2016-17 Edition

Department of English

Michael F. Szalay, Department Chair
435 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-6712
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/english/

Overview

The Department of English comprises undergraduate and graduate programs in literature in English; the M.F.A. Program in Writing; Literary Journalism; and Composition. Among our faculty members are theorists and literary historians, scholars of rhetoric and experts in composition, journalists, writers of fiction, and poets.

Students in the Department explore a variety of models for literary analysis. They write stories and poems. They produce journalism. In every case, our students think about writing: its history, its changing functions, and its place in today’s culture. The major prepares students for a world in which informed analysis of language and forceful writing continue to be crucial.

Undergraduate Program

All of the Department’s areas of study emphasize a variety of critical approaches in the reading and criticism of literature. Two majors, as well as an emphasis in Creative Writing, are offered. The Department also offers English majors a specialization in English for Future Teachers for those interested in a teaching career. 

English. This major seeks to introduce students to the entire range of literatures written in English, from British and American to African, Asian, and Australasian literatures. The major emphasizes the differences among historical periods and various genres, and encourages exploration of a broad range of literary theories. It also offers students the opportunity to do significant work in Creative Writing.

Creative Writing. This emphasis within the English major provides a setting in which students write original work and subject it to critique in peer workshops led by instructors who are themselves writers. The disciplines of close reading and practical criticism are taken up in the lecture classes.

Literary Journalism. This major was created to meet the needs of a growing number of students who wish to read, study, and write nonfiction prose that has transcended the limits of daily journalism. This is prose that has evolved into a distinct branch of literature, prose that adopts the aims and techniques of the finest fiction. The program provides majors with a solid foundation in nonfiction writing and an equally solid background in areas such as literary history, which together will help make students more informed writers. A Literary Journalism minor is also offered.

Literary Journalism majors take three intensive writing seminars, and are expected to develop a portfolio of work by graduation which they can present as evidence of their skill for purposes of employment or future education. At the same time, majors are asked to take a comprehensive look at the theory, history, and context of literary journalism. Among other forms, they study and write narratives, memoirs, profiles, histories, and personal essays, in subject areas as varied as science, politics, justice, travel, sports, food, and popular culture.

While it differs from an applied journalism major that focuses primarily on newspaper writing, the major in Literary Journalism is excellent preparation for students planning to enter graduate programs in journalism, as well as for those interested in the many careers requiring sophisticated writing and communication skills.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in English

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
A. Complete the following:
ENGLISH 28A The Poetic Imagination
or ENGLISH 28D The Craft of Poetry
ENGLISH 28B Comic and Tragic Vision
ENGLISH 28C Realism and Romance
or ENGLISH 28E The Craft of Fiction
B. Complete the following:
ENGLISH 100 Introduction to Literary Theory
ENGLISH 101W Undergraduate Seminar in Critical Writing: Topics in Literary History
C. Complete the following:
ENGLISH 102A Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
ENGLISH 102B Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature
ENGLISH 102C Topics in Romantic and Nineteenth-Century Literature
ENGLISH 102D Topics in Twentieth-Century Literature
ENGLISH 105 Multicultural Topics in Literatures in English
ENGLISH 106 Advanced Seminar: Topics in English Literature
D. Select at least three more Departmental (English, Literary Journalism, Writing) courses numbered 102 or above, excluding ENGLISH 150, LIT JRN 197, WRITING 139W, and WRITING 179W. An upper-division foreign literature-in-translation course may be substituted for one of the three courses. 1
E. Completion of one of the following:
1. Two years of work in a single acceptable modern foreign language (through 2C) or equivalent, plus either one course in a foreign literature in which texts are read in the original language or two upper-division courses in foreign literatures in translation; or 1
2. GREEK or LATIN 100, and one GREEK or LATIN 103 and one GREEK or LATIN 104, or two GREEK or LATIN 103s or 104s.
3. Select one of the following:
Advanced Mandarin Chinese
Advanced Korean
Advanced Japanese
NOTE: If a student is exempted from 3C based on examination or equivalent, a course in which texts are read in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean is required.
1

Foreign literature-in-translation courses are offered in Classics, Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Literatures, French and Italian, German, and Spanish and Portuguese. COM LIT 150, COM LIT 160, E ASIAN 160, FLM&MDA 160, FRENCH 160, GERMAN 160, JAPANSE 180, KOREAN 180, and SPANISH 160 when appropriate, also qualify as foreign language literature-in-translation courses.

 Emphasis in Creative Writing
ENGLISH 100 Introduction to Literary Theory
WRITING 101W Undergraduate Seminar: Applications in Literary Theory and Criticism for Creative Writing
Completion of a portfolio
Specific course work (below) in either Poetry of Fiction:
Poetry
The Craft of Poetry
The Art of Writing: Poetry
Intermediate Poetry Writing
Students may additionally take Writing 111 after submitting work in advance.
Fiction
The Craft of Fiction
The Art of Writing: Prose Fiction
Intermediate Fiction Writing
Students may additionally take Writing 110 after submitting work in advance.
A further, optional course may be taken as a tutorial:
Conference in Writing
1

NOTE: WRITING 101W may be substituted for ENGLISH 101W in the major requirement.

Residence Requirement for the English Major: ENGLISH 100, ENGLISH 101W, two ENGLISH 102s, and ENGLISH 106 must be completed successfully at UCI.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in English with a Specialization in English for Future Teachers

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
A. Complete the following:
ENGLISH 28A The Poetic Imagination
or ENGLISH 28D The Craft of Poetry
ENGLISH 28B Comic and Tragic Vision
ENGLISH 28C Realism and Romance
or ENGLISH 28E The Craft of Fiction
B. Complete the following:
ENGLISH 100 Introduction to Literary Theory
ENGLISH 101W Undergraduate Seminar in Critical Writing: Topics in Literary History
C. Complete the following:
ENGLISH 102A Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
ENGLISH 102B Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature
ENGLISH 102C Topics in Romantic and Nineteenth-Century Literature
ENGLISH 102D Topics in Twentieth-Century Literature
ENGLISH 106 Advanced Seminar: Topics in English Literature
D. Complete two ENGLISH 105 courses with different topics.
E. Complete at least two more Departmental (English, Literary Journalism, Writing) courses numbered 102 or above, excluding ENGLISH 150, LIT JRN 197, WRITING 139W, or WRITING 179W. An upper-division foreign literature-in-translation course may be substituted for one of the three courses. 1
F. Select one from following:
Adolescent Development and Education
Multicultural Education in K-12 Schools
Exceptional Learners
Educational Technology
Urban Youth and the Development of Literacy through the Arts I
Urban Youth and the Development of Literacy through the Arts II
Cognition and Learning in Educational Settings
Psychology of Learning, Abilities, and Intelligence
G. Complete at least two units of field work from EDUC 100, WRITING 197, or other relevant experience with prior departmental approval.
H. Completion of one of the following:
1. Two years of work in a single acceptable modern foreign language (through 2C) or equivalent, plus either one course in a foreign literature in which texts are read in the original language or two uppper-division courses in foreign literatures in translation. 1
2. GREEK or LATIN 100, and one GREEK or LATIN 103 and one GREEK or LATIN 104, or two GREEK or LATIN 103s or 104s.
3. Select one of the following:
Advanced Mandarin Chinese
Advanced Korean
Advanced Japanese
NOTE: If a student is exempted from 3C based on examination or equivalent, a course in which texts are read in Chinese, Korean, or Japanese is required.
1

 Foreign literature-in-translation courses are offered in Classics, Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Literatures, French and Italian, German, and Spanish and Portuguese.  COM LIT 150 and COM LIT 160, E ASIAN 160, FLM&MDA 160, FRENCH 160, GERMAN 160, JAPANSE 180, KOREAN 180, and SPANISH 160 when appropriate, also qualify as foreign language literature-in-translation courses.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Literary Journalism

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
A. Complete:
LIT JRN 20 Introduction to Literary Journalism
LIT JRN 21 Reporting for Literary Journalism
LIT JRN 100 Advanced Reporting
B. Select one course from the English 28 series, and 1
Multicultural Topics in Literatures in English
C. Complete:
LIT JRN 101A Studies in the History, Theory, and Ethics of Literary Journalism
LIT JRN 101BW Literary Journalism Core Writing Seminar (three times, on various topics)
D. Select at least three more Departmental courses numbered 102 or above (excluding ENGLISH 150, LIT JRN 197, WRITING 139W, or WRITING 179W), for one of which may be substituted an upper-division foreign literature-in-translation course offered in the School of Humanities (that is, requisite courses in Classics, Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Literatures, French and Italian, German, Spanish and Portuguese).
E. Two upper-division History courses in a single regional or thematic focus area.
1

Students can substitute COM LIT 60A or COM LIT 60C for any one English 28 course.

 Residence Requirement for the Literary Journalism Major:  LIT JRN 20, LIT JRN 21, LIT JRN 100, LIT JRN 101A, and three LIT JRN 101BW courses must be completed successfully at UCI.

Additional Information

Planning a Program of Study

Students should plan coherent programs of study with their faculty advisors, including undergraduate seminars, workshops and seminars in writing (for students choosing a Literary Journalism major or Creative Writing emphasis), and courses in allied areas outside the Department. It is possible to combine a cluster of courses in literature with other majors in the sciences and social sciences, and to use an English or Literary Journalism major as preprofessional training in government, law, or medicine. Students who wish advice in planning such programs should consult both the Department and people in their prospective professional areas.

A student who intends to continue with graduate work is urged to study a second foreign language before graduation.

Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity to study abroad through the UC Education Abroad Program. Visit the Study Abroad Center website or an academic counselor for additional information.

Careers for the English or Literary Journalism Major

The study of literature helps students express their ideas clearly, do independent research, and think analytically and imaginatively. These capabilities will help qualify majors for careers in education, law, technical writing, communications, journalism, public relations, business, marketing, and management. Departmental advisors encourage their students to investigate various career options before completing their undergraduate educations.

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. See the Career Center section for additional information.

Departmental Requirements for the English Minor

A. Select three of the following:
The Poetic Imagination
Comic and Tragic Vision
Realism and Romance
The Craft of Poetry
The Craft of Fiction
B. Select at least five Departmental (English, Literary Journalism, Writing) courses numbered 102 or higher (excluding LIT JRN 197 & WRITING 139W), although two courses from the following may be substituted:
Introduction to Literary Theory
Undergraduate Seminar in Critical Writing: Topics in Literary History
Undergraduate Seminar: Applications in Literary Theory and Criticism for Creative Writing

Residence Requirement for the English Minor: Four upper-division courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the department undergraduate chair.

Departmental Requirements for the Literary Journalism Minor

A. Complete:
LIT JRN 20 Introduction to Literary Journalism
LIT JRN 21 Reporting for Literary Journalism
B. Select one course from the English 28 series. 1
C. Complete:
LIT JRN 100 Advanced Reporting
LIT JRN 101A Studies in the History, Theory, and Ethics of Literary Journalism
D. Complete:
LIT JRN 103 Lectures on Topics in Literary Journalism (three times, on various topics.)
1

Students can substitute COM LIT 60A or COM LIT 60C for any one English 28 course.


Residence Requirement for the Literary Journalism Minor: LIT JRN 20, LIT JRN 21, LIT JRN 100, and LIT JRN 101A must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the three LIT JRN 103 courses may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the Literary Journalism program.

On This Page:


Graduate Program

The Department’s three principal undergraduate offerings—English and American Literature, the English major with a Creative Writing emphasis, and Literary Journalism—are reflected in the graduate programs, which at this level, may also involve collaboration with the Department of Comparative Literature: M.A. and Ph.D. in English, M.F.A. in English (fiction/poetry), and an emphasis in Creative Nonfiction within the Ph.D. degree in English. The faculty is particularly equipped to guide students with special interests in criticism and theory, an area which candidates for the Ph.D. in English may stress by adding the Schoolwide Critical Theory emphasis. Applicants for graduate degrees in English must submit scores for the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Ordinarily students are not admitted to the English program unless they plan to continue, and are qualified to continue, to the degree of Ph.D. Students are admitted to the M.F.A. program chiefly on the basis of submitted creative work.

Specific requirements for the graduate degrees will be established by consultation between members of the faculty and the candidate. First-year graduate students or candidates for the Master of Fine Arts in English (fiction/poetry) plan a program with an assigned advisor; candidates for the Ph.D. plan with an advisor and three-person committee. At the time of the M.A. examination, the Graduate Committee evaluates the student’s graduate career up to that point and offers advice about future prospects. Candidates for literary degrees are also encouraged to study philosophy, history, foreign languages and literatures, and the fine arts.

Only in exceptional circumstances will students be permitted to undertake programs of less than six full courses during the academic year. The normal expectation is enrollment in three courses each quarter; Teaching Assistants take two courses in addition to earning credit for University Teaching. Students who are not teaching should be able to complete course work in two years. The Ph.D. qualifying examination should be taken within a couple of quarters after courses are finished. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. in English is seven years.

The Murray Krieger Fellowship in Literary Theory is intended for an outstanding entering graduate student who is pursuing the Ph.D. in English or Comparative Literature and who demonstrates a primary interest in theory as theory relates to literary texts. A range of other fellowships is also available to students in the Department.

Emphasis in Creative Nonfiction

Students admitted to the emphasis in Creative Nonfiction must meet all course, language, and examination requirements for the Ph.D. in English. Their course work must include: (1) three writing workshops in nonfiction; (2) three courses in nonfictional literature or rhetoric; and (2) if needed for the projected dissertation, one course outside the Department.

Students must also conduct a dissertation defense.

School Emphases

Schoolwide graduate emphases are available in Asian American Studies, Critical Theory, and Feminist Studies. Refer to the appropriate sections of the Catalogue for information.

English

Master of Arts in English

Each candidate for the M.A. will be assigned to a graduate advisor who will supervise the student’s program. The M.A. plan of study includes: (1) the completion of course work, as advised, for three quarters or the equivalent; (2) demonstrated proficiency in reading a designated foreign language, modern or classical; and (3) the submission of materials (including a statement about work accomplished and plans for future study, and a sample essay) to the Graduate Committee, who will review and assess the student’s progress, recommend whether further study toward the Ph.D. is advisable, and, if so, give advice about areas for further study.

The Department of English sponsors a Summer M.A. Program in English designed for teachers and returning students. The M.A. degree in English is awarded to candidates who complete 36 units of graduate course work through three summers in the program and submit an acceptable Master’s essay.

The M.A. plan of study includes: (1) the completion of 32 units of course work for two summers; (2) the completion of 4 units of dissertation research course work in the third summer, and (3) the completion of the Master's essay by the end of the third summer.

Master of Fine Arts in English

The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) is a degree in fiction writing or poetry. The M.F.A. degree is normally conferred upon the completion of a three-year residence. Each quarter the candidate will be enrolled in either the poetry or fiction section of the Graduate Writers’ Workshop, which will constitute two-thirds of a course load, the other course to be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor. It is expected that M.F.A. candidates will complete at least one supervised teaching seminar.

In addition to course work, the candidate is required to present as a thesis an acceptable book-length manuscript of poetry or short stories or a novel. The normative time for completion of the M.F.A. is three years, and the maximum time permitted is four years.

Doctor of Philosophy in English

The program for the Ph.D. in English requires about two years of full-time enrollment in regular courses beyond the B.A.; proficiency in the reading of one acceptable foreign language, modern or classical; satisfactory performance on designated examinations; and the dissertation.

The languages acceptable depends upon the nature of the student’s program as determined by the student’s advisors. Reading competence in this language must be established in the first year of residence. Competence in the language required for the Ph.D. is verified through examination.

Upon completion of course work the student is examined in three areas: (1) a primary field; (2) a secondary field; and (3) theory and/or criticism.

Upon satisfactorily completing this Qualifying Examination, the student is admitted to candidacy for the degree. As soon after completion of the Qualifying Examination as is practical, the student presents a dissertation prospectus for the approval of the doctoral committee. After submitting a full dissertation to their committee members, students will be required to pass an oral dissertation defense with their doctoral committee prior to filing the dissertation and graduating. All work for the Ph.D. degree must be in courses limited to graduate students. The normative time for advancement to candidacy is four years. The normative time for completion of the Ph.D. is seven years, and the maximum time permitted is nine years.

Criticism Courses

CRITISM 220B. Studies in Literary Theory and Its History. 4 Units.

Introduction to criticism and aesthetics for beginning graduate students. Readings from continental, English, and American theorists.

Same as HUMAN 220B.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

CRITISM 240. Advanced Theory Seminar. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Criticism Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

English Courses

ENGLISH 8. Multicultural American Literature. 4 Units.

Writings from at least two historically underrepresented groups in California and the United States with particular attention to historical conditions of literary production. Considers in-depth how literary works relate to racial constructions, economic conditions, and/or social movements.

(IV, VII)

ENGLISH 10. Topics in English and American Literature. 4 Units.

Explores the diversity of human expression manifested in selected works of literature. By engaging with substantial literary texts, students will think critically about how meaning is created and how experience is interpreted in literary language.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

(IV)

ENGLISH 11. Society, Law, and Literature. 4 Units.

How works of literature represent and influence the relation between law and society. The primary readings will be works of literature, but selections of works of law, politics, and sociology may also be assigned.

(III or IV ).

ENGLISH 12. Young Adult Fiction . 4 Units.

Young adult fiction studied in historical context, including the publishing industry and mass marketing as well as education and literacy. Primary readings will focus on young adult fiction, but works of history, advertising, and film will also be included.

(IV)

ENGLISH 28A. The Poetic Imagination. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which these modes formulate experience. Students write several short analytic papers.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(IV)

ENGLISH 28B. Comic and Tragic Vision. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which these modes formulate experience. Students write several short analytic papers.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(IV)

ENGLISH 28C. Realism and Romance. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which these modes formulate experience. Students write several short analytic papers.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(IV)

ENGLISH 28D. The Craft of Poetry. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which these modes formulate experience. Students write several short analytic papers. Requires creative writing.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(IV)

ENGLISH 28E. The Craft of Fiction. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which these modes formulate experience. Students write several short analytic papers. Requires creative writing.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

(IV)

ENGLISH 100. Introduction to Literary Theory. 4 Units.

Using Plato and Aristotle as points of departure, addresses a range of perspectives and problems in literary theory. To be taken by English majors in the junior year.

Prerequisite: (ENGLISH 28A and ENGLISH 28B and ENGLISH 28C) or (ENGLISH 28D and ENGLISH 28B and ENGLISH 28C) or (ENGLISH 28A and ENGLISH 28B and ENGLISH 28E) or (ENGLISH 28A and ENGLISH 28B and ENGLISH 28C) or (ENGLISH 28D and ENGLISH 28B and ENGLISH 28E), or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and ENGLISH 28A) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and ENGLISH 28B) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and ENGLISH 28C) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and ENGLISH 28D) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and ENGLISH 28E).

ENGLISH 101W. Undergraduate Seminar in Critical Writing: Topics in Literary History. 4 Units.

Each instructor identifies a topic within literary history; special attention will be given to mastering the conventions of academic argument and expression. To be taken as early as possible in the junior year.

Prerequisite: (Three courses in ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and (ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E)). Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

ENGLISH 102A. Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature. 4 Units.

Studies of works representative of Medieval and Renaissance literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre.

Prerequisite: (Three courses in ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and (ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E)).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 102B. Topics in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature . 4 Units.

Studies of works representative of Restoration and eighteenth-century literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre.

Prerequisite: (Three courses in ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and (ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E)).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 102C. Topics in Romantic and Nineteenth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Studies of works representative of Romantic and nineteenth-century literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre.

Prerequisite: (Three courses in ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and (ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E)).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 102D. Topics in Twentieth-Century Literature. 4 Units.

Studies of works representative of twentieth-century literature in English, with attention to literary history, treating at a minimum more than one author and more than one genre.

Prerequisite: (Three courses in ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E) or (LIT JRN 20 and LIT JRN 21 and (ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E)).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. English majors have first consideration for enrollment.

ENGLISH 103. Topics in Literature, Theory, and Criticism. 4 Units.

A series of lectures on and discussions of announced topics in literary criticism, theory, history, genres, modes, major authors.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-division students only.

ENGLISH 105. Multicultural Topics in Literatures in English. 4 Units.

Focuses on ethnic or minority literatures, or treats issues related to race and cultural identity.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-division students only.

ENGLISH 106. Advanced Seminar: Topics in English Literature . 4 Units.

Capstone course. Provides intensive work on a topic within the area of literatures in English with particular attention to the theoretical, critical, or conceptual issues it raises, with the goal of producing a substantive research paper.

Prerequisite: (ENGLISH 101W or WRITING 101W) and (ENGLISH 100 and 102A) or (ENGLISH 100 and 102B) or (ENGLISH 100 and 102C) or (ENGLISH 100 and 102D) or (ENGLISH 102A and 102B) or (ENGLISH 102A and 102C) or (ENGLISH 102A and 102D) or (ENGLISH 102B and 102C) or (ENGLISH 102C and 102D) or (ENGLISH 103 and 102A) or (ENGLISH 103 and 102B) or (ENGLISH 103 and 102C) or (ENGLISH 103 and 102D) or (ENGLISH 105 and 102A) or (ENGLISH 105 and 102B) or (ENGLISH 105 and 102C) or (ENGLISH 105 and 102D) or (ENGLISH 100 and 103) or (ENGLISH 103 and 105) or (ENGLISH 100 and 105).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: English majors have first consideration for enrollment. Seniors only.

ENGLISH 150. Topics in Literature for Nonmajors . 4 Units.

Major texts in English, American, and Comparative Literature explored for basic humanistic issues and themes, on announced topics. Primarily for upper-division students, but not requiring previous training in literature.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-division students only.

ENGLISH 160. English Language Cinema. 4 Units.

Focuses on any one of the different cinematic traditions in the English-speaking world, from a historical theoretical, or comparative perspective.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

ENGLISH 198. Special Topics. 4 Units.

Directed group study of selected topics as arranged by instructor.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ENGLISH 199. Independent Study. 1-4 Units.

To be taken only when the materials to be studied lie outside the normal run of departmental offerings, and when the student will have no formal chance to pursue the subject. Research paper required.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ENGLISH 210. Studies in Literary History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of literary history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ENGLISH 225. Studies in Literary Genres. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of literary genres. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ENGLISH 230. Studies in Major Writers. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of major writers. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ENGLISH 255. Graduate Workshop in Academic Publishing. 4 Units.

Reading and critique of student-authored essays with the goal of producing a publishable essay. Instructor leads discussion, meets with students individually, and provides an introduction to appropriate venues for publication and the process of submission, peer review, and revision.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

ENGLISH 290. Reading and Conference. 4-12 Units.

Studies in selected areas. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

ENGLISH 291. Guided Reading Course. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

ENGLISH 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

A units-only course for students in the dissertation phase.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ENGLISH 398. Rhetoric/Teaching of Composition. 4 Units.

Readings, lectures, and internship designed to prepare graduate students to teach composition. Formal instruction in rhetoric and practical work in teaching methods and grading.

ENGLISH 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

A units-only course for students appointed as teaching assistants or associates.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Literary Journalism Courses

LIT JRN 20. Introduction to Literary Journalism. 4 Units.

Reading of selected texts to explore the ways in which literary journalism and related nonfiction modes formulate experience. Students complete a range of writing projects.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Literary Journalism majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(IV)

LIT JRN 21. Reporting for Literary Journalism. 4 Units.

Instruction and hands-on training in how to interview, report, research, and collect the types of information needed to write literary journalism.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Literary Journalism majors have first consideration for enrollment.

LIT JRN 100. Advanced Reporting. 4 Units.

Practical engagement with advanced reporting techniques of Literary Journalism, emphasizing the importance of thorough and effective research in the production of high-quality journalistic writing. Prepares students to make good decisions about where and how to publish their writing.

Prerequisite: LIT JRN 21.

LIT JRN 101A. Studies in the History, Theory, and Ethics of Literary Journalism. 4 Units.

Required of upper-division majors in Literary Journalism. Lectures and discussion on topics that explore the historical and theoretical dimensions of literary journalism, with particular emphasis on the evolution of ethics in the field.

Prerequisite: LIT JRN 21 and LIT JRN 20 and (ENGLISH 28A or ENGLISH 28B or ENGLISH 28C or ENGLISH 28D or ENGLISH 28E or COM LIT 60A or COM LIT 60B or COM LIT 60C).

LIT JRN 101BW. Literary Journalism Core Writing Seminar. 4 Units.

Limited to 20 students. Writing seminars in announced specialized genres that students will both study and practice. Examples: "The Memoir"; "Review Writing"; "The Editorial"; "Writing Biography"; "The Profile"; "Political Writing.".

Prerequisite: LIT JRN 101A. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. Students may enroll in a maximum of one LIT JRN 101BW course per quarter.

(Ib)

LIT JRN 103. Lectures on Topics in Literary Journalism. 4 Units.

A series of lectures on, and discussions of, announced topics in literary journalism and the literature of fact. Examples include "Travel Literary Journalism"; "Literature of True Crime"; "Narratives in the Digital Age"; "Journalism on the Edge".

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Recommended: Upper-division students only.

LIT JRN 197. Community Reporting . 4 Units.

Directed group study in which students work with an instructor to report and write about community news in a newsroom-style format. Students will partner with local publications to pitch, market, and publish their stories.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of lower-division writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

LIT JRN 198. Special Topics. 4 Units.

Directed group study of selected topics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

LIT JRN 199. Reading and Conference. 1-4 Units.

To be taken only when the materials to be studied lie outside the normal run of departmental offerings.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Writing Courses

WRITING 30. The Art of Writing: Poetry. 4 Units.

Beginners' workshop in the writing of poetry, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

(Ia)

WRITING 31. The Art of Writing: Prose Fiction. 4 Units.

Beginners' workshop in fiction writing, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

(Ia)

WRITING 37. Intensive Writing. 6 Units.

Guided practice in critical reading and analysis including instruction in paragraph development and sentence-level mechanics. Readings selected from current fiction and nonfiction; writing assignments require demonstration of analysis and rhetorical principles.

Prerequisite: Students must have taken the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination.

Overlaps with WRITING 39A, WRITING 39B.

(Ia)

WRITING 39A. Introduction to Writing and Rhetoric. 4 Units.

Deals with the writing of expository essays, principles of rhetoric, paragraph development, and the fundamentals of sentence-level mechanics. Frequent papers, some exercises. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Students must have taken the UC Analytical Writing Placement Examination with placement in Writing 39A.

Overlaps with WRITING 37, WRITING 39A.

WRITING 39B. Critical Reading and Rhetoric. 4 Units.

Guided practice in the critical reading and written analysis of both popular and academic prose. Readings selected from literary, academic, journalistic, and fictional genres; writing topics require rhetorical analysis of readings and demonstration of rhetorical principles in student writing. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

Overlaps with WRITING 37.

(Ia)

WRITING 39C. Argument and Research. 4 Units.

Guided writing practice in argumentation, logic, and inquiry. Readings are selected from current nonfiction and from materials students select from the University Library. Research strategies emphasized. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: WRITING 37 or WRITING 39B.

(Ia)

WRITING 90. Intermediate Poetry Writing. 4 Units.

Intermediate workshop in the writing of poetry, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings.

Prerequisite: WRITING 30.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 91. Intermediate Fiction Writing. 4 Units.

Intermediate workshop in the writing of fiction, evaluation of student manuscripts, and parallel readings.

Prerequisite: WRITING 31.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 101W. Undergraduate Seminar: Applications in Literary Theory and Criticism for Creative Writing. 4 Units.

Substitute for ENGLISH 101 for Creative Writing emphasis students.

Prerequisite: ENGLISH 100 or LIT JRN 100. Satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: English majors and Literary Journalism majors only.

(Ib)

WRITING 110. Short Story Writing. 4 Units.

Three-hour workshop in short fiction; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 111. Poetry Writing. 4 Units.

Three-hour advanced poetry writing workshop; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 113. Novel Writing. 4 Units.

Three-hour advanced workshop in fiction writing; discussion of student writing and of relevant literary texts.

WRITING 115. Conference in Writing. 4 Units.

Primarily for writing emphasis seniors.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

WRITING 139W. Advanced Expository Writing. 4 Units.

Study of rhetoric, disciplinary genres, and modes of knowledge production; practice in writing effective prose. Essays of varying lengths, totaling at least 4,000 words. Course may be offered online.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

WRITING 179W. Advanced Composition for Teachers. 4 Units.

Principles of formal composition and problems of teaching. Selecting handbooks and ancillary reading, marking papers, making assignments, and conducting workshops and tutorials.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as EDUC 179W.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

WRITING 197. Writing Internship . 2-4 Units.

Internships focused on writing. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students create a course from response essays, research essays, and assessment project data. Internships may include editing and publication projects, supervised teaching and tutoring assignments, community literacy projects.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the lower-division writing requirement.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

WRITING 250A. Graduate Writers' Workshop (Fiction). 4 Units.

Graduate fiction workshop open to students enrolled in the MFA program in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 250B. Graduate Writers' Workshop (Fiction). 4 Units.

Graduate fiction workshop open to students enrolled in the MFA program in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 250C. Graduate Writers' Workshop (Poetry). 8 Units.

Graduate poetry workshop open to students enrolled in the M.F.A. Programs in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 251A. Writing in Conference (Fiction). 4 Units.

Graduate fiction workshop open to students enrolled in the MFA program in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 251B. Writing in Conference (Fiction). 4 Units.

Graduate fiction workshop open to students enrolled in the MFA program in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

WRITING 251C. Writing in Conference (Poetry). 8 Units.

Graduate poetry workshop open to students enrolled in the M.F.A. Programs in Writing.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

Jonathan Alexander, Ph.D. Louisiana State University, Campus Writing Coordinator and Professor of English; Culture and Theory; Education; Gender and Sexuality Studies (writing studies, sexuality studies, queer theory, new media studies)
Bobbie J. Allen, Ph.D. University of Washington, Lecturer of English
Elizabeth G. Allen, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of English (Chaucer, Gower, 15th century poetry; exemplary literature, romance, chronicle, episodic form; intersections between ethics and politics, politics and religion; hospitality, sovereignty, legal and constitutional history of England)
Michael Andreasen, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Stephen A. Barney, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of English
Jami Bartlett, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of English (The 19th-Century Novel, literature and philosophy, narrative theory)
Alice C. Berghof, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Humanities; English
Emily M. Brauer, M.A. University of Southern California, Lecturer of English
Carol M. Burke, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Professor of English (literary and cultural theory, literary journalism, new media studies)
Ellen S. Burt, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century French literature and nineteenth-century poetry)
James L. Calderwood, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of English
Ronald Carlson, M.A. University of Utah, Professor of English (creative writing, fiction, contemporary literature, short stories)
Chieh L. Chieng, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Jerome C. Christensen, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of English (Hollywood motion pictures, corporate authorship, romantic literature)
Michael P. Clark, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of English
Rachael L. Collins, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Miles Corwin, M.A. University of Missouri-Columbia, Professor of English (law enforcement, the criminal justice system, homicide, inner-city education, affirmative action)
Keith Danner, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Lecturer of English
Rebecca Davis, Ph.D. University of Notre Dame, Assistant Professor of English (Old and Middle English literature, Piers Plowman, medieval religious culture, women’s writing, medieval philosophy)
Susan E. Davis, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Lorene D. Delany-Ullman, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Amy Depaul, B.A. Boston University, Lecturer of English
Jaya Dubey, M.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Kathryn Eason, M.A. University of Colorado Boulder, Lecturer of English
Loren P. Eason, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Anita W. Fischer, M.A. Loyola Marymount University, Lecturer of English
Robert Folkenflik, Ph.D. Cornell University, Edward A. Dickson Emeriti Professorship and Professor Emeritus of English
Linda M. Georgianna, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emerita of English
Amy Gerstler, M.F.A. Bennington College, Professor of English (poetry, creative writing, fiction, creative nonfiction, hybrid literature, visual art, lyric essay, art and science, women writers)
Richard Godden, Ph.D. University of Kent, Professor of English (20th century and contemporary American literature, Faulkner)
Chelsea J. Gordon, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Rebecca C. Gray, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Daniel Gross, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English (emotion studies, history and theory of rhetoric, early modern literature and culture, Heidegger and rhetoric)
Alberto D. Gullaba, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Linda G. Haas, Ph.D. University of South Florida, Lecturer of English
Martin Harries, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of English (20th century theater, critical theory)
Erika Hayasaki, B.A. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Assistant Professor of English (literary journalism in the digital age, narrative nonfiction, immersion journalism, youth, culture, crime, poverty, health, science, education, urban affairs, death)
Rebeca Louise Helfer, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of English (Renaissance literature and culture, memory, Spenser)
Andrea K. Henderson, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor of English (19th century literature, literature and visual arts, literature and science)
Margaret A. Hesketh, M.F.A. Chapman University, Lecturer of English
John W. Hollowell, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of English
Oren J. Izenberg, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Associate Professor of English (poetics, modern and contemporary poetry, 20th century literature and culture, philosophy and literature)
Virginia W. Jackson, Ph.D. Princeton University, Chair in Rhetoric and Communication and Associate Professor of English (poetics, 19th, 20th and 21st century American poetry, 19th century American literature and culture, the history of literary theory)
Leah C. Kaminski, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Charlene J. Keeler, M.A. California State University, Fullerton, Lecturer of English
Jonathan I. Keeperman, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Tarah M. Keeperman, M.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Arlene Keizer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory (African American and Caribbean literature, critical race and ethnic studies, feminist and psychoanalytic theory, cultural studies)
Douglas V. Kiklowicz, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Peter O. Krapp, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Professor of Film and Media Studies; English; Informatics; Visual Studies (digital culture, media history, cultural memory)
P. Michelle Latiolais, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Professor of English (creative writing, fiction, contemporary literature)
Karen R. Lawrence, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emerita of English
Rodrigo Lazo, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (hemispheric American studies, nineteenth century, Latino studies and the Americas, Cuba, immigrant literature)
Jerry Won Lee, Ph.D. University of Arizona, Assistant Professor of English
Jayne Elizabeth Lewis, Ph.D. Princeton University, Director of Humanities Honors Program and Professor of English (literature and medicine, restoration and 18th century British literature, literature of the supernatural and gothic fiction, history and/of fiction, atmosphere as literary concept and construct within natural philosophy)
Julia R. Lupton, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean for Research and Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Education (Renaissance literature, literature and psychology)
Juliet F. MacCannell, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor Emerita of English
Steven J. Mailloux, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor Emeritus of English; Comparative Literature (rhetoric, critical theory, American literature, law and literature)
Gregory J. McClure, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Lowell B. McKay, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
James L. McMichael, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of English
John Miles, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of English (religion, literature, international relations, western scriptures [Jewish, Christian, Muslim] as literature; religious poetry and music, religion, science, and the environment)
J. Hillis Miller, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Endowed Chair and Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature; English (Victorian literature, critical theory)
Joseph M. Morales, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Lecturer of Humanities; English
Olga Moskvina, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Jane O. Newman, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory; English; European Languages and Studies (comparative Renaissance and early modern literature and culture [English, French, German, Italian, neo-Latin], Mediterranean Renaissance studies, Baroque, afterlives of antiquity, Walter Benjamin, Erich Auerbach, pre-modern lessons for the modern and post-modern)
Robert W. Newsom, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emeritus of English
Margot Norris, Ph.D. State University of New York College at Buffalo, Professor Emerita of English; Comparative Literature (modern Irish, British, American and continental modernism, literature and war)
Laura B. O'Connor, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (Irish literature, twentieth-century poetry, Anglo-American modernism)
Aaron M. Peters, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Robert L. Peters, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor Emeritus of English
Bradley A. Queen, Ph.D. Boston University, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of English
Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan, Ph.D. Binghamton University, State University of New York, UCI Chancellor's Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory (critical theory, postcoloniality, nationalisms and diasporas, poststructuralism, postmodernism, democracy and minority discourse, cultural studies, globalization and transnationalism)
Barbara L. Reed, Ph.D. Indiana University, Lecturer with Security of Employment Emerita of English
Hugh J. Roberts, Ph.D. McGill University, Associate Professor of English (romantic literature, Shelley, literature and science, chaos theory and literature, politics and literature)
John C. Rowe, Ph.D. State University of New York College at Buffalo, Professor Emeritus of English; Comparative Literature
Michael Ryan, Ph.D. University of Iowa, Professor of English (American literature, creative writing, poetry, poetics, autobiography)
Edgar T. Schell, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of English
Gretchen K. Short, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Humanities; English
Barry E. Siegel, M.S. Columbia University, Professor of English (literary journalism, English)
Victoria A. Silver, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of English; European Languages and Studies (early modern literature and culture, religious studies, history and theory of rhetoric, literature and philosophy)
Richard A. Sims, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
James Steintrager, Ph.D. Columbia University, Director of the Emphasis in Critical Theory and Professor of English; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century comparative literature, ethical philosophy and literature, systems theory, amatory and erotic fiction)
Michael F. Szalay, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Department Chair and Professor of English (contemporary television and literature)
Ngugi Wa Thiong'O, B.A. Makerere University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature; English (African and Caribbean literatures, theater and film, performance studies, cultural and political theory)
Brook Thomas, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, UCI Chancellor's Professor of English (U.S. literature and culture, law and literature, literature and history)
Harold E. Toliver, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of English
Andrew T. Tonkovich, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Irene Tucker, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of English (Victorian studies)
Georges Y. Van Den Abbeele, Ph.D. Cornell University, Dean of the School of Humanities and Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (French and European philosophical literature, travel narrative and tourism/migration studies, critical theory and aesthetics, francophone literature, history of cartography, media history and theory.)
Ann J. Van Sant, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English (restoration and 18th century literature)
Andrzej J. Warminski, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean for Academic Personnel and Professor of English; European Languages and Studies; Humanities (romanticism, history of literary theory, contemporary theory, literature and philosophy)
Jacqueline Y. Way, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English
Henry Weinstein, J.D. University of California, Berkeley, Senior Lecturer of School of Law; English
Amy Wilentz, B.A. Harvard University, Professor of English (formal mechanisms of literary journalism, travel journalism as a literary form, explanatory journalism, role of journalism for the everyday reader)
David Lee Wirthlin, M.F.A. The Art Institute of Chicago, Lecturer of English
Geoffrey Wolff, B.A. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of English
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