Division of Undergraduate Education

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Michael Dennin, Dean
Dean's Office
611 Aldrich Hall
949-824-3291
http://www.due.uci.edu

The core mission of the Division of Undergraduate Education is to support and enrich the academic experiences of undergraduate students so that they succeed and thrive. The Division provides campus leadership, programs, and services that enhance the quality of undergraduate education at UCI. An advocate and steward for educational excellence, the Division works with all academic units, programs, and members of the UCI community to foster a climate of learning, discovery, and engagement for every undergraduate student. Through its diverse and innovative programs and services, the Division provides support for student academic achievement, for a rich and coherent curriculum, and for outstanding teaching through the integration of teaching and research activities and the facilitation of effective pedagogy.

The Division also supports excellence in undergraduate education through assessment of student learning outcomes and a comprehensive program of research and evaluation conducted by its Center for Assessment and Applied Research. This center coordinates the campus approach to educational assessment and provides data and information on undergraduate students, programs, and policies for use in decision-making by the Dean of the Division and other campus leaders. It also provides consultation and technical advice for faculty and staff on assessment of student learning, program evaluation, survey research, statistical analyses of student data, and development of new undergraduate majors and minors with a view to enhance undergraduate education at UCI. For further information visit the Center for Assessment and Applied Research website.

A current list of DUE Program faculty directors can be found on the DUE Homepage.

 

On This Page:

The Division of Undergraduate Education is responsible for the following student programs and services:

These programs and services are described in detail below.


Academic Testing Center

3040 Anteater Instructional Research Building (AIRB)
949-824-6207
http://testingcenter.uci.edu

Placement Testing

UCI’s Academic Testing Center (ATC) administers placement tests to new and continuing students to ensure correct placement in selected introductory courses and to help students assess their readiness for University-level work. These tests are selected or developed by UCI faculty who also determine the grading criteria for each test. Results from placement tests are used by students and their academic counselors to create a plan of study which is best suited to the students’ learning needs and career goals and to determine enrollment in introductory courses. Additional information, such as entrance examination scores, Advanced Placement (AP) scores, and high school work, also may be used to determine course placement.

Placement tests are given in the areas of Physics, Calculus, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Russian, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Academic English/English as a Second Language. Detailed information about who needs to take which test is available on the Academic Testing Center website.

All newly admitted freshmen will be directed to information about summer orientation, placement testing, and registering for courses in late spring. Participation in summer orientation and advising is required of new freshmen. Freshmen will register for their fall quarter courses at orientation. Students are strongly advised, therefore, to take any required placement tests before their orientation program.

The Academic Testing Center also administers other language tests for exemptions from general education categories VI and VIII. More information is available at the Language Testing Program website.

For further information on placement testing and summer testing dates, visit the Academic Testing Center website or call the center’s office.

UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination

The Academic Testing Center is responsible for the campus-based administration of the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination.

Results from the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination are used to place students in UCI writing courses. There is a nonrefundable administrative fee associated with the examination. The fee payment process and waiver information are explained in materials students receive in April from the University of California Office of the President. Students who receive admission application fee waivers will automatically have this examination fee waived. Refer to the section on Requirements for a Bachelor’s Degree for complete information on the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination and the UC Entry Level Writing requirement. Important information about the examination is also available here.

ANTrepreneur Center

233 Pereira Drive
(949) 614-0101
http://antrepreneur.uci.edu/
antrepreneur@uci.edu

In partnership with UCI Applied Innovation, the ANTrepreneur Center has the mission of integrating entrepreneurial and innovative thinking into the UC Irvine campus and to UC Irvine students in starting new ventures. This center provides free mentorship learning opportunities, resources to help students scale their business, and connections to the greater Irvine entrepreneurial network.

For more information visit the ANTrepreneur Center website.

Blum Center for Poverty Alleviation

5548 Social & Behavioral Sciences Gateway
949-824-6307
http://blumcenter.uci.edu/
blumcenter@uci.edu

The mission of the Blum Center for Poverty Alleviation is to stimulate interest, deepen commitment, and find creative ways to bring the extensive resources of the campus to bear on the complex challenge of sustainable poverty alleviation. The critical components of the Center are education, community engagement, and research.

Campuswide Honors Program

1200 Student Services II
949-824-5461
http://honors.uci.edu
honors@uci.edu

Founded in 1988, the Campuswide Honors Program (CHP) is available to selected high-achieving undergraduates in all academic majors and years of study. It maintains an active roster of approximately 750 students. Many CHP students continue their studies after graduation from UCI at the most prestigious graduate and professional schools in the country.

The CHP provides talented and successful UCI students with a special honors curriculum consisting of core courses designed especially for CHP students, an honors community of highly dedicated students, and mentorship by UCI’s top faculty, who teach honors classes and supervise student research. Enhanced academic advising provides students with assistance in planning a path to success, including course selection and preparation for graduate and professional schools, prestigious scholarships, and study abroad. Completion of the Campuswide Honors Program is noted on the student’s transcript and baccalaureate diploma.

Admission. Admission to the program as an incoming UCI freshman is by invitation; all eligible candidates are reviewed and selected by faculty representatives from each academic unit. Transfer students may be eligible for special admissions programs offered through the Office of Admissions and Relations with Schools to students who have completed approved community college honors programs. Current UCI students are eligible to apply for admission to the CHP after completion of at least one quarter at UCI with 12 or more graded units and a grade point average of 3.5 or better. Current students may submit their applications until the end of week 5 of winter quarter of their second year. Transfer students may submit applications in the summer before enrolling at UCI, or until the end of week 5 of winter quarter of their first year at UCI. The CHP seeks to admit students who have a demonstrated passion for learning, a willingness to explore and be challenged, and an interest in pursuing academic excellence in a range of disciplines outside of their major area. Successful completion of the program requires that students complete specified honors courses, engage in faculty mentored research that culminates in an honors thesis or project, and fulfill the program’s GPA requirements. CHP students who complete a departmental honors program in addition to the CHP will receive the “University Honors” notation on their transcript.

For details about curriculum, extracurricular activities, on-campus honors housing and other benefits of the CHP, see the CHP website. For information on other honors opportunities such as school and major honors programs and honors at graduation, see the “Honors Opportunities” section of this Catalogue.

Capital Internship Programs

1100 Student Services II
949-824-5400
http://capitalinternships.uci.edu/ (Washington DC Program)
http://uccs.ucdavis.edu/ (Sacramento Program)
dccenter@uci.edu (both programs)

UCDC Academic Internship Program

The UCDC Academic Internship Program supervises and supports students who pursue internships, elective courses, research, and creative activities in the nation’s capital. This UC systemwide program, situated in the exciting environment of Washington DC, is open to students in all majors. Students may enroll for fall, winter, or spring quarter. While living in Washington DC, students are enrolled at UCI and earn 12–16 units of credit. Financial aid eligibility is maintained and is adjusted to cover the total cost of the program. Students live in the UC Washington Center building together with students from all of the participating UC campuses, which provides a social and intellectual community throughout the quarter. Internship opportunities are available in almost any setting including Capitol Hill, the White House, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, think tanks, art museums, educational institutions, media outlets, and scientific organizations, just to name a few. Interested students with strong academic records are encouraged to apply.

UC Center Sacramento Scholar Intern Program

The UC Center Sacramento (UCCS) Scholar Intern Program supervises and supports students who pursue internships, elective courses, research, and creative activities in the state capital. This UC systemwide program is open to students in all majors, and is currently available for the fall, winter, spring, or summer terms. While living in Sacramento, students are enrolled at UC and earn 12–16 units of credit. Financial aid eligibility is maintained. Internship opportunities are available for students in many different settings including the offices of Assembly Members, Senators, and the Governor, as well as with State agencies, nonprofit organizations, and lobbying organizations. Interested students with strong academic records are encouraged to apply.

Center for Excellence in Writing and Communication

193 Science Library
949-824-8949
http://writingcenter.uci.edu
writing-center@uci.edu

The UCI Center for Excellence in Writing and Communication offers free writing support to all enrolled UCI undergraduate students; we strive to make better writers, not just better writing. Our services include individual writing consultations, online tutorials, peer tutoring, workshops about writing for different occasions and needs, and assistance with developing research skills.

The Writing Center, in conjunction with the Campus Writing Coordinator and the Division of Undergraduate Education, also conducts research about best practices in the teaching of writing, and is the central campus hub for developing a culture of writing and communication at UCI.

Civic and Community Engagement Minor

http://engage.uci.edu/
CCEMinor@uci.edu

The Minor in Civic and Community Engagement is an interdisciplinary program that provides students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values to engage as citizens and active community members in the 21st century. It provides a theoretical and empirical framework to increase students’ understanding of public problems (environmental, social, and other) from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students learn about strategies to address public problems, including through public policy; through the involvement of community-based and nonprofit organizations; and through the cultivation of leadership. The minor helps students build on their major programs of study to make connections between public problems and issues of equity and social justice. It is open to students of all majors and is distinguished both by what students learn, and by how they learn it: through a combination of coursework, research and service.

Additional information is available at the Interdisciplinary section of the Catalogue.

First-Year Integrated Program

611C Aldrich Hall
949-824-1955
http://fip.uci.edu/
FIP@uci.edu

University Studies 13–16 are three-quarter multidisciplinary sequences for freshmen or lower-division students only. These integrated courses are designed to introduce students to the ways different disciplines approach similar problems and to provide a freshman learning community experience. Successful completion of all three quarters will satisfy several courses toward partial fulfillment of different general education (GE) requirement categories. These courses (with the exception of UNI STU 13AUNI STU 13B, UNI STU 13C) are designed to have a capstone research writing component in the third quarter that will satisfy the second quarter of the lower-division writing requirement—one of the four courses toward partial fulfillment of GE categories. To satisfy the second quarter of the lower-division writing requirement with a FIP sequence, students must concurrently enroll in WRITING 39B either the fall or winter quarter and pass it with a grade of C or better, and also complete the FIP sequence with a grade of C (or Pass) or better in the third quarter of the sequence.

UNI STU 13A- 13B- 13C Introduction to Global Sustainability I
and Introduction to Global Sustainability II
and Introduction to Global Sustainability III
(GE: Two courses toward Category II and one course toward Category III)
UNI STU 15A- 15B- 15C Consciousness I
and Consciousness II
and Consciousness III
(GE: One course toward Category I-equivalent of WRITING 39C, one course toward Category III, and two courses toward Category IV.)
UNI STU 16A- 16B- 16C How Race Is Made I
and How Race Is Made II
and How Race Is Made III
(GE: One course toward category I–equivalent of WRITING 39C, one course toward category III, one course toward category IV, one course toward category VII, and one additional course toward either category III or IV.)

Freshman Seminar Program

611C Aldrich Hall
949-824-1955
http://freshmanseminar.uci.edu/ (Freshmen)
seminars@uci.edu

Small seminars are offered to new Freshmen students to introduce them to the academic culture of UC Irvine. Faculty from a broad range of disciplines teach about topics of current interest in sections of up to 15 students. These seminars are a great way for new students to learn about a variety of academic fields, meet a faculty member who can serve as a mentor, get to know other new students with similar interests, and take a small class as one of their first courses on campus.

Freshman Seminars (UNI STU 3 classes) are offered all three quarters, with priority given to new students who can enroll in a maximum of three sections during their time at UCI. Details of each quarter’s offerings are available on the program website and in the Schedule of Classes.

International Students Excellence Program

949-824-6776
http://internationalpeergroup.uci.edu/
ahmedz@uci.edu

The International Students Excellence Program's (ISEP) mission is to assist UCI's international freshmen in making a smooth transition into university life. ISEP provides both academic excellence and social support in order to engage international students in UCI’s vibrant campus life and help them create solid relationships in their new environment. It is based on strong mentor/mentee relationships that encourage cultural exploration as well as academic and personal success. In addition to individual mentoring, ISEP offers small group meetings and larger group events during Welcome Week and throughout the year. Students with questions or who do not yet have a mentor should contact the office.

Learning and Academic Resource Center

284 Rowland Hall
949-824-6451
http://larc.uci.edu
larc@uci.edu

The Learning and Academic Resource Center (LARC) provides academic support programs for undergraduate students. These include course-specific tutorials, as well as Academic Learning Skills workshops on specific study skills (e.g. time management, academic reading, preparing for exams, etc.) that can be applied to all courses. Tutorials are regularly-scheduled, informal review sessions in which 12-15 students enrolled in the same lecture compare notes, discuss readings, develop organizational tools, and predict test items in two, 50-minute LARC Sessions per week. The primary goal of the LARC program is to facilitate student collaboration among peers to increase understanding and retention of course-specific material for academic success. By working together, students learn how to integrate course content and learning skills to become independent, successful learners.

Peer Academic Advising Program

256 Aldrich Hall
949-824-3559
http://peeradvisor.uci.edu

The Peer Academic Advising Program provides valuable services for all UCI undergraduate students. It is the source of student-to-student academic counseling based not only on academic, but also personal experiences of UCI students. Peer academic advisors (PAAs) are juniors and seniors who rigorously train in academic counseling before beginning work as PAAs. They are found in the offices of various academic units all over campus. PAA training prepares them to manage issues related to academic counseling and enables them to obtain a wide knowledge of campus resources available to students, such as the Career Center, Office of Disability Services, Financial Aid, Housing, and the Learning and the Academic Resource Center (LARC). The information PAAs provide students also comes from their personal experience as successful UCI undergraduates.

During the academic year, PAAs maintain regular office hours in their respective academic units. They assist students in selecting courses to best fit their college and career paths, planning quarterly programs of study, learning about the various majors and minors, obtaining information about UCI's resources and opportunities, and simply adjusting to life as UCI undergraduates.

Scholarship Opportunities Program

193 Science Library
949-824-0189
http://scholars.uci.edu
sklrship@uci.edu

UCI encourages high-achieving undergraduates to compete successfully for the most prestigious scholarships, grants, and graduate fellowships available, and to begin learning about the process as early as possible. The Scholarship Opportunities Program (SOP) organizes and disseminates information on a select group of prestigious awards that are national and international in scope; including opportunities for funded research and study at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The SOP also facilitates UCI’s processes for evaluating applications and endorsing candidates for awards requiring University nomination. Additionally, staff provide individual and group counseling, present workshops, assist students with curriculum vitae (CVs), and edit Statements of Purpose and research/project proposals.

Student Success Initiatives

2100 Student Services II
949-824-6234
http://sss.uci.edu
osss@uci.edu

Student Success Initiatives (SSI) provides students with the personal, academic, and professional support and development to thrive and succeed at UCI and beyond. SSI is dedicated to serving and assisting with the transitions of low-income students, first-generation students, undocumented students, former foster youth, transfer students, adult-learners, students with dependents, and students with disabilities. SSI also provides a learning community that empowers students to be productive and engaged in their academic careers and personal endeavors. Drop-in counseling, scholarships for tutoring, peer mentoring, and weekly workshops are offered throughout the year. Summer academic programs are also available for incoming students.

SSI administers and oversees the Summer Bridge Program at UCI for eligible students who are committed to starting their academic careers in the summer in order to achieve their full academic potential. Summer Bridge is designed to provide opportunities for students to earn academic credit, make a successful academic and social transition to the University, build relationships with peers, and engage with UCI faculty and staff.

Students are encouraged to visit SSI and meet our staff. Appointments can be made with the SSI staff by phone or email. Additional information is available on the SSI website.

Study Abroad Center

1100 Student Services II
949-824-6343
http://studyabroad.uci.edu
studyabroad@uci.edu

In partnership with the Office of Global Engagement, the Study Abroad Center is a comprehensive resource and counseling center that helps students take advantage of the many worldwide opportunities that exist for study, work, internship, volunteering, research, and non-credentialed teaching that relates to their degree programs at UCI.

Studying abroad is an important resource for achieving the skills, knowledge, and understanding that will make today’s undergraduates effective citizens and leaders in local, national, and global affairs once they depart the University. In today’s political and business environment, college graduates must be informed decision-makers with a capacity to reflect on their own values while understanding the complex identities, histories, and cultures of others. Studying abroad provides students with the language skills and cultural competence necessary to meet the current demands of business, government, and educational institutions.

Professional staff and peer advisors, who have returned from experiences abroad, are available to guide students in making appropriate choices of international programs for their educational goals. Advising is available when UCI is in session. Participants are provided with pre-departure and reentry orientations.

Students are advised to plan early in their academic career in order to best match studying abroad with their major to graduate on time. Programs are available for students in every major. The wide variety of programs includes those offering general curriculum, intensive language study, and programs focusing on a specific academic subject area. Preliminary guidance is available at the Study Abroad Academic Planning website. Students are encouraged to combine undergraduate research and studying abroad. Coordinated advising between the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program and the Study Abroad Center facilitates this option. Participation in study abroad satisfies category VIII, international/global issues, of the UCI general education requirement. Students are encouraged to study abroad as a sophomore or junior, allowing the opportunity to incorporate their international learning into their final year at UCI.

The cost of studying abroad is often comparable to the cost of studying at UCI, while some options cost more and some cost less. Financial aid remains available while students study abroad and scholarships are also available.

Students may participate in the University of California Education Abroad Program (UCEAP) offering more than 300 programs in 40 countries for UC students; UC summer programs offered by other UC campuses; and hundreds of programs through UCI’s International Opportunities Program (IOP), which is the link between UCI students and any international educational experience that occurs outside the boundaries of the U.S. and is not a part of UCEAP nor a UC campus summer program.

Transfer Student Center

2200 Student Services II
949-824-1142
http://transferhub.uci.edu/
transfer@uci.edu

The Transfer Student Hub (TSH) works with new and returning transfer students to facilitate their transition and overall success at UCI by directing them to appropriate campus programs and services, organizing weekly workshops, providing formal and informal mentoring, and offering a space for study. The Transfer Student Hub strives to foster a sense of community among the transfer student population at UCI and advocates for transfer students in order to enhance their academic and social experience. The Transfer Student Hub works closely with Tau Sigma National Honor Society for transfer students and provides guidance in this organizations’ work to advocate and support transfer students at UCI.

Students are encouraged to visit TSH and meet with the staff. TSH staff can be reached in person, by telephone or via e-mail.  Additional information is available on the TSH website.

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program

2300 Student Services II
949-824-4189
http://urop.uci.edu
urop@uci.edu

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), encourages and facilitates research and creative activities by undergraduates. Research opportunities are available not only from every discipline, interdisciplinary programs, and schools, but also from many outside agencies, including national laboratories, industrial partners, and other universities. UROP offers assistance to students and faculty through all phases of the research activity: proposal writing, developing research plans, resource support, conducting the research and analyzing data, and presenting results of the research at the annual spring UCI Undergraduate Research Symposium. Calls for proposals are issued in the fall and spring quarters. Projects supported by UROP may be done at any time during the academic year and/or summer, and the research performed must meet established academic standards and emphasize interaction between the student and the faculty supervisor. In addition, all students participating in faculty-guided research activities are welcome to submit their research papers for faculty review and possible publication in the annual UCI Undergraduate Research Journal.

UROP also sponsors the following programs:

  • Biophotonic Summer Undergraduate Research Program (B-SURP)
  • Edwards Life Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research Program (E-SURP)
  • Integrated Micro/Nano Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (IM-SURE)
  • Inter-Disciplinary Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (ID-SURE)
  • Multidisciplinary Design Program (MDP)
  • Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in Information Technology (SURF-IT)
  • Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP)

Complete information on current UROP programs can be found on the UROP website. For additional questions, contact UROP in person, telephone or by email.

Undergraduate/Undeclared Advising Program

256 Aldrich Hall
949-824-6987
http://uu.uci.edu

Students who enter the University as freshmen or sophomores may be uncertain about which major they should choose and may not feel ready to declare their major or even to identify their interests with a particular school. Such students participate in the Undergraduate/Undeclared Advising Program, which is administered by the Division of Undergraduate Education. The goal of the Undergraduate/Undeclared Advising Program is to help students make the best informed choice of a major that is possible to meet their academic goals. All students at UCI are required to choose their major by the time they reach junior status.

To make a good decision about which major to declare, students should know the range of programs UCI offers and have some experience with them, have a good knowledge of their own abilities and interests, have clear educational goals, and have a sense of their vocational goals and of the academic programs at UCI that will provide appropriate preparation. Students in the Undergraduate/Undeclared Advising Program meet with faculty and receive quarterly individualized staff counseling that helps them explore the variety of course offerings on campus, become more aware of their own interests and abilities, formulate sound educational goals, and learn how to prepare for graduate education and/or possible careers.

To assist students in choosing a major, the program offers a course designed to expose Undeclared students to a variety of opportunities and resources available to them and to introduce students to the schools and majors offered. In addition, students learn about research and career opportunities within different disciplines.

UTeach

611C Aldrich Hall
949-824-1955
http://sites.uci.edu/uteach/
uci.uteach@gmail.com

The UTeach program enables upper-division UCI undergraduates to design, develop, and deliver their own lower-division seminar classes. This provides an opportunity to integrate research, teaching, and learning, as contemplated by UC’s mission.

Candidate student-instructors (prospective “UTeachers”) apply for the program in the spring quarter, describing their proposed course and designating a faculty mentor to supervise their research and development. Applications are reviewed near the end of the quarter by the UTeach Student-Faculty Advisory Board (for more information, see the UTeach website). 

During the summer and fall, prospective UTeachers are expected to conduct research with their faculty mentor. They enroll in an independent study course (UNI STU 197A) with their mentor in the fall, producing a draft syllabus and course plan. The Advisory Board reviews these documents at the end of fall quarter. UTeachers whose courses pass the review enroll in a pedagogy seminar (UNI STU 197B) in the winter quarter; this seminar focuses on presentation skills, classroom management, active learning, and discussion of each other’s teaching presentations. After final approval of the syllabus and course plan, UTeachers deliver their seminars in the spring quarter and attend a weekly seminar (UNI STU 197C) that addresses practical teaching issues that have come up in the UTeachers’ classes.

The UTeach seminars (sections of UNI STU 7) are offered for one unit of P/NP credit in spring quarter. In their entire time at UCI, students may enroll for credit in at most two sections of UNI STU 7.

Reserve Officers Trainng Corps Courses

ROTC 10L. Military Science-Basic Leadership Laboratory. 1 Workload Unit.

Provides hands-on and practical military science material covered in the corresponding military science courses.

Grading Option: Workload Credit P/NP Only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ROTC 11. Military Science-Personal Development. 1 Workload Unit.

Focuses on life skills such as physical fitness, nutrition, and time management while providing an introduction to military knowledge, customs, and skills.

ROTC 12. Military Science-Leadership I. 1 Workload Unit.

Focuses on the fundamentals of leadership, Army leadership values, ethics, and counseling techniques.

ROTC 13. Military Science-Tactical Leadership I. 1 Workload Unit.

Focuses on leadership at the tactical level and includes instruction in fundamental military skills such as map reading, land navigation, squad and platoon operations, and resource planning techniques.

ROTC 21. Military Science-Team Leadership I. 2 Workload Units.

Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership requirements model.

ROTC 22. Military Science-Team Leadership II. 2 Workload Units.

Explores team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership requirements model.

ROTC 23. Military Science-Tactical Leadership II . 2 Workload Units.

Examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the OE. Highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders.

ROTC 100L. Military Science-Advanced Leadership Laboratory. 1 Workload Unit.

Provides hands-on and practical exercises for the military science material covered in the corresponding military science courses as well as leader training through practical application of the Leadership Development Program.

Corequisite: ROTC 131 or ROTC 132 or ROTC 133 or ROTC 141 or ROTC 142 or ROTC 143 or ROTC 197.

Grading Option: Workload Credit P/NP Only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ROTC 131. Military Science-Leadership II. 3 Workload Units.

Challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Cadets receive systematic and specified feedback on their leadership attributes and core leader competencies.

Corequisite: ROTC 100L
Prerequisite: ROTC 11 and ROTC 12 and ROTC 13 and ROTC 21 and ROTC 22 and ROTC 23

ROTC 132. Military Science-Team Leadership III. 3 Workload Units.

Provides cadets systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and core leader competencies. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities.

Corequisite: ROTC 100L
Prerequisite: ROTC 11 and ROTC 12 and ROTC 13 and ROTC 21 and ROTC 22 and ROTC 23

ROTC 133. Military Science-Tactical Leadership III. 3 Workload Units.

Uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills in leading small units. Skills in decision-making, persuading, and motivating team members when "under fire" are explored, evaluated, and developed.

Corequisite: ROTC 100L
Prerequisite: ROTC 11 and ROTC 12 and ROTC 13 and ROTC 21 and ROTC 22 and ROTC 23

ROTC 141. Military Science-Leadership III . 3 Workload Units.

Transitions the focus of student learning from being trained, mentored, and evaluated as a cadet to learning how to train, mentor, and evaluate cadets. Cadets begin to learn the duties and responsibilities of an Army staff officer.

Corequisite: ROTC 100L
Prerequisite: ROTC 131 and ROTC 132 and ROTC 133

ROTC 142. Military Science-Leadership IV. 3 Workload Units.

Requires students to continue to train, mentor, and evaluate underclass cadets. Cadets learn to safely conduct training by understanding and employing the Composite Risk Management Process and the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program.

Corequisite: ROTC 100L
Prerequisite: ROTC 131 and ROTC 132 and ROTC 133 and ROTC 141

ROTC 143. Military Science-Officership. 3 Workload Units.

Explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the OE. Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism.

Corequisite: ROTC 100L
Prerequisite: ROTC 131 and ROTC 132 and ROTC 133 and ROTC 141 and ROTC 142

ROTC 151. United States Military History-1607 to 1865. 3 Workload Units.

Examines the creation of the American military establishment and traces its evolution in the context of the changing nature of warfare, the progression of military professionalism, and social, political, economic, and technological developments through the Civil War.

ROTC 152. United States Military History-1865 to 1945. 3 Workload Units.

Examines the evolution of the American military establishment and the progression of military professionalism in terms of social, political, economic, military, and technological developments from the end of the Civil War through World War II.

ROTC 153. United States Military History-1945 to 2001. 3 Workload Units.

Examines the evolution of the American military establishment and the progression of military professionalism in terms of social, political, economic, military, and technological developments from the Cold War to the War on Terrorism.

ROTC 197. Military Science Independent Studies. 2-4 Workload Units.

Provides intensive, individual study with scheduled meetings to be arranged between Cadre and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

UC Washington DC Courses

UCDC 170. Washington DC Internship. 4-8 Units.

Supervised internship (20-40 hours per week) in Washington DC government, nonprofit, or private institution consistent with student's interest.

Corequisite: UCDC 180
Prerequisite: Selected for Washington DC Center Program.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

UCDC 180. Washington-Themed Seminar. 4 Units.

UCDC core course (multiple topics offered each quarter). Enhances students' experiential learning and imparts knowledge and skills to help them transition into public service/private sector positions. One core course per quarter mandatory for all participants in Washington DC Center Program.

Prerequisite: Selected for Washington DC Center Program.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

UCDC 190. Washington DC Elective. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas related to the UC Washington, DC Center Program (UCDC).

Prerequisite: Selected for Washington DC Center Program.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

University Affairs Courses

UNI AFF 1A. Student Participation. 1.3 Unit.

Campus projects with a University department to enrich academic growth and development as well as academic growth and development of UCI. Includes 30 hours per quarter working on proposed project under faculty/staff supervision. Paper required.

Prerequisite: Project must be approved by a Student Affairs Department head and the instructor.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

UNI AFF 1B. Student Participation. 1.3 Unit.

Campus projects with a University department to enrich academic growth and development as well as academic growth and development of UCI. Includes 30 hours per quarter working on proposed project under faculty/staff supervision. Paper required.

Prerequisite: UNI AFF 1A

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

UNI AFF 1C. Student Participation. 1.3 Unit.

Campus projects with a University department to enrich academic growth and development as well as academic growth and development of UCI. Includes 30 hours per quarter working on proposed project under faculty/staff supervision. Paper required.

Prerequisite: UNI AFF 1B

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

University Studies Courses

UNI STU 1. Freshman Experience. 2 Units.

An introduction to the freshman experience provides an overview of the University's aims and resources and exploration of developmental theories and skills necessary for academic success. Attention is also paid to questions of personal development and major choice. Materials fee.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

UNI STU 3. Mini-Seminars . 1 Unit.

Designed primarily for freshmen as introduction to scholarly inquiry. Each section is taught by a faculty member from one of the academic disciplines and presents interesting and challenging topics representing the instructor's interest. Students participate in discussions, presentations, and projects.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

UNI STU 4. Transfer Student Seminars. 1 Unit.

Designed primarily for transfer students during their first year at UCI. Each section is taught by a faculty member from one of the academic disciplines as introduction to scholarly inquiry in their discipline. Students participate in discussions, presentations, and projects.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: New students only. Upper-division only until first week of classes.

UNI STU 6. University Studies International Village Seminar. 1 Unit.

Seminars held in International Village that are specifically designed to either (a) introduce visiting international students to the U.S. and/or local area and institutions or (b) engage both international and U.S. students in discussion of topics of international interest.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

UNI STU 7. UTeach: Student-Taught Seminar. 1 Unit.

Student-taught seminar courses on selected topics. Topics vary each year according to the interest of the students teaching the classes.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

UNI STU 10. Introduction to Civic and Community Engagement. 4 Units.

Provides a foundation for understanding the role of public scholarship, civic engagement, and social action, and the relationship between service learning and engaged citizenship. Introduces key theoretical and research methodologies on the traditions and innovations of civic and community engagement.

UNI STU 13A. Introduction to Global Sustainability I. 4 Units.

Introduces Earth as a system and living planet. Examines physical and biological resources as well as energy, water, climate, and ecosystems. Introduces and applies analytic lens of environmental, social, and economic sustainability to examine human impacts and resource use.

Restriction: Lower-division students only.

(II)

UNI STU 13B. Introduction to Global Sustainability II. 4 Units.

Introduces Earth as a system and living planet. Examines physical and biological resources as well as energy, water, climate, and ecosystems. Introduces and applies analytic lens of environmental, social, and economic sustainability to examine human impacts and resource use.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 13A

(II)

UNI STU 13C. Introduction to Global Sustainability III. 4 Units.

Introduces Earth as a system and living planet. Examines physical and biological resources as well as energy, water, climate, and ecosystems. Introduces and applies analytic lens of environmental, social, and economic sustainability to examine human impacts and resource use.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 13B

(III)

UNI STU 15A. Consciousness I. 5 Units.

Introduces students to the theory of consciousness in the disciplines of cognitive science, philosophy, literature, psychoanalysis, and fine arts as represented in the genres of poetry, fiction, and film.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Restriction: Freshmen only.

UNI STU 15B. Consciousness II. 5 Units.

Introduces students to the theory of consciousness in the disciplines of cognitive science, philosophy, literature, psychoanalysis, and fine arts as represented in the genres of poetry, fiction, and film.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 15A. Prerequisite or corequisite: WRITING 39B. WRITING 39B with a grade of C or better.

Restriction: Freshmen only.

(IV)

UNI STU 15C. Consciousness III. 5 Units.

Introduces students to the theory of consciousness in the disciplines of cognitive science, philosophy, literature, psychoanalysis, and fine arts as represented in the genres of poetry, fiction, and film.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 15B and WRITING 39B. WRITING 39B with a grade of C or better

Restriction: Freshmen only.

(IA and III and IV ).

UNI STU 16A. How Race Is Made I. 5 Units.

Introduces students to an examination of how race is "made" in America and the consequences of this construction through a variety of lenses: historical, legal, anthropological, sociological, and pop culture.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Restriction: Freshmen only.

UNI STU 16B. How Race Is Made II. 5 Units.

Introduces students to an examination of how race is "made" in America and the consequences of this construction through a variety of lenses: historical, legal, anthropological, sociological, and pop culture.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 16A. Prerequisite or corequisite: WRITING 39B. WRITING 39B with a grade of C or better.

Restriction: Freshmen only.

(IV)

UNI STU 16C. How Race Is Made III. 5 Units.

Introduces students to an examination of how race is "made" in America and the consequences of this construction through a variety of lenses: historical, legal, anthropological, sociological, and pop culture.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 16B and WRITING 39B. WRITING 39B with a grade of C or better

Restriction: Freshmen only.

(Ia, III, IV, VII)

UNI STU 17C. Water III. 5 Units.

Introduces students to water as a global and contested resource across space, time, and peoples from a scientific, historical and policy perspective. Wherever possible, examples are drawn from the local environment.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 17B and (WRITING 39B or HUMAN 1B). WRITING 39B with a grade of C or better. HUMAN 1B with a grade of C or better

(n/a ).

UNI STU 42. Sankofa Project. 2 Workload Units.

The purpose of this course is to strengthen intercultural understanding and cooperation among UCI students.

Grading Option: Workload Credit P/NP Only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

UNI STU 43. Topics in Illuminations . 1 Unit.

This course connects students to Illuminations, the Chancellor’s Arts and Culture Initiative. Students will attend five Illuminations-sponsored events and engage in brief preparatory and reflective activities in response to these events.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

UNI STU 45. Graduate School Opportunities and Preparation. 1 Unit.

Explores the opportunities associated with graduate school by considering a wide range of disciplines and career paths. Reviews professional and academic paths in graduate school and the ways to prepare for a chosen path.

UNI STU 83. Pathways to University Success. 2 Units.

Helps first-year students transition to UC Irvine and promotes a successful University experience. Students learn about academic resources and programs that support acclimation to the campus and enhance academic development through lectures, discussions, and a range of co-curricular activities.

Overlaps with UNI STU 84.

UNI STU 84. Bridges to University Success. 4 Units.

Helps first-year students transition to UC Irvine and promotes a successful University experience. Students learn about academic resources/programs that support acclimation to the campus and enhance academic development through lectures, writing laboratories, discussions, and a range of co-curricular activities.

Overlaps with UNI STU 83.

UNI STU 85A. Leading from Within. 4 Units.

Students examine characteristics and behaviors of effective leaders. Study the history and theoretical framework for understanding effective leadership. In addition, examine their own leadership strengths and weakness and become familiar with the theory behind and use of comprehensive self-assessment tools.

(III)

UNI STU 85B. Leading Others. 4 Units.

Students examine best practices within a team environment. They learn goal setting, diagnosing performance problems, designing solutions, and recognizing relevant differences in culture, priorities, and values within a team through lectures, writing, discussions, and practical activities.

(III)

UNI STU 85C. Leading Change. 4 Units.

Focused on a global viewpoint, students learn the theoretical framework behind innovation and change management. Develop innovative solutions to real-world challenges, design strategies to bring an expansive vision into fruition, and learn to communicate a vision and strategies.

(III)

UNI STU 93. Strategies for Success. 2 Workload Units.

Designed to develop good study skills in technical fields and the participation of students as active learners in their education. Topics include time management, analytical thinking, text analysis, academic survival strategies, and goal setting.

Grading Option: Workload Credit P/NP Only.

UNI STU 100. Doing Research in the Community. 4 Units.

Critically reimagines the research endeavor and its participants/outcomes. Grapples with methods, values, and relationships involved in research. Explores alternative conceptions of research; focus is community-based. Students work in teams on real-world community research projects with faculty mentors and community partners.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 10

UNI STU 108. Introduction to Research. 4 Workload Units.

Introduces new transfer students to research culture of the University. Students learn about the importance of research and creative activities as they are framed in a broad range of disciplines and are introduced to general research methods and approaches.

Grading Option: Workload Credit P/NP Only.

Restriction: Transfer Summer Bridge Program students only.

UNI STU 170. Advanced Internship in Undergraduate Education. 1-2 Workload Units.

Advanced interns have a year's internship experience and return to contribute to Undergraduate Education programs in a leadership position. Students work three-five hours per week in a DUE office to coordinate or lead less-experienced interns and/or events.

Prerequisite: UNI AFF 1A and UNI AFF 1B and UNI AFF 1C

Grading Option: Workload Credit P/NP Only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 6 units.

UNI STU 175. Methods and Application in Small Group Instruction. 2 Workload Units.

Explores various theories and methods of learning and development and their practical application in small group settings. Peer tutors receive instruction in the design, implementation, and evaluation of an effective learning environment for undergraduate students.

Grading Option: Workload Credit P/NP Only.

Restriction: Learning and Academic Resource Center employed tutors only.

UNI STU H176A. Campuswide Honors Thesis Seminar. 2 Units.

Supports the honors thesis research activities of Campuswide Honors Program students. Students set research goals, discuss, and develop their research interests.

Corequisite: Students must sign up separately for 8 units of independent study with faculty mentors.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

UNI STU H176C. Campuswide Honors Thesis Seminar. 2 Units.

Supports the honors thesis research activities of Campuswide Honors Program students. Students work with each other to improve both written and spoken presentations of their results.

Corequisite: Students must sign up separately for 8 units of independent study with faculty mentors.
Prerequisite: UNI STU H176A

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: Campuswide Honors Program students only.

UNI STU 181. Internship in Civic and Community Engagement. 2-4 Workload Units.

Provides an opportunity to extend learning into a community-based setting addressing important social, environmental, and public issues. The internship project has a creative and scholarly component where students initiate their own action or inquiry experience.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 10

Grading Option: Workload Credit P/NP Only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

UNI STU 190. Teaching Seminar: Theory and Practice. 2 Units.

For students selected to be discussion leaders for University Studies 2. Models of teaching, developmental theory applied to college freshmen, curriculum development. Practice of teaching techniques and group management skills.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

UNI STU 192. Group Project for Discussion Leaders. 4 Units.

For discussion leaders for University Studies 2. Weekly discussion group training for leading effective groups in addition to evaluations of weekly discussion sections and completion of a special project on issues of freshman development. Materials fee.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

Restriction: Discussion leaders only.

UNI STU 195A. Engaged Leadership. 4 Units.

Three-quarter series on civic education theory, the civic mission of higher education, and community-based action research methods. Provides students with a solid grounding in civic education theory while also creating opportunities for students to practice civic habits.

UNI STU 195B. Engaged Leadership. 4 Units.

Three-quarter series on civic education theory, the civic mission of higher education, and community-based action research methods. Provides students with a solid grounding in civic education theory while also creating opportunities for students to practice civic habits.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 195A

UNI STU 195C. Engaged Leadership. 4 Units.

Three-quarter series on civic education theory, the civic mission of higher education, and community-based action research methods. Provides students with a solid grounding in civic education theory while also creating opportunities for students to practice civic habits.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 195B

UNI STU 196. Directed Studies in Undergraduate Education. 1-4 Units.

Students do directed study (research, readings, etc.) on a topic related to Undergraduate Education under the supervision of one of the faculty who serve as Deans or Faculty Directors in the Division of Undergraduate Education.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 12 units.

UNI STU 197A. UTeach Special Study. 2 Units.

Students accepted to teach a UTeach course in spring quarter enroll in Special or Independent Study with their faculty mentor during the preceding fall quarter to develop their detailed course syllabus.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: UTeach Program students only.

UNI STU 197B. UTeach: Teaching Theory and Practice. 2 Units.

Students accepted to teach a UTeach course in spring quarter enroll during the winter to develop their teaching skills in preparation for teaching the following quarter.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 197A

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: UTeach Program students only.

UNI STU 197C. UTeach: Teaching Practicum. 2 Units.

Students selected to teach in the UTeach Program teach their courses and meet weekly in a seminar to continue to develop and enhance their teaching skills.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 197B

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: UTeach Program students only.

UNI STU 197D. Study Abroad Experiential Learning. 1 Unit.

Study abroad on an approved program. Complete critical reflection (written paper, blog, etc.) submitted no later than the end of the quarter following the completion of the study abroad program. Enroll while studying abroad or the quarter immediately following return.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

UNI STU 197E. Reflections While Abroad. 1 Unit.

For students while they are studying abroad; maximizing learning outcomes by critically reflecting on learning experiences while abroad. Topics include cultural observations, professional issues, cultural competence, etc. Participants are located in different countries around the world.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

UNI STU 198. Pedagogy of Small Group Facilitation - Learning Assistants. 1-4 Units.

Overview and readings in evidence-based instruction for undergraduate learning assistants. Learning assistants receive instruction, training, and feedback on effective small group facilitation and active learning. To be taken while serving as a learning assistant in a course.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 6 times.

UNI STU 296. Graduate Legal Studies . 0.3 Units.

Monthly faculty/student colloquium to present and discuss socio-legal related research/issues. Course convened by Law School faculty with other faculty participation. Required for PLGS students enrolled in Law portion of degree.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only. Law students only.

UNI STU 297. California Community College Internship. 2-8 Units.

The California Community College Internship offers graduate students the opportunity to learn about faculty life, governance, and teaching at local community colleges. Structures fieldwork for students to participate in and reflect on the educational mission of community colleges.

Prerequisite: Teaching experience.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 10 units.

Restriction: MFA or Doctoral students who have advanced to candidacy.

UNI STU 390A. Advanced Pedagogy and Academic Job Preparation. 2-4 Units.

Focuses on advanced pedagogical research and practices. Students design and implement an integrated curriculum in the context of the TA Professional Development Program. Prepare for the academic job market by developing application materials and reviewing Pedagogical Fellow applicants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Must be a pedagogical fellow.

UNI STU 390B. Advanced Pedagogy and Academic Job Preparation. 2-4 Units.

Focuses on advanced pedagogical research and practices. Students design and implement an integrated curriculum in the context of the TA Professional Development Program. Prepare for the academic job market by developing application materials and reviewing Pedagogical Fellow applicants.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 390A

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Must be a pedagogical fellow.

UNI STU 390C. Advanced Pedagogy and Academic Job Preparation. 2-4 Units.

Focuses on advanced pedagogical research and practices. Students design and implement an integrated curriculum in the context of the TA Professional Development Program. Prepare for the academic job market by developing application materials and reviewing Pedagogical Fellow applicants.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 390B

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Must be a pedagogical fellow.

UNI STU 390X. Developing Teaching Excellence. 2-4 Units.

An introduction to evidence-based instructional design and methods, specifically for higher education courses. Students practice, observe, and design instruction based on pedagogical literature. Meets most of the requirements for the Certificate in Teaching Excellence Program.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit for 8 units.

UNI STU 395. Seminar for Teaching as Research. 1 Unit.

Preparation and implementation of a teaching as research project in higher education. Participants learn research, experimental design, human subjects, and statistical analysis.

Prerequisite: UNI STU 390B

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

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