticulitis, laparoscopy and robotic surgery, anorectal surgery, pelvic floor disease management, and endoscopy

Cytopathology

The Department of Pathology at the University of California, Irvine offers a one-year Cytopathology Fellowship Program. The Program is designed to provide comprehensive training in diagnostic cytology including fine needle aspiration biopsy with surgical pathology and clinical correlation. Training will be provided in both gynecologic and non-gynecologic materials including performance and interpretation of fine needle aspiration biopsies. Fellows are also responsible for the weekly cytology conference, a research project, the cytopathology review courses and workshops given by the University of California, Irvine. In addition to cytopathology responsibilities, fellows will rotate through flow cytometry and image analysis units which are parts of the pathology laboratory. They are exposed to research opportunities that are available in cytopathology, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry/image analysis.

Dermatology

The Department of Dermatology offers a three-year accredited residency which has 15 residents, five for each of three postgraduate years. Residents rotate through clinics at UC Irvine, the Veteran Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, and Kaiser Permanente and receive extensive training in medical and surgical dermatology and are active in research projects. Residents rotate through specialty clinics which see patients with immunobullous disease, pigmentary disorders, venous disease, vascular birthmarks, pediatric disorders, and melanoma. Residents receive extensive training in Mohs surgery, laser techniques, excisional surgery, performance of flaps and grafts, and administration of cosmetic agents. Residents present at local, national, and international meetings.

Emergency Medicine

The Emergency Medicine residency was established in 1988 and has full accreditation by the Residency Review Committee. The program has 24 residents, eight for each of three postgraduate years. The UC Irvine Medical Center Emergency Department is a high-acuity, Level I Trauma Center, treating over 50,000 patients annually. Nineteen board-certified emergency medicine faculty provide 24-hour patient care and supervision of residents and medical students. The Department of Emergency Medicine is active in disaster preparedness and response, emergency uses of ultrasound imaging, public affairs, community service, and research in the areas of prehospital care, instructional methods, trauma, health policy, and infectious disease, among others.

Endocrinology

The fellowship program in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at the University of California, Irvine prepares physicians for clinical and academic practice in endocrinology. The principal training sites are the UC Irvine Medical Center (UCIMC) and the Long Beach VA Medical Center (LBVAMC), and additional training is provided at the Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC). The fellows are exposed to a broad spectrum of patients, males and females, both in in- and out-patient settings. The patients represent a broad range of ages, spanning from pediatric to endocrine cases associated with aging. The program emphasizes the comprehension of molecular and cellular approaches to determining the pathogenesis and diagnoses of endocrine diseases. This is a two-year accredited program, but additional years of research training can be arranged for physicians interested in academic endocrinology. 

Family Medicine

The University of California, Irvine Family Medicine Residency Program strives to train excellent clinicians who provide the best patient-centered compassionate medical care to our most vulnerable and under-served communities. The residency is a fully accredited program with 27 residents who practice out of the only federally qualified health center that is fully academic in the entire state of California. The residency incorporates technology and innovation in a unique community-academic hybrid educational setting that provides a rich and intensive clinical training medium. Residents obtain exceptional clinical skills while promoting community engagement, patient advocacy and the practice of socially responsible and culturally appropriate care. We aim to graduate physician leaders dedicated to medically under-served communities. 

Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS)

The Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS) Fellowship in the Division of Urogynecology/Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of California, Irvine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). This is a three year fellowship program with training taking place at UC Irvine and two affiliate sites. Fellows rotate with Colorectal surgery and Urology. Post baccalaureate courses and a Masters Degree in clinical research are offered. Fellows are given opportunities to participate in translational and basic science research. Surgical training focuses on vaginal, laproscopic, and robotic approaches to pelvic organ prolapse and incontinence, sacral nerve modulation, fistula repair, and office procedures. Elective time is provided for global health outreach.

Forensic Psychiatry

The Forensic Psychiatry fellowship is an ACGME-accredited post-graduate year 5 (PGY-5) program which offers intensive training in both criminal and civil forensic psychiatry principles and practice, landmark mental health law, forensic psychiatric evaluation and report writing, clinical care in forensic settings, and court testimony. Fellows will work with forensic psychiatrists and psychologists as well as attorneys, receiving training in mock trials. Access to the law library services at the UC Irvine School of Law will be provided. The sites include UC Irvine Medical Center and DSH Patton (California Department of State Hospitals). There will be protected time for didactics one day per week and will include seminars on the principles of forensic psychiatry, landmark mental health case law, forensic psychopharmacology, and a journal club focused on current forensic psychiatry literature. The faculty include some of the most highly respected and well-known experts in this field who are excited by the opportunity to work with the fellow and truly dedicated to the teaching mission. 

Gastroenterology

The gastroenterology fellowship training program is a three-year training program. The program focuses on core skills of the gastroenterologist including endoscopy, inpatient consultations, outpatient consultations, and chronic care of GI and liver conditions. Research training is a copoment of the training program with an emphasis on clinical research. The program  offers training to ensure our residents have access to a broad array of career options including community private practice, group practice and academic medicine. Trainees rotate through UC Irvine Medical Center, the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, and Kaiser Hospital. Core program faculty have a special interest in academic gastroenterology, endoscopy, and education.

Geriatrics

The Geriatrics Fellowship is a comprehensive one-year training program that has been accredited since 1991, providing eligibility for Geriatric Medicine specialization for Internal Medicine and Family Medicine physicians. Fellows receive training at UC Irvine Medical Center as well as affiliated sites, including Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, and alternative community care environments for seniors. Fellows have longitudinal experiences in high-quality skilled nursing facilities, assisted living facilities, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary assessment program, and primary care practices.

Hand Surgery

The University of California Irvine Hand Surgery Fellowship provides comprehensive training not only in hand surgery, but also in upper extremity surgery and microsurgery. The one year ACGME accredited fellowship is based at the UCI Medical Center; Kaiser Permanente – Orange County; Children’s Hospital of Orange County and Shriners Hospital of Los Angeles. The 2 fellows rotate with 9 fellowship-trained hand surgeons from both the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. These rotations provide a very high volume of acute trauma and post-traumatic reconstruction of the entire upper extremity, including the hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder; in addition to a diverse spectrum of nerve problems, brachial plexus, congenital anomalies, arthritis, and arthroscopy. Fellows gain extensive experience not only in replantation, but also in elective microsurgical reconstruction including toe-to-hand transfers, limb salvage for malignant tumors and soft-tissue coverage, and bony reconstruction of both the upper and lower extremities. Fellows receive one-on-one supervision in the operating room and outpatient clinics, but can also develop their own independent responsibility allowing them to supervise orthopaedic surgery and plastic surgery residents rotating on a combined Hand Service. There is a weekly didactic teaching conference, a monthly journal club, anatomical dissections in a fresh frozen cadaver facility, and an introductory microsurgical course. One day per week is reserved for research and basic science projects can be facilitated in two NIH-funded laboratories focusing on biomechanics of the upper extremity and molecular biology of peripheral nerve injury.

Hematology Oncology

The Division of Hematology/Oncology at UC Irvine's School of Medicine offers a rigorous three-year accredited fellowship program that emphasizes intensive theoretical training and a broad spectrum of clinical experience with the goal of preparing highly skilled hematologists and oncologists for careers in both clinical and academic medicine. The division's fellowship is conducted in concert with UC Irvine's prestigious Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of 41 U.S. comprehensive cancer centers designated for excellence by the National Cancer Institute. The multidisciplinary cancer center at UC Irvine Medical Center is supported by more than 100 UC Irvine faculty members from five schools and 23 departments.

The division's faculty members serve patients with hematologic and oncologic disorders at the medical center, which has been ranked among the top 50 U.S. hospitals by U.S. News & World Report, and at the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System. Throughout fellowship hematology/oncology fellows function as primary longitudinal caregivers to a panel of patients and serve as consultants directing the management of large numbers of patients under the supervision and guidance of faculty physicians.

The fellowship program is designed to educate and support future clinical investigators who plan to dedicate their professional careers to clinical or laboratory research in hematology and oncology. The three-year program is approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and is recognized by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM).

Hospice and Palliative Care

The Palliative Medicine Fellowship is a one-year, accredited program. The fellows spend the clinical training year at multiple sites including Hoag Memorial Hospital, community hospices, Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Miller Children's Hospital at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. The training includes inpatient palliative medicine consultation, outpatient palliative care clinic, an inpatient hospice unit, community hospice, pediatric hospice and palliative care, and long-term care. Examples of available electives include interventional pain management, pediatric pain management, long-term acute care, administrative medicine, and neurocritical care.

Infectious Disease

The Division of Infectious Diseases offers a two year fellowship which is accredited by the ACGME. The Fellowship offers a wide range of experiences including inpatient consultations, outpatient clinics, research, clinical microbiology, antibiotic stewardship and infection control and prevention. The two main teaching hospitals are the UC Irvine Medical Center and the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System. The patient population is ethnically and socioeconomically diverse and fellows manage a wide variety of disease processes. Fellows who demonstrate an early interest in research may consider a third research year of fellowship. This well established program began in 1971 and has graduated many successful clinicians and academicians over the past 45 years.

Internal Medicine

The internal medicine residency program is a traditional three-year training program and also sponsors a one-year preliminary medicine program in addition the ABIM certified research pathway. The program focuses on core educational skills of the internist and offers training to ensure our residents have access to a broad array of career options including hospitalist medicine, primary care, and subspecialty training. Residents rotate through UC Irvine Medical Center, the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. Core program faculty have a special interest in academic internal medicine and education. Subspecialty fellowships are offered in basic and clinical allergy/immunology, cardiology, endocrinology and metabolic diseases, gastroenterology, geriatrics, hematology/oncology, infectious disease, nephrology, palliative care, pulmonary/critical care, and rheumatology.

Interventional Cardiology

The Interventional Cardiology Fellowship at the University of California, Irvine is a one-year ACGME-approved program designed to train fellows in the use of percutaneous interventional techniques for the management of coronary, peripheral vascular and structural heart/valvular heart disease. The training includes didactic conferences, weekly case conferences, and individual fellow and faculty clinical patient reviews (pre- and post-procedure) to discuss risk, benefit, results, treatment strategies, and complications. Fellow experience is very individualized with one-on-one faculty interactions for each procedure. Trainees also assist in teaching general cardiology fellows, medicine residents, and other student groups. The fellowship functions as an integral component of the subspecialty residency in cardiology and the categorical residency program in internal medicine. During the year of interventional training, fellows are expected to master the techniques involved in coronary intervention, while developing perspective on procedural risk and benefit, patient selection, and clinical decision-making in cardiovascular patient care. At the end of the year, fellows should function as independent operators during interventional procedures.

The program adheres to the tenets outlined in the ACC COCATS guidelines document and the AHA statement on clinical competency in interventional cardiology. Fellows share their time at the UC Irvine Medical Center, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, and the Long Beach Veterans Administration Hospital.

Interventional Radiology

The Department of Radiological Sciences offers a one-year, clinically oriented fellowship in Interventional Radiology. Training in this discipline involves a broad range of vascular and interventional radiology procedures including interventional CT and Ultrasound. The fellow will also have the opportunity and option to participate in neuroradiological procedures including neurovascular intervention. The fellow is encouraged to participate in ongoing research projects and publications. The Vascular and Interventional Fellowship Program at UCI is ACGME accredited.

Medical Genetics

UCI offers two Medical Genetics residency training programs. The first is a two-year categorical Medical Genetics residency that is straight Medical Genetics and requires prior satisfactory completion of 24 months of the ACGME-accredited residency training in a specialty other than Medical Genetics. At the end of the program a trainee should be eligible to take the American Board of Medical Genetics (ABMG) examinations. The second program is a five-year combined Pediatrics/Medical Genetics training program that devotes two and one-half years each to Pediatrics and to Medical Genetics. Usually, the first year is all Pediatrics, the last year is all Medical Genetics, and the middle three years alternate between Pediatrics and Medical Genetics for periods of three-six months each. After successful completion of the program the trainee will be eligible to take both the Pediatrics boards and the Medical Genetics boards. The number and content of genetics rotations that the combined Pediatrics/Genetics residents do are identical to those of the categorical genetics residents except that there is an additional six months of genetics time that is expected to be devoted to research or to training in a specialized area of genetics in which the resident intends to devote his or her career. This extra is flexible but must be spent in academic pursuit. Training utilizes three teaching hospitals: UC Irvine Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Orange County, and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center/Miller Children’s Hospital. Research offices and laboratories are on the UCI main campus.

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

UCI offers a three-year fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The program provides a well-rounded curriculum that balances between clinical experiences, teaching opportunities, and academic and scientific activities. The program offers variety and depth due to the diversity of the two major training sites—UC Irvine Medical Center and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center/Miller Children’s Hospital. The care of newborns seen through the two hospitals represents a cross-section of racial, cultural, and socioeconomic groups from a local population of more than 2.5 million. These two sites represent a broad-spectrum of neonatal practice and offer excellent opportunities to learn and teach. Clinical and basic science research conducted by the faculty in the section gives the fellow the ability to gain skills in scientific investigation. The program’s superb physical environment, extraordinary clinical services, and varied research interests permit the faculty to carry out the mission of preparing neonatal fellows for a career in clinical or academic neonatology. In addition, the program collaborates clinically and through research with a superb fellowship training in Maternal-Fetal Medicine that is also based at the two institutions. The Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship training consists of 14 months of direct patient care responsibilities, 19 months of research training, and three months of vacation.

Nephrology

The Division of Nephrology and Hypertension is committed to providing exemplary care for patients with a variety of kidney diseases. We have earned UC Irvine Medical Center recognition by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation's top 50 hospitals for nephrology services. We are heavily engaged in cutting-edge research and education and lead in kidney disease research nationally and internationally in several arenas. Our two-year ACGME-approved fellowship program offers fellows, residents, and medical students valuable experience in treating patients with a broad range of renal diseases and extensive didactic core lectures, grand rounds, seminars, and journal clubs. Research experience is an integral part of the educational program. Our fellows are given protected time during the fellowship to pursue research projects under the guidance of dedicated faculty and many research opportunities are available for interested students and residents.

Neurology

Neurology residency training focuses on the development of strong clinical skills to competently evaluate and treat the large number of disorders that afflict the nervous system. During three years of training at UCI, residents have the opportunity to see a wide variety of neurological conditions and receive progressively more responsibility. The program provides a rich, intellectually stimulating environment in which to learn. UCI Neurology faculty all have broad experience caring for neurological disorders and have special expertise in different neurological disciplines. Residents have opportunities to work in many different subspecialty areas with the faculty. The neurology residency program is big enough to provide a rich environment to learn about neurological disorders, yet remains small enough for residents to work closely with each faculty member. Residents are encouraged to learn at every opportunity: from patients, peers, the faculty, and visiting experts. There are many formats in which to learn, from bedside discussions, tutorials, to specially prepared lectures. To further stimulate intellectual growth, residents are actively encouraged to pursue research in any topic of their choosing, with the guidance of the faculty.

Neuromuscular 

The fellowship provides comprehensive training in neuromuscular disorders, including the diagnosis and clinical management of inherited and acquired neuromuscular disorders (general neuromuscular diseases, neuropathy, muscular dystrophies, ALS and myasthenia gravis), training in electrodiagnostic medicine (EMG, single fiber EMG, quantitative sensory testing and autonomic testing), as well as nerve and muscle biopsy analysis.

Given the number of patients seen in our center and our weekly half day teaching sessions in place (didactic neuromuscular lectures, review of interesting EMG cases from the week, and muscle/nerve pathology), the fellowship provides a great opportunity for well versed education and training in Neuromuscular medicine.

Neuroradiology

A one-year ACGME-approved fellowship is offered in diagnostic neuroradiology (one position). The fellow will spend 10 months of the 12-month fellowship in training and experience in the interpretation of studies of brain, spine, and head and neck disorders. Additional time will be spent in interventional neuroradiology with experience and training in both diagnostic and therapeutic vascular studies, as well as time spent on relevant nuclear medicine techniques. Participation in the ongoing research projects and publications of the section is encouraged

Neurosurgery

The UCI Residency Program in Neurosurgery is a rigorous training program designed to develop academic neurosurgeons. There are ample opportunities for both clinical and basic research within the Department and in collaboration with other laboratories or departments at UCI. Applicants are expected to have a strong academic record with a strong commitment to neurosurgery. One candidate is selected for each program year. Exact order of clinical rotations may vary slightly subject to the trainee’s previous experience and needs as well as the training program circumstances, however, the rotation generally proceeds as follows: the PGY-1 year consists of thirteen (13), four (4) week blocks. There are six (6) blocks of a neurosurgery rotation, one (1) block of ENT rotation, two (2) blocks of neurology rotation, one (1) block of ACS/trauma rotation, and three (3) blocks of neurocritical care rotation; PGY-2 is one year of training at UC Irvine Medical Center; PGY-3 is a six-month rotation at Kaiser Permanente, Anaheim, followed by three months of neuropathology and three months of neuroradiology at UC Irvine Medical Center; PGY-4 is a six-month rotation at Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC) and a six-month rotation at Kaiser Permanente, Anaheim; PGY-5 is a research year; PGY-6 is a three-month rotation for stereotactic radiosurgery and a three-month elective (Interventional Radiology or Spine) at UC Irvine Medical Center and a six-month rotation at CHOC; PGY-7 is the chief resident year and will be at UC Irvine Medical Center. Invitations to interview for these positions are based on the candidate’s academic record, National Board scores, publications, letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Obstetrics and Gynecology

This four-year program provides a solid foundation in Obstetrics and Gynecology with emphasis in the reproductive pathophysiology in the many different areas of women’s health care. Based on this foundation, training continues with progressive resident responsibility for operative and medical management and surgical techniques. While predominantly clinical in scope, the program is strongly flavored by academic and research exposure. Training is provided in general obstetrics and gynecology with rotations in the subspecialties of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Gynecologic Oncology, Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Family Planning and Reproductive Endocrinology, and Infertility. There are seven resident positions available each year in this four-year training program.   

Ophthalmology

The UC Irvine, Gavin Herbert Eye Institute Ophthalmology Residency Program is three years in duration and provides extensive clinical and surgical experience coupled to a robust weekly didactic curriculum. Trainees are exposed to a broad spectrum of ophthalmic disease management with high volume surgical experience in the full range of ophthalmology subspecialties. The curriculum includes rotations in cornea and refractive surgery, vitreoretinal surgery, oculoplastic and orbital surgery, glaucoma, pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus, ophthalmic pathology, and neuro-ophthalmology, in addition to comprehensive ophthalmology. Trainees are exposed to diverse patient populations at various sites including Long Beach Veterans Affairs, Kaiser Permanente, and UCI Medical Center, as well as Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, a 70,000 square foot facility dedicated to ophthalmic patient care, surgery, and education.

Orthopaedic Surgery

The program is designed to provide intense exposure and experience in all areas of orthopaedics including trauma, reconstructive and joint replacement surgeries, pediatric orthopaedics, spine surgery, sports medicine, foot surgery, and rehabilitation. It is structured for maximum resident participation with an emphasis on personalized mentorship. The program’s teaching hospitals include UC Irvine Medical Center, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, and Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Anaheim. There are four resident positions available each year.

Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery

The Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery offers a five-year residency program providing comprehensive training in otolaryngology and prepares trainees to sit for the American Board of Otolaryngology Examinations. The five-year program provides a breadth of training in general and pediatric otolaryngology, head and neck surgery, otological surgery, rhinology (including endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery), laryngology, and facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Residents receive an extensive clinical experience at UC Irvine Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Orange County, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, and Kaiser Foundation Hospital-Anaheim and Irvine. Acceptance is through application and successful matching through the National Residency Matching Program. The program follows requirements set by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

Pain Medicine

The Fellowship Training Program in Pain Medicine at the UC Irvine Medical Center is an intensive one-year ACGME-accredited multidisciplinary training program. The comprehensive training includes pain assessment, treatment, and management, covering both inpatient and outpatient care, with a special focus on advanced interventional techniques. The fellowship includes hands-on training in many procedures including interventional neuromodulation techniques, intrathecal drug delivery systems, disc procedures, neuraxial interventions, and peripheral nerve blocks, among others. Fellows work closely with specialists in physical medicine and rehabilitation, anesthesiology, neuroradiology, palliative care, neurology, and psychiatry to gain a comprehensive understanding of pain management. Fellows also have work in Pediatric Pain Medicine. For candidates with an interest in pain related research, the UC Irvine Center for Pain Management has a strong complement of basic and translational researchers with active laboratories in pain related to spinal cord injury and mechanisms of chronic pain. The program has a strong tradition of providing trainees with the broadest experience in pain medicine.

Pathology

The Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine offers a residency training program covering all areas of anatomic and clinical pathology. The program is affiliated with Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Children’s Hospital of Orange County, and the Orange County Coroner’s Office. The training for the combined anatomic and clinical pathology program consists of four years of training in both anatomic and clinical pathology. The first three and one-half years consist of a core program providing exposure to each of the subspecialty areas of clinical pathology as well as surgical pathology, autopsy pathology, and cytopathology. Ample opportunities for research and teaching exist for individuals planning on an academic career. Excellent preparation is also provided for individuals planning on a career in forensic pathology or private practice in a community hospital. We also offer a one-year-long General Surgical Pathology Fellowship or Surgical Pathology Fellowship focusing on GI Pathology.

Pediatrics

The Pediatric Residency Program emphasizes the interrelationship of patient care, didactic teaching, and research in the training of the pediatric resident physician. The focus is on the total care of the child from birth through young adulthood. A strong clinical and educational foundation is provided through experiences in a broad spectrum of disease and/or injury as well as training in biosocial pediatrics, preventive health care, and community resources.

The program offers variety and depth due to the diversity of the Department’s major teaching hospitals—Children’s Hospital of Orange County, Miller Children’s Hospital (located at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center), and UC Irvine Medical Center. The faculty at these institutions provides a comprehensive teaching program in general pediatrics and cover the full range of pediatric subspecialties. The care of children seen through the two hospitals represents a cross-section of racial, cultural, and socioeconomic groups from a local population of more than 2.5 million. Thus, pediatric residents are exposed to a wide range of problems presented in settings ranging from intensive care to supervised office-based practice.

Pediatrics Pulmonary

At UC Irvine, we are pleased to partner with Miller Children's Hospital in offering one of the few pediatric pulmonology fellowship training programs in California. The program, directed by Dr. Inderpal Randhawa at Miller’s, has been in existence for more than 26 years and has attracted outstanding candidates from the United States and internationally. The pulmonary fellowship offers tailored, innovative research projects for fellows, as well as a thorough and comprehensive program in pediatric and pulmonary medicine. Commencing this year, we are offering a special track program for candidates interested in pursuing a career in academic pediatrics. This candidate will have a research focus in exercise physiology in children and will be eligible for a Masters in Clinical Science at UCI.

The research interests of fellows include such topics as air pollution and asthma in children, immunological aspects of lung disease, exercise and the impact of immunity, and growth factor in children. Research is done under the direction of Dr. Dan Cooper. The six faculty members of the pediatric pulmonology program are supported by solid research faculty, primarily at the UC Irvine School of Medicine, with NIH and local grants.

Pediatric Urology

The Pediatric Urology Fellowship program, is an ACGME accredited program, leading to qualification for the American Board of Urology’s Subspeciality Certification in Pediatric Urology. This is a two year fellowship, centered in Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and UCI. Four Pediatric Urologists, faculty in the Department of Urology, oversee a full clinical program in which trainees are guided through all aspects of Pediatric Urology. One year is fully clinical, and a second year is split between clinical and research activities. Research projects may make full use of the robotic and surgical simulation and animal facilities in UCI. Collaborative conferences are regularly held within the Urology Department, in which the Fellows are encouraged to present materials and participate. In addition, regular conferences in CHOC, include Radiology, Nephrology, Endocrinology, and Tumor Board. The entry to the Fellowship required the completion of a recognized Urology residency, and is coordinated by the Society of Pediatric Urology matching program. 

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

The Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation offers a three-year residency for applicants who have completed a 12-month ACGME accredited internship. The residency program focus is on the diagnosis and comprehensive treatment and care of patients with musculoskeletal, neurological problems or cardiopulmonary disabilities, from newborns to the elderly. Residents rotate at the UC Irvine Medical Center, the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach Memorial Hospital, and St. Jude Hospital. PM&R Residents are involved in research and medical student teaching.

Plastic Surgery

The Department of Plastic Surgery at the University of California, Irvine has a fully integrated residency program. The program currently accepts three residents for a six-year educational training experience in Plastic Surgery. The goals and objectives of this program are to educate plastic surgeons who are analytical and scholarly in their approach to surgical problem solving, broadly experienced in all fields of the specialty, safe in their application of judgment and technique, and ultimately self-educating in a lifelong continuing medical education process. The goals and teaching philosophy are based on the graduate school model, which emphasizes analytic problem solving, scholarly use of the knowledge base and scientific resources of the field, development of judgment skills, and identification of educational tools that produce the ability to self-direct one’s lifelong professional education in a scholarly manner. At the successful completion of this program, candidates will be able to sit for their boards in Plastic Surgery.

Micrographic Surgery and Dermatologic Oncology (Dermatologic Surgery)

The Department  of Dermatology offers a 1 year subspecialty fellowship with 1 fellow who rotates through clinics at UC Irvine and Kaiser Permanente. The fellow receives extensive training in the study, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of disease of the skin and adjacent mucous membranes, cutaneous appendages, hair, nails, and subcutaneous tissue. Dermatologic Surgery is broadly categorized into the following three areas: cutaneous oncologic surgery, cutaneous reconstructive surgery, and cutaneous aesthetic surgery.

Pulmonary and Critical Care

The Pulmonary Diseases and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship at UC Irvine's School of Medicine is a fully accredited three-year program designed to train clinicians to deliver high-quality, skilled care to patients. Our highly competitive program, run by leading interventional pulmonologists, provides selected fellows with clinical research career opportunities in academic pulmonary and critical care. In addition to assuring competency and proficiency in medical care, our goal is to help fellows achieve independence and confidence in all clinical, academic, and educational endeavors.

Occupational Medicine

The Occupational Medicine residency program is based in the Division of Occupational Medicine, Department of Medicine. It is intended for physicians who are seeking certification by the American Board of Preventive Medicine in the field of Occupational Medicine. A prerequisite to participation is a minimum of one year of postgraduate clinical training in a primary care discipline. The program generally expects entering residents to have completed a three-year primary care residency or the equivalent. The objective of the program is to train physicians to be specialists and leaders in the fields of occupational and environmental medicine. During the two year program, residents are provided academic foundation in occupational medicine, industrial hygiene, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. Residents complete a Master of Science degree program in Environmental Health Sciences and toxicology. The program also includes didactic and clinical training, and field experience in occupational health and safety. Upon completion of training, the resident is qualified to enter the specialty practice of occupational medicine as a consultant or in an occupational medicine specialty practice, workplace setting, government agency, or academic institution.

Psychiatry

The Psychiatry Residency Training Program is a four-year program that fosters academic excellence and broad clinical experience in general psychiatry. Residents receive extensive supervised training in psychopharmacology and various modalities of psychotherapy. Opportunities for research abound with expert faculty available to provide guidance. The core curriculum includes weekly didactic seminars and supervised clinical experiences in the following areas: adult inpatient and outpatient psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry, geriatric psychiatry, primary care, neurology, emergency psychiatry, consultation and liaison psychiatry, forensic psychiatry, and addiction psychiatry. Throughout their training, by treating a highly diverse patient population, residents acquire competency in culturally-sensitive psychiatric assessment and treatment as well as with different systems-based practices. The primary teaching site for the residency program is the UC Irvine Medical Center, a 412-bed acute care hospital that provides tertiary and quaternary care, ambulatory and specialty medical clinics, behavioral health, and rehabilitation. The residency teaching affiliates include Long Beach Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, and Orange County Behavioral Health. Elective rotations are available at the UC Irvine Outreach Clinics such as the Student Health Center, as well as at Kaiser Permanente sites, Pat Moore Foundation, John Henry Foundation, DHS Patton, Village of Hope, and Royale Health Care Center. The flexible curriculum and supportive faculty allow residents to pursue elective interests in research, teaching, and administrative psychiatry, ensuring attainment of the residents' career goals. The program includes a broad array of full-time, part-time, and volunteer clinical and research faculty who are truly dedicated to the teaching mission

Radiology, Diagnostic

The Department of Radiological Sciences has an ACGME-approved four-year residency program in diagnostic radiology based at UC Irvine Medical Center and integrated with Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System. There are also month-long Pediatric Radiology rotations at Children’s Hospital of Orange County and Children's Hospital of Los Angeles. The objectives of the program are (1) to train competent radiologists with a solid background in all modalities of imaging and interventional procedures, (2) to provide a conducive atmosphere and to encourage opportunities for residents to participate in translational and basic science research as well as patient care quality improvement and healthcare economics, and (3) to provide elective periods in which residents have the opportunity to increase their clinical radiology expertise or to work on research projects during their residency training. The residency program includes sub-specialized training in interventional, cardiothoracic, abdominal, pediatric, musculoskeletal radiology, as well as breast imaging, neuroradiology, and molecular imaging. Residents are exposed to a variety of modalities including radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography, mammography, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging. All residents participate in scholarly activities and are encouraged to complete at least one research project during the program. The program provides a month-long research time. Candidates are accepted for six positions at the PGY-2 level for the four-year program. Fellowships are available for an additional year in specialized areas following the successful completion of the residency. The newest technologies in the field of radiological sciences are available at UC Irvine Medical Center and affiliated institutions. The program sponsors a four-week course in radiology-pathology correlation training, as well as training in radiology physics.

Radiation Oncology

The Residency Training Program in Radiation Oncology is designed to prepare suitably qualified applicants for academic and clinical practice careers in radiation oncology. Candidates enter a four-year program which includes clinical experience, didactic lectures and integrated research experience. Unique opportunities exist for training in the use of interstitial and intracavitary treatment using radionuclides and specially designed applicators as well as a variety of high-dose external beam technologies such as IMRT, radiosurgery, and VMAT/IMAT. The program includes rotations at three participating hospitals: UC Irvine Medical Center, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center.

Rheumatology

The Division of Rheumatology at UC Irvine offers a highly competitive, two-year fellowship program that provides extensive clinical training in rheumatic and musculoskeletal disorders. We are accredited for four fellows by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). We encourage fellows seeking a career in academic medicine to pursue a third year of sponsored research. The program is equally based at two sites- the UC Irvine Medical Center, Orange County's only university medical center, and the Long Beach Veterans Administrative Hospital. We see a diverse and complex patient population with frequent presentations of Lupus, Myositis and Vasculitis. All fellows are trained in Musculoskeletal Ultrasound, and for the past two years the fellows have successfully taken the Ultrasound certification course by the American College of Rheumatology

Spinal Cord Injury 

The Spinal Cord Injury Medicine Fellowship is a one year accredited program. The Fellow rotates through 3 teaching institutions: the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System (VALBHS), Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, and University of California, Irvine (UCI). The Spinal Cord Injury Center at the Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System (VALBHS) is one of the largest SCI inpatient units in the Veterans Healthcare System with 77 maximum bed capacity. Inpatient units treat complex medical/surgical cases, which include ventilator-dependent respiratory care. Outpatient services include general and focused primary care for Geriatric patients and SCI patients with diabetes. There are specialty clinics, such as surgical care (urology and plastic surgery), upper extremity restoration (tendon transfers), annual evaluations, shoulder clinic, orthotic wheelchair clinics and driver's training. Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) is a world renowned rehabilitation hospital with unique learning opportunities including spasticity, post-polio, and orthopedic rehabilitation clinics. In addition, RLANRC provides experiences in pediatric spinal cord disorders in acute, subacute, and rehabilitation settings, care of spinal bifida patients and an opportunity to learn about problems associated with transition from childhood to adulthood in persons with SCI. UCI is a level 1 trauma center which offers the SCI fellow the opportunity to understand the multi-disciplinary approach for the acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury. The Fellow will learn the clinical pathway guidelines for the critical care management of acute traumatic spinal cord injury and to understand the role of the physiatrist consult in the care of the acute spinal cord injured patient. In addition to the academic and clinical work, our fellows are expected to participate in performance improvement projects, shadow the chief/program director to various hospital-wide administrative meetings and actively participate in research.

Surgery

The University of California, Irvine General Surgery program places strong emphasis on provision of excellent clinical care, establishing new horizons in minimally invasive surgery, education of residents and medical students in all aspects of surgery, and high-level surgical research. Our program trains and prepares some of the finest young surgeons in the country for the rigors of academic or private practice as well as subsequent fellowship training.

Our general surgery residency program’s integrated and affiliated training sites include rotations in surgical oncology, cardiothoracic, vascular, gastrointestinal, colorectal, hepatobilliary, general surgery, surgical critical care, pediatric surgery, and trauma/acute care surgery. UC Irvine’s faculty and volunteer faculty, as well as that of our affiliate institutions, are committed to teaching and provide residents with a variety of resources and opportunities to engage their surgical knowledge. Surgical residents perform clinical rotations at our University Medical Center, the Veteran’s Affairs – Long Beach Hospital, Kaiser Permanente, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, and Children’s Hospital of Orange County.

Residents interested in research will find a broad range of resources and mentors. While not required, research during residency imbues critical skills and exposes the resident to the an additional dimension of academic surgery. Options for one or two years of dedicated research outside of the clinical track are available.

Fully accredited by the ACGME, UC Irvine’s General Surgery Residency Program emphasizes the surgeon of the future in its curriculum—providing world class surgical care while minimizing the footprint we leave behind. We practice and abide by the motto coined by our former chair, David Hoyt, M.D., FACS, “When you see one of us, you see all of us.”

Surgery Critical Care

The Surgical Critical Care Fellowship Program is a one-year accredited categorical program with an opportunity for a second-year non-accredited option.

As a PGY-6, experience will be gained working at UC Irvine Medical Center at an ACS-verified Level I Trauma and Burn Center with over 2,200 annual admissions. There are over 3,600 annual admissions to the intensive care unit which would offer a broad range of surgical pathology. Extensive exposure to trauma resuscitation, operative management, and ICU procedures is provided. The faculty consists of 7 surgeons who are all board-certified in Surgical Critical Care.

The optional second year in Acute Care Surgery will offer exposure to advanced rotations in emergency general surgery and appropriate surgical specialties. Clinical and Basic Science research is also recommended during the second year. 

All candidates interested in pursuing a Surgical Critical Care Fellowship must be board certified/eligible graduates from an ACGME-approved surgical residency.  

Urology

The Department of Urology Residency Program is a five-year training program that includes a one-year internship in the Department of Surgery and four years of Urology training. The residency program provides training in all aspects of adult and pediatric urologic diseases. The residents receive extensive training in open and endoscopic procedures, laparoscopy and other minimally invasive techniques, urologic pathology, uroradiology, and management of non-operative urologic conditions. The program’s training hospitals include UC Irvine Medical Center, Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Kaiser Permanente Anaheim, and Children’s Hospital of Orange County. The Urology Department encourages and supports both clinical and basic science research.

Vascular Neurology Fellowship

Department of Neurology is offering an ACGME accredited Vascular Neurology fellowship position annually. This one-year program offers comprehensive training in acute stroke care and clinical research. The training is based at the new state-of-the-art UC Irvine Medical Center Douglas Hospital, which is the first Certified Comprehensive Stroke Center in Orange County, CA. The hospital has 24/7 advanced neuroimaging and neurointerventional capabilities, a dedicated 12-bed Neuroscience ICU, a Neuroscience stepdown unit, and over 600 stroke admissions a year. We have 6 board-certified or fellowship-trained Vascular Neurology Faculty, 5 board-certified Neurointensivists, and 5 Endovascular or Cerebrovascular Surgeons. Electives or research experience can be tailored to meet individual needs.

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Graduate Academic Programs

The School of Medicine offers graduate study in a wide variety of fields in both basic science and clinical departments. The basic medical science departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biological Chemistry, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and Physiology and Biophysics offer graduate instruction leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biomedical Sciences. The Department of Pharmacology, in conjunction with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, offers graduate instruction leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Pharmaceutical Sciences. The Department of Epidemiology offers graduate instruction leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Epidemiology. The Department of Medicine offers graduate instruction leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Environmental Health Sciences. Most graduate students in these programs are admitted for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree. The Department of Pediatrics offers an M.S. degree in Genetic Counseling. The School of Medicine also offers an M.S. degree in Biomedical and Translational Science. Each department or program has a graduate advisor whom students may consult for additional details of the individual programs.

The departments evaluate applications for admission to graduate study or program based on letters of recommendation, Graduate Record Examination scores, grades, research experience, and other relevant qualifications of the applicant. Candidates for graduate admission are urged to consult the particular department or program whose faculty and expertise best fit their interests and background.

Application materials may be obtained by contacting the individual graduate programs or:

University of California, Irvine
Graduate Division
120 Aldrich Hall
Irvine, CA 92697-4611
949-824-6761

http://www.grad.uci.edu

Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the School of Medicine

The School of Medicine offers both the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees, although emphasis at the graduate level is placed on the Ph.D. programs. Most training takes place within one of the departments, although full facilities and curricular offerings are available to all graduate students in all departments of the School of Medicine. Interdisciplinary study and research are encouraged. Students are expected to maintain a B average at all times. The normative time to degree is two years for the master’s degree, and five years for the doctoral degree. A master’s degree is not a prerequisite for the Ph.D. degree.

Students plan their academic program in consultation with the graduate advisor or a faculty committee. Faculty advisors may be changed to meet the needs and interests of the student. In addition, it is possible for students to transfer to another program in the School, subject to the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies, and acceptance into that program. Students are encouraged to consult with faculty members with regard to their research and academic interests.

Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences

The Master of Science degree in Biomedical Sciences may be completed by submission of a research thesis (plan I) or by course-work and a comprehensive exam (plan II).

Plan I: Thesis Plan. The student is required to complete at least four didactic graduate courses (16 units) offered by the department, and elective course work with an additional 8 units of graduate or upper-division undergraduate course work. In addition, the student will typically take additional seminar courses during the graduate study. Students in the M.S. program may be employed as teaching assistants, but units earned through enrollment in University Teaching (399) may not be counted toward degree completion. The student engages in thesis research with a faculty thesis advisor, and will prepare and submit a dissertation to the thesis committee. The final examination is an oral presentation of the thesis to the committee. The normative time to degree is two years for the thesis M.S. degree.

Plan II: Comprehensive Examination Plan. The plan II M.S. degree is awarded based on completion of at least 36 units of course work and a satisfactory completion of a comprehensive exam. The student is required to complete at least 16 units (four courses) of didactic graduate course work offered by the department. In addition, the student will take up to 12 units of research. An additional 8 units or more of elective course work will be completed from other graduate courses offered by the department. A maximum of 4 units of upper-division undergraduate courses may be included in the program with the approval of the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies. Students in the M.S. program may be employed as teaching assistants, but units earned through enrollment in University Teaching (399) may not be counted toward degree completion. The comprehensive exam will be administered by a committee of at least three departmental faculty, and may include written and oral sections. The comprehensive exam format will include a research presentation and may include additional portions such as a research proposal, presentation of a project, or other components. The normative time to degree is one year for the M.S. degree by comprehensive exam.

Doctor of Philosophy

Comprehensive Examination-First Year. The student must pass comprehensive oral or written examinations at the discretion of the department. The examination is generally taken at the end of the first year of graduate study.

Advancement to Candidacy. The advancement to candidacy examination is taken before the end of the third year of graduate study. The student is expected to have identified an important and tractable dissertation research topic. A faculty committee for the advancement to candidacy examination is proposed by the faculty mentor in consultation with the student, and approved by the Department Graduate Advisor. A majority of the committee must hold primary or joint appointments in the student’s department.

Once this examination is completed, the student is advanced to candidacy for the doctoral degree and is expected to complete the degree within three years. The student must submit a dissertation on this research and defend the thesis in an oral examination during the final year of graduate study. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years, and the maximum time permitted is seven years.

Graduate-student status or consent of instructor is a prerequisite for all 200–299 courses.

Faculty

Payandeh S. Abadee, M.D. Pahlavi University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Pablo J. Abbona, M.D. National University of Cuyo, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Geoffrey W. Abbott, Ph.D. University of London, Professor of Pharmacology; Physiology and Biophysics
Hermelinda Abcede, M.D. Medical College of Wisconsin, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Munjal Acharya, Ph.D. Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Assistant Professor in Residence of Radiation Oncology
Gregory R. Adams, Ph.D. Michigan State University, Associate Adjunct Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Felice Adler Shohet, M.D. Vanderbilt University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Behnoosh Afghani, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Phyllis F. Agran, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emerita of Pediatrics
Anshu Agrawal, Ph.D. Lucknow University, Associate Adjunct Professor of Medicine
Thomas E. Ahlering, M.D. Saint Louis University, Professor of Urology
Irfan Ahmad, M.D. School Name Not In Table, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Jane Ahn, M.D. City University of New York, Mount Sinai, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Kyle Ahn, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Shlomit Aizik, M.S. Tel Aviv University, Assistant Professor in Residence of Pediatrics
Yama Akbari, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Assistant Professor of Neurology
Muthana S. Al-Ghazi, Ph.D. University of Manitoba, Health Sciences Professor of Radiation Oncology
Lama M. Al-Khoury, M.D. American Universityniversity of Beirut, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Gregory C. Albers, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Lawrence Albers, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Navid Alem, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Michael T. Alkire, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor in Residence of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Tina M. Allee, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Byron J. Allen, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Al Aly, M.D. Georgetown University, Health Sciences Professor of Surgery
Alpesh N. Amin, M.D. Northwestern University, Thomas and Mary Cesario Endowed Chair in Medicine and Professor of Medicine; Biomedical Engineering; Paul Merage School of Business (hospital medicine, quality/safety, new technologies in healthcare)
George Anas, M.D. West Virginia University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Arash Anavim, M.D. University of Tehran, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Bogi Andersen, M.D. University of Iceland, Professor of Medicine; Biological Chemistry
Aileen J. Anderson, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Cynthia T. Anderson, M.D. University of Tennessee, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Kathrine M. Andreeff, M.D. Wayne State University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Brian S. Andrews, M.D. University of New South Wales, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Hoda Anton-Culver, Ph.D. University of St Andrews, Genetic Epidemiology Research Institute and Professor of Epidemiology
Stuart M. Arfin, Ph.D. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Professor Emeritus of Biological Chemistry
Steven A. Armentrout, M.D. University of Chicago, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Jeffrey Armstrong, M.D. University of South Carolina, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
William B. Armstrong, M.D. University of Washington, Department Chair and Professor of Otolaryngology
Antonio C. Arrieta, M.D. Cayetano Heredia University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Negar Ashouri, M.D. St. George's University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Muhammad Aslam, M.D. , Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Golnaz Aubin, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Radiological Sciences
Raciela B. Austin, MSN California State University, Long Beach, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Robert E. Ayer, M.D. Boston University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Neurological Surgery
Samar H. Azawi, M.D. University of Baghdad, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiation Oncology
Simon R. Bababeygy, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Ophthalmology
Kara N. Babaian, M.D. University of Texas, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Urology
George Baerveldt, M.D. University of Pretoria, Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology
Berge C. Bakamjian, D.O. Midwestern State University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Dean B. Baker, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health
Pierre F. Baldi, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Computer Science; Biological Chemistry; Biomedical Engineering; Developmental and Cell Biology (bioinformatics, computational biology)
Kenneth M. Baldwin, Ph.D. University of Iowa, Professor Emeritus of Physiology and Biophysics
Fayez M. Bany-Mohammed, MBBS University of Jordan, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Tallie Z. Baram, M.D. University of Miami, Danette Dee Dee Shepard Chair in Neurological Studies and Professor of Pediatrics; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Neurology; Physiology and Biophysics
Alan G. Barbour, M.D. Tufts University, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Medicine
Steven J. Barker, M.D. University of Miami, Professor Emeritus of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Ronald J. Barr, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emeritus of Dermatology
Cristobal Barrios, M.D. University of Miami, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery
Cyril H. Barton, M.D. University of Colorado Boulder, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Erik Barton, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Stanley Bassin, Ed.D. University of California, Berkeley, Clinical Professor of Medicine
Daryoush Bassiri, M.D. St. George's University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Anjan S. Batra, M.D. Ohio State University, Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Donald Beamon, M.D. University of Missouri–St. Louis, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
S. S. Bederman, M.D. University of Toronto, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Dorit Ben-Ezer, M.D. Tel Aviv University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Donald W. Bendig, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Lbachir Benmohamed, Ph.D. Pasteur Institute, Associate Professor in Residence of Ophthalmology
Rimal B. Bera, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Pamela Berkson, M.S. California State University, Long Beach, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Michael L. Berman, M.D. George Washington University, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Stephen Berman, M.D. Rush University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Nicole P. Bernal, M.D. Case Western Reserve University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery
Michael W. Berns, Ph.D. Cornell University, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Chair in Laser Biomedicine and Professor of Surgery; Biomedical Engineering; Developmental and Cell Biology (photomedicine, laser microscopy, biomedical devices)
Deepak K. Bhalla, Ph.D. Howard University, Senate Emeritus of Medicine
Naveen D. Bhandarkar, M.D. Ohio State University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Otolaryngology
Rishi Bhargava, M.D. Indiana University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Nitin Narain Bhatia, M.D. Baylor College of Medicine, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Anand B. Bhatt, M.D. University of Miami, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
John T. Billimek, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Medicine
Robert H. Blanks, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Robert S. Blumenfeld, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Neurology
Maureen E. Bocian, M.D. Ubiversity of Illinois Medical Center, Senate Emerita of Pediatrics
Jacob O. Boeckmann, M.D. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Otolaryngology
Stephen C. Bondy, Ph.D. University of Birmingham, Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Pharmacology; Program in Public Health
Peyman Borghei, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Emiliana Borrelli, Ph.D. University of Strasbourg, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Pharmacology
Daniela Bota, M.D. Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Associate Professor in Residence of Neurology
Elliot L. Botvinick, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Associate Professor of Surgery; Biomedical Engineering; Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (laser microbeams, cellular mechanotransduction, mechanobiology)
Varaz Bozoghlanian, M.D. Medical College of Wisconsin, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Ralph A. Bradshaw, Ph.D. Duke University, Professor Emeritus of Physiology and Biophysics
Peter Breen, M.D. University of Manitoba, Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Matthew Brenner, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Medicine
Robert E. Bristow, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Philip J. Di Saia, M.D., Prestigious Chair in Gynecologic Oncology and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Ashley Broussard, M.D. Tulane University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Donald J. Brown, Ph.D. University of Colorado Denver, Associate Professor in Residence of Ophthalmology (glaucoma, optic nerve, non-linear optics)
Robert Brown, Ph.D. , Adjunct Professor of Surgery
David K. Buchbinder, M.D. Medical College of Wisconsin, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Michael J. Buchmeier, Ph.D. McMaster University, Professor of Medicine; Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Monte S. Buchsbaum, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Sean F. Buckley, M.D. Creighton University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Diep Ngoc Bui, M.D. City University of New York, Mount Sinai, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Lynette T. Bui, D.O. Midwestern University, Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Szofia S. Bullain, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Neurology
William E. Bunney, M.D. University of Pennsylvania, Della Martin Chair in Psychiatry and Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Keith R. Burnett, M.D. Creighton University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; Radiological Sciences
Kerry P. Burnight, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Joseph Burns, M.D. McGill University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Michael J. Burns, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Emergency Medicine
Claudia Buss, Ph.D. , Assistant Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics
Jennifer R. Butler, M.D. University of Virginia, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
John A. Butler, M.D. Loyola University Chicago, Professor of Surgery
Matthew Butteri, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Michael D. Cahalan, Ph.D. University of Washington, UCI Distinguished Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Catherine M. Cahill, Ph.D. Dalhousie University, Acting Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Pharmacology
Vincent J. Caiozzo, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor in Residence of Orthopaedic Surgery; Environmental Health Sciences; Physiology and Biophysics
Justin D. Call, M.D. University of Utah, Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Anne L. Calof, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Developmental and Cell Biology (neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation)
Joan E. Campbell, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Professor of Radiological Sciences
Maxime Cannesson, M.D. Paris Descartes University, Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Jamie B. Capasso, D.O. A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Joseph C. Carmichael, M.D. University of Missouri-Columbia, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery
Jose Carrillo, M.D. Dartmouth College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Robert M. Carroll, M.D. Hahnemann University Hospital, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Paolo Casali, M.D. University of Milan, Donald Bren Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Thomas C. Cesario, M.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, UCI Endowed Chair and Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Kelly F. Chain, M.D. Temple University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Pediatrics
Barry F. Chaitin, M.D. New York University, Non-Senate Academic Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Bharath Chakravarthy, M.D. Boston University, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Program in Public Health
Mark Chambers, M.D. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Jefferson Chan, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences
Maria Y. Chandler, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
P. A. Chandraratna, M.D. University of Ceylon, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Carrie E. Chandwani, M.D. Chicago Medical School, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Carrie Chandwani, M.D. Chicago Medical School, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
K. George Chandy, Ph.D. University of Birmingham, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Eric Y. Chang, M.D. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Assistant Professor in Residence of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Kenneth J. Chang, M.D. Brown University, Endowed Chair in Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Oncology and Professor of Medicine
Wayne Wei Chung Chang, M.D. Saint Louis University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Elizabeth Chao, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics
Constance Chen, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Dongbao Chen, Ph.D. Beijing University of Agricultural, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Joline L. Chen, M.D. University of Toronto, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Lily K. Chen, D.O. Western University of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Phang-Lang Chen, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry
Zhongping Chen, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Otolaryngology; Surgery (biomedical optics, optical coherence tomography, bioMEMS, biomedical devices)
Steven D. Chessler, M.D. University of Washington, Associate Professor of Medicine; Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Kota G. Chetty, MBBS Guntur Medical College, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Robert R. Chilcote, M.D. University of Rochester, Senate Emeritus of Pediatrics
Vi K. Chiu, M.D. New York University, Assistant Professor of Medicine
Zang-Hee Cho, Ph.D. Uppsala University, Professor Emeritus of Radiological Sciences
Bernard H. Choi, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Associate Professor of Surgery; Biomedical Engineering (biomedical optics, in vivo optical imaging, microvasculature, light-based therapeutics)
Bongkyoo Choi, Sc.D. University of Massachusetts, Assistant Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Ho Joon Choi, M.D. Seoul National University, Health Sciences Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Yung-In Choi, M.D. Yonsei University, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Susan S. Choo, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Christine C. Chou, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Pediatrics
Emilie Chow, M.D. Chicago Medical School, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Sophia N. Chun, M.D. Loma Linda University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Judith H. Chung, M.D. University of Pennsylvania, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Susan Claster, M.D. University of Chicago, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Ralph V. Clayman, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Dean of the School of Medicine and Professor of Urology
John P. Cleary, M.D. University of Massachusetts Medical School, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Melitza J. Cobham-Browne, M.D. Universidad de Panamá, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Allen J. Cohen, M.D. University of Miami, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Rebecca Coleman, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Martin Colman, MMed University of Witwatersrand, Professor Emeritus of Radiation Oncology
Henri G. Colt, M.D. University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Senate Emeritus of Medicine
John E. Connolly, M.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Jason Cook, M.D. University of Vermont, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Dan M. Cooper, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor of Pediatrics (impact of exercise on exhaled biological gases, novel methods of assessing physical activity in infants and children using bioMEMS, impact of oxygen gradients on neutrophil trafficking)
Maria A. Corrada-Bravo, SCE Johns Hopkins University, Associate Adjunct Professor of Neurology
Carl W. Cotman, Ph.D. Indiana University, Professor of Neurology; Biomedical Engineering; Neurobiology and Behavior (Alzheimer's disease, apoptosis, successful aging, dementia)
Ardith Courtney, D.O. University of North Texas, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology
Steven C. Cramer, M.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Neurology; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Francis M. Crinella, Ph.D. Louisiana State University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Robert W. Crow, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology; Neurology
Roger L. Crumley, M.D. University of Iowa, Professor Emeritus of Otolaryngology
Dwight Culver, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Epidemiology
Brian J. Cummings, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Anatomy and Neurobiology
Ralph W. Cygan, M.D. State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
James I. Cyriac, M.D. State University of New York Upstate Medical Center, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Dvora Cyrlak, M.D. Yale University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Mudit Dabral, M.D. , Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Maria G. Dacosta-Iyer, M.D. University of Bombay, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Xing Dai, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Biological Chemistry
Amish A. Dangodara, M.D. University of Miami, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Mark W. Daniels, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Francis Dann, M.D. Columbia University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Dermatology
Parima Daroui, M.D. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Radiation Oncology
Omar S. Darwish, D.O. Touro U College of Osteopathic Medicine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Cyrus Dastur, M.D. Drexel University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Mohsen Davoudi, M.D. University of Tehran, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Israel De Alba, M.D. University of Guadalajara, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Ralph J. Delfino, M.D., Ph.D. McGill University, Professor in Residence of Epidemiology
Michael Demetriou, M.D. University of Toronto, Professor of Neurology; Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Aram N. Demirjian, M.D. Boston University, Assistant Professor of Surgery
Sheetal Desai, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Suvarna A. Deshmukh-Rane, M.D. University of Pune, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Robert Detrano, M.D. University of Rome, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences; Program in Public Health
Philip J. Di Saia, M.D. Tufts University, Dorothy J. Marsh Chair in Reproductive Biology and Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Catherine Diamond, M.D. Albany Medical College, Associate Professor of Medicine
Cordula V. Dick-Muehlke, Ph.D. Fuller Theological Seminary, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Hamid Djalilian, M.D. University of Minnesota, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology; Biomedical Engineering (medical devices, hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness/imbalance, clinical research)
An H. Do, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Matthew O. Dolich, M.D. State University of New York at Stony Brook, Health Sciences Professor of Surgery
Michele Domico, M.D. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Joseph H. Donnelly, M.D. Georgetown University, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Peter J. Donovan, Ph.D. University College London, Professor of Biological Chemistry; Developmental and Cell Biology (stem cell biology)
Nita Doshi, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Emily E. Dow, M.D. University of Cincinnati, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Kenneth W. Dumars, M.D. University of Colorado Boulder, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Dang Tam Duong, M.D. University of Washington, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Anthony J. Durkin, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Associate Professor in Residence of Surgery
Karen L. Edwards, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor of Epidemiology; Genetic Epidemiology Research Institute
Robert A. Edwards, M.D. Baylor College of Medicine, Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Rufus D. Edwards, Ph.D. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Associate Professor of Program in Public Health; Environmental Health Sciences; Epidemiology
Alan N. Elias, M.D. University of Calcutta, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Mark H. Ellis, M.D. Tulane University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Jill Elizabeth Endres, M.D. University of Vermont, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery
Scott A. Engwall, M.D. University of Florida, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Sonja Entringer, Ph.D. University of Trier, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics
Ramez N. Eskander, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Gregory R. Evans, M.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Surgery; Biomedical Engineering (aesthetic surgery, breast augmentation, cosmetic plastic surgery, craniomaxillofacial, hand surgery, head and neck reconstruction, liposuction, oncology, pelvic bone reconstruction, peripheral nerve regeneration, reconstructive microsurgery, replantation, tissue engineering)
Marc-Eivind C. Evensen, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
James H. Fallon, Ph.D. University of Illinois Medical Center, Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Guity Farahmand, M.D. University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Hamed Farid, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Marjan Farid, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
Lawrence R. Faziola, M.D. Creighton University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Marion J. Fedoruk, M.D. University of Alberta, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Stephen Feig, M.D. New York University, Fong and Jean Tsai Chair in Women's Imaging and Professor of Radiological Sciences
Philip Felgner, Ph.D. Michigan State University, Adjunct Professor of Medicine; Physiology and Biophysics
Amanda N. Fernandez, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Dayantha Fernando, M.D. Georgetown University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Robert R. Field, M.D. University of Kansas, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Mark J. Fisher, M.D. University of Cincinnati, Professor of Neurology; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Political Science
Sheila Fitzgibbons, M.P.A. California State University, Long Beach, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Laura E. Fitzmaurice, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Lisa Flanagan-Monuki, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Neurology; Biomedical Engineering (stem cells, neural, embryonic, neuron)
Angela G. Fleischman, M.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Medicine; Biological Chemistry
Pamela L. Flodman, M.S. University of California, Irvine, Associate Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics
Cecilia A. Florio, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Alex Fong, M.D. Northwestern University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Gareth K. Forde, M.D. University of Minnesota, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Nikta Forghani, M.D. University of California, Davis, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Donald N. Forthal, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Medicine
Michelle Fortier, Ph.D. University of Nebraska, Assistant Professor in Residence of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Psychology and Social Behavior (pediatric pain management, pediatric oncology, family-centered medicine, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), health information technology, coping with illness-related Stress)
Clarence E. Foster, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Health Sciences Professor of Surgery
John C. Fox, M.D. Tufts University, Professor of Emergency Medicine
David L. Franklin, Ph.D. Alliant International University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Kathryn Steinhaus French, M.S. University of Colorado Denver, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
John P. Fruehauf, M.D. Rush University, Professor of Medicine; Biomedical Engineering; Pharmaceutical Sciences (in-vitro cancer models using 3-D tissue systems to predict drug response)
Roy M. Fujitani, M.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa, Professor of Surgery
Cole M. Fulwider, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Dermatology
David W. Furnas, M.D. University of California, Berkeley, Non-Senate Academic Emeritus of Surgery
Pietro R. Galassetti, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Pharmacology
Anjalee W. Galion, M.D. New Jersey Medical School, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Christine M. Gall, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Department Chair and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Neurobiology and Behavior
Valerie B. Galvan-Turner, M.D. University of Texas Medical Branch, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Anand K. Ganesan, M.D. Medical College of Wisconsin, Associate Professor of Dermatology; Biological Chemistry
Sumit Garg, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
John Jay Gargus, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics; Pediatrics
Thomas J. Garite, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Leslie Garson, M.D. University of Kansas, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Alan B. Gazzaniga, M.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Norman Ge, M.D. Baylor College of Medicine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Otolaryngology
Jean G. Gehricke, Ph.D. Free University of Berlin, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics
Gamal Ghoniem, M.D. Alexandria University, Professor of Urology
Lisa M. Gibbs, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Stuart Gilman, M.D. Rush University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Kimberly Marie Gimenez, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Roland A. Giolli, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Melanie W. Gironda, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine
Gordon Gl. Globus, M.D. Tufts University, Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Julie A. Goddard, M.D. Baylor College of Medicine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Otolaryngology
Shruti K. Gohil, M.D. Tufts University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Alan L. Goldin, M.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Physiology and Biophysics
Sastry V. Gollapudi, Ph.D. Dalhousie University, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Medicine
Kiarash Golshani, M.D. Oregon Health & Science University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurological Surgery
Sidney H. Golub, Ph.D. Temple University, Professor Emeritus of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Deborah Goodman, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology
Scott C. Goodwin, M.D. Harvard University, Hasso Brothers Endowed Chair in Radiological Sciences and Professor of Radiological Sciences
Ian L. Gordon, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Surgery
Wamda Goreal, M.D. University of Baghdad, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Namita Goyal, M.D. Ross University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Kaylan A. Graham, M.D. Loyola University Chicago, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Sergei Grando, M.D. , Professor of Dermatology
Kenneth E. Grant, M.D. Albany Medical College, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Jennifer S. Green, M.D. Georgetown University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Sheldon Greenfield, M.D. University of Cincinnati, Donald Bren Professor and Professor of Medicine
Fred S. Greensite, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Radiological Sciences
Leonid Groysman, M.D. Nicolae Testemi?anu State University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Jacqueline M. Guerrero, M.D. University of Rochester, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Rajesh Gulati, MBBS University College of Medical Sciences, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Gultekin Gulsen, Ph.D. Bogazici University, Associate Professor of Radiological Sciences; Biomedical Engineering; Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Physics and Astronomy (in vivo molecular imaging, diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence tomography, photo-magnetic imaging, multi-modality imaging)
Padma Gulur, MBBS, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Geeta K. Gupta, M.D. Harvard University, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Ranjan Gupta, M.D. Albany Medical College, Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Biomedical Engineering (hand and upper extremity surgery)
Sudhir Gupta, Ph.D. University of Lucknow, Professor of Medicine
Ravi Chandra Gutta, M.D. Andhra Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Grant Gwinup, M.D. University of Colorado Boulder, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Molood Hadi, D.O. Western University of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Richard J. Haier, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Senate Emeritus of Pediatrics
Harry T. Haigler, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
James E. Hall, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Afshan Hameed, B.A. King Edward Medical College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Jason Handwerker, M.D. Harvard University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences; Otolaryngology
Tabetha Harken, M.D. University of Colorado Boulder, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Kevin Harley, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Anna L. Harris, M.D. Loma Linda University, Health Sciences Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Anton N. Hasso, Ph.D. Loma Linda University, Professor of Radiological Sciences
Justin Hata, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Tamera J. Hatfield, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
David J. Haupt, M.D. California School of Podiatric Medicine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Peter Hauser, M.D. University of Virginia, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Leif Havton, Ph.D. Umea University, Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Neurology
Heather T. Hawthorne, M.D. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Susan M. Heller, M.D. University of Iowa, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Mohammad Helmy, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Walter L. Henry, M.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
June Herman, M.D. U of North Dakota, Health Sciences Professor of Radiological Sciences
Neal Hermanowicz, M.D. Temple University, Health Sciences Professor of Neurology
Klemens J. Hertel, Ph.D. University of Colorado Boulder, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
David A. Hicks, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Elsie R. Hidalgo, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Richard A. Hill, M.D. Northwestern University, Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology
Jeffrey H. Ho, D.O. Touro U College of Osteopathic Medicine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Danphuong Ho-Wang, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Bang H. Hoang, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
John C. Hoefs, M.D. George Washington University, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
M. Mark Hoffer, M.D. Chicago Medical School, Professor Emeritus of Orthopaedic Surgery
Michael Hollifield, M.D. University of Washington, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Christine L. Hollister, M.D. Dartmouth College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Todd Holmes, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department Vice Chair and Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Christy Hom, M.A. University of Michigan, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont, M.D. , Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
Susan Hopp, M.D. City University of New York, Mount Sinai, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Naoto Hoshi, Ph.D. Kanazawa University, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology; Physiology and Biophysics
Roozbeh Houshyar, M.D. , Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
David B. Hoyt, M.D. Case Western Reserve University, Professor Emeritus of Surgery
David Jb. Hsiang, M.D. Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Associate Professor of Surgery
An-Fu Hsiao, M.D. Boston University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Lanny Hsieh, M.D. New York University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Loan B. Hsieh, M.D. Virginia Commonwealth University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Frank P. Hsu, M.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Department Chair and Professor of Neurological Surgery; Biomedical Engineering; Otolaryngology (biomechanics of cerebral aneurysms, functional neurosurgery, epilepsy)
Ke-Qin Hu, M.D. Tongji Medical College, Professor of Medicine
Lan Huang, Ph.D. University of Florida, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics; Biological Chemistry
Susan Huang, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Associate Professor of Medicine
Taosheng Huang, Ph.D. City University of New York, Mount Sinai, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Yan Lin Huang, MBBS University of Melbourne, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
F. Allan Hubbell, M.D. Baylor University, Professor Emeritus of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Juliette L. Hunt, M.D. University of California, Davis, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Peter C. Hunt, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Robert F. Hunt, Ph.D. University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Anju Hurria, M.D. State University of New York Upstate Medical Center, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Kenneth H. Ibsen, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Biological Chemistry
Hirohito Ichii, Ph.D. Kobe University, Associate Professor of Surgery
David Imagawa, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Suzanne Dykema Endowed Chair in Pancreatic Cancer and Professor of Surgery
Heba Ismail, M.D. Alexandria University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Leslie M. Israel, D.O. U Medical C of Kansas City, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Padmini Iyer, M.D. Andhra University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Sonali L. Iyer, M.D. Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, Chicago Medical School, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Stephanie A. Jacobs, M.D. University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Behrouz Jafari, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Daniel Jaffurs, M.D. University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery
Vivek Jain, M.D. Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology
James G. Jakowatz, M.D. University of Kansas, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Surgery
Mehrdad Jalili, M.D. University of Isfahan, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
M. M. Jamal, M.D. University of Damascus, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Anthony A. James, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, UCI Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Algimantas Jasinskas, Ph.D. , Associate Specialist of Medicine
Edward W. Jeffes, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Dermatology
Brenda L. Jensen, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
James V. Jester, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Jack H. Skirball Endowed Chair and Professor of Ophthalmology; Biomedical Engineering (mechanics of wound healing and the inter-relationship of mechanical force, cell-matrix interaction, and gene expression, cellular basis of corneal transparency and the role of water-soluble proteins in isolated cell light scattering, three-dimensional and temporal imaging of cells in intact living tissue)
Jonathan Jewkes, M.D. Loma Linda University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Radiological Sciences
Deepa Jeyakumar, M.D. Temple University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Luohua Jiang, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology
Anna Jin, M.D. Tulane University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Rongsheng Jin, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Victor C. Joe, M.D. Virginia Commonwealth University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery
Jennifer Johnson, M.D. University of Münster, Senate Emerita of Pediatrics
Neil Jones, M.D. Oxford University, Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Mark L. Jordan, M.D. University of Toronto, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Urology
Sara M. Jordan, M.D. University of New Mexico, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Tibor Juhasz, Ph.D. Attila József University, Professor of Ophthalmology; Biomedical Engineering (laser-tissue interactions, high-precision microsurgery with lasers, laser applications in ophthalmology, corneal biomechanics)
Pawan Juneja, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Kwang M. Jung, Ph.D. Chung-Ang University, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Frances A. Jurnak, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emerita of Physiology and Biophysics
Nii-Kabu Kabutey, M.D. Albany Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery
Kanwarpal S. Kahlon, M.D. Ubiversity of Illinois Medical Center, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Tatiana Kain, M.D. Ben Gurion School of Medicine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Zeev Kain, M.D. Ben Gurion School of Medicine, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Peter Kaiser, Ph.D. University of Innsbruck, Professor of Biological Chemistry
Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, M.D. University of Bonn, Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Katalin Kalman, Ph.D. , Associate Project Scientist of Ophthalmology
Daniel Kang, M.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Pediatrics
Grace Kao, M.D. National Taiwan University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology
Robert Kaplan, M.D. Harvard University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Sherrie H. Kaplan, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Medicine; Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Shreya Kapoor, M.D. Ross University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Danielle Karimi, M.D. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
William E. Karnes, M.D. University of Minnesota, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Moti L. Kashyap, M.D. National University of Singapore, Senate Emeritus of Medicine
Kari L. Kassir, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
David Katz, M.D. Case Western Reserve University, Non-Senate Academic Emeritus of Radiological Sciences
Mark Katz, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Mitchell Katz, M.D. State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Robert Katzer, B.A. University of California, Berkeley, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Claudia H. Kawas, M.D. University of Louisville, Nichols Term Chair in Neuroscience and Professor of Neurology; Neurobiology and Behavior
Kirk A. Keegan, M.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Non-Senate Academic Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Kristen M. Kelly, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Dermatology
Richard Kelly, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Maria C. Kenney, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Ophthalmology
Morton Kern, M.D. City University of New York, Mount Sinai, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Kai Kessenbrock, Ph.D. Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry
Joyce H. Keyak, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor in Residence of Radiological Sciences; Biomedical Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (bone mechanics, finite element modeling, quantitative computed tomography, prosthetic implants, osteoporosis, metastatic tumors in bone, radiation therapy)
Aaron Kheriaty, M.D. Georgetown University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Rostam Khoshsar, M.D. University of Tehran, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Antoine Elie Khoury, M.D. Ain Shams University, Walter R. Schmid Chair in Pediatric Urology and Professor in Residence of Urology
Shahira Khoury, M.D. Ain Shams University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Nafiz M. Kiciman, M.D. Hacettepe University, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Jayashri Kidao, M.D. Christian Medical College of India, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
P. Douglas Kiester, Ph.D. University of Utah, Health Sciences Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
David B. Kilgore, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Christine M. Kim, M.D. Saint Louis University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Deborah Kim, M.D. Drexel University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Ophthalmology
Jin Kyung Kim, M.D. University of Rochester, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Michael J. Kim, M.D. Northwestern University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Moon H. Kim, M.D. Yonsei University, Non-Senate Academic Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Ronald C. Kim, M.D. Jefferson Medical College, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Sharon Kim, M.D. Drexel University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Virginia Kimonis, M.D. University of Southampton, Professor of Pediatrics; Environmental Health Sciences
Ivan I. Kirov, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Leonard M. Kitzes, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Henry John Klassen, M.D. University of Pittsburgh, Associate Professor in Residence of Ophthalmology
Michael T. Kleinman, Ph.D. New York University, Adjunct Professor of Community & Environ Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health
Samuel J. Klempner, M.D. University of Massachusetts, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Jason M. Knight, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Kristi L. Koenig, M.D. City University of New York, Mount Sinai, Professor of Emergency Medicine
Scott J. Koenig, M.D. New York University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Allen P. Kong, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery
Elliott H. Kornhauser, M.D. University of Toronto, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Arthur Kreitenberg, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Lauren D. Krill, M.D. Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Mayil S. Krishnam, M.D. Stanley Medical College, Professor of Radiological Sciences
Christopher A. Kroner, M.D. Tulane University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Jeffrey V. Kuo, M.D. Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Health Sciences Professor of Radiation Oncology
Baruch D. Kuppermann, M.D. University of Miami, Professor of Ophthalmology; Biomedical Engineering (ocular manifestations of AIDS, risk factors for the development of retinopathy of prematurity post partum, photodynamic therapy for the treatment of choroidal melanomas)
John A. Kusske, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor Emeritus of Neurological Surgery
Frank M. Laferla, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Dean of the Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences and Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior; Neurology
Kimberly Lakes, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Assistant Professor in Residence of Pediatrics
Jonathan Lakey, Ph.D. University of Alberta, Associate Professor of Surgery; Biomedical Engineering (islet transplantation for patients with diabetes, improving methods of islet isolation, characterization and developing novel methods of islet transplantation, biopolymer and encapsulation technologies)
Chandana Lall, M.D. University College of Medical Sciences, Health Sciences Professor of Radiological Sciences
Nils W. Lambrecht, Ph.D. Ruhr University Bochum, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Jaime Landman, M.D. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Professor of Urology
Felicia L. Lane, M.D. Georgetown University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Karen T. Lane, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery
Nathaniel G. Lane, M.D. University of Colorado Boulder, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Mark I. Langdorf, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Emergency Medicine
Janos K. Lanyi, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Physiology and Biophysics
Kathryn M. Larsen, M.D. University of Washington, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Wei Ling Lau, M.D. University of Washington, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Pamela A. Lawrence, M.D. Columbia University, Non-Senate Academic Emerita of Medicine
George V. Lawry, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Devon Lawson, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Chinh Duy Le, M.D. Ho Chi Minh City Medicine and Pharmacy University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Khanh-Van T. Le-Bucklin, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Eva Y. Lee, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Biological Chemistry
Jenny Lee, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
John G. Lee, M.D. University of Miami, Professor of Medicine
Nancy Lee, M.D. Temple University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Ophthalmology
Robert H. Lee, M.D. University of Michigan, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Se-Young Lee, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Thay Q. Lee, Ph.D. Gothenburg School of Business, Economics and Law, Professor in Residence of Orthopaedic Surgery; Biomedical Engineering; Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (research biomechanics)
Thomas K. Lee, M.D. George Washington University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Wen-Hwa Lee, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Donald Bren Professor Emeritus of Biological Chemistry
Michael E. Lekawa, M.D. Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Health Sciences Professor of Surgery
Lucille Lemus, M.D. Harvard University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Dermatology
Patrick J. Lenehan, M.D. University of Vermont, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine
Marc A. Lerner, M.D. City University of New York, Mount Sinai, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Lawrence Lerno, M.D. University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Frances L. Leslie, Ph.D. University of Aberdeen, Professor of Pharmacology; Anatomy and Neurobiology
Alvina Leung, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Steven B. Leven, M.D. Medical College of Wisconsin, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Ellis Levin, M.D. Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Professor in Residence of Medicine; Biological Chemistry; Pharmacology
Mark R. Levinstein, M.D. Northwestern University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Donald S. Levy, M.D. University at Albany, State University of New York, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Patricia Liao, M.D. Northwestern University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Solomon S. Liao, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Lih-Huei Liaw, M.S. Northeastern University, Project Scientist of Surgery
Richard W. Light, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Senate Emeritus of Medicine
Charles L. Limoli, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Radiation Oncology; Environmental Health Sciences
Estelle S. Lin, M.D. Drexel University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Jack J. Lin, M.D. Rush University, Associate Professor of Neurology
Jeannette Lin, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Kenneth Linden, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology
Robert W. Lingua, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Professor of Ophthalmology
Mark E. Linskey, M.D. Columbia University, Professor of Surgery
Linda S. Lippa, M.D. Columbia University, Health Sciences Professor of Ophthalmology
Fong W. Liu, M.D. University of Alabama, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Haoping Liu, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Biological Chemistry
Jeffrey W. Liu, M.D. Brown University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Ophthalmology
Feng Liu Smith, Ph.D. Iowa State University, Assistant Researcher of Epidemiology
Dawn M. Lombardo, D.O. Midwestern University, Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
John C. Longhurst, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Susan Samueli Chair in Integrative Medicine and Professor of Medicine; Pharmacology; Physiology and Biophysics
Kenneth J. Longmuir, Ph.D. University of Oregon, Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Shahram Lotfipour, M.D. University of Iowa, Professor of Emergency Medicine; Program in Public Health
Ira T. Lott, M.D. Ohio State University, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Di Lu, M.D. Shanghai Medical University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Kim D. Lu, M.D. Tufts University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Stephanie Lu, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
Yuxin Lu, M.D. Suzhou Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Paul Lubinsky, M.D. University of Capetown, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Ulrike Luderer, M.D., Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Medicine; Developmental and Cell Biology; Environmental Health Sciences; Program in Public Health (reproductive toxicology, developmental toxicology, developmental basis of ovarian toxicity, ovarian cancer)
Hartmut Luecke, Ph.D. William Marsh Rice University, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Physiology and Biophysics
Zhigang D. Luo, Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Pharmacology
Gary S. Lynch, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; Anatomy and Neurobiology
David C. Lyon, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Department Vice Chair and Associate Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Cognitive Sciences (long range cortical circuits)
Fabio Macciardi, M.D. University of Milan, Professor in Residence of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Gerald A. Maguire, M.D. Saint Louis University, Kirkup Chair in Psychiatry and Human Behavior for the Medical Treatment of Stuttering and Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Arash Mahajerin, M.S. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Carol A. Major, M.D. Case Western Reserve University, Health Sciences Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Deepika Malik, MBBS , Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Ophthalmology
Shaista Malik, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor of Medicine
Fred M. Malkin, M.D. University of Miami, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Dan A. Mandel, M.D. Tel Aviv University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Alberto Manetta, M.D. University of Buenos Aires, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
William W. Mantulin, Ph.D. Northeastern University, Adjunct Professor of Surgery
Irina Maramica, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Heather A. Marino, D.O. Midwestern University, Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine
Donald C. Martin, M.D. University of British Columbia, Professor Emeritus of Surgery
G. Robert Mason, M.D. University of Chicago, Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Farhad Mazdisnian, M.D. Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Irene M. McAleer, M.D. Ohio State University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Urology
Michael McClelland, Ph.D. University of Georgia, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Christopher McCoy, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Jerry L. McCullough, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Dermatology
Elspeth M. McDougall, M.D. University of Calgary, Professor Emerita of Urology
Christine E. McLaren, Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University, Professor of Epidemiology
Gordon McLaren, M.D. Stanford University, Adjunct Profoessor of Medicine
Calvin S. McLaughlin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor Emeritus of Biological Chemistry
Gordon McLorie, M.D. University of Toronto, Health Sciences Professor of Urology
Kirk McNagny, M.D. Creighton University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Deena McRae, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Rita S. Mehta, M.D. Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Medical College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Daniel B. Menzel, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Dan Mercola, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Hooshang Meshkinpour, M.D. University of Tehran, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Frank L. Meyskens, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr. Endowed Chair and Professor of Medicine; Biological Chemistry; Program in Public Health
David E. Michalik, D.O. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
John Middlebrooks, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor of Otolaryngology; Biomedical Engineering; Cognitive Sciences; Neurobiology and Behavior (hearing research, neurophysiology, psychophysics, auditory prosthesis, computational neuroscience)
Michel Mikhael, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Ronald B. Miller, M.D. Columbia University, Non-Senate Academic Emeritus of Medicine
Jeffrey C. Milliken, M.D. University of Michigan, Health Sciences Professor of Surgery
Steven D. Mills, M.D. New York Medical College, Associate Professor of Surgery
Donald S. Minckler, M.D. University of Oregon School of Medicine, Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology; Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Sean A. Minjares, M.D. University of California, Davis, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Lilit Mnatsakanyan, M.D. Yerevan State Medical University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Sabee Y. Molloi, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor of Radiological Sciences; Biomedical Engineering (quantitative aspects of medical x-ray imaging and its applications to cardiac and breast imaging)
Edwin S. Monuki, M.D. Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Developmental and Cell Biology (cerebral cortex, choroid plexus development, translation)
Hamid Moradi, M.D. Oregon Health & Science University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Edgar M. Moran, M.D. University of Bucharest, Senate Emeritus of Medicine
Timothy R. Morgan, M.D. Emory University, Professor in Residence of Medicine
David K. Morohashi, M.D. University of Washington, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Debra E. Morrison, M.D. Northwestern University, Health Sciences Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care; Urology
Sameh Mosaed, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
Gina R. Mosich, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Harry David Mosier, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Ross Moskowtiz, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Urology
Laura Mosqueda, M.D. University of Southern California, Ronald Reagan Chair in Geriatrics and Professor of Family Medicine
Peter J. Mostert, D.O. Oklahoma State University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Radiological Sciences
Robert K. Moyzis, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emeritus of Biological Chemistry
Tahseen Mozaffar, MBBS Aga Kahn University, Professor of Neurology
Dana Mukamel, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Jogeshwar Mukherjee, Ph.D. Jodhpur National University, Professor in Residence of Radiological Sciences; Biomedical Engineering; Physiology and Biophysics (preclinical imaging, radiopharmaceutical design and development, PET imaging and quantitation, neuroscience)
J. Dennis Mull, M.D. Medical College of Virginia, Professor Emeritus of Family Medicine
Maury Lee Ellis Mulligan, M.D. City University of New York, Mount Sinai, Senate Emeritus of Medicine
Penny R. Murata, M.D. Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Yuji Murata, M.D. Osaka University, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Cynthia T. Murphy, M.D. University of South Dakota, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Sandra Murray, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Padmaja Muthiah, M.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Robert Myers, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Bavani Nadeswaran, MBBS University of the West Indies, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Orhan Nalcioglu, Ph.D. University of Oregon, Professor Emeritus of Radiological Sciences
Patricia W. Nance, M.D. University of South Florida, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Andreea Nanci, M.D. Goethe University Frankfurt, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Chaitali S. Nangia, M.D. Lady Hardinge Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Shoba Narayan, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Corey Nelson, M.D. Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Edward L. Nelson, M.D. University of Oregon, Associate Professor of Medicine; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
J. Stuart Nelson, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Surgery; Biomedical Engineering (laser surgery, port wine stains, hemangiomas, vascular birthmarks)
Kari J. Nelson, M.D. Medical College of Wisconsin, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Radiological Sciences
Linda D. Nelson, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Senate Emerita of Neurology
Thomas L. Nelson, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Anthony B. Nesburn, M.D. Harvard University, Adjunct Professor of Ophthalmology
Robert L. Newcomb, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of Pediatrics; Clinical Translational Science
Richard S. Newman, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Angelica T. Nguyen, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Danh V. Nguyen, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Professor of Medicine
Hanh T. Nguyen, M.D. Medical College of Virginia, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Lan T. Nguyen, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Ninh Tuan Nguyen, M.D. University of Texas at San Antonio, Professor of Surgery
Tan Quoc Viet Nguyen, M.D. Michigan State University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Y. Vien T. Nguyen, D.O. Western University of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Radiological Sciences
Bruce Nickerson, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Delma J. Nieves, M.D. University of Washington, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Theresa L. Nilson, M.D. Boston University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Karen L. Noblett, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Trina Norden-Krichmar, Ph.D. The Scripps Research Institute, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology
Diane J. Nugent, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Eliezer Nussbaum, M.D. Tel Aviv University, Professor of Pediatrics
Diane K. O'Dowd, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Developmental and Cell Biology; Anatomy and Neurobiology (regulation of activity in developing and adult nervous systems)
Michael O'Reilly, M.D. University of Vermont, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Andrew O. Odegaard, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology
Leticia Oliveros, M.D. University of Iowa, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Bonnie Jean Olsen, Ph.D. California School of Professional Psychology, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Harold G. Olson, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Robin D. Onishi, M.D. University of Washington, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Kathryn Osann, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Adjunct Profoessor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences
Megan Osborn, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Donald R. Ostergard, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Senate Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Sai-Hong Ignatius Ou, Ph.D. University of Texas at Dallas, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Yi Ouyang, M.D. Jilin University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Madeleine V. Pahl, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Medicine
Marilyn J. Pais, M.D. Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emerita of Radiological Sciences
Nimisha Parekh, M.D. Tulane University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Hannah L. Park, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor in Residence of Epidemiology
Steven Park, M.D. New York University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Ian Parker, Ph.D. University College London, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior; Physiology and Biophysics
Angela Parkin, M.D. University of Texas, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Iris Partovi, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Victor Passy, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of Otolaryngology
Anup Patel, M.D. University of Nevada, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Hiren Patel, M.D. , Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Pranav Patel, M.D. Saint Louis University, Chief, Division of Cardiology; Director of Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory and Cardiac Care Unit (CCU) and Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine; Biomedical Engineering (intravascular imaging (OCT and IVUS), interventional cardiology research-coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease, medical quality and outcomes research, cardiac hemodynamics: fractional flow reserve and coronary flow reserve, preventive cardiology research)
Sameer S. Pathare, M.D. Medical College of Wisconsin, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Julie V. Patterson, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Specialist of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Keyianoosh Paydar, M.D. University of Tennessee, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery
Eric Pearlman, Ph.D. University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, Director of the Institute of Immunology and UCI's Chancellor Professor of Physiology and Biophysics; Ophthalmology
Daniel Pelot, M.D. Howard University, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of Medicine
Kristine R. Penner, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Ellena Peterson, Ph.D. Georgetown University, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Parham Pezeshk, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Radiological Sciences
Robert F. Phalen, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Professor of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences
Peter H. Pham, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Radiological Sciences
Son Phan, M.D. University of Vermont, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Nicolas M. Phielipp, M.D. University of Buenos Aires, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Gloria J. Picking, M.A. San Diego State University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Aimee Pierce, M.D. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology
Alessio Pigazzi, M.D. Boston University, Associate Professor of Surgery
Daniele Piomelli, Ph.D. Columbia University, Louise Turner Arnold Chair in the Neurosciences and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Biological Chemistry; Pharmacology
Alice Police, M.D. Loma Linda University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery
Robert W. Porter, M.D. Northwestern University, Senate Emeritus of Neurological Surgery
Dmitry Portnoy, M.D. Moscow State University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Manuel Porto, M.D. Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, The Edward J. Quilligan Chair in Maternal-Fetal Medicine and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Steven G. Potkin, M.D. Washington University, Robert R. Sprague Chair in Brain Imaging and Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Thomas L. Poulos, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Chemistry; Pharmaceutical Sciences; Physiology and Biophysics (chemical biology)
Adrian Preda, M.D. , Health Sciences Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Pamela E. Prete, M.D. Hahnemann University Hospital, Senate Emerita and Professor of Medicine
Henry W. Pribram, MB BChir Cambridge University, Professor Emeritus of Radiological Sciences
Douglas W. Priestly, M.D. University of Manitoba, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Michael D. Prislin, M.D. Georgetown University, Professor of Family Medicine
James Puckett, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Geetha Puthenveetil, MBBS , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Feng Qiao, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry
Lisa K. Quane, M.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Health Sciences Professor of Radiological Sciences
Edward J. Quilligan, M.D. Ohio State University, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
W. Leslie Quinlivan, MBBS University of London, Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Bouchaib Rabbani, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Non-Senate Academic Emeritus of Radiation Oncology
Manuela Raffatellu, M.D. Università degli Studi di Sassar, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Gregory Rafijah, M.D. Chicago Medical School, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Maryam Rahimi, M.D. Indiana University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Asif Rahman, M.D. University of Toledo, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine
Govind R. Rajan, MBBS University of Delhi, Health Sciences Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Davinder Ramsingh, M.D. Medical College of Georgia, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Nilam S. Ramsinghani, MBBS Grant Medical College, Health Sciences Professor of Radiation Oncology
Leslie M. Randall, M.D. University of Louisville, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Bahram Raofi, M.D. University of Tehran, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Darren R. Raphael, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Jody M. Rawles, M.D. Albany Medical College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Radoslav Raychev, M.D. , Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurological Surgery
Virgil S. Raymundo, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Michael R. Recto, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Varalakshmi Reddy, M.D. Osmania Medical College, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
John L. Redpath, Ph.D. University of Newcastle, Professor Emeritus of Radiation Oncology; Environmental Health Sciences
Christina M. Reh, M.D. Loma Linda University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Andrew R. Reikes, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
David J. Reinkensmeyer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Biomedical Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (robotics, mechatronics, biomedical engineering, rehabilitation, biomechanics, neural control of movement)
Christopher Reist, M.D. Medical College of Virginia, Associate Professor in Residence of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Ricardo Restrepo, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Sherif Rezk, MBBS Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine, Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Connie Rhee, M.D. Northwestern University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Jessica M. Rhee, M.D. University of Chicago, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Charles E. Ribak, Ph.D. Boston University, Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology
James Rick, M.D. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Cameron Ricks, M.D. American Universityniversity of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Joseph Rinehart, M.D. Loyola University Chicago, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Monica B. Rivera, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Dante Eduardo Roa, Ph.D. Florida State University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiation Oncology
Richard T. Robertson, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Leland D. Ronningen, M.D. Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Health Sciences Professor of Urology
Abraham Rosenbaum, M.D., Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Steven D. Ross, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Elyssa Rubin, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Lloyd Rucker, M.D. University of Kentucky, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Scott E. Rudkin, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Emergency Medicine
Bahman Saatian, M.D. , Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Terra R. Safer, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Angela N. Sagar, M.D. Ross University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Hamid M. Said, Ph.D. Aston University, Professor of Medicine; Physiology and Biophysics
Naghmeh Salamat Saberi, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Jason B. Samarasena, M.D. Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Curt A. Sandman, Ph.D. Louisiana State University, Senate Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Suzanne B. Sandmeyer, Ph.D. University of Washington, Grace Beekhuis Bell Chair in Biological Chemistry and Professor of Biological Chemistry; Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (retroelements, metabolic molding, genomics)
Zsuzsanna Sandor, M.D. Semmelweis University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Jose Y. Sandoval, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Rozanne M. Sandri-Goldin, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
I. James Sarfeh, M.D. Albany Medical College, Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Jon F. Sassin, M.D. Saint Louis University, Professor Emeritus of Neurology
Paolo Sassone-Corsi, Ph.D. University of Naples Federico II, Donald Bren Professor and Professor of Biological Chemistry; Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Catherine S. Sassoon, M.D. Gadjah Mada University, Professor in Residence of Medicine
Mona Sazgar, M.D. McMaster University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology
Shira A. Schlesinger, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine
Peter L. Schnall, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Alan L. Schneider, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Sanford Schneider, M.D. New York University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Merritt D. Schreiber, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine
Steven S. Schreiber, M.D. Albany Medical College, Professor in Residence of Neurology; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Sabrina E. Schuck, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics; Psychology and Social Behavior (ADHD, autistic spectrum disorders, disorders of reading and written language, human-animal intervention, non-pharmacological treatment of disruptive behavior, cognitive-behavioral school-based and family-based interventions)
Carl Schultz, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Emergency Medicine
Adam J. Schwarz, M.D. Stanford University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Ran Schwarzkopf, M.D. , Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Howard Schwid, M.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
John A. Scolaro, M.D. Boston College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Shruti Scott, D.O. Western University of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Tara E. Seery, M.D. University College Dublin, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Gary P. Segal, M.D. University of Pennsylvania, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Sonia Sehgal, M.D. St. George’s University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Varun Sehgal, Ph.D. University of Florida, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiation Oncology
Bert L. Semler, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Leonard S. Sender, M.D. University of Witwatersrand, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Stefano Sensi, M.D. Gabriele D'Annunzio University of Chieti Pescara, Associate Adjunct Professor of Neurology; Pharmacology
Cagin Senturk, M.D. Hacettepe University Medical School, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Arnold H. Seto, M.D. Harvard University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Gaurang Shah, M.D. The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Shalini S. Shah, M.D. St. George’s University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Joel B. Shallit, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine
Ronald C. Shank, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor Emeritus of Medicine; Environmental Health Sciences
Deane H. Shapiro, Ph.D. Stanford University, Senate Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Johanna F. Shapiro, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Family Medicine
Ankush Sharma, M.D. American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Lili Sheibani, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Lavonne Sheng, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Yongsheng Shi, Ph.D. Syracuse University, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Cynthia H. Sholly, M.D. University of Utah, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Jordan A. Siegel, M.D. Tufts University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Urology
Herbert C. Sier, M.D. Medical College of Virginia, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Jack H. Sills, M.D. Northwestern University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Valeria B. Simon, M.D. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Jennifer L. Simpson, M.D. University of Michigan, Health Sciences Professor of Ophthalmology
Jasjit Singh, M.D. Duke University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Kira Skavinski, D.O. New York Inst of Technology, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Harry B. Skinner, M.D. Medical University of South Carolina, Professor Emeritus of Orthopaedic Surgery
Lewis M. Slater, M.D. University of Vermont, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Steven L. Small, M.D. University of Rochester, Dr. Stanley van den Noort Endowed Chair and Professor of Neurology; Cognitive Sciences; Neurobiology and Behavior
Brian Smith, M.D. Universidad Autonoma De Guadalajara, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery
Janellen Smith, M.D. University of Iowa, Health Sciences Professor of Dermatology
Martin A. Smith, Ph.D. University of Newcastle, Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Moyra Smith, M.D. University of Pretoria, Professor Emerita of Pediatrics
Kenneth Sokolski, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Antoine N. Soliman, M.D. Pennsylvania State University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Ana Solodkin, Ph.D. National Polytechnic Inst of Mexico, Associate Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Neurology
Ivan Soltesz, Ph.D. Eötvös Loránd University, Adjunct Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Charles A. Sondhaus, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Radiological Sciences
Amit Soni, M.D. St. George's University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Dara H. Sorkin, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor in Residence of Medicine; Psychology and Social Behavior (close relationships, behavioral lifestyle interventions for chronic disease management, health disparities, program evaluation)
Martha G. Sosa-Johnson, M.D. University of San Diego, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Jennifer Soung, M.D. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology
Marian Sowa, M.D. , Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology
M. Anne Spence, Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa, Professor Emerita of Pediatrics
Donald R. Sperling, M.D. Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Lawrence D. Sporty, M.D. State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Norbert Staimer, Ph.D. Technical University of Munich, Project Scientist of Epidemiology
Michael J. Stamos, Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University, John E. Connolly Chair in Surgery and Professor of Surgery
Robert E. Steele, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of Biological Chemistry
Joan S. Steffan, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Associate Professor in Residence of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Robin Steinberg-Epstein, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Roger F. Steinert, M.D. Harvard University, Irving H. Leopold Chair in Ophthalmology and Professor of Ophthalmology; Biomedical Engineering (cataract surgical technique and management of complications, refractive surgery, corneal transplantation)
Barry A. Steinmetz, M.D. Baylor College of Medicine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Megan L. Stephenson, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Oswald Steward, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Reeve-Irvine Chair in Spinal Cord Injury Research and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Neurobiology and Behavior
Cassandra L. Stewart, M.D. Medical University of South Carolina, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Pediatrics
Svetlana R. Stivi, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Suzanne L. Strom, M.D. University of Texas, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Min-Ying Su, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Radiological Sciences; Physics and Astronomy
Veedamali Subramanian, Ph.D. University of Madras, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Medicine
Jeffrey R. Suchard, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Emergency Medicine; Pharmacology
Coral Sun, M.D. University of Florida, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Laxmi A. Suthar, M.D. Oregon Health & Science University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Shuichi Suzuki, M.D. Kitasato University, Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery; Neurology
Morgan L. Swank, M.D. Creighton University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
James M. Swanson, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Bindu Swaroop, M.D. St. George's University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
John E. Swett, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Yona Tadir, M.D. Tel Aviv University, Adjunct Professor of Surgery
Ronald Takemoto, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Steven Tam, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Ming Tan, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Medicine
Siu W. Tang, M.D. University of Hong Kong, Senate Emeritus of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Dawn T. Tanner, M.D. Creighton University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Radiological Sciences
Jeremiah Tao, M.D. University of South Carolina, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
Blanca Tapia-Zuniga, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Sharief K. Taraman, M.D. Wayne State University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Andrzej S. Tarnawski, M.D. University Medical School, Professor of Medicine
Candice E. Taylor, M.D. , Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Jamshid Tehranzadeh, M.D. Pahlavi University, Professor Emeritus of Radiological Sciences
Krishnansu S. Tewari, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Gaby T. Thai, M.D. Tufts University, Health Sciences Professor of Neurology
Leslie M. Thompson, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; Biological Chemistry; Neurobiology and Behavior
Lauri D. Thrupp, M.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Jeremiah G. Tilles, M.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Pornchai Tirakitsoontorn, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Katherine Tobin, M.D. Stritch School of Medicine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Jerome S. Tobis, M.D. Chicago Medical School, Professor Emeritus of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Francesco Tombola, Ph.D. University of Padua, Associate Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Julianne S. Toohey, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Nojan Toomari, M.D. Western University of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Surgery
Simin Torabzadeh, Ph.D. Universidad Central del Este, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Jason D. Toranto, M.D. University of Michigan, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery
Lillibeth Torno, M.D. , Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Minodora Totoiu, M.D. , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Paul E. Touchette, Ed.D. Harvard University, Recall Non-Senate Academic of Pediatrics
Anne E. Tournay, MBBS University College London, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Bao Q. Tran, M.D. Creighton University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Hien T. Tran, M.D. Harvard University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Dermatology
Huy T. Tran, M.D. Western University of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Lily H. Tran, M.D. University of Rochester, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Minh-Ha Tran, D.O. Western University of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Lien N. Trinh, M.D. St. George's University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Bruce Tromberg, Ph.D. University of Tennessee, Director of Beckman Laser Institute and Professor of Surgery; Biomedical Engineering; Physiology and Biophysics (photon migration, diffuse optical imaging, non-linear optical microscopy, photodynamic therapy)
Fong Y. Tsai, M.D. Taipei Medical University, Senate Emeritus of Radiological Sciences
Atur V. Turakhia, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Martin Tynan, M.D. Trinity College, Health Sciences Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Edward M. Uchio, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Urology
Cherry C. Uy, M.D. Far Eastern University, Health Sciences Professor of Pediatrics
Duane J. Vajgrt, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Health Sciences Professor of Radiological Sciences
Shermeen Bejan Vakharia, MBBS Aga Khan University, Health Sciences Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Theodorus G. Van Erp, Ph.D. Utrecht University, Assistant Professor in Residence of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Richard A. Van Etten, M.D. Stanford University, Professor of Medicine; Biological Chemistry
Nicolaas-John Van Nieuwenhuysen, MBBS , Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Negean Vandordaklou, M.D., Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Taya C. Varteresian, D.O. A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Nosratola D. Vaziri, M.D. University of Tehran, Professor Emeritus of Medicine; Physiology and Biophysics
Charles P. Vega, M.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Health Sciences Professor of Family Medicine
Swapna Vemuri, M.D. Wayne State University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Ophthalmology
Vasan Venugopalan, ScD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department Chair and Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Biomedical Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Surgery (laser-induced thermal, mechanical and radiative transport processes for application in medical diagnostics, therapeutics, biotechnology, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS))
Sunil P. Verma, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Otolaryngology
Larry E. Vickery, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor Emeritus of Physiology and Biophysics
S. Armando Villalta, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Anthony Vo, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Baotran N. Vo, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
Martin J. Vogel, M.D. New York Medical College, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Trung Q. Vu, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
K. Mark Vuchinich, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Health Sciences Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Thomas W. Waddington, M.D. Saint Louis University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Matthew Wade, M.D. George Washington University, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology
Pathik Wadhwa, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Feizal Waffarn, MBBS University of Madras, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Howard B. Waitzkin, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Akio Wakabayashi, M.D. University of Tokyo, Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Roger Walsh, Ph.D. University of Queensland, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; Anthropology
Annabel Wang, M.D. McGill University, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology
Beverly Wang, M.D. Jiangxi Medical College, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Ping H. Wang, M.D. Harvard University, Professor of Medicine; Physiology and Biophysics
Raymond Wang, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Tommy Wang, M.D. Albany Medical College, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Kerry E. Wangen, M.D. University of Minnesota, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
James E. Ward, M.D. Loyola University Chicago, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine
Marian L. Waterman, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
David Webb, M.D. Tufts University, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Steven L. Wechsler, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professor of Ophthalmology
Elias Wehbi, M.D. University of Toronto, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Urology
Gerald Weinstein, M.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor Emeritus of Dermatology
John H. Weiss, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Neurology
Christopher H. Wen, M.D. Baylor College of Medicine, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences
Li Wen, M.D. West China University of Medical Sciences, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Medicine
Lari B. Wenzel, Ph.D. Arizona State University, Professor of Medicine; Program in Public Health
Dennis Whang, M.D. Northwestern University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Stephen H. White, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of Physiology and Biophysics
Warren F. Wiechmann, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Jamie Wikenheiser, Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology
Petra E. Wilder-Smith, Ph.D. University of Bern, Associate Professor in Residence of Surgery
James H. Williams, M.D. Harvard University, Health Sciences Professor of Medicine
Richard G. Williams, M.D. University of Pittsburgh, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Radiation Oncology
Russell A. Williams, MBBS University of Sydney, Professor of Surgery
Archie F. Wilson, M.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Samuel E. Wilson, M.D. Wayne State University, Professor of Surgery
William C. Wilson, M.D. Temple University, Health Sciences Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care
Deborah A. Wing, M.D. Tulane University, Professor in Residence of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Sara T. Winokur, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Project Scientist of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Garrett A. Wirth, M.D. Albany Medical College, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery
Michael Wolf, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Andrew Wong, M.D. University of Michigan, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine
Brian Wong, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor of Otolaryngology; Biomedical Engineering (biomedical optics, tissue engineering, development of surgical instrumentation)
Edward K. Wong, M.D. University of Southern California, Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology
Nathan D. Wong, Ph.D. Yale University, Adjunct Professor of Medicine; Epidemiology
Joseph C. Wu, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor in Residence of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Mark Li-cheng Wu, M.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Sing-Yung Wu, M.D. Johns Hopkins University, Senate Emeritus of Radiological Sciences
Frederic A. Wyle, M.D. University of Pennsylvania, Senate Emeritus of Medicine
Danli L. Xing, M.D. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Ophthalmology
Xiangmin Xu, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Associate Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Biomedical Engineering; Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (local cortical circuits)
Aparche B. Yang, M.D. University of California, Irvine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology
Jing Yang, M.D. , Assistant Professor in Residence of Ophthalmology
Qin Yang, M.D. , Assistant Professor of Medicine; Physiology and Biophysics
Daniel S. Yanni, M.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery
Leman Yel, M.D. Hacettepe University, Senate Emeritus of Medicine
Douglas B. Yim, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Radiological Sciences; Surgery
Hong Zhen Yin, M.D. , Specialist of Neurology
Kyoko Yokomori, Ph.D. University of Tokyo, Professor of Biological Chemistry; Biological Chemistry
Hiroshi Yoshioka, Ph.D. University of Tsukuba, Professor in Residence of Radiological Sciences
Julie H. Youm, Ph.D. Teachers College, Columbia University, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Emergency Medicine
Bassam Younes, M.D. , Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Christopher Young, M.D. Duke University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Robert R. Young, M.D. Harvard University, Senate Emeritus of Neurology
Ronald F. Young, Ph.D. State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Professor Emeritus of Neurological Surgery
Julie N. Youssef, D.O. New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Christopher B. Zachary, M.D. University of London, Health Sciences Professor of Dermatology
David Zamorano, M.D. University of Southern California, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Nicole M. Zanin, M.D. Wright State University, Health Sciences Clinical Instructor of Medicine
Michael V. Zaragoza, M.D. Case Western Reserve University, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics; Biological Chemistry
Sohila Zarandy, M.D. University of Tehran, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine
Jason Zell, D.O. Nova Southeastern University, Assistant Professor of Medicine
Fan-Gang Zeng, Ph.D. Syracuse University, Professor of Otolaryngology; Anatomy and Neurobiology; Biomedical Engineering; Cognitive Sciences (cochlear implants and auditory neuroscience)
Xiaohui Zhao, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Xiaolin Zi, Ph.D. Shanghai University, Associate Professor of Urology; Pharmacology
Argyrios Ziogas, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Associate Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology
Albert Zlotnik, Ph.D. University of Colorado Boulder, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Physiology and Biophysics
Mary L. Zupanc, M.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Luis M. de La Maza, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
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