Department of Criminology, Law and Society

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Cheryl Maxson, Department Chair
2340 Social Ecology II
949-824-5575
http://cls.soceco.uci.edu/

Overview

The Department of Criminology, Law and Society focuses on the problem of crime and on understanding the social, cultural, political, and economic forces that interact with the law. Basic courses present overviews of American legal systems with particular emphasis on criminal and juvenile justice, forms of criminal behavior, the role of law in understanding social and psychological phenomena, and the applications of sociological theory in understanding law and legal systems. Subsequent course work provides a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of crime, criminal justice policy, and socio-legal theory, including how legal institutions can both address problems of inequality and exacerbate those problems.

Students are provided with opportunities to become acquainted with the varieties of behavior that society chooses to control or regulate, the methods and institutions used to achieve that control or regulation, and the approaches aimed specifically at altering behavior deemed unacceptable. In addition, there is provision for students to use their increasing knowledge of the law, its procedures, and institutions to enhance their understanding of the social sciences.

The course of study provides excellent preparation for law school and for graduate study in sociology, criminology, and criminal justice. Careers for students who terminate their University education at the baccalaureate level may be developed through placements in criminal justice and regulatory agencies, in organizations determining public policy, and in programs that deliver services to people who have difficulties with some aspect of the legal system.

Field study placements are available in police departments, public defenders’ offices, probation and parole agencies, the Orange County District Attorney’s Office, the State juvenile detention system, the Orange County Victim/Witness Assistance Program, juvenile shelters, legislative offices, and in private legal firms.

Undergraduate Program

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Criminology, Law and Society

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Departmental Requirements

Eleven courses (44 units) as specified below:

A. Complete one lower-division gateway course:
CRM/LAW C10 Fundamentals of Criminology, Law and Society
B. Select one course from each of the following four groups:
(1) The Legal System, Law and Society
American Law
Introduction to the Comparative Study of Legal Cultures
American Legal Thought
Sociology of Law
Psychology and the Law
(2) Crime and Criminology
Crime and Public Policy
Deviance
Criminological Theory
Juvenile Delinquency
Community Context of Crime
(3) Formal Institutions of Social Control
Theories of Punishment
Legal Sanctions and Social Control
Miscarriages of Justice
Prisons, Punishment, and Corrections
Constitutional Law
(4) Justice and Inequalities
Gender and Social Control
Race, Ethnicity, and Social Control
Law and Inequality
Hate Crimes
Critical Race Theory
C. Six upper-division elective courses (24 units). 1
Select from courses numbered CRM/LAW C100–C191.
1

Courses taken to satisfy requirement B may not also be used to satisfy requirement C.

Requirements for the Minor in Criminology, Law and Society

Minor Requirements

Eight courses (32 units) as specified below:

A. Complete the following:
CRM/LAW C7 Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society
CRM/LAW C10 Fundamentals of Criminology, Law and Society
and six upper-division courses selected from CRM/LAW C100–C191

NOTE: SOCECOL 198 and SOCECOL 199 may not be applied toward the minor.

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Graduate Program

General information about the School of Social Ecology’s graduate programs, including admission requirements, career opportunities, and Ph.D. program milestones can be found in the School of Social Ecology Graduate section of the Catalogue. Specific information about the Department of Criminology, Law and Society’s graduate program appears below.

Graduate Emphasis in Race and Justice Studies

Students from any UCI state-supported graduate or professional program, including J.D., Master's, and M.F.A. students, are eligible to apply to the Emphasis in Race and Justice Studies, housed in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. The Emphasis in Race and Justice Studies is comprised of three interconnected components that promote inclusive excellence: 1) A first-year mentorship proseminar; 2) Interdisciplinary coursework and writing that emphasizes cross-departmental interests and perspectives on critical studies of race, crime, and law; 3) Engagement with diverse audiences through traditional and innovative forms of research presentation.

Students may apply for admission into the emphasis upon completion of the first-year mentorship of the proseminar. Admitted students who satisfactorily complete the program requirements will be awarded a letter signed by the Director noting that the student has incorporated Race and Justice studies into their research and professional activities. Each student will be assigned a peer and faculty mentor to discuss the student's ongoing research and the value of inclusive excellence.

Requirements
  1. A first-year mentorship proseminar, consisting of nine workshops, discussions, and presentations offered over three quarters by selected faculty from across campus with experience negotiating policies and conducting research with high impact on fostering inclusive excellence. Students will receive a grade for this proseminar in the spring quarter.
  2. One Race and Justice Studies-approved course offered under the supervision of the emphasis.
  3. A writing seminar in which a paper developed through Race and Justice Studies coursework and programming will be workshopped and revised toward publication.
  4. A public presentation which translates the students Race and Justice Studies-influenced research for an interdisciplinary audience, which can include but is not limited to those found through professional associate conferences, small symposia and colloquia, social media publications, community-based collaborations, program and policy consultations, and artistic or alternative media formats.
Admission

The following is needed to apply for admission

  1. Satisfactory completion of the first-year mentorship proseminar.
  2. A statement of interest.
  3. An unofficial transcript.
  4. One faculty reference letter that speaks to the student's capabilities.
  5. Endorsement of the student's application by the student's advisor. The student's advisor may provide the reference letter. The deadline for this application is week 10 of the spring quarter of the student's first year of graduate study.
Petition for Formal Letter of Completion

A transcript showing satisfactory completion of coursework, a writing seminar paper, and a one-page report of public presentation is required for the petition for a formal letter of completion. The deadline for this petition is week 10 of the spring quarter of the student's third year of graduate study.

For students admitted to graduate study before fall 2016, prerequisites must be fulfilled between fall 2016 and spring 2019 and requirements must be fulfilled between fall 2016 and spring 2021. Upon approval by the Director, students may use prior coursework to satisfy one of the requirements of the Emphasis.

M.A.S. in Criminology, Law and Society

The Master of Advanced Study (M.A.S.) in Criminology, Law and Society, the first online degree program at the University of California, prepares professionals for leadership positions in criminal justice and the legal professions. The curriculum emphasizes theoretical and practical applications central to crime and its control, social policy, and the law. In keeping with one of the main tenets of the School of Social Ecology, students approach topics from a multidisciplinary perspective.

This program is ideally suited for professionals interested in obtaining positions in or currently working in the criminal justice or legal fields and who are seeking a graduate degree for career advancement. The program consists of 52 units of course work completed over a two-year period (six quarters) that includes a required one-week in-residence introductory course scheduled right before the first fall quarter of instruction. In lieu of a thesis, students are required to take a capstone course in the winter quarter of the second year of study. The M.A.S. is awarded upon completion of 13 courses (52 units).

Master of Legal and Forensic Psychology

The Master of Legal and Forensic Psychology is designed for professionals or recent graduates who wish to further their education and gain skills that will help them obtain careers in the field of legal and forensic psychology. Students will be immersed in an interdisciplinary field devoted to advancing scholarship, testing theories, and engaging in public service relevant to individuals’ participation and experiences in legal contexts.

For more information, visit the Psychology and Social Behavior Graduate tab.

Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society

The study of crime, institutional responses to illegal behavior, and the interaction of law and society are the foci of the doctoral program in Criminology, Law and Society. Students examine issues related to the etiology of crime, the process of changing criminal behavior, social regulation, the civil justice system, and the social and cultural context of law.

Students gain familiarity with a number of subjects including sentencing; crime rates; modes of modifying criminal behavior; police behavior; white collar and organized crime; policies against hate crimes; behavior of courts, juries, and regulatory agencies; environmental law; immigration lawmaking; Native American justice issues; and the interaction among law, culture, and identity. In general, students are introduced to the leading classical and contemporary issues in criminology, law and society and to ways of understanding them through interdisciplinary research. The program aims to develop theoretical sophistication and to prepare the graduate student for faculty positions at major universities; and for research and administrative work in institutions in the legal system, the criminal justice system, and related organizations.

The following four core courses are required: Seminar in Social Ecology (SOCECOL 200), Research Methods (CRM/LAW C201), two quarters of graduate-level statistics: Data Analysis (SOCECOL 264A) and Data Analysis (SOCECOL 264B); and two additional approved graduate research methods or statistics courses. Students in the Criminology, Law and Society program additionally take four required courses: Criminology: Micro Approaches (CRM/LAW C228); Criminology: Macro Approaches (CRM/LAW C229); Law and Society I (CRM/LAW C239A); and Law and Society II (CRM/LAW C239B); and two elective courses in Criminology, Law and Society. These elective courses should be chosen according to a plan that best meets the needs of the individual student, as determined in consultation with the student's faculty advisor. They should satisfy the elective requirement with regularly scheduled courses (with rare exceptions). (NOTE: An initial faculty advisor for each new Criminology, Law and Society student is assigned by the Criminology, Law and Society Graduate Advisor. Students, however, are expected to choose their own faculty advisor during their first year of study based on research interests. Students must notify the Criminology, Law and Society Graduate Advisor and the Departmental Graduate Coordinator of any changes in advisors.

Students become involved in research activities from the earliest stages of their training and complete an independent, supervised research project during the second year of graduate study. Methods of research may include questionnaires and surveys, systematic field observation, computer simulation, legal analyses, and archival research. Students complete a written comprehensive examination during year three, which requires them to demonstrate mastery of major issues in criminology, and law and society. The normative time for advancement to candidacy is four years (three years for students who entered with a master’s degree). Students are required to advance to candidacy by the end of fall quarter of their fifth year of study, adjusted for any approved leaves of absence. The fourth and, possibly, fifth years of study are devoted to developing and defending a dissertation proposal and completing dissertation research. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is six years, and the maximum time permitted is seven years. (For students who have waived two required courses and the second-year project based upon master’s-level work completed at another institution, the time to degree is five years, with a maximum of six years.) All Ph.D. students in the Criminology, Law and Society program are required to pass a final oral defense of the dissertation. Opportunities for field placements in legal and criminal justice settings also are available.

Program in Law and Graduate Studies (J.D./Ph.D.)

Highly qualified students interested in combining the study of law and graduate qualifications in Criminology, Law and Society are invited to undertake concurrent degree study under the auspices of UC’s Irvine’s Program in Law and Graduate Studies (PLGS). Students in this program pursue a coordinated curriculum leading to a J.D. degree from the School of Law in conjunction with a Ph.D. degree in Criminology, Law and Society. Additional information is available from the PLGS Director’s office, 949-824-4158, or by email to plgs@law.uci.edu. A full description of the program, with links to all relevant application information, can be found at the School of Law Concurrent Degree Programs website.

Courses

CRM/LAW C7. Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society . 4 Units.

Introduces characteristics of the U.S. criminal justice system, including responses to crime, components of the system, and current challenges to the system. Examines structure and function of police and courts, criminal procedure, and sentencing and incarceration policies. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, Urban Studies, Psychology and Social Behavior, and Unaffiliated Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

CRM/LAW C10. Fundamentals of Criminology, Law and Society . 4 Units.

Introduces three interdisciplinary literatures: criminology, socio-legal studies, and justice studies. Focuses on theoretical and empirical work addressing law making, law breaking, and legal systems.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

CRM/LAW C40. Forms of Criminal Behavior. 4 Units.

Undergraduates are introduced to the subjects of crime and criminal behavior. Topics include "street" and "white-collar" crimes. Histories of the offenses, the types of people who commit the crimes, and society's reactions to the offenses are presented.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(III)

CRM/LAW C100. Special Topics in Criminology, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Special topic courses are offered from time to time. Course content varies with interest of the instructor.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CRM/LAW C101. American Law. 4 Units.

Introduction to substantive and procedural law governing private dispute resolution, including common law (tort, property, contracts), lawsuits (civil procedure), and alternative dispute resolution; emphasis on the socio-legal ramifications of private disputes, particularly the modern tort system and tort reform movement.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C102. Introduction to the Comparative Study of Legal Cultures. 4 Units.

Traces the anthropological and comparative cultural study of law from the nineteenth century to the present; briefly surveys the diversity of recorded legal cultures and critically examines key concepts which have been used to describe and classify them.

Same as INTL ST 124A.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and International Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C103. American Legal Thought. 4 Units.

Evolution of legal thought in socio-historical context from nineteenth century to present; emphasizes the rise and fall of legal classicism and modern socio-legal critiques, including the law and society movement, critical legal studies, feminist legal theory, and critical race studies.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C104. Sociology of Law. 4 Units.

Examines law creation and law enforcement in their social and political context. Discusses the major theories of law and the modern state, and presents case studies in order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of these theoretical perspectives.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C105. Psychology and the Law. 4 Units.

Psychological assumptions of American legal system and mental health aspects of provision of criminal justice services. Civil commitment, insanity defense, competence to stand trial, jury selection, eye-witness identification. Use of police, courts, correctional institutions in prevention of behavior disorder.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7 or CRM/LAW C101.

Same as PSY BEH 193E.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Psychology and Social Behavior majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C106. Crime and Public Policy. 4 Units.

Explores nature and dimensions of crime in America and uses and limits of various strategies to control it. Topics include growth of imprisonment, the problem of domestic violence, the death penalty, gun control, and the potential of crime prevention programs.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C107. Deviance. 4 Units.

Perspectives on deviance and criminality in behavior, institution, community, and myth. The suitability of contemporary theories of deviant behavior.

Same as SOCIOL 156, PSYCH 177D.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, Sociology, and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C108. Criminological Theory. 4 Units.

Explores the question of crime causation from a number of theoretical perspectives in the social sciences. Schools of thought examined include utilitarianism, positivism, human ecology, social structural approaches, social process (learning) theories, labeling, and radical-critical (political) perspectives.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C109. Juvenile Delinquency. 4 Units.

Patterns of delinquent behavior, theories that explain behavior, current research aimed at enhancing exploratory power. Attempts to prevent and control delinquency are put in historical perspective. Development of the current juvenile justice system and evolution of modern juvenile law.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Same as PSY BEH 193B.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Psychology and Social Behavior majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C110. Community Context of Crime. 4 Units.

Examines the social context of high-crime communities, with special emphasis on the problems of poverty, joblessness, economic inequality, and racial discrimination. Assesses debates on the causes of these problems, and on the most effective policies to combat them.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C111. Theories of Punishment. 4 Units.

Survey of the various schools of thought regarding formal punishment theory. The purposes of legal sanctions are examined, including those of deterrence, rehabilitation, retribution, and incapacitation. Considers problems in realizing formal goals of punishment in practice.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C112. Legal Sanctions and Social Control. 4 Units.

Examination of criminal sanctions as mechanisms of social control. Includes the nature, function, and organization of courts as sanction generating institutions, and problems associated with punishing white-collar and corporate illegalities.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C113. Gender and Social Control. 4 Units.

Examines the legal system's use of sex as an organizing characteristic, focusing particularly on sameness and difference feminism, and tracing the evolution of equal treatment of men and women in the areas of constitutional rights, employment, education, and military service.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C114. Miscarriages of Justice. 4 Units.

Systematically describes, explains, and analyzes the causes and consequences of the wrongful accusation, prosecution, incarceration, and sometimes even execution, of the innocent in the American criminal justice system.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C115. Prisons, Punishment, and Corrections. 4 Units.

A review of how the U.S. punishes and rehabilitates convicted law violators. The conflicts among the major purposes of sentencing—rehabilitation, deterrence, incapacitation—are discussed, as well as the effects of different sanctions on public safety, offender rehabilitation, and justice system costs.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C116. Race, Ethnicity, and Social Control. 4 Units.

Provides a historical and sociological survey of racial and ethnic group relations in contexts of crime control, emphasizing the roles of racial ideology, structural racism, and social movements in shaping these dynamic relations, and their significance to American liberal democracy.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Same as CHC/LAT 152A.

CRM/LAW C117. Imprisonment and Reentry. 4 Units.

Offers an overview of imprisonment and reentry in the contemporary United States. Examines the development of the prison in the United States and explores changes in its composition, structure, and purpose over time.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C120. Law and Inequality. 4 Units.

Various aspects of the law as related to three specific areas of inequality: immigration and immigrants, race, and gender. The role of law as a tool of social reform and limitations of the legal system historically in resolving inequality issues.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C122. Constitutional Law. 4 Units.

Examines the First and Fourteenth Amendments, focusing on freedom of speech and religion, and the incorporation of the Bill of Rights. Topics include political, symbolic, offensive, and obscene speech, student speech rights, and the free exercise and disestablishment of religion.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Overlaps with POL SCI 174A.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C123. Family Law. 4 Units.

Examines legal issues surrounding marriage, cohabitation, divorce, child custody and support, adoption, and the rights of parents and children in the family context. The findings of social science research are used to illuminate the legal issues.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7 or CRM/LAW C101.

Same as PSY BEH 193F.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, and Criminology, Law and Society majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C125. Child Development, the Law, and Social Policy. 4 Units.

Examines the rights of children and adolescents in the U.S. and internationally; law and policy with regard to the family, government services, health care, education, juvenile justice and the labor market; and the connection between child development, law and policy.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C. Recommended: PSY BEH 111D or PSY BEH 112D.

Same as PSY BEH 120D.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, and Criminology, Law and Society majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C126. Drugs, Crime, and Social Control. 4 Units.

Drug abuse in the U.S.; the psychopharmacology of various drugs; biological, psychological, and sociological explanations for drug abuse. Policy issues are discussed; students will develop and defend a set of strategies for limiting harm done by drugs and drug laws.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C127. Hate Crimes. 4 Units.

Examines the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes and the larger social context within which they occur. The politics and dynamics of intergroup violence born of bigotry and manifested as discrimination; social policy designed to control bias-motivated violence.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C128. Environmental Law and Policy . 4 Units.

Environmental law as a combination of traditional legal principles and newly created statutes, rules, and decisions applied to environmental protection. Investigates roles of courts, legislature, executive branch and administrative agencies, and private citizens attempting to regulate environmental quality.

Prerequisite: ENVIRON E8 or PP&D 4.

Same as PP&D 133.

Restriction: Majors only.

CRM/LAW C130. Seminar on Gangs. 4 Units.

An overview of gangs, including the nature and definition of gangs; types of gangs; diversity of membership; theoretical explanations; criminal behavior; drug use and sales; law enforcement responses; gangs in correctional institutions; intervention and prevention strategies; and public policy issues.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C131. Organized Crime and American Society. 4 Units.

Examination of the phenomenon of American organized crime from a sociological perspective. Explanation of methods by which organized crime is tolerated at various levels of society. Emphasis on ways in which "underworld" interests interact with legitimate economic and political institutions.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C132. Forensic Science, Law, and Society. 4 Units.

Examines use of "forensic science" to resolve issues arising in criminal cases including crime scene analysis, DNA testing, fingerprints, trace evidence comparisons, profiling, lie detectors, other forensic techniques; evaluation, statistical characterization, and legal admissibility of evidence; regulation of forensic laboratories.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C133. Homicide and Suicide. 4 Units.

Examines similarities and differences among homicide and suicide, two major causes of death.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C134. Victimless Crimes. 4 Units.

Examines major theoretical, empirical, and policy-oriented research related to the design, implementation, and analysis of government intervention, through the criminal sanction, in the spheres of vice and morality.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C136. Forensic Psychology: Advanced Seminar. 4 Units.

The focus is on the psychology of criminal offending, particularly violent behavior. Examines violence, sexual offending, and mental disorder related to crime with regard to clinical assessment and treatment; mental health services within forensic institutions.

Prerequisite: (PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C) and PSY BEH 102C and (PSY BEH 178S or CRM/LAW C149).

Same as PSY BEH 156C, PSYCH 177F.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, Psychology, and Criminology, Law and Society majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C137. Criminal Procedure. 4 Units.

Examines the law governing arrests (with and without a warrant); police detention; search and seizure; interrogation; use of informers, eavesdropping, wiretapping; examination and identification of suspects. Pretrial motions such as speedy trial and discovery of evidence may be covered.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C139. Police and Change. 4 Units.

Organizational efforts to modify police conduct are addressed by focusing on the history of policing in the United States including training, education, and the contributions of women.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C140. Surveillance and Society. 4 Units.

Explores the development and deployment of surveillance technologies in contemporary society. The social and legal impact of surveillance technologies, in such areas as crime control, privacy, trust, community, democracy, and the war on terror.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society majors only.

CRM/LAW C142. White-Collar Crime. 4 Units.

Examines criminal activity in business and corporate enterprise, organizations, and the professions. Theories regarding the causes and control of white-collar and corporate crime are covered as well as the numerous definitions of these terms.

Same as SOCIOL 142.

Restriction: Sociology, Criminology, Law and Society, and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C144. Criminal Law. 4 Units.

Deals specifically with the substantive nature of criminal law and its historical development. Focuses on understanding the development of fundamental doctrinal principles upon which criminal law is based, including mens rea, actus reus, homicide, causation, group criminality, and exculpation.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C145. Government Crime. 4 Units.

Examines the legal, organizational, and political issues involved in the generation and control of government lawlessness. Readings present historical and theoretical perspectives in the abuse of government authority and the ability of the legal system to control such behavior.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C148. Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Basic geographic, cartographic, and GIS concepts including computer representation of physical, political, statistical, and social aspects of space using vector and grid-based maps. Experience with extensive geographic base map files and databases through use of GIS software (ArcView 3.x).

Same as PUBHLTH 166.

Restriction: Public Health Sciences, Public Health Policy, and Criminology, Law and Society majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C149. Violence in Society. 4 Units.

Current theory and research on aggression; anger and violence as problems in individual and social functioning. Process and functions of anger examined with regard to normal behavior and psychopathology. The determinants, prevalence, and implications of violence in society are analyzed.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11C or PSYCH 7A or PSYCH 9C.

Same as PSY BEH 178S.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Psychology and Social Behavior majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C150. The Legal Profession. 4 Units.

Role of the legal profession in modern society, the diverse professional roles lawyers play, the American legal profession compared with that of other societies. "Litigation explosion," ethical problems, interactions between lawyers and other professionals, training and socialization of new lawyers.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C156. Cross-Cultural Research on Urban Gangs. 4 Units.

Taking an urban policy approach, examines the background and contemporary traditions of gangs in several ethnic groups including African-, Asian-, and Mexican-Americans. Cross-cultural exploration of the varied facets of gang life. The major social-control institutions affecting them.

Same as CHC/LAT 153.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(VII)

CRM/LAW C157. Language in Law and Society. 4 Units.

Considers the role of language in legal practice and power. Particular attention is paid to linguistic and discourse analytic research that covers topics such as: trial talk, language crimes, law talk in cross-cultural perspectives, and linguistic evidence.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C160. Forensic Psychology . 4 Units.

Forensic psychology is the interface between clinical psychology and the law. Emphasizes clinically relevant legal topics (insanity defense; competency to stand trial) and includes critical thinking about issues that arise when psychologists are involved in legal proceedings.

Prerequisite: PSY BEH 9 or PSY BEH 11B or PSY BEH 11C.

Same as PSY BEH 161C.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Criminology, Law and Society, and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C162. Crime Hotspots. 4 Units.

Criminological theories of local public safety hazards or hotspots are introduced. Spatial statistics are developed for different types of hotspots. Hotspot policing theories are introduced and research on the effectiveness of policing strategies is reviewed.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C163. Ethics and Politics of Justice. 4 Units.

Theoretical perspective on how ethics and politics relate to criminal justice through an introduction to moral philosophy; consideration of specific theories of punishment and justice; and consideration of practical and empirical illustrations of the intersection of ethics, politics, and justice.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C164. Social Control of Delinquency. 4 Units.

Assumes familiarity with theories of delinquency, the juvenile justice system, and elements of juvenile law. Explores socio-historical origins and evolution of juvenile justice, current research and policy on delinquency prevention and treatment, and future directions of law, policy, and practice.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7. Recommended: CRM/LAW C109.

Same as PSY BEH 193C.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Social Ecology, Criminology, Law and Society, and Psychology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C165. The Death Penalty. 4 Units.

Examines why the U.S. continues to have a death penalty when so many other countries have abandoned it. Arguments for and against the death penalty are covered.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite or corequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C167. Crime Measurement. 4 Units.

The strengths and weaknesses of three crime measures (police reports, victim surveys, and offender self-reports) are illustrated through analyses of research articles. Common measurement problems are analyzed with a focus on reliability and validity.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C168. Extreme Punishment . 4 Units.

Explores the history and law of America’s Eighth Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, examining the death penalty, long prison sentences, harsh confinement conditions, and other punishments. Students debate practical, legal, and moral arguments for and against these punishments.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C170. Federal Law Enforcement. 4 Units.

The peculiar legal, organizational concerns of the federal system of law enforcement and some of the crimes it is uniquely designed to address—white-collar crime, drug trafficking, racketeering, public corruption. Roles, responsibilities of the FBI, DEA, Customs, other policing agencies.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Psychology and Social Behavior majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C171. Latinos and the Law. 4 Units.

Examines a range of theoretical, empirical, and policy approaches to legal issues affecting the Latino population, with emphasis on California. Discusses topics concerning the purpose of law, the creation of law, and the enforcement of law.

Same as CHC/LAT 142.

(VII)

CRM/LAW C172. Culture Change and the Mexican People. 4 Units.

Reviews culture contact and colonization, innovation diffusion, acculturation, assimilation, culture conflict and marginality, modernization, urbanization, legal transformations. Mexico and the Southwestern U.S. are reviewed through several centuries to better appreciate the indigenous base of the Mexican people.

Same as CHC/LAT 155.

CRM/LAW C173. Maritime Piracy, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Explores the historical and contemporary images and reality of pirates and piracy since the 16th century across the globe through an analysis of primary sources, key historiographical and legal debates, and criminological theories. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C174. Immigration and Crime. 4 Units.

Examines immigration and crime in the global context, highlighting immigrants as criminals and victims; immigration and crime control; immigrants’ perceptions of the criminal justice system; public discourse and public perception on immigration and crime; and human rights issues.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

CRM/LAW C175. Issues in Policing. 4 Units.

Lectures and readings focus on the history and strategies of policing, measuring the quality of policing, and police misconduct. Strategies for enhancing the quality of policing for controlling misconduct are covered.

CRM/LAW C176. Classics in Crime Cinema. 4 Units.

A multidimensional understanding of crime films and how they shape public thinking about crime and criminals.

Restriction: CRM/LAW C176 and CRM/LAW C20 may not be taken for credit.

CRM/LAW C177. Eyewitness Testimony. 4 Units.

Faulty eyewitness testimony is a major cause of wrongful convictions. Covers the fast-growing topic of eyewitness testimony and memory for real-world events, both how psychologists study eyewitness capacity, and how the legal system has dealt with eyewitness issues.

Prerequisite: SOCECOL 10.

Same as PSY BEH 193G.

Restriction: Psychology and Social Behavior, Criminology, Law and Society and Social Ecology majors have first consideration for enrollment. Seniors only.

CRM/LAW C178. Critical Race Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to Critical Race Theory and key American cases on racial inequality. Using this literature, examines the possibilities and pitfalls of legal claims of race, gender, and sexuality discrimination in the age of colorblindness.

Same as AFAM 157.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

CRM/LAW C179. Race and Incarceration. 4 Units.

Examines the racial politics of mass incarceration through historical, empirical, theoretical, and legal frameworks. Focuses on race, gender, and sexual differences to develop a critique on policing, incarceration, and other forms of punishment.

CRM/LAW C180. Power, Constructions of Deviance, and Social Control . 4 Units.

Examines the forms and limits of power in the construction of social deviants. Theories of state power are covered to understand the prison system as a contemporary driver of social inequality. The collateral consequences of mass incarceration are discussed.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Psychology and Social Behavior majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C185. Criminal Justice System Capacity. 4 Units.

Examines "system capacity" in criminological and criminal justice related research and how it is used to explain and describe current problems and practices in the American legal system. Limitations of sanctioning criminals due to political, physical space, and resource constraints.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C7.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Chicano/Latino Studies majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C191. Law and Modernity. 4 Units.

The rise and spread of Enlightenment legal traditions, social contract theory, individual rights, ideologies of "liberty, equality, fraternity"; contradictions of liberal law, its understandings of "primitive" and "civilized"; pervasive myths of property, difference, race, and rights. Reading- and writing-intensive.

Same as ANTHRO 127A.

CRM/LAW C196. Research Seminar in Criminology, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Special topics research seminar. Content varies with interest of instructor. Capstone research opportunity with Criminology, Law and Society faculty members.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Criminology, Law and Society, Social Ecology, and Anthropology majors have first consideration for enrollment.

CRM/LAW C201. Research Methods. 4 Units.

An introduction to techniques of inductive methodologies, including qualitative interviewing and participant observation, and deductive methodologies, including survey research and experimental and quasi-experimental design. Provides a sound overview of research methodology with tools to pursue specific methods in greater depth.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C207. Land Use Law. 4 Units.

Investigates legal and institutional frameworks for development control. Review of constitutional issues implicated in land-use regulation. Traces development control historically and analyzes contemporary approaches to land-use control which reflect environmental and economic development concerns.

Same as PP&D 207.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C210. Introduction to Criminology, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with the interrelated fields of criminology, law and society studies, and criminal justice studies. Organized around three well-established interdisciplinary literatures: criminology, sociolegal studies, and criminal justice studies. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C211. Legal Institutions and Society. 4 Units.

Acquaints students with the institutions of U.S. legal system and its operations, as well as with the constitutional framework undergirding this system, and defines the relationship between U.S. citizens and government at a variety of levels. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C212. Police, Courts, and Corrections. 4 Units.

Focuses on basic policy issues in the administration of the criminal justice system. The key elements of the criminal justice system are police, courts, and corrections. Prepares students for continued study of these organizations. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C213. Crime and Social Deviance. 4 Units.

Examines the major social scientific perspectives on criminal and deviant behavior. Specific deviant and criminal activities are described and explained using established theoretical frameworks. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C214. Research Methods. 4 Units.

Structures research methodology, the approach to developing and evaluating knowledge of the sciences for use in criminal justice professional activities. Special emphasis on differentiating scientific approaches from pseudo-science. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C215. Applied Statistics. 4 Units.

Provides a basis for the use of fundamental statistical analysis techniques for solving public policy and management problems through a series of assignments, examinations, and online discussions and demonstrations. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C216. Public Policy, Crime, and Criminal Justice. 4 Units.

Increases understanding of crime, violence, and the criminal justice system. Assesses the state of knowledge on key policy issues of our time. Discusses the contribution of communities, schools, employment, drugs, guns, and alcohol to crime and violence. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C217. Leadership. 4 Units.

Introduces concepts, ideas, and theories about leadership and its operation. Explores leadership concepts through interviews with leaders from the community and fellow classmates. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C218. Social Problems, Law, and Policy. 4 Units.

Capstone course for M.A.S. program in Criminology, Law and Society. Students choose a social problem related to crime, criminal justice, and law; relate the problem to legal and social issues; and devise a plan of action to research the problem. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Criminology, Law and Society M.A.S. students only.

CRM/LAW C219. Hate Crime. 4 Units.

Examines the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes, as well as the larger social context within which they occur, are reacted to, and seem to be proliferating. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C221. Sentencing and Corrections. 4 Units.

Reviews U.S. attempts to punish and rehabilitate convicted law violators. Conflicts among major purposes of sentencing (rehabilitation, deterrence, incapacitation, and retribution) are discussed, as well as effects of different sanctions on public safety, offender rehabilitation, and justice system costs. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C222. Ethnography. 4 Units.

Explores the theory and practice of ethnography with a focus on anthropology, the discipline most associated with ethnography. Students will be exposed to the theoretical underpinnings of ethnographic work, traditional and innovative practices, and sample ethnographies.

Same as CHC/LAT 217, ANTHRO 230F.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C224. Organizational Perspectives on the Legal System. 4 Units.

Familiarizes students with organization theory and research as ways to make sense of, navigate, and act on the legal system. Acquaints students with major frameworks in organization theory and their application to the system of legal organizations. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C227. Conflict Resolution: Theory and Methods. 4 Units.

Provide an understanding of the major alternatives to the traditional system for the administration of justice, expanding on some of the newer theories and methods in the field. Key research on social conflict and its resolution examined. Course may be offered online.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C228. Criminology: Micro Approaches. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the dominant theories in modern criminology, their theoretical antecedents and extensions, major empirical tests and implications for programs, policy and practice, and focuses on micro-level, individual theories of crime causation. Formerly Criminology, Law and Society C233A.

CRM/LAW C229. Criminology: Macro Approaches. 4 Units.

Introduces students to the dominant theories in modern criminology, their theoretical antecedents and extensions, major empirical tests and implications for programs, policy and practices, and addresses macro-level theories of crime causation. Formerly Criminology, Law and Society C233B.

CRM/LAW C231. Crime and Gender . 4 Units.

Examines the legal, political, social, economic, and policy implications of making gender (primarily) and race (secondarily) the focus in the study of crime, criminal law, and the criminal justice system. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C236. Gender and Power in Law and Society. 4 Units.

Focuses on questions of gender and sexuality in law and society studies. Drawing on a variety of theoretical frameworks, especially feminist legal theory, examines social processes and structures related to legal regulation, inequality, and social change.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C238. White-Collar Crime. 4 Units.

Examines the illegal behavior of individuals who commit crimes in the course of their employment. Special attention will be paid to ways in which power and organizational structure affect the behavior of the white-collar offenders. Course may be offered online.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C239A. Law and Society I. 4 Units.

Provides an introduction to the law and society field from its origins in social scientific, legal, and philosophical scholarship during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early-twentieth centuries. Formerly Criminology, Law, and Society C239.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C239B. Law and Society II. 4 Units.

Building on Law and Society I, addresses contemporary issues in the field from mid-twentieth century to the present with emphasis on the degree to which the field's foundational assumptions are being challenged, refined, or confirmed through current research.

Prerequisite: CRM/LAW C239A.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C241. Race, Ethnicity, and Social Control. 4 Units.

Origins and organization of racialized social control, with emphasis on criminal justice. Racial politics of criminal/juvenile justice considered in comparative (historical and international) perspective. Exploration of theoretical and methodological issues for research on race, ethnicity, and social control.

Same as CHC/LAT 221.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C248. Geographic Information Systems. 4 Units.

Prepares students to become proficient in the basic GIS functionality including visualization, data management, and spatial analysis.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C252. Issues in Environmental Law and Policy. 4 Units.

Treatment of legal and policy strategies for promoting environmental protection and deterring environmental degradation within the context of other societal objectives. Topical approach with a focus on problems of special interest to criminologists and to environmental policy specialists.

Same as PP&D 252.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C255. Public Policy. 4 Units.

Explores different approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.

Same as POL SCI 221A, PP&D 221.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C263. Eyewitness Testimony. 4 Units.

Examines the evidence that shows that faulty eyewitness memory is the major cause of wrongful convictions. Explores what the legal system thinks of eyewitness testimony and how the legal system has dealt with eyewitness issues.

Same as PSY BEH P263.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C265. Memory and the Law. 4 Units.

Examines the controversial topic of repressed memory, or perception and memory of real-world events.

Same as PSY BEH P265.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C266. Psychology and the Law. 4 Units.

Overview of how psychology is applied to the civil and criminal justice systems, how case law shapes this application, and how legal decisions affect the direction of psychological research. Interdisciplinary approach to research in psychology, law, and/or criminology.

Same as PSY BEH P266.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C275. Special Topics in Criminology, Law and Society. 4 Units.

Topics covered vary with interests of instructor.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

CRM/LAW C296. Doctoral Dissertation Research and Writing. 2-12 Units.

Dissertation research with Criminology, Law and Society faculty.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

CRM/LAW C298. Directed Study. 2-4 Units.

Directed study with Criminology, Law and Society faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRM/LAW C299. Independent Study . 2-8 Units.

Independent research with Criminology, Law and Society faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

Susan C. Bibler Coutin, Ph.D. Stanford University, Associate Dean of the Graduate Division and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Anthropology; Culture and Theory (law, culture, immigration, human rights, citizenship, political activism, Central America)
Arnold Binder, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (research methodology, juvenile delinquency, police organization and methods)
Kitty C. Calavita, Ph.D. University of Delaware, Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society (sociology of law, criminology, social deviance, immigration, inequality)
Simon A. Cole, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; History (science, technology, law, criminal justice)
Elliott P. Currie, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (criminal justice policy in the U.S. and other countries, causes of violent crime, social context of delinquency and youth violence, etiology of drug abuse and assessment of drug policy, race and criminal justice)
Teresa A. Dalton, Ph.D. University of Denver, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Criminology, Law and Society (quantitative methodology, criminology, law and social sciences)
John D. Dombrink, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (crime and criminal justice, deviance and social control)
Michael R. Gottfredson, Ph.D. University at Albany, State University of New York, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law; Sociology (criminology, juvenile delinquency, crime theory, public policy)
Sora Han, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; African American Studies; Culture and Theory (law and popular culture, critical race theory, philosophies of punishment, feminism and psychoanalysis)
John R. Hipp, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design; Sociology (community context of crime, household decisions and neighborhood change, research methods)
Clarence Ronald Huff, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (criminology and public policy, wrongful convictions, gangs)
Valerie Jenness, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (links between deviance and social control [especially law], the politics of crime control and criminalization, social movements and social change, corrections and public policy)
Paul D. Jesilow, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (healthcare regulation, in particular the role of fraud; the police, in particular police-community relations)
Charis E. Kubrin, Ph.D. George Washington University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (crime, neighborhood effects and social processes, race/ethnicity and violence, immigration and crime)
Elizabeth F. Loftus, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Cognitive Sciences; Criminology, Law and Society; School of Law (cognitive psychology, human memory, psychology and law)
Mona Lynch, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (law and society, psychology and law, punishment and society, race and criminal justice)
Cheryl Lee Maxson, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (crime and delinquency, youth violence, street gangs, juvenile justice system and policing)
Richard D. McCleary, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design (criminal justice, research methodology, statistics)
James W. Meeker, J.D., Ph.D. State University of New York at Buffalo, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (sociology of law, criminal justice, research methodology, statistics, access to civil justice)
Joan R. Petersilia, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society (program evaluation, public policy, juvenile justice)
Henry N. Pontell, Ph.D. State University of New York at Stony Brook, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (white-collar and corporate crime, criminology, criminal justice, deviance and social control, sociology of law)
Keramet A. Reiter, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (prisons, legal history, criminal justice policy, criminal and civil rights law, law and society)
Nicholas I. Scurich, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Criminology, Law and Society (judgment and decision making, juridical proof, violence risk assessment)
Carroll S. Seron, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (sociology of law, sociology of professions, law and society, sociology of legal profession, methods and police misconduct)
Naomi Sugie, Ph.D. Princeton University, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (sociology of crime and punishment, inequality, families, demography, methods, new technologies for data collection)
Bryan Sykes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Program in Public Health; Sociology (demography, criminology, research methods, health, social inequality, statistics)
William C. Thompson, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Psychology and Social Behavior (psychology and law, criminal justice, forensic science, expert evidence, human judgment and decision making, use of social science in appellate litigation)
George E. Tita, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Planning, Policy, and Design (criminology, community context of violence, urban youth gangs, homicide studies)
Susan F. Turner, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society (sentencing and corrections, applied research methods)
James D. Vigil, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Society (urban research, urban poverty, culture change, socialization and education, psychological anthropology, street gangs in cross-cultural perspective, Mexico and U.S. southwestern ethnohistory, comparative ethnicity)
Geoff Ward, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (racial politics of social control, legal profession, youth justice, racial violence, transitional justice)

Affiliate Faculty

Mario Barnes, J.D., LL.M. University of California, Berkeley; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Associate Dean of Faculty Research and Development and Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society (criminal law, constitutional law, critical race theory)
Joseph DiMento, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; Paul Merage School of Business; Planning, Policy, and Design (planning, land use and environmental law, use of social science in policy making, legal control of corporate behavior)
Catherine Fisk, J.D., LL.M. University of California, Berkeley; University of Wisconsin at Madison, UCI Chancellor's Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; History (labor and employment law, civil rights)
Howard A. Gillman, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Chancellor and Professor of Political Science; Criminology, Law and Society; History
David Theo Goldberg, Ph.D. The Graduate Center, City University of New York, Director of the UC Humanities Research Institute and Professor of Comparative Literature; Anthropology; Criminology, Law and Society; Culture and Theory (race, racism, race and the law, political theory, South Africa, digital humanities)
William M. Maurer, Ph.D. Stanford University, Dean of the School of Social Sciences and Professor of Anthropology; Criminology, Law and Society; Culture and Theory (anthropology of law, globalization, Caribbean, anthropology of money and finance, gender and kinship)
Ruben G. Rumbaut, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Distinguished Professor of Sociology; Criminology, Law and Society; Education (international migration, immigration laws, criminalization, incarceration, social inequality and mobility, race and ethnicity)
Ann Southworth, J.D. Stanford University, Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society
Shauhin A. Talesh, J.D., Ph.D. University of Connecticut, University of California, Berkeley, Acting Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology (civil procedure, consumer law, insurance, business organizations, empirical legal studies, law and society)
Christopher L. Tomlins, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, UCI Chancellor's Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society (law and humanities, law and society, legal history)
Kristin E. Turney, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Associate Professor of Sociology; Criminology, Law and Society (social inequality, family demography, population health, incarceration and punishment, intergenerational transmission of disadvantage, child well-being)
Deborah Lowe Vandell, Ph.D. Boston University, Professor of Education; Criminology, Law and Society; Psychology and Social Behavior (longitudinal studies of development, early childhood education, after-school programs, summer learning, child development, adolescent development)
Benjamin van Rooij, Ph.D., LL.B. Leiden University, John S. and Marilyn Long Chair in U.S.-China Business and Law and Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society
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