2016-17 Edition

Department of Art History

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Cécile Whiting, Department Chair
2000 Humanities Gateway
949-824-6635
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/arthistory/

Overview

The Department of Art History offers a major and minor in Art History. Art History is the study of works of art and other visual artifacts from all regions of the world and all periods of history. Consequently, the undergraduate curriculum in Art History, with its global perspective, is one of the most diverse disciplines in the humanities. Through Art History, students learn how to describe and interpret a range of objects including sculpture, painting, photography, architecture, and “new media” such as video and performance art. These skills, along with the program’s intense focus on writing and verbal expression, prepare students to think critically and to express themselves clearly at a time when visual communication is becoming ever more important.

Because works of art are always created within a larger cultural context, Art History courses are a good way to understand what other places or times were like. Students may explore, for example, ancient Greece, 19th century Japan, or even the 21st century United States. Majors in Art History are thus welcome to take related courses in other fields of the humanities. Students are encouraged to pursue the study of language beyond the minimum requirements, and because of its international perspective, Art History is a particularly good major for students interested in studying abroad. There are many study centers throughout the world associated with the University’s Education Abroad Program.

Career Opportunities

Following their graduation, students with a B.A. in Art History have found employment in art galleries, auction houses, and museums, and they have entered graduate programs with a view to careers in university teaching, curatorial work, and art conservation. Moreover, with its strong emphasis on developing critical skills in writing, speaking, and analysis, Art History also provides an excellent preparation for many other careers. UCI graduates have pursued professional paths ranging from medicine and law, to business and education, to information technologies and architecture. As in the case of arts administration or intellectual property law, some of these professional pursuits have depended on and continue to make use of training in the arts.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Art History

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Departmental Requirements for the Major
A. Select three of the following:
Ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Art and Architecture
Arts of Europe: Medieval and Renaissance
Early Modern and Modern Art in Europe and America
History of Asian Art: Arts of India
History of Asian Art: Arts of China
History of Asian Art: Arts of Japan
History of Asian Art: Arts of Islam
Image Collision: A Multicultural Approach to Images and Their Users
B. Select eight upper-division Art History courses, with at least one course in each of the following geographical regions: 1
Americas: Art History 140, 156, 163–167
Europe: Art History 100–140
Asia: Art History 150–163
and at least one course in each of the following five historical periods: 1
Ancient:
Art History 100–107
Ancient India
Medieval:
Studies in Medieval Art
Byzantine Art: 650-1450
Studies in Early Christian and Byzantine Art
Studies in Western Medieval Art
Medieval India
Early Modern:
Art History 120–128
Early Modern European Art: Age of Absolutism
Later Imperial China
Early Modern Japan
Early American Art
Modern:
Modern European Art: From Revolution to Realism
Modern European Art: From Impressionism to the Fauves
Modern European Art: From Cubism to Surrealism
Topics in Modern European Art
Studies in Modern Architecture
Modern China
Modern India
Art and Globalization, Modern
Modern Japan
Modern African American Art
African Americans and Photography
Nineteenth Century American Art
Modern American Art
20th Century Photographic History
Selected Topics in Photographic History
Contemporary:
History of Contemporary Art
Topics in Contemporary Art
Studies in Architecture after 1945
Contemporary Japan
Asian American Art, Contemporary
Contemporary African American Art
African American Women in Art
20th Century Photographic History
Selected Topics in Photographic History
C. Complete:
ART HIS 190W Art History Methods
D. Select one of the following options:
1. Two quarters of:
ART HIS 198 Advanced Seminar: Topics in Art History
2. or one quarter of:
ART HIS 196 Ethics, Law, and Art
and
ART HIS 198 Advanced Seminar: Topics in Art History
1

NOTE: A course may apply as both one Geographical Region and one Historical Period, but no course may be used to satisfy more than one Geographical Region or more than one Historical Period.

Students should enroll in ART HIS 190W (for upper-division writing) as early as possible in their junior year, after successfully completing UCI’s lower-division writing requirement. It is strongly recommended that students complete ART HIS 190W before taking ART HIS 198.

Residence Requirement for the Major: Five upper-division courses required for the major must be completed successfully at UCI.

4+1 Program in Art History

The 4+1 program allows students to earn a bachelor’s degree in Art History while simultaneously completing courses that can be applied toward a master’s degree in Art History. This unique structure permits students to complete coursework for their master’s degree during the undergraduate term and one additional year.

The M.A. degree program in Art History is designed to provide students with advanced skills and broad knowledge in the discipline of art history. The faculty is particularly well equipped to guide students with special interests in American, Asian, and European art history.

For more information on the 4+1 M.A. in Art History, visit the Art History Graduate tab.

Requirements for the Minor in Art History

Departmental Requirements
A. Select three of the following:
Ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Art and Architecture
Arts of Europe: Medieval and Renaissance
Early Modern and Modern Art in Europe and America
History of Asian Art: Arts of India
History of Asian Art: Arts of China
History of Asian Art: Arts of Japan
History of Asian Art: Arts of Islam
Image Collision: A Multicultural Approach to Images and Their Users
B. Select four upper-division Art History courses from 100–198, excluding ART HIS 190W.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: Four upper-division courses required for the minor must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the department chair.

4+1 M.A. Program in Art History

The 4+1 program allows students to earn a bachelor’s degree while simultaneously completing courses that can be applied toward a master’s degree in Art History. This unique structure permits students to complete coursework for their master’s degree during the undergraduate term and one additional year.

The M.A. degree program in Art History is designed to provide students with advanced skills and broad knowledge in the discipline of art history. The faculty is particularly well equipped to guide students with special interests in American, Asian, and European art history.

This is a 4+1 M.A. Program for UCI undergraduates majoring in Art History or other majors. Students can begin coursework during the last year of the B.A. and are required to take a total of nine courses, equivalent to 36 units, toward the M.A. Nine courses are required for the degree: two Art History Masters Seminars (ART HIS 298), Art History: Theory and Methods (VIS STD 290A), three Graduate Seminars in Visual Studies taught by Art History faculty (VIS STD 295), an additional elective graduate seminar; and two quarters of Master’s Thesis Research (ART HIS 299).

The Master’s Thesis is an approximately 20-page work of independent research supervised by a member of the faculty. Students wishing to participate in the program should apply either in their final undergraduate year or in the spring quarter of their penultimate year, which would allow them to begin course work toward the M.A. in their last undergraduate year.

For more information, please visit: http://www.humanities.uci.edu/arthistory/graduate/51.php

Graduate Program in Visual Studies

In conjunction with the Department of Film and Media Studies, the Department of Art History offers a graduate program in Visual Studies. A program description and graduate courses may be found in the Program in Visual Studies section.

Courses

ART HIS 40A. Ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Art and Architecture. 4 Units.

An overview of Prehistoric, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman art. Considers how and why the peoples of antiquity created art and architecture, as well as the significance of these works within their social, religious, and historical contexts.

(IV, VIII)

ART HIS 40B. Arts of Europe: Medieval and Renaissance. 4 Units.

Focuses on the art of the Mediterranean area and Europe between ca. A.D. 350 and 1600. By means of movements and artists, examines the cultural identities of the Christian, Islamic, and Early Modern worlds.

(IV, VIII)

ART HIS 40C. Early Modern and Modern Art in Europe and America. 4 Units.

The visual arts from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries. Explores the purposes and meaning of painting, sculpture, and architecture in relation to artists, viewers, and historical events.

(IV, VIII)

ART HIS 42A. History of Asian Art: Arts of India. 4 Units.

Emphasizing Hindu, Buddhist, and Islamic art of greater India (Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka) from proto-historic to modern times. Themes include art as a source of history, commercial and religious pan-Asian connections, nationalism, and modern versus historical identities.

(IV, VIII)

ART HIS 42B. History of Asian Art: Arts of China. 4 Units.

An introduction to the arts and visual culture of China from Neolithic to modern times. Themes includes the representation of power, death and the afterlife, popular culture and elite arts, landscape and women's painting, and concludes with contemporary China.

(IV, VIII)

ART HIS 42C. History of Asian Art: Arts of Japan. 4 Units.

Examines compelling images and objects of spirit and power created in Japan over many centuries. Themes include Buddhist icons, narative illustration, popular prints, architecture, manga, and the avant-garde. Japanese interactions with Korean, Chinese, and European culture are emphasized.

(IV, VIII)

ART HIS 42D. History of Asian Art: Arts of Islam. 4 Units.

Examines past and present Islamic art, spanning 1,500 years and extending from the Americas through Indonesia. Themes include Islam as a globalizing force, the definition of "Islamic," and the competing roles of religion and politics in making art.

(IV, VIII)

ART HIS 44. Image Collision: A Multicultural Approach to Images and Their Users. 4 Units.

Comparisons between present-day visual culture and pre-modern art to re-evaluate the ways in which one understands the contemporary histories of underrepresented groups in the United States.

(IV and VII ).

ART HIS 100. Studies in Ancient Art . 4 Units.

Topics in Egyptian, Prehistoric, and Etruscan art of the Mediterranean area treated with specific reference to relevant cultural and historical settings. Specialized courses in Greek and Roman art are also taught.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 103. Studies in Greek Art. 4 Units.

Topics in Greek art, architecture, and topography from the Prehistoric period through the end of the fourth century B.C.E.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 107. Studies in Roman Art. 4 Units.

Topics in Hellenistic and Roman art and architecture; stresses historical and political background.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 110. Studies in Medieval Art. 4 Units.

Specialized topics in Medieval art and architecture in Europe, the Mediterranean area, and the Near East between the fourth and fifteenth centuries. Examples: the Art of the Migration Period, Medieval City.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 111B. Byzantine Art: 650-1450. 4 Units.

Studies in the development of the art and architecture of the Byzantine Empire between ca. 650 and 1450.

ART HIS 112. Studies in Early Christian and Byzantine Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics on the development of the art and architecture of the Later Roman and Byzantine Empires between ca. 300 and 1453. Examples: Early Christian architecture, Byzantine painting.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 114. Studies in Western Medieval Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics on the development of art and architecture in Western Europe between ca. 700 and 1400. Examples: Romanesque painting, Gothic architecture.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 120. Studies in Renaissance and Baroque Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics on the art and architecture of Europe between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries. Examples: Renaissance and Baroque prints, Bruegel to Rubens.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 121. Studies in Southern Renaissance Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics determined by individual faculty members exploring historical developments and individual artists of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italy and Spain. Examples: Renaissance Venice, Age of Michelangelo.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 123. Studies in Northern Renaissance Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics determined by individual faculty members exploring historical developments and individual artists of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Northern Europe. Examples: Late Medieval art, painting from Van Eyck to Bosch.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 125. Studies in Southern Baroque Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics determined by individual faculty members exploring historical developments and individual artists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in Italy and Spain. Example: Rome in the seventeenth century.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 128. Studies in Northern Baroque Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics determined by individual faculty members exploring historical developments and individual artists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in Northern Europe. Example: the Age of Rembrandt.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 134A. Early Modern European Art: Age of Absolutism. 4 Units.

History of European painting, sculpture, and architecture from 1643 to 1789, during the emergence of nation states dominated by kings and court.

ART HIS 134B. Modern European Art: From Revolution to Realism. 4 Units.

History of European painting and other arts from 1789 to 1851, as the continent lurched through revolution, reaction, and the birth of modern societies and sensibilities.

ART HIS 134C. Modern European Art: From Impressionism to the Fauves. 4 Units.

History of European painting and urban transformation from 1851 to 1907, when Paris stood strong as the unquestioned cultural capital of the nineteenth century.

ART HIS 134D. Modern European Art: From Cubism to Surrealism. 4 Units.

History of European painting, sculpture, and design from 1907 to 1940, when Paris and painting lost their dominance as other cultural centers and other media claimed renewed importance.

ART HIS 134E. Topics in Modern European Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics within the period 1643 to 1940.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 140A. History of Contemporary Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics exploring historical developments of contemporary art from 1945 to the present. Examples: American Art 1945-1989, European Art 1945-1989, Art After 1989. Works of art are studied as cultural, social, and political practices.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 140B. Topics in Contemporary Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics exploring artistic movements, artists, and/or issues in contemporary art from 1945 to the present. Examples include Junk Art, Countercultures, Art and Politics Now. Works of art are studied as cultural, social, and political practices.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 145A. Studies in Modern Architecture. 4 Units.

Architecture and related design practices from the late eighteenth century through 1945 are studied in relation to social, aesthetic, technological, and political questions.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 145B. Studies in Architecture after 1945. 4 Units.

Architecture and related design practices from 1945 through present are studied in relation to social, aesthetic, technological, and political questions.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 145C. Topics in the History of Modern and Contemporary Architecture. 4 Units.

Varying topics from the late eighteenth century to the present. Architecture and related design practices are studied in relation to social, aesthetic, technological, and political questions.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 150. Studies in Asian Art. 4 Units.

Topics include visual studies in China, Japan, Korea and India.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 151B. Later Imperial China. 4 Units.

Investigates the uses, subjects, styles, and social contexts of art made in the later Imperial dynasties, whether court art, religious art, women's painting, scholar painting, or art for the market.

ART HIS 151C. Modern China. 4 Units.

Examines the evolution and media of Chinese art and visual culture in the context of modern China's sweeping historical, social, and political changes.

ART HIS 155A. Ancient India. 4 Units.

Examines the visual and religious history of the region defined as "India" today, but necessarily encompassing modern Bangladesh and Pakistan. Culminates with the supposed Golden Age of the Gupta empire and its far-reaching legacies.

Same as HISTORY 170A, REL STD 122.

ART HIS 155B. Medieval India. 4 Units.

Begins with the Gupta period's aesthetic legacies in South Asia's architecture, sculpture, and painting. Explores the dispersal of Islam throughout South Asia, including the Muslim communities of southern India.

Same as HISTORY 170B, REL STD 123.

ART HIS 155C. Modern India. 4 Units.

Examines the imperial patronage of the Mughal emperors, covering their territorial holdings extending from Afghanistan through western Bangladesh. Continues with the "aftermath" of the Mughal empire and the rise of British commercialism and colonialism.

ART HIS 155D. Topics in the Art and Architecture of India. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Art and Architecture of India. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 156. Art and Globalization, Modern. 4 Units.

Study of modern art as a cause and expression of increasing contacts between cultures. Focusing on regions in Asia and the Americas, adoption of European oil painting, indigenous art movements, and national capital architecture are explored.

ART HIS 162A. Early Modern Japan. 4 Units.

Focuses on the Edo Period (1615-1868), an enormously productive time in the early modern development of Japanese art in woodblock prints, painting, and crafts. Topics include the image of the beautiful woman, kabuki actor prints, and intoxicated ink painting.

ART HIS 162B. Modern Japan. 4 Units.

Explores artistic developments during the tumultuous modernization of Japan from 1868-1945, with a focus on painting, commercial art, and architecture. Topics include arts of the Japanese Empire, neo-traditional arts, responses to European modernism, and war propaganda.

ART HIS 162C. Contemporary Japan. 4 Units.

Study of various media of Japanese art from the time of war defeat in 1945 until the present. Topics include artists' responses to the nuclear bomb, the aesthetics of the "economic miracle," avant-garde groups, manga, and innovations in architecture.

ART HIS 163. Asian American Art, Contemporary. 4 Units.

Study of the Asian American experience in contemporary art and visual culture. Art by Asian Americans of diverse backgrounds as well as the history of visualization of Asian identities in American art/visual culture.

ART HIS 164A. Modern African American Art. 4 Units.

Investigates the history of modern African American art; emphasis on the politics of representation. Examines art in a variety of media from material culture and textiles to painting and photography. Issues of migration, nationalism, gender, sexuality, and hybridity are discussed.

Same as AFAM 111A.

ART HIS 164B. Contemporary African American Art. 4 Units.

Investigates the history of contemporary African American art; emphasis on the politics of representation. Explores art in a variety of media: painting, sculpture, photography, installation, and new media. Cultural politics, appropriation, identity, gender, sexuality, hybridity and civil rights issues discussed.

Same as AFAM 111B.

ART HIS 164C. Topics in African American Art. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of African American Art. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 164D. African American Women in Art. 4 Units.

Examines depictions of and by African American women in art and popular culture through a variety of media including textiles, painting, sculpture, photography, and installation. Focuses on African American women's experiences, perspectives, and strategies for contemporary representation.

Same as AFAM 125.

ART HIS 164E. African Americans and Photography. 4 Units.

Explores depictions of and by African Americans through photography. Examines the history of photography in relationship to African American culture through a variety of media from early daguerreotype processes to digital imagery.

Same as AFAM 145.

ART HIS 165A. Early American Art. 4 Units.

An examination of American visual culture from 1620 to 1860 from the era of European exploration and colonization of the New World to the beginning of the Civil War.

ART HIS 165B. Nineteenth Century American Art. 4 Units.

An exploration of American visual culture from 1860 to 1900, including paintings, sculpture, and photographs produced during the Civil War and during the decades of prosperity that followed.

ART HIS 165C. Modern American Art. 4 Units.

Focusing on the period from 1900 until 1965, this course considers the emergence and institutionalization of modern art in the United States.

ART HIS 165D. Topics in American Art. 4 Units.

Varying topics within the period 1620 to 1970. Works of art are studied in their cultural, social, and political contexts.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 167. Latin American Art History. 4 Units.

Historical periods vary with each offering and may range from pre-Columbian societies, through the colonial era, to developments in modern and contemporary art.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 175. Studies in Native and Tribal Art. 4 Units.

Varying topics on the art and culture of native and tribal societies. For example, North American Indians.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 180. Topics in the Criticism of Art. 4 Units.

Selected topics discussed on the theoretical and/or practical dimensions of art historical criticism.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 181. Topics in Museum Studies. 4 Units.

Addresses the historical and contemporary function of the museum as an instructional device. The function of exhibitions in the public sphere, and the roles of curators, educators, and the public are analyzed.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 183B. 20th Century Photographic History. 4 Units.

Varying topics within the history of photography in the 20th century. Photographic practice studied in relation to art history, cultural history, and social history.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 183C. Selected Topics in Photographic History. 4 Units.

Varying topics within the history of photography from the early 19th century to the present. Photographic practice studied in relation to art history, cultural history, and social history. Examples include documentary; pictorialism and art photography; photomontage, photographic books.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 185. Topics in Visual Studies. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary topics on the cultural analysis of visual artifacts and practices.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

ART HIS 190W. Art History Methods. 4 Units.

Theory and practice of art history, with an emphasis on formal and social models of analyzing and writing about art.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-division Writing requirement.

Restriction: Art History majors only. Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

ART HIS 196. Ethics, Law, and Art. 4 Units.

Addresses a broad range of ethical and legal issues pertaining to art, ownership, looting and theft, museum policies, and cultural heritage.

ART HIS 198. Advanced Seminar: Topics in Art History. 4 Units.

Discussion and report-oriented seminar with emphasis on reading, writing, and thinking about problems in art history. Examples: Gothic Cathedral, Portraiture East and West.

Prerequisite: Recommended: ART HIS 190W.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Art History majors have first consideration for enrollment. Upper-division students only.

Concurrent with ART HIS 298.

ART HIS 199. Independent Study in Art History. 1-4 Units.

Supervised, but independent reading or research on art historical topics.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 4 times.

Restriction: Art History majors only.

ART HIS 298. Master's Seminar: Topics in Art History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Art History. Examples include Gothic Cathedral, Portraiture East and West.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Concurrent with ART HIS 198.

ART HIS 299. Master's Thesis Research. 4 Units.

Research and writing of the Master's thesis.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

ART HIS 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to teaching assistants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

George C. Bauer, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of Art History (Renaissance and Baroque)
Linda F. Bauer, Ph.D. New York University, Professor Emerita of Art History (Renaissance and Baroque)
Roland Betancourt, Ph.D. Yale University, Assistant Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (Byzantine and Medieval Art, Critical Theory)
Bridget R. Cooks Cumbo, Ph.D. University of Rochester, Associate Professor of African American Studies; Art History; Culture and Theory; Visual Studies (African-American art, museum studies, feminist and post-colonial theory)
Aglaya Glebova, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of Art History; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (history and theory of photography and film, European avant-garde, Russian and Soviet art)
Anna Gonosová, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emerita of Art History (Byzantine art, Medieval art)
James D. Herbert, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean of Curriculum and Student Services and Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (modern European art)
Judy H. Ho, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emerita of Art History (Chinese art, archaeology, common religion, Buddhist art)
Philip Leider, M.A. University of Nebraska, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of Art History
Lyle Massey, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (Italian Renaissance and early modern European art, gender theory, science studies)
Margaret Miles, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (Greek and Roman art, archaeology)
James P. Nisbet, Ph.D. Stanford University, Director of the Graduate Program in Visual Studies and Assistant Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (modern and contemporary art)
Alka Patel, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (South Asian and Islamic art and architecture, historiographies, Islamic diasporas in Cuba)
Amy Powell, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Art History; European Languages and Studies; Visual Studies (Late medieval and early modern art of northern Europe, critical theory)
Sally A. Stein, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emerita of Art History (American art, history of photography, feminist theory)
Dickran L. Tashjian, Ph.D. Brown University, Professor Emeritus of Art History (American art and literature, American and European avant-garde, art and technology)
Cécile Marie Whiting, Ph.D. Stanford University, Department Chair and Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (American art, 20th century visual culture)
Bert Winther-Tamaki, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Art History; Asian American Studies; Visual Studies (modern Japanese art and visual culture, Asian American art, art and globalization)
Roberta Wue, Ph.D. New York University, Associate Professor of Art History; Visual Studies (modern Chinese art, photography, print culture)
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