Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry


Christopher C.W. Hughes, Department Chair
Donald F. Senear, Department Vice Chair
3205 McGaugh Hall
949-824-4915
http://mbb.bio.uci.edu/

Overview

The research interests of faculty in the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry include structure and synthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, regulation, virology, biochemical genetics, gene organization, nucleic acids and proteins, cell and developmental biology, molecular genetics, biomedical genetics, and immunology.

The Department offers graduate study in conjunction with the program in Cellular and Molecular Biosciences (CMB) and the Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program (INP). Students admitted into a combined program who select a research advisor in the Department begin following the departmental requirements for the Ph.D. at the beginning of their second year. Participation in an advanced topics seminar series and completion of at least one course per year for three years are expected of all students. Students must advance to candidacy in their third year. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is five years, and the maximum time permitted is seven years.

Graduate Gateway Program in Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology (MCP). The one-year MCP graduate gateway program is designed to function in concert with selected graduate programs, including the Ph.D. in Biological Sciences. Detailed information is available on the Pharmaceutical Sciences website.

Undergraduate Major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Few areas of Biological Sciences remain that are not impacted by studies at the chemical and molecular level. The major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is designed to provide a comprehensive background in this modern, conceptual understanding of biology. Students who wish to begin in-depth study of the molecular basis in any of a variety of fields, including development, gene expression, immunology, pathogenesis, disease, virology, and evolution, can do so through this major. This program will be especially attractive to those students who intend to pursue an advanced degree in biological or medical sciences.

The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major is based upon required courses in Advanced Biochemistry and Advanced Molecular Biology (BIO SCI M114 and BIO SCI M116). These courses, together with a wide variety of elective course offerings, provide majors the choice to either explore the breadth of the field or follow a more in-depth study of any of its subdisciplines. For students interested in the interface between biology and chemistry, this program articulates well with a second major in Chemistry.

The program of study emphasizes laboratory experience and its integration with basic theory. This is accomplished in three ways: first, through coordination between the advanced courses in Biochemistry (BIO SCI M114) and Molecular Biology (BIO SCI M116), and laboratory courses in Biochemistry (BIO SCI M114L) and Molecular Biology (BIO SCI M116L) which provide students with the basic laboratory skills and an appreciation for the experimental foundations of the field; second, through advanced laboratories in Immunology (BIO SCI M121L) and Virology (BIO SCI M127L) which provide students with the opportunity to develop cutting edge research skills; and third, by emphasizing independent research sponsored by a participating faculty member. The program encourages the research interests of students in subdisciplines other than immunology or virology by offering the opportunity to substitute one year of independent research for the advanced laboratory.

The major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is designed to provide students with the appropriate tools and training to successfully pursue graduate degrees that emphasize basic scientific research, including Ph.D. and M.S. training as well as combined M.D./Ph.D. programs. In addition, and particularly with the explosive growth in biotechnology and its significant influence in everyday life, graduates could use their backgrounds very effectively to pursue careers in business, education, law, and public affairs.

Requirements for the B.S. Degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Major Requirements
A. Required Major Courses:
BIO SCI M114 Advanced Biochemistry
BIO SCI M116 Advanced Molecular Biology
B. Upper-Division Laboratories:
BIO SCI M114L Biochemistry Laboratory
BIO SCI M116L Molecular Biology Laboratory
Select one of the following:
Advanced Immunology Laboratory
Virus Engineering Laboratory
Virology and Immunology Laboratory
Advanced Molecular Lab Techniques
BIO SCI 199 Study in Biological Science Research (Approved by the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Faculty Board.)
C. Upper-Division Biology Electives:
Select three of the following:
Select one of the following:
Eukaryotic and Human Genetics
Genomics, Development, and Medicine
Introduction to Chemical Biology
Quantum Principles
Molecular Structure and Elementary Statistical Mechanics
Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics
Molecular Pharmacology I
Physical Biochemistry
Select two four-unit courses from the following:
BIO SCI D103–D189, E106–E189, M119–M190, N110–N189
Introduction to Chemical Biology
Quantum Principles
Molecular Structure and Elementary Statistical Mechanics
Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics
Molecular Pharmacology I
Physical Biochemistry
No course may be used to satisfy more than one requirement.

 Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time, but typically in the spring of the sophomore year. Review of applications submitted at that time and selection to the major by the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Faculty Board is completed during the summer. Information can also be found at the UCI Change of Major Criteria website. Double majors within the Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences or with Public Health Sciences, Biomedical Engineering: Premedical, Nursing Science, or Pharmaceutical Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program — Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Freshman
Fall Winter Spring
BIO SCI 93BIO SCI 94MATH 2A or 5A
CHEM 1ACHEM 1BCHEM 1C- 1LC
Lower-Division Writing1Lower-Division Writing1Lower-Division Writing1
BIO SCI 2A  
Sophomore
Fall Winter Spring
BIO SCI 97BIO SCI 98BIO SCI 99
CHEM 51ACHEM 51B- 51LBCHEM 51C- 51LC
CHEM 1LDGeneral EducationSTATS 7, 8, MATH 2D, or MATH 3A
MATH 2B or 5B  
BIO SCI 194S  
Junior
Fall Winter Spring
Biochem./Mol. electiveBIO SCI M114BIO SCI M116
Research/ElectiveBiochem./Mol. electiveBiochem./Mol. elective
BIO SCI 100BIO SCI M114LPHYSICS 3C- 3LC
PHYSICS 3APHYSICS 3B- 3LB 
Senior
Fall Winter Spring
Biochem./Mol. electiveBio. Sci. elective or labBio. Sci. elective or lab
BIO SCI M116LResearch/ElectiveResearch/Elective
Research/ElectiveGeneral Education/ElectiveGeneral Education/Elective
General Education/Elective  
1

Students have the option of taking HUMAN 1AS, HUMAN 1BS, HUMAN 1CS or WRITING 39A, WRITING 39B, WRITING 39C in order to fulfill the lower-division writing requirement.

Undergraduate Major in Microbiology and Immunology

Microbiology and immunology are well-established disciplines within the life sciences. Microbiology addresses the biology of bacteria, viruses, and unicellular eukaryotes such as fungi and protozoa. Studies of microorganisms reveal basic information about processes in evolution, genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, structural biology, and ecology. Many bacteria, viruses, and protozoa cause disease in plants and animals. Hence, major areas of medicine and public health focus on these microorganisms.

Immunology encompasses efforts to understand how multicellular organisms have evolved to survive a variety of challenges to health and survival, including threats by pathogens and cancer cells. Basic questions of how immunity functions are entwined with a fundamental understanding of the consequences of microbial infection. Immunology also refers to the study of autoimmunity, the attack of the host by its own immune system.

The study of viruses (virology) is an important branch of microbiology that has contributed to our understanding of most of the fundamental processes in eukaryotic molecular biology, including the discovery of oncogenes. Viruses provide an excellent tool for the study of disease, cancer, and mechanisms of gene control. With the growing threat of emerging diseases and the potential for viral-based biological weapons, the study of virology was recently intensified and gained new perspectives.

The major is designed primarily for students who are serious about pursuing careers in microbiology and immunology and is intended to provide its graduates with the appropriate tools and training to successfully pursue professional and graduate degrees emphasizing these disciplines. These include Ph.D., M.D., and combined M.D./Ph.D. programs. Majoring in Microbiology and Immunology will also provide resources for serious students wishing to use a solid background in these disciplines for career goals in business, law, public and environmental policy, education, and other pursuits.

Requirements for the B.S. Degree in Microbiology and Immunology 

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Major Requirements for Microbiology and Immunology
A. Required Major Courses:
BIO SCI M121 Immunology with Hematology
BIO SCI M122 General Microbiology
BIO SCI M124A Virology
B. Upper-Division Laboratories:
BIO SCI M116L Molecular Biology Laboratory
and either
BIO SCI M118L Experimental Microbiology Laboratory
or BIO SCI M121L Advanced Immunology Laboratory
or BIO SCI M127L Virology and Immunology Laboratory
C. Upper-Division Biology Electives:
Select at least four from the following:
Infectious Disease Dynamics
Evolution of Infectious Disease
Advanced Topics in Immunology
Signal Transduction in Mammalian Cells
Viral Pathogenesis and Immunity
Molecular Biology of Cancer
Innate Immunity, Infection, and Pathogenesis
Microbial Genetics
Human Parasitology
Biotechnological Applications of Energy and Environmental Research
Molecular Virology
and two can be selected from the following:
Cell Biology
Eukaryotic and Human Genetics
Advanced Biochemistry
Advanced Molecular Biology
Cell Organelles and Membranes

Application Process to Declare the Major: The major in Microbiology and Immunology is open to junior- and senior-level students only. Applications to declare the major can be made at any time, but typically in the spring of the sophomore year. Review of applications submitted at that time and selection to the major by the Microbiology and Immunology Faculty Board is completed during the summer. Information can also be found at the UCI Change of Major Criteria website. Double majors within the Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences or with Public Health Sciences, Biomedical Engineering: Premedical, Nursing Science, or Pharmaceutical Sciences are not permitted.

Sample Program — Microbiology and Immunology
Freshman
Fall Winter Spring
BIO SCI 93BIO SCI 94MATH 2A or 5A
CHEM 1ACHEM 1BCHEM 1C- 1LC
Lower-Division Writing1Lower-Division Writing1Lower-Division Writing1
General EducationGeneral Education 
BIO SCI 2A  
Sophomore
Fall Winter Spring
BIO SCI 97BIO SCI 98BIO SCI 99
CHEM 51ACHEM 51B- 51LBCHEM 51C- 51LC
CHEM 1LDGeneral EducationGeneral Education
MATH 2B or 5B STATS 7, 8, MATH 2D, or MATH 3A
BIO SCI 194S  
Junior
Fall Winter Spring
PHYSICS 3APHYSICS 3B- 3LBPHYSICS 3C- 3LC
BIO SCI M124ABIO SCI M121BIO SCI M122
BIO SCI 100BIO SCI M116LGeneral Education or U-D Lab
BIO SCI 199BIO SCI 199BIO SCI 199
Senior
Fall Winter Spring
U-D Biology ElectiveU-D Biology ElectiveU-D Biology Elective
U-D Biology ElectiveU-D Biology ElectiveU-D Biology Elective
BIO SCI 199BIO SCI 199BIO SCI 199
1

Students have the option of taking HUMAN 1AS, HUMAN 1BS, HUMAN 1CS or WRITING 39A, WRITING 39B, WRITING 39C in order to fulfill the lower-division writing requirement.

Courses

MOL BIO 200A. Research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. 2-12 Units.

Individual research with Molecular Biology and Biochemistry faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 200B. Research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. 2-12 Units.

Individual research with Molecular Biology and Biochemistry faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 200C. Research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. 2-12 Units.

Individual research with Molecular Biology and Biochemistry faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 200R. Research in Developmental & Cell Biology for First-year Students. 2-12 Units.

Independent research within the laboratories of graduate training faculty in the Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry for first-year Ph.D. students.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

MOL BIO 201A. Seminars in Molecular Biology & Biochemistry. 2 Units.

Presentation of research from department laboratories or, when pertinent, of other recent developments.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

MOL BIO 201B. Seminars in Molecular Biology & Biochemistry. 2 Units.

Presentation of research from department laboratories or, when pertinent, of other recent developments.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

MOL BIO 201C. Seminars in Molecular Biology & Biochemistry. 2 Units.

Presentation of research from department laboratories or, when pertinent, of other recent developments.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

MOL BIO 202A. Tutorial in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. 2 Units.

Tutorials in the area of research of a particular professor which relate current research to the literature. May be conducted as journal clubs.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

MOL BIO 202B. Tutorial in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. 2 Units.

Tutorials in the area of research of a particular professor which relate current research to the literature. May be conducted as journal clubs.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

MOL BIO 202C. Tutorial in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. 2 Units.

Tutorials in the area of research of a particular professor which relate current research to the literature. May be conducted as journal clubs.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

MOL BIO 203. Nucleic Acid Structure and Function. 4 Units.

Structure and chemistry of nucleic acids. Relationship between these properties and the mechanisms of fundamental processes such as replication and repair, RNA-mediated catalysis, formation and regulation of higher order chromatin structure and recombination.

Prerequisite: BIO SCI 98 and BIO SCI 99 and CHEM 51A and CHEM 51B and CHEM 51C.

MOL BIO 204. Protein Structure and Function. 4 Units.

The structure and properties of proteins, enzymes, and their kinetic properties.

Prerequisite: BIO SCI 98 and BIO SCI 99 and CHEM 51C.

MOL BIO 205. Molecular Virology. 4 Units.

Primary research data on the major DNA and RNA viruses emphasizing strategies of regulation of gene expression. Utilization of viruses as molecular biological tools. Graduate-level knowledge of the biochemistry and molecular biology of macromolecules is required.

Prerequisite: MOL BIO 203 and MOL BIO 204.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 211. High-Resolution Structures: NMR and X-ray. 4 Units.

Basic principles of magnetic resonance and x-ray crystallography toward the determination of high-resolution biomolecular structures.

Prerequisite: MATH 2B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with BIO SCI M133.

MOL BIO 213. Literature in Nucleic Acid Structure and Function. 2 Units.

Exploration and critical analysis of recent primary scientific literature in structure, properties, and biological mechanisms involving nucleic acids.

Corequisite: MOL BIO 203.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

MOL BIO 214. Literature in Protein Structure and Function. 2 Units.

Exploration and critical analysis of recent primary scientific literature in structure and properties of proteins, enzymes, and their kinetic properties.

Corequisite: MOL BIO 204.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

MOL BIO 215. Integrative Immunology. 4 Units.

Lectures and student presentations of primary literature. The main goal is to achieve a basic understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of innate and adaptive immunity, and how immune function is coordinated at a systems level.

Same as M&MG 215.

MOL BIO 217A. Principles of Cancer Biology I. 4 Units.

Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are studied from molecular viewpoints. Also studies their role in cancer; viral carcinogenesis. Designed for graduate students interested in cancer research. Format includes lectures and student-led discussions.

Prerequisite: MOL BIO 203 and MOL BIO 204.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 217B. Principles of Cancer Biology II. 4 Units.

Topics include cancer cell growth and metastasis, chemical carcinogenesis, and cancer genetics and epidemiology. Designed for graduate students interested in cancer research. Format includes lectures and student-led discussions.

Prerequisite: MOL BIO 203 and MOL BIO 204.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 218. Clinical Cancer. 3 Units.

Designed to acquaint students in basic life science with clinical cancer.

Restriction: Graduate students and Postdocs only.

MOL BIO 220. Structure & Synthesis of Biological Macromolecules Journal Club. 2 Units.

Advanced topics in macromolecular struture and synthesis as related to biological problems.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 221. Advanced Topics in Immunology. 4 Units.

Literature-based, interactive discussions focused on review of seminal historic and recent immunology literature. Student responsibilities include reading, critical evaluation, and discussion of manuscripts.

Prerequisite: M&MG 215.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 221L. Advanced Immunology Laboratory. 4 Units.

An advanced course in immunology for graduate students enrolled in the Biotechnology master's program. Emphasis is placed on learning modern techniques in immunology such as ELISAs, western blotting, immunofluorescent staining assays.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with BIO SCI M121L.

MOL BIO 223. Introduction to Computational Biology. 4 Units.

The use of theories and methods based on computer science, mathematics, and physics in molecular biology and biochemistry. Basics in biomolecular modeling. Analysis of sequence and structural data of biomolecules. Analysis of biomolecular functions.

Same as BME 232.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Concurrent with BIO SCI M123 and COMPSCI 183 and BME 132.

MOL BIO 227. Immunlology Journal Club. 2 Units.

Advanced topics in immunology as related to an understanding of human disease.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 15 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 227L. Virology and Immunology Laboratory. 5 Units.

Introductory laboratory course in virology and immunology designed for Biological Sciences graduate students. Curriculum includes plasmid preparation, plasmid characterization, microscopy, cell culture, transfection and infection of cells, cell counting, plaque assays, ELISA, Western blot, mixed lymphocyte reactions.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 229. Research-in-Progress Seminars. 1 Unit.

Two half-hour presentations by graduate students and postdoctorals to the department on their current research projects.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 15 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 250. Advanced Topics in Biotechnology - Nucleic Acids. 2 Units.

Supplements laboratory curriculum with scientific background behind experimental methods. Format consists of lectures and the presentation and analysis of relevant papers from the scientific literature.

Corequisite: MOL BIO 250L.

Restriction: Biotechnology graduate students only.

MOL BIO 250L. Biotechnology Laboratory - Nucleic Acids. 8 Units.

Nucleic acid techniques and recombinant DNA technology. Extraction and purification of nucleic acids, cloning and subcloning, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, nucleic acid hybridization, additional associated procedures. Students must demonstrate accurate documentation of data (laboratory notebook) detailing experience and results.

Corequisite: MOL BIO 250.

Restriction: Biotechnology graduate students only.

MOL BIO 251. Advanced Topics in Biotechnology - Protein Purification and Characterization. 2 Units.

Supplements laboratory curriculum with scientific background behind experimental methods. Format consists of lectures and the presentation and analysis of relevant papers from the scientific literature.

Corequisite: MOL BIO 251L.
Prerequisite: MOL BIO 250L and MOL BIO 250.

Restriction: Biotechnology graduate students only.

MOL BIO 251L. Biotechnology Laboratory - Protein Purification and Characterization. 8 Units.

Major techniques of handling proteins and antibodies. Protein engineering, expression and large-scale purification of recombinant proteins from bacteria, HPLC, antibody purification, western blotting, additional associated procedures. Students must demonstrate accurate documentation of data (laboratory notebook) detailing experience and results.

Corequisite: MOL BIO 251.
Prerequisite: MOL BIO 250L and MOL BIO 250.

Restriction: Biotechnology graduate students only.

MOL BIO 252L. Biotechnology Management Laboratory. 8 Units.

Overview of current methods in biotechnology, designed specifically for biotechnology graduate students. Organized into four distinct sections (nucleic acids, proteins, virology, and immunology). Students must demonstrate accurate documentation of data (laboratory notebooks) detailing experience and results.

Restriction: Biotechnology graduate students only.

MOL BIO 253. Biotech Management . 5 Units.

Taught jointly by Biological Sciences and Merage School faculty, the course addresses fundamental aspects within, and associated with, the biotechnology industry. Curriculum is focused largely on management issues, including finance, product development, pharmaceuticals, project management, regulatory affairs, and ethics.

Same as MGMTMBA 293.

Restriction: Master's Program in Biotechnology Management students only.

MOL BIO 253L. Stem Cell Laboratory. 4 Units.

Designed to prepare M.S. Biotechnology program students for a career in stem cell research. Laboratory training utilizes tissue culture, mouse and human embryonic stem cells, and is enhanced with didactic material and discussion.

Prerequisite: MOL BIO 250L and MOL BIO 251L.

Restriction: Biotechnology graduate students only.

MOL BIO 270. Science Communication Skills. 2 Units.

Development of effective communication skills, oral and written presentations. Topics range from the art of creating keynote slides to strategically crafting a personal story, culminating in a live presentation to an invited audience.

MOL BIO 291. Graduate School Fundamentals. 2 Units.

Lectures and discussions providing basic skills needed for success in Ph.D. graduate studies. Topics include formulating a hypothesis, experimental design, literature review, grant writing, oral communication, biostatistics, time management, and professional development.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: First-year students in the Cellular and Molecular Biosciences gateway Ph.D. program.

MOL BIO 292A. Scientific Communication. 2 Units.

Small group meetings for graduate students to practice scientific writing, debate, and presentation skills.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

MOL BIO 292B. Scientific Communication. 2 Units.

Small group meetings for graduate students to practice scientific writing, debate, and presentation skills.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

MOL BIO 292C. Scientific Communication. 2 Units.

Small group meetings for graduate students to practice scientific writing, debate, and presentation skills.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

MOL BIO 293A. Cancer Biology Journal Club. 1 Unit.

Focuses on molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and progression of cancers. Covers a variety of cancer-related research areas, such as cell cycle control, apoptosis, DNA repair, metastasis, angiogenesis, and others.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 293B. Cancer Biology Journal Club. 1 Unit.

Focuses on molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and progression of cancers. Covers a variety of cancer-related research areas, such as cell cycle control, apoptosis, DNA repair, metastasis, angiogenesis, and others.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 293C. Cancer Biology Journal Club. 1 Unit.

Focuses on molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and progression of cancers. Covers a variety of cancer-related research areas, such as cell cycle control, apoptosis, DNA repair, metastasis, angiogenesis, and others.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

MOL BIO 295. Biomedical Research Methods. 2 Units.

Lectures and interactive discussions of research methods in modern biomedical science. Each week will focus on a different class of techniques, including molecular, biochemical, immunological, genomic, bioinformatics, microscopy, cancer biology, genome editing. One hour per week, grading based on attendance.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Enrollment restricted to 1st year students in the Cellular & Molecular Biosciences gateway Ph.D. program. Other Ph.D. candidates may audit.

MOL BIO 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

Dana W. Aswad, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Hans-Ulrich Bernard, Ph.D. University of Goettingen, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Program in Public Health
Alexander D. Boiko, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Michael J. Buchmeier, Ph.D. McMaster University, Professor of Medicine; Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Melanie Cocco, Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University, Associate Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Michael G. Cumsky, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Senior Lecturer of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Hung Y. Fan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
David A. Fruman, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Paul David Gershon, Ph.D. University of Liverpool, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Charles Glabe, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Celia Goulding, Ph.D. King's College London, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Gale A. Granger, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Michael T. Green, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Chemistry (chemical, biology, inorganic and organometallic, physical chemistry and chemical physics, theoretical and computational)
Barbara A. Hamkalo, Ph.D. University of Massachusetts, Professor Emerita of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Yilin Hu, Ph.D. Loma Linda University, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Christopher C. Hughes, Ph.D. University of London, Francisco J. Ayala Chair and Interim Director of Edwards Lifesciences Center for Advanced Cardiovascular Technology and Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Biomedical Engineering (tissue engineering, growth and patterning of blood vessels)
Matthew Inlay, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Anthony A. James, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, UCI Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Pavan Kadandale, Ph.D. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Young Jik Kwon, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Biomedical Engineering; Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (gene therapy, drug delivery, cancer-targeted therapeutics, combined molecular imaging and therapy, cancer vaccine)
Melissa Lodoen, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Hartmut Luecke, Ph.D. William Marsh Rice University, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Physiology and Biophysics
Ray Luo, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Biomedical Engineering; Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (protein structure, noncovalent associations involving proteins)
Andrej Luptak, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Chemistry; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (chemical biology)
Jerry E. Manning, Ph.D. University of Utah, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Rachel Martin, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Professor of Chemistry; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (analytical, chemical biology, physical chemistry and chemical physics)
Maria J. Massimelli, Ph.D., Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Alexander McPherson, Ph.D. Purdue University, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Naomi Morrissette, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Associate Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Edward L. Nelson, M.D. University of Oregon, Associate Professor of Medicine; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Irene Pedersen, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Thomas L. Poulos, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Chemistry; Pharmaceutical Sciences; Physiology and Biophysics (chemical biology)
Jennifer A. Prescher, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Chemistry; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Pharmaceutical Sciences (chemical biology, organic and synthetic)
Olga Razorenova, Ph.D. Institute of Molecular Genetics, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Elizabeth L. Read, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (dynamics of complex biochemical systems, regulation of immune responses)
Markus W. Ribbe, Ph.D. University of Bayreuth, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Chemistry (chemical biology, inorganic and organometallic)
Brian Sato, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Donald F. Senear, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Andrea Tenner, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Neurobiology and Behavior
Krishna K. Tewari, Ph.D. University of Lucknow, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Shiou-Chuan (Sheryl) Tsai, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Chemistry; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Luis P. Villarreal, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Craig Walsh, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Gregory A. Weiss, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of Chemistry; Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (analytical, chemical biology, organic and synthetic, polymer, materials, nanoscience)
Katrine Whiteson, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Clifford A. Woolfolk, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
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