2016-17 Edition

Department of History

David Igler, Department Chair
200 Murray Krieger Hall
949-824-6521
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/history/

Overview

The undergraduate program in History is designed to develop critical intelligence and to foster an awareness of ourselves and our world through the study of the past. The Department presents a variety of approaches to history, and each emphasizes basic disciplinary skills: weighing evidence, constructing logical arguments, and exploring the role of theory in historical analysis and human action.

The Department offers a number of lower-division courses open to majors as well as non-majors, most of which fulfill part of the UCI general education requirements.

Students who are interested in the study of history but are majoring in other disciplines may minor in History. The minor incorporates elements of the Department’s program for majors but allows students enough flexibility to pursue programs in other departments and schools.

Upper-division courses range from the examination of individual nation-states (e.g., Chinese history), to studies of the relations among nation-states (e.g., Emergence of the Modern Middle East), to historical analyses of political, socio-economic, and cultural factors (e.g., Women in the United States). Students are also provided the opportunity for small-group learning experiences through colloquia. The colloquia are conducted as discussion groups, involve close reading and analysis of primary and secondary texts, and require writing.

In addition, History students have the option of pursuing advanced study through programs offered by the Department, the School of Humanities, and the University. Within the Department of History, students have the opportunity to complete an advanced research seminar series or to design their own research project with a faculty advisor through Independent Study.

Specialization in History for Future Teachers

The Specialization in History for Future Teachers is designed to prepare history majors who aspire to earn a post-baccalaureate teaching credential. Through specific history course requirements, courses in the School of Education, and a field work requirement, students will be well positioned for admission to teaching credential programs.

Phi Alpha Theta

Phi Alpha Theta is a charter member of the Association of College Honor Societies for undergraduates, graduates, and faculty within the discipline of history. Becoming a member to the society will grant you honor cords for graduation and allow eligibility for several national and regional scholarships. To become eligible for initiation, students must have achieved junior standing, have completed seven or more history courses in residence at UCI, and have acquired a minimum 3.5 GPA in the major and a minimum 3.3 GPA overall. For more information, please contact the History Undergraduate Program Coordinator.

Study Abroad

The department strongly encourages majors and minors to take advantage of the University’s study abroad programs and to experience a different culture, for a quarter or longer, while making progress toward their UCI degree. Moreover, students who are particularly interested in the history of a specific country or region would greatly benefit from direct study and cultural interaction within that country or region. Information about studying abroad can be found at UCI's Study Abroad Center website.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in History

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Departmental Requirements for the Major

Twelve courses are required:

A. Select two of the following:
Problems in History: Asia
Problems in History: Europe
Problems in History: United States
Problems in History: Latin America
Problems in History: Middle East and Africa
Problems in History: Transregional History
B. Two additional lower-division History courses
C. Four upper-division History courses
D. Complete the following:
HISTORY 100W Writing About History
HISTORY 190 Colloquium
E. Two additional lower- or upper-division History courses
F. At least one of the twelve required courses must be devoted to the period prior to 1800.

Residence Requirement for the History Major: One course from the History 70 series, HISTORY 100W, HISTORY 190, and three upper-division History courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the six may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided that course content is approved in advance by the Chair of the History Undergraduate Program Committee.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in History with a Specialization in History for Future Teachers

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.

Fifteen courses are required:

A. Select one of the following series:
HISTORY 21A- 21B- 21C World: Innovations
and World: Empires and Revolutions
and World: Wars and Rights
or
HISTORY 40A- 40B- 40C Colonial America: New Worlds
and Nineteenth-Century U.S.: Crisis and Expansion
and Modern America: Culture and Power
B. Complete the following:
HISTORY 70C Problems in History: United States
HISTORY 100W Writing About History
HISTORY 190 Colloquium
C. Select two courses from the following:
HISTORY 70A Problems in History: Asia
HISTORY 70B Problems in History: Europe
HISTORY 70D Problems in History: Latin America
HISTORY 70E Problems in History: Middle East and Africa
HISTORY 70F Problems in History: Transregional History
D. Select one course in California History.
HISTORY 142A California Dreaming: Conquest, Conflict, and Globalization in the Golden State
HISTORY 151A Chicana/Chicano History: Pre-Colonial to 1900
HISTORY 151B Chicana/Chicano History: Twentieth Century
E. Two upper-division U.S. History courses.
F. Two upper-division non-U.S. History courses.
G. Select one course from the School of Education.
EDUC 108 Adolescent Development and Education
EDUC 124 Multicultural Education in K-12 Schools
EDUC 128 Exceptional Learners
EDUC 131 Educational Technology
EDUC 173 Cognition and Learning in Educational Settings
H. Complete at least two units of field work from EDUC 100 or other relevant experience with prior departmental approval.

Residence Requirement for the History Major with a Specialization in History for Future Teachers: HISTORY 70C, HISTORY 100W, HISTORY 190, and three upper-division History courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the six may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, provided that course content is approved in advance by the Chair of the History Undergraduate Program Committee.

Additional Information

Career Opportunities

The training and discipline derived from historical studies provide a valuable experience for all educated persons seeking to understand themselves and their world. Many students who complete undergraduate degrees in the Department of History go on to graduate school in a variety of fields, including history, law, business, international relations, and education.

The study of history is valuable preparation for many other careers as well. The strong academic and professional orientation acquired by History majors is necessary to pursue successful careers in such diverse fields as advertising, the non-profit sector, journalism, management, public relations, publishing, international relations,and government service.

The UCI Career Center provides services to students on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. See the Career Center for additional information.

Requirements for the Minor in History

Departmental Requirements

Seven courses are required:

A. Select three lower-division History courses.
B. Select four upper-division History courses.

Residence Requirement for the Minor: All four upper-division History courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the Chair of the History Undergraduate Program Committee.

On This Page:


Department of History Graduate Program

The Department of History at the University of California, Irvine emphasizes graduate training in regional areas, world and transnational history, and thematic specialties such as empire and colonialism; environmental history; gender and sexuality; global migrations, slavery, and diasporas; and science and medicine. Whatever the student's chosen emphasis, the History Graduate Program encourages students to think across national and regional borders and to have a solid understanding of how the discipline of History contributes to debates about global and local transformation.

The Doctoral Program

The Doctoral Program in History is designed to provide students with advanced historical research skills and a solid grounding in the theory and methodology of history. This combination reflects the Department’s conviction that scholars should approach significant questions about the past with rigor and sophistication. The Department requires that students develop critical abilities in dealing with primary sources, secondary syntheses, and the interrelationship of history and theory. Candidates for the Ph.D. in History are expected to gain teaching experience as an integral part of their graduate training. This is accomplished through work as a teaching assistant. 

Coursework: Doctoral students take a minimum of 15 formal courses to be completed during the first two years of the program. Twelve courses must be taken within the History Department. Three electives may be taken inside or outside the Department.

History and Theory: Required coursework for doctoral students includes a mandatory two-quarter sequence in History and Theory (HISTORY 200A and HISTORY 200B), during the first year. These courses explore a variety of theoretical issues and methodological concerns that have sparked debate in the humanities and social sciences in the past decades and which remain pertinent to 21st century historical writing. Topics may include the relationship between materialist approaches and cultural analysis; subjectivity and governance; gender and sexuality; ethnicity and racial formation; the politics of religion; "the archive" and archival practice; nationalism and postcolonialism; world history and transnational studies.

Field Emphases: Doctoral students are required to take a total of six courses satisfying requirements for specialization in two historical fields, in either an area studies field or a thematic field. Students take three courses in each field. The Department offers area studies fields in Asian History, European History, Latin American History, Middle East and African History, U.S. History, and World History. Thematic fields vary depending on demand and may include empire and colonialism; environmental history; gender and sexuality; global migrations, slavery, and diasporas; and science and medicine. Students may take courses satisfying field requirements in any order.

Research Seminars: Doctoral students are required to take a two-quarter course sequence in research and writing both their first and second year in the graduate program. In the first year, students take a proseminar readings course (HISTORY 202) on a given thematic category or subject (history of gender, science, diaspora, etc.), followed by a second quarter (HISTORY 203) in which they write a research paper that engages the methodologies and questions explored in the previous quarter. Students who enter the doctoral program with a master's may petition to be exempt from the first-year research sequence, pending acceptance of the M.A. thesis as an equivalent to the final research paper of the sequence.

In the second year of study, Ph.D. students take a two-course sequence (HISTORY 204A and HISTORY 204B) in which they research and write a paper on a topic of their choice. The second year research paper is required of all doctoral students.

Language Requirement: All students must demonstrate a proficiency in one language other than English prior to taking the Ph.D. candidacy qualifying exam. Competency in a language may be established either by passing a departmental examination (proctored in the department office) or through extensive language use in one of the research seminars. The language used to satisfy this requirement is subject to their advisors' approval.

Summary of Required Course of Study:

  1. History and Theory - two courses
  2. Research Seminars – four courses 
  3. First Field  - three courses
  4. Second Field – three courses
  5. Electives - three courses
  6. Foreign Language Proficiency
     

First-Year Review. To be admitted formally into the doctoral program, students must satisfactorily pass a departmental evaluation at the end of their first year of study; this includes students who entered with a M.A. from another institution. Doctoral students can be awarded an M.A. from UCI after fulfilling requirements for residence, one language, and successfully completing 36 units, including 28 units in required courses.

The Candidacy Qualifying Exam and Dissertation Prospectus: In the third year of the doctoral program, students prepare for their candidacy qualifying exam and write the dissertation prospectus. Most third year students enroll in the intensive readings course (HISTORY 298) or directed readings (HISTORY 291) to work closely with faculty in preparing for exams and writing their prospectus.

The candidacy qualifying exam is an oral, two-hour meeting during which a student is examined in their first and second field by a committee of five faculty members. The dissertation prospectus is presented in a colloquium including all members of the dissertation committee for formal approval. Both the exam and prospectus colloquium should be completed by the end of the third year. Once completed, students will have officially advanced to doctoral candidacy and obtain A.B.D. (all but dissertation) status.

Dissertation Research and Writing: The dissertation is the most important part of the Department's doctoral program. The dissertation is an original piece of historical scholarship, involving extensive primary research and original analysis of secondary source material. Students spend a year or more engaged in intensive research, and another year or more writing the dissertation. Throughout this period, students work closely with the advisor and the dissertation committee members. The finished dissertation must be approved by all members of the dissertation committee.

Teaching: Most graduate students begin work as a teaching assistant for the Department or School courses during their second year and continue throughout their tenure in the program, except when dissertation research or writing require their residency away from the university. Students have the opportunity to apply to teach their own courses during summer session once they have advanced to doctoral candidacy.

Time to Degree for the Ph.D.: Normative time to degree for the doctoral program is seven years. Maximum time to degree permitted is nine years.

Requirements for Admission to the Ph.D. Program: It is desirable that an applicant have the equivalent of an undergraduate major in History; however, the Department also considers students who have previously specialized in other subject areas and who have strong analytical and writing skills. Many students entering the program hold a Masters degree in History, or an associated field. The Department's required grade-point minimums and requested exams (GRE/TOEFL) are consistent with university policy. Students are accepted for fall admission only.

The Master of Arts Program

Program of Study: Masters students receive similar opportunities as those offered doctoral students to train in the history of area regions and thematic emphases. A total of nine courses are required: three in a first field (either area-based or thematic), two in a second field (area-based, thematic, or HISTORY 200A and HISTORY 200B), the two-quarter first-year research seminar (HISTORY 202 and HISTORY 203), and two electives that may be taken outside the Department. It is strongly recommended that at least one of these electives be a directed readings course (HISTORY 291) with the advisor to either work on the thesis or prepare for the comprehensive exam. Upon entering the program, M.A. students must chose a department faculty member to serve as their advisor.

Time Limits: The M.A. is a one year program in academic residence as a full-time student. However, it is understood that many M.A. students are employed and need to enroll on a part-time basis. Students are allowed up to three years of graduate study to complete the degree.

Degree Conferral Plan I- Thesis: The master’s thesis represents a revision of the first-year research paper, equivalent to a scholarly article, under the supervision of the faculty advisor. The project is reviewed and approved by the advisor and the thesis committee.

Degree Conferral Plan II- Comprehensive Exam: At the end of the final quarter, the M.A. candidate must pass a comprehensive oral exam administered by the faculty advisor and two other faculty members. Students are examined on their first field.

Language Requirement: Students in the M.A. program whose major field requires use of foreign language sources must demonstrate competence in a foreign language in the process of writing the first-year research paper and thesis. Other M.A. students do not have to meet a foreign language or alternative skills requirement.

Requirements for Admission to the M.A. Program: It is desirable that an applicant have the equivalent of an undergraduate major in History; however, the Department also considers students who have previously specialized in other subject areas and who have strong analytical and writing skills. The Department's required grade-point minimums and requested exams (GRE/TOEFL) are consistent with university policy. Students are accepted for fall admission only.

Courses

HISTORY 10. The Holocaust. 4 Units.

Introduction to the history of European Jewish communities before the Holocaust; the origins of Nazi antisemitism; the implementation of the "Final Solution"; Jewish resistance to the Nazis; and attempts in film and literature to represent the Holocaust since 1945.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 11. Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity Since WWII. 4 Units.

Investigates instances of genocide since 1945 (including Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda, and others); explores the history behind these mass murders; considers why people kill, how victims survive, and questions whether international agreements are enough to prevent crimes against humanity.

(III, VIII)

HISTORY 12. Introductory Topics in History . 4 Units.

Introduces methods and premises of historical study. Topics include introductions to cultural, political, economic, social, and religious history.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV)

HISTORY 15A. Native American History. 4 Units.

An overview of major developments in Indian-white relations from the American Revolution to the present with an emphasis on political and legal history. How tribal sovereignty has been redefined over time is a central theme of the course.

(IV, VII)

HISTORY 15C. Asian American Histories. 4 Units.

Examines and compares diverse experiences of major Asian American groups since the mid-nineteenth century. Topics include origins of emigration; the formation and transformation of community; gender and family life; changing roles of Asian Americans in American society. Formerly ASIANAM 60A.

Same as ASIANAM 50, SOC SCI 78A.

((III or IV) and VII ).

HISTORY 15D. History of Sexuality in the US . 4 Units.

Explores intertwined histories of sexuality, race, and gender in the US. By examining how different cultures and times viewed sexuality, race and gender, it analyzes relationships between regulation of bodies/behaviors and construction of cultural, economic, and political norms.

(IV, VII)

HISTORY 15E. Memory and Migration: American Families on the Move. 4 Units.

Examines family migration stories as a tool for understanding the intertwined histories of international and domestic migration that have shaped the lives of the diverse peoples of the United States.

(IV, VII)

HISTORY 15F. What to Eat? Immigrants and the Development of American Cuisines. 4 Units.

Relationship between immigration and changing American foodways; impact of several major culinary traditions of immigrants and racial minorities, such as African Americans, Asian Americans, Mexican Americans, Italian Americans, Irish Americans, and Jewish Americans, on America’s gastronomical and socioeconomic landscape.

((III or IV) and VII ).

HISTORY 15G. Racial Segregation in Modern U.S.. 4 Units.

Explores the history of racial segregation in the United States from the late 19th century to the present.

( VII ).

HISTORY 16A. World Religions I. 4 Units.

An introduction to the history, doctrine, culture, and writing of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Same as REL STD 5A.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 16B. World Religions II. 4 Units.

An introduction to various religious traditions in selected areas of the world—including India and South Asia, East Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

Same as REL STD 5B.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 16C. Religious Dialogue. 4 Units.

Lectures and discussion on controversial topics in religion: sexual morality; religious violence; science; treatment of women and girls; religious truth, American Constitutional matters; secularization; the future of religion, and other topics.

Same as REL STD 5C.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 18A. Introduction to Jewish Cultures. 4 Units.

Introduction to the diversity of Jewish cultures from ancient to modern times. Surveys the Jewish experience in various societies and civilizations: ancient Mediterranean, Middle East and North Africa, Europe, and the Americas.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 21A. World: Innovations. 4 Units.

Treats major themes of world historical development through the mid-seventeenth century, focusing on the Eurasian world, but with secondary emphasis on Africa and the Americas.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 21B. World: Empires and Revolutions. 4 Units.

Examines three major transformations that made the world of 1870 dramatically different from that of 1650: e.g., the scientific revolution, industrialization, and the formation of modern states and nations.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 21C. World: Wars and Rights. 4 Units.

Considers several major currents of modern history: technological change and its social effects; changes in gender relations; totalitarianism; peasant revolutions and the crisis of colonization; international migration; and ecological problems.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 36A. The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Early Greece. 4 Units.

A survey of ancient Greek civilization from its origins in the Bronze Age to the mid-Archaic period. Examines political and social history, as well as literature, art, religion, and archaeological remains.

Same as CLASSIC 36A.

(IV)

HISTORY 36B. The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Late Archaic and Classical Greece. 4 Units.

A survey of ancient Greek civilization from the Late Archaic period to the Classical period. Focuses on major institutions and cultural phenomena as seen through the study of ancient Greek literature, history, archaeology, and religion.

Same as CLASSIC 36B.

(IV)

HISTORY 36C. The Formation of Ancient Greek Society: Fourth-Century and Hellenistic Greece. 4 Units.

A survey of ancient Greek civilization from the fourth century BCE through to the Hellenistic period. Focuses on major institutions and cultural phenomena as seen through the study of ancient Greek literature, history, archaeology, and religion.

Same as CLASSIC 36C.

(IV)

HISTORY 37A. The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Origins to Roman Republic. 4 Units.

A survey of the development of Roman civilization from its eighth century BCE beginnings to the civil wars of the first century BCE. Examines political and social history, as well as literature, art, architecture, and religion.

Same as CLASSIC 37A.

(IV)

HISTORY 37B. The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: Roman Empire. 4 Units.

A survey of Roman civilization from Augustus’s consolidation of power following the civil wars of the first century BCE to the crisis of the third century CE. Includes social history, literature, art, architecture, and religion.

Same as CLASSIC 37B.

(IV)

HISTORY 37C. The Formation of Ancient Roman Society: The Fall of Rome. 4 Units.

A survey of Roman civilization from the crisis of the third century CE to the so-called “fall of Rome” in 476 CE. Examines political and social history, as well as literature, art, architecture, and religion.

Same as CLASSIC 37C.

(IV)

HISTORY 40A. Colonial America: New Worlds. 4 Units.

Important themes in the social, economic, political, and cultural development in North America that transformed part of the geographical space into the U.S. Topics include Native Americans, European colonization, African enslavement, borderlands, gender, economic stratification, the American Revolution, the Constitution.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

(IV)

HISTORY 40B. Nineteenth-Century U.S.: Crisis and Expansion. 4 Units.

Explores the transformation of American society, economy, and politics during the nineteenth century. Topics include industrial revolution, slavery, antislavery, women's rights, reform movements, Civil War and Reconstruction, immigration and ethnicity, and cultural and social transformation.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

(IV)

HISTORY 40C. Modern America: Culture and Power. 4 Units.

Important themes in U.S. history in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Topics include corporate capitalism, empire, immigration, race, gender, consumer society, World Wars, Progressiveness, New Deal, Great Society, civil rights, women's movements, Vietnam War, conservative politics, and economic stratification.

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the UC Entry Level Writing requirement.

(IV)

HISTORY 50. Crises and Revolutions. 4 Units.

Study of turning points in world history, illustrating themes and methods of historical analysis.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 3 times as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 60. The Making of Modern Science. 4 Units.

Surveys the history of science and mathematics since the Scientific Revolution, examining central developments both chronologically and thematically, as well as investigating their significance for contemporary philosophical debates about the role and status of current scientific theories.

Same as LPS 60.

(GE II or GE IV ).

HISTORY 70A. Problems in History: Asia. 4 Units.

An introduction to the historical problems, the issues of interpretation, the primary sources, and the historical scholarship of the history of Asia, with an emphasis on developing skills in historical essay-writing.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 70B. Problems in History: Europe. 4 Units.

An introduction to the historical problems, the issues of interpretation, the primary sources, and the historical scholarship of the history of Europe, with an emphasis on developing skills in historical essay-writing.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 70C. Problems in History: United States. 4 Units.

An introduction to the historical problems, the issues of interpretation, the primary sources, and the historical scholarship of the history of the United States, with an emphasis on developing skills in historical essay-writing.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV)

HISTORY 70D. Problems in History: Latin America. 4 Units.

An introduction to the historical problems, the issues of interpretation, the primary sources, and the historical scholarship of the history of Latin America, with an emphasis on developing skills in historical essay-writing.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 70E. Problems in History: Middle East and Africa. 4 Units.

An introduction to the historical problems, the issues of interpretation, the primary sources, and the historical scholarship of the history of the Middle East and Africa, with an emphasis on developing skills in historical essay-writing.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 70F. Problems in History: Transregional History. 4 Units.

An introduction to the historical problems, the issues of interpretation, the primary sources, and the historical scholarship of transregional history, with an emphasis on developing skills in historical essay-writing.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

(IV, VIII)

HISTORY 100W. Writing About History. 4 Units.

Specialized courses focusing on history writing and research skills. Each class reflects the instructor's intellectual interests and is conducted as a discussion group. Limited to 18 students. Several short writing assignments and one longer project meeting the upper-division writing requirement.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 12 or HISTORY 15A or HISTORY 15C or HISTORY 15D or HISTORY 16A or HISTORY 16B or HISTORY 16C or HISTORY 18A or HISTORY 21A or HISTORY 21B or HISTORY 21C or HISTORY 40A or HISTORY 40B or HISTORY 40C or HISTORY 60 or HISTORY 70A or HISTORY 70B or HISTORY 70C or HISTORY 70D or HISTORY 70E or HISTORY 70F. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: History majors have first consideration for enrollment.

(Ib)

HISTORY 102B. Topics in Environmental History. 4 Units.

Explores the many historical interfaces between climate change, modes of production, and culture. Topics include the environmental history of warfare, imperialism, and famine in the nineteenth century and the history of environmental thought.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 110A. Europe in the Early Middle Ages. 4 Units.

Survey of Europe between 300 A.D. and 900 A.D. Topics include the breakup of the Roman Empire, barbarian invasions, spread of Christianity, rise of Islam, the Carolingian Empire, and the Vikings.

HISTORY 110D. Topics in Medieval Europe. 4 Units.

Studies of the topics in Medieval Europe.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 112D. Topics in Early Modern Europe. 4 Units.

Theme-based approach to the main social, political, and cultural developments in Europe between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries. Topics included Renaissance humanism, Reformation and Counter-Reformation, scientific revolution, court culture and nation building, interactions with non-European peoples, cities and commerce.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 114. Topics in Modern European History. 4 Units.

Course content changes with instructor. Topics include the Inquisition; science and religion in modern Europe; sex and society in modern Europe; French revolutions; culture in interwar Europe; the Holocaust; the fall of communism in Eastern Europe.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 115C. Europe: Twentieth Century. 4 Units.

World War I and its impact on the modern world; rise of an international Communist movement; regimes created by Mussolini, Hitler, Stalin; World War II; the killing of Europe's Jews; Cold War and collapse of communism.

HISTORY 118A. Modern Britain: 1700 to 1850. 4 Units.

Examines the major developments in British politics, socioeconomic structure, and culture from 1700-1850. The development of the British nation-state and the fashioning of a national identity. Explores basic questions about British national identity.

HISTORY 118B. Modern Britain: 1850 to 1930. 4 Units.

Examines the social, economic, and political history of Britain from 1850-1930. Post-industrialism, urbanization, population and economic change, increased political participation by working classes and women, consolidation of the empire and the breakup of the United Kingdom.

HISTORY 118C. Modern Britain: 1930 to Present. 4 Units.

Explores Britain from the Second World War to resignation of Margaret Thatcher. Examines Britain's devolution from world power to member of the European Community; transition from a manufacturing to service-based economy; changing demographic and racial composition in light of decolonization.

HISTORY 120B. The French Revolution: 1774-1815. 4 Units.

Emphasis on social, economic, and cultural history of the French Revolution.

HISTORY 120C. Revolution, Nation, and Modernity: France, 1789-1900. 4 Units.

After 1789, France struggled to build a republic based on ideas of nationhood and citizenship with universal aspirations that could be exported to the rest of the world. Topics include empire, secularism vs. religion, gender relationships, birth of cinema.

HISTORY 120D. War and Empire: France and the World in the 20th Century. 4 Units.

Examines French experience of World War I, the defeat and occupation by Germany in World War II, the violent struggles that came with the loss of the French empire in the 1950s and 1960s, immigration, French responses to globalization.

HISTORY 120E. History of Paris. 4 Units.

The development of Paris from the beginnings through the present, with emphasis on the last three centuries. The city is examined from the political, social, ecological, and architectural points of view as well as through the perspective of urban planning.

HISTORY 122B. Hitler and the Germans. 4 Units.

Focuses on Hitler's rise to power and Nazi society. Examines Germany's defeat in World War I; the political and cultural experimentation of the 1920s; the causes of Hitler's success; and life in Germany under the Nazis.

HISTORY 123D. Topics in Spanish History. 4 Units.

Topics include Spain in the nineteenth century, the Spanish Civil War, and dictatorship and democracy in modern Spain.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 124A. Imperial Russia: 1689-1905. 4 Units.

Political and social developments in Russia from 1689-1905.

HISTORY 124B. Twentieth-Century Russia. 4 Units.

Political and social developments in Twentieth-Century Russia.

HISTORY 126A. The Era of World War I: 1900-1939. 4 Units.

The era of World War I and its political, social and economic history.

HISTORY 126B. The Era of World War II: 1933-45. 4 Units.

The era of World War II and its political, social and economic history.

HISTORY 128C. Topics in the History of Women in Europe. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of history of European women. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 130A. Jewish History, Ancient to Early Modern Times. 4 Units.

The history of the Jewish people from their origins in the ancient world to the 1700s. Social, religious, and intellectual life of Jewish communities in the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe.

HISTORY 130B. Modern Jewish History. 4 Units.

History of the Jews in Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, and the United States from the early-eighteenth century to recent times. Emancipation, assimilation, religious reform, antisemitism, Zionism, socialism, the Holocaust, and modern Israel are the major themes.

HISTORY 130C. Topics in the Jewish History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Jewish history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 131A. History of Zoroastrianism. 4 Units.

Reviews major trends in the history of Zoroastrianism.

Same as REL STD 131A.

HISTORY 131B. Ancient Persia. 4 Units.

Survey of the history of Persia in antiquity.

HISTORY 131C. Medieval Persia. 4 Units.

A survey of Persian history in the context of Late Antique and Medieval Islamic history.

HISTORY 131D. Modern Iran. 4 Units.

The history of Iran from the end of the Safavid Empire in the eighteenth century to the present.

HISTORY 131E. Topics in Iranian History. 4 Units.

Topics include the cultural, political, intellectual, social, and/or economic histories of Iran.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 132A. Israel and Palestine. 4 Units.

Origins of Zionism in the nineteenth century, Arab-Jewish conflicts in Palestine, emergence of Palestinian nationalism, formation of the Israeli nation after 1948, and the development of the Palestinian movement. Focus on Palestinian and Israeli society and culture. Formerly History 132.

HISTORY 132B. The Emergence of the Modern Middle East. 4 Units.

Offers a survey of the history of the Middle East from the nineteenth century to the present time. Formerly History 133A.

HISTORY 132G. Topics in Islamic History. 4 Units.

The evolution of Islam as a religion within the social, political, and economic histories of various Muslim societies throughout its 14 centuries. Introduces major concepts, practices, and texts of Islam, and key historical events associated with them. Formerly History 131.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 132H. Topics in Middle Eastern History. 4 Units.

Topics include the cultural, political, intellectual, social, and/or economic histories of one or many regions of the Middle East.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 134A. Africa: Societies and Cultures. 4 Units.

Introduction to the variety of cultures, political organizations, social structures, and artistic expressions created by Africans over a broad time span. Indigenous development of African societies in distinct regions of the continent. Issues, themes, processes for understanding history of Africa.

HISTORY 134B. Modern Africa. 4 Units.

Explores the last 200 years of history in Africa, from the end of the Atlantic slave trade through colonization to independence.

HISTORY 134C. Topics in the History of Africa. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of African history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 134D. Topics in South African History. 4 Units.

Introduction to important historical events and processes in Southern Africa. Focuses on particular themes and explores how those themes change over time. Topics include: changing ideas about race, the development of class structures, identity formation, the role of gender.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 134E. History of the African Diaspora. 4 Units.

Examines the causes and consequences of the multiple diasporas of African peoples since the sixteenth century in the Atlantic world, especially the Americas and Europe.

Same as AFAM 137.

HISTORY 135B. Crossing the World's Oceans: From Sail to Steam. 4 Units.

Explores the basics of oceanography, the evolution of ships and sailing in the ancient Mediterranean world, the North Atlantic, Polynesia, the South China Sea, the Arab Indian Ocean, the global oceanic world, and the discovery of celestial and terrestrial navigation.

HISTORY 135D. Maps from Prehistory to the Present. 4 Units.

Examines how technology has assisted in creating visual representations of place, space, and time beginning in ancient Babylonia to the present day.

HISTORY 135E. Topics in the History of Science and Technology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of science and technological history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 135G. Language Origins: Evolution, Genetics, and the Brain. 4 Units.

Examines how human language(s) may have originated. Studies pertinent techniques (reconstruction) and addresses related questions, including Is our language faculty inborn (i.e., genetically encoded)? Can brain imaging and population genetics research help to unlock this mystery of human evolution?.

Same as GLBLCLT 105, ANTHRO 152A, LINGUIS 175.

HISTORY 136D. Topics in the History of Medicine and Health Care. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Medicine and Health Care history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 140A. Colonial America . 4 Units.

Examines the interactions of various African, European, and Native American societies in North America, including social structures, politics, economics, and cultures.

HISTORY 140B. Revolutionary America: 1740-1790. 4 Units.

An exploration of why 13 continental colonies, whose commercial and cultural connections with Britain far exceed their interaction with one another, resisted imperial reform after 1763 to the point of war in 1775 and independence the following year.

HISTORY 142A. California Dreaming: Conquest, Conflict, and Globalization in the Golden State. 4 Units.

California as a case study of national trends and as a unique setting: its specific problems and culture. Major themes include: colonization, immigration, race relations, agricultural development, industrialization, urbanization, working class movements, social conflict, and political reform.

HISTORY 142B. Topics in American Social and Economic History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of American social and economic history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 144G. Topics in American Cultural and Intellectual History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of American cultural and intellectual history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 146D. Sex in the U.S. to 1860. 4 Units.

Perspectives on sexual behavior in colonial and U.S. history to c. 1860. Mainstream and non-mainstream sexual practices, beliefs, identities. Asks why various ideas of sexual behavior developed and how they related to religious, racial, ethnic, political, cultural belief systems.

HISTORY 146H. Topics in Women and Gender Relations in the United States. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of women and gender relations in the United States. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 148B. Topics in Multicultural U.S. History. 4 Units.

Examines the variety of cultural expressions through which the people who came to inhabit the United States historically signify their collective identities.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 150. Topics in African American History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of African American history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as AFAM 138.

HISTORY 151A. Chicana/Chicano History: Pre-Colonial to 1900. 4 Units.

Examines social history of the southwest region from antiquity to 1900. Discusses major questions, theory and research methods pertinent to Chicanas/Chicanos. Themes include: indigenous empires, conquest, colonialism, social stratification, ideology, marriage, sexuality, industrial capitalism, accommodation and resistance.

Same as CHC/LAT 132A.

HISTORY 151B. Chicana/Chicano History: Twentieth Century. 4 Units.

Examines social history of the Southwest with emphasis on Mexican-origin people. Discusses major questions, theory and research methods pertinent to Chicana/Chicano history. Themes explored include: immigration, xenophobia, class struggle, leadership, generational cohorts, unionization, education, barrioization, ethnicity, patriarchy, sexuality.

Same as CHC/LAT 132B.

HISTORY 151C. Latinas in the Twentieth Century U.S.. 4 Units.

Latinas in the U.S. from 1900 to present, offering a diversity of their cultures, regional histories, sexualities, generations, and classes.

Same as CHC/LAT 135.

HISTORY 152. Topics in Asian-American History. 4 Units.

Introduction to important themes in the history of people of Asian ancestry in the United States from the nineteenth century to the present.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 152A. Asian American Labor. 4 Units.

Explores history of Asian Americans and work from the nineteenth century to the present. Areas of study include migration, colonialism, family, social organization, and work culture.

Same as ASIANAM 137.

HISTORY 152B. Asian American and African American Relations. 4 Units.

Addresses relationships of Asian American and African American communities in the United States. Topics include race, class, gender, labor, economic systems, political mobilization, community, civil rights, activism, cultural expression.

Same as AFAM 117, ASIANAM 167.

HISTORY 154. American Urban History. 4 Units.

A study of urban communities in the United States, from colonial times to the present. Traces the impact of industrialization and urbanization on social and cultural life, and investigates the significance of urban life for U.S. democratic culture.

HISTORY 158A. U.S. as a Global Power. 4 Units.

Examines post-World War II cultural, economic, and strategic patterns that have shaped U.S. relations with the world. Presents diverse perspectives on issues such as nationalism, anticommunism, secrecy and covert action, economic influences, the media's role, and race, gender, and class-related.

HISTORY 160. Sex and Conquest in Latin America. 4 Units.

Competing ideas of masculinity and femininity, sexual violence, sexual identities, and gendered hierarchies informed how the Spanish engaged in military and religious domination of Mexican and Andean communities, as well as the forms of native resistance throughout colonial Latin America.

Same as GEN&SEX 171A.

HISTORY 161C. Twentieth-Century Mexico. 4 Units.

Examines the history of contemporary Mexico beginning with the Mexican Revolution and concluding with the present administration. Social, economic, and political effects of the Revolution; formation of a "one-party democracy"; economic transformation of the nation; the present crisis.

Same as CHC/LAT 133B.

HISTORY 162. Topics in Brazilian History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Brazilian history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 163. World of Coffee . 4 Units.

History of consumption and production of coffee over the centuries, and coffee's cultural, economic, social, political consequences. Coffee's social life as a drug, symbol of hospitality, religious rite, sociability and bourgeois lifestyle, commodity, source of livelihoods, imperial revenues, corporate profits.

Same as INTL ST 111B.

HISTORY 164A. Caribbean History: Colonization to Emancipation. 4 Units.

Exploration of the history of the archipelago from pre-Columbian times to the end of slavery; examining the impact of European colonization, decimation of the indigenous populations, African slavery, resistance, and emancipation; the unity and diversity of experience in region.

Same as AFAM 134A.

HISTORY 164B. Caribbean History: Emancipation to Independence. 4 Units.

Post-emancipation and anti-colonial struggles ending with political independence for most of the region. Examines social, political, economic, cultural dimensions of post-emancipation period, including large-scale migration to Central America, the U.S., and Britain; the region's global cultural and political contribution.

Same as AFAM 134B.

HISTORY 165. Race and Empire in Colonial Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores how native people of Latin America with enslaved and free African incorporated and defied Spanish and Portuguese colonization. Focuses on religious adaptions, resistance movements, legal systems, and the emergence of multicultural communities to explain how race shaped European empires.

Same as ANTHRO 162C.

HISTORY 165A. War and Revolution in Colonial Latin America. 4 Units.

Comparison of how Andeans resurrected the leaders of the Inca, a defeated indigenous empire, to contest the Spanish empire with how enslaved Africans, with their descendants and others, defeated Spanish colonial rule in what would become the Cuban nation.

HISTORY 166. U.S. Intervention in Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores political, economic, social, and cultural ties that bind Latin America to the United States. Focuses on U.S. intervention and Latin American response from early nineteenth century to present day. Case studies include Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, and Central America.

Same as POL SCI 142J, INTL ST 177D, CHC/LAT 150.

HISTORY 166A. Gender, Race, and Nation in Latin America. 4 Units.

Addresses the importance of gender and race to nation-making in Latin America during the 19th and 20th centuries (1810-1945). Considers how hierarchies between men and women shaped ideas about family, the state, and modernity.

Same as GEN&SEX 172, INTL ST 177H.

HISTORY 166B. Revolution and Reaction in Cold War Latin America. 4 Units.

Explores Latin American experiences of revolutionary change and military dictatorship during the Cold War (1945-1990). Pays particular attention to the lives of women, peasants, workers, and the urban middle classes. Case studies include Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, Argentina, Nicaragua, and Mexico.

Same as INTL ST 177G.

HISTORY 166C. Cuban Society and Revolution. 4 Units.

Explores the causes, development, and legacy of the 1959 Revolution. Themes include economic dependency, democracy, race, gender, culture, and the always volatile relations between Cuba and the United States.

Same as POL SCI 153G, INTL ST 177E, CHC/LAT 157.

HISTORY 166D. Revolution in Latin America. 4 Units.

Presents a comparative analysis of the causes, development, and consequences of selected revolutionary movements, focusing on outbreaks in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, and Grenada. Explores topics of state formation, economic nationalism, social justice, ethnicity, and role of international affairs.

Same as CHC/LAT 151B, SOC SCI 173N, INTL ST 177C.

HISTORY 169. Topics in Latin American History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Latin American history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 170A. Ancient India. 4 Units.

Examines the visual and religious history of the region defined as "India" today, but necessarily encompassing modern Bangladesh and Pakistan. Culminates with the supposed Golden Age of the Gupta empire and its far-reaching legacies.

Same as ART HIS 155A, REL STD 122.

HISTORY 170B. Medieval India. 4 Units.

Begins with the Gupta period's aesthetic legacies in South Asia's architecture, sculpture, and painting. Explores the dispersal of Islam throughout South Asia, including the Muslim communities of southern India.

Same as ART HIS 155B, REL STD 123.

HISTORY 170G. Topics in the History of Asia. 4 Units.

Topics include the cultural, political, economic, social, intellectual, and religious history of Asia.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 171D. Chinese History to 1800. 4 Units.

A survey of the history of China to 1800.

HISTORY 171E. Chinese History: 1800-1949. 4 Units.

An examination of Chinese society and thought from the late-eighteenth century to the 1949 revolution. Focuses on the role of intellectuals; popular culture; women in Chinese society; developments in commerce and urban life; rebellion; foreign imperialism.

HISTORY 171G. Topics in the History of China. 4 Units.

Topics include the cultural, political, economic, social, intellectual, and religious history of China.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 172D. Age of the Samurai. 4 Units.

Topics include the simultaneous elaboration of a civilian aristocratic tradition and the military ethos, the conflict between martial and economic values in the context of an expanding economy, and the development of Japan's indigenous religions, art, and literature.

HISTORY 172E. Imperial Japan. 4 Units.

Topics in the rise of modern Japan include the relationship between centralization and imperialism, democracy and fascism, industrialization and feminism in the context of the complex and competing forces that shaped Japan's experience in the modern world.

HISTORY 172F. Postwar Japan. 4 Units.

From the ashes of defeat to economic superpower, from poverty to material consumerism, from the ethic of diligence and fortitude to hedonism. Addresses what these changes have meant for ordinary people, as well as government policy and Japan's international position.

HISTORY 172G. Topics in the History of Japan. 4 Units.

Topics include the cultural, political, economic, social, intellectual and religious history of Japan.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 173D. Korean History to 1800. 4 Units.

A general survey of the history of Korea to 1800. Focuses on internal sociopolitical development, major cultural trends, and foreign relations. Students are introduced to various interpretive approaches in the historiography.

HISTORY 173E. Korean History: 1800-1945. 4 Units.

An examination of Korean society and culture in tumultuous transition, focusing on some new challenges for the Choson Dynasty and its abortive reform effort, external imperialist pressures, and the Japanese colonial rule.

HISTORY 173F. Korean History Since 1945. 4 Units.

Topics include the national liberation, origins of conflict between two rival regimes, South Korea's emergence as a major player in the international political economy, some salient characteristics of the North Korean Marxist state, triumph of democracy, and prospect for reunification.

HISTORY 173G. Topics in the History of Korea. 4 Units.

Topics include the cultural, political, economic, social, intellectual, and religious history of Korea.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 174G. Topics in the History of South Asia. 4 Units.

Topics include the cultural, political, economic, social, intellectual, and religious history of South Asia.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 175G. Topics in the History of Southeast Asia. 4 Units.

Topics include the cultural, political, economic, social, intellectual, and religious history of Southeast Asia.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 180. Special Studies in Social History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 181. Special Studies in Economic History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of economic history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 182. Special Studies in Intellectual-Cultural History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of intellectual-cultural history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 183. Special Studies in International History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of international history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 184. Special Studies in Comparative History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of comparative history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 185. Special Studies in Social Theory. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of social theory. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 190. Colloquium . 4 Units.

Specialized courses dealing primarily with close reading and analysis of primary and secondary works; required reports and papers. Each colloquium reflects the instructor's intellectual interests and is conducted as a discussion group. Limited to 18 students.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. History majors have first consideration for enrollment.

HISTORY 193. Advanced Research Seminar I. 4 Units.

The first course in a two-quarter advanced research sequence, this course allows upper-division history majors to undertake significant research and writing under close faculty supervision.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: History majors only. Upper-division students only.

HISTORY 194. Advanced Research Seminar II. 4 Units.

Second course in a two-quarter advanced research sequence. Allows upper division history majors to undertake significant research and writing under close faculty supervision.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 193. Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Restriction: History majors only. Upper-division students only.

HISTORY 197. Internships in Public History. 4 Units.

Students will sharpen their abilities to research, critically interpret, and present history by “doing history” beyond the formal classroom. Internships, which introduce students to the field of “public history,” include working as archivists, oral historians, project advisers, and exhibit curators.

Grading Option: Pass/no pass only.

Restriction: Upper-division students only. History majors only.

HISTORY 198. Directed Group Study. 4 Units.

Special topics through directed reading. Paper required.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 199. Independent Reading. 1-4 Units.

Investigation of special topics through directed reading. Paper required.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

HISTORY 200A. History and Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to role of theory in historical writing, focusing on several major theorists, their relation to their setting, the structure of their thought, and its application to significant historical issues. (200A and 200B required for History Ph.D. students; 200C optional.).

Same as HUMAN 200A.

HISTORY 200B. History and Theory. 4 Units.

Introduction to role of theory in historical writing, focusing on several major theorists, their relation to their setting, the structure of their thought, and its application to significant historical issues. (200A and 200B required for History Ph.D. students; 200C optional.).

Same as HUMAN 200B.

HISTORY 200C. History and Theory . 4 Units.

Introduction to role of theory in historical writing, focusing on several major theorists, their relation to their setting, the structure of their thought, and its application to significant historical issues. (200A and 200B required for History Ph.D. students; 200C optional.).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as HUMAN 200C.

HISTORY 202. Proseminar. 4 Units.

Topical courses devoted to the literature of a broad historical subject, e.g., the absolutist state, the French Revolution, comparative industrialization, women's history.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: History graduate students only.

HISTORY 203. First-Year Research Seminar. 4 Units.

Devoted to research and writing on questions connected with proseminar topics. Normally required of all entering graduate students. Includes review of the current state of the literature and practical experience in conducting research and writing a research paper.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 202.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 1 times as topics vary.

HISTORY 204A. Second-Year Research Seminar. 4 Units.

Two-quarter sequence required of all Ph.D. students. Taken during the second year of the Ph.D. program; not required for M.A. students. Includes review of current state of the literature and practical experience in conducting research and writing a research paper.

Restriction: History graduate students only.

HISTORY 204B. Second-Year Research Seminar. 4 Units.

Two-quarter sequence required of all Ph.D. students. Taken during the second year of the Ph.D. program; not required for M.A. students. Includes review of current state of the literature and practical experience in conducting research and writing a research paper.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 204A.

Restriction: History graduate students only.

HISTORY 220A. The Literature and Interpretations of Early Modern Europe: Society and Economy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of society and economy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 220B. The Literature and Interpretations of Early Modern Europe: Political History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of political history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 220C. The Literature and Interpretations of Early Modern Europe: Intellectual & Cultural History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of intellectual and cultural history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 230A. The Literature and Interpretations of Modern European History: Europe, 1789-1848. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Europe, 1789-1848. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 230B. The Literature and Interpretations of Modern European History: Europe, 1850-1914. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Europe, 1850-1914. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 230C. The Literature and Interpretations of Modern European History: Europe, 1914-1989. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of Europe, 1914-1989. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 240A. The Literature and Interpretations of World History: Approaches to World History. 4 Units.

Overview of major directions of inquiry in world history and their implications for teaching and research. Topics will include cultural, sociological, economic, and political frameworks.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: History graduate students only.

HISTORY 240B. The Literature and Interpretations of World History: Topics in World History. 4 Units.

Selected historical issues and periods viewed from a global perspective. Examples include: environmental history, media studies, political economy. May be repeated two times for graduate credit other than fulfillment of field requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: History graduate students only.

HISTORY 240C. The Literature and Interpretations of World History: Advanced Research in World History. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of advanced research in world history. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Restriction: History graduate students only.

HISTORY 250A. The Literature and Interpretations of Latin American History: Colonial Period. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of the Colonial Period. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 250B. The Literature and Interpretations of Latin American History: Nineteenth Century. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of nineteenth century. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 250C. The Literature and Interpretations of Latin American History: Twentieth Century. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of twentieth century. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 260A. The Literature and Interpretations of American History: Seventeenth & Eighteenth Centuries. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 260B. The Literature and Interpretations of American History: Nineteenth Century. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of the nineteenth century. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 260C. The Literature and Interpretations of American History: Twentieth Century. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of the twentieth century. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 273. Research Methods in Chinese History. 4 Units.

Introduces major tools for research in Qing and twentieth-century Chinese history as well as an introduction to research tools for earlier periods.

HISTORY 274A. Seminar in Chinese History: 1100-1750. 4 Units.

The development of Chinese society and culture from 1100-1750. May be used to fulfill the First-Year Research requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 274B. Seminar in Chinese History: 1600-1937. 4 Units.

The development of Chinese society and culture from 1600-1937. May be used to fulfill the First-Year Research requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 274C. Seminar in Chinese History: 1850-Present. 4 Units.

The development of Chinese society and culture from 1850 to the present. May be used to fulfill the First-Year Research requirement.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 275A. Approaches to Islam in the Middle East/Maghrib. 4 Units.

Examines methodologies and approaches to the study of Muslim culture and history in the Middle East and North Africa in medieval and modern times.

Restriction: History graduate students only.

HISTORY 280A. China. 4 Units.

Studies in literatures and interpretations of Chinese history.

HISTORY 280B. Japan. 4 Units.

Studies in literatures and interpretations of Japanese history.

HISTORY 280C. Korea. 4 Units.

Studies in literatures and interpretations of Korean history.

HISTORY 280D. South Asia . 4 Units.

Studies in literatures and interpretations of South Asian history.

HISTORY 290. Special Topics . 4 Units.

Lectures, readings, and discussion on subjects more limited in scope than those included in the year-long colloquium series.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

HISTORY 291. Directed Reading. 4-12 Units.

Reading courses focused on specialized topics.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: History graduate students only.

HISTORY 295. Special Methods. 4 Units.

Development of particular research skills.

HISTORY 298. Experimental Group Study. 4-12 Units.

Open to four or more students.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

HISTORY 299. Dissertation Research. 4-12 Units.

Specifically designed for students researching and writing their dissertations.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Advancement to Ph.D. candidacy.

HISTORY 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Grading Option: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: Graduate students only.

Faculty

Emily L. Baum, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of History (modern Chinese history, history of medicine)
Sharon B. Block, Ph.D. Princeton University, Associate Professor of History (digital humanities, early American, race and sexuality)
Alex Borucki, Ph.D. Emory University, Assistant Professor of History; African American Studies (African diaspora, early modern Atlantic world, slave trade, colonial Latin America)
Anita Casavantes Bradford, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Associate Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; History (20th century U.S., U.S. in the world, Cuba and the Caribbean; history of childhood; history of immigration, race and ethnicity; transnational and comparative Latina/o history; religion, politics and social movements)
Vinayak Chaturvedi, Ph.D. University of Cambridge, Associate Professor of History; Culture and Theory (modern South Asia, social and intellectual history)
Yong Chen, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of History; Asian American Studies (Asian American history and immigration, food and culture, U.S./China economic and cultural interactions)
Simon A. Cole, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society; History (science, technology, law, criminal justice)
Ian Coller, Ph.D. University of Melbourne, Associate Professor of History (Europe and the Muslim world, the French Revolution and the global history of the Revolutionary age)
Touraj Daryaee, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, UCI Endowed Chair and Professor of History (Iran, Zoroastrianism, Ancient Medieval World)
Alice Fahs, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of History (Civil War America, American cultural history, gender)
Sarah Bennett Farmer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of History; European Languages and Studies (modern French history, twentieth-century Europe, social and cultural history)
Catherine Fisk, J.D., LL.M. University of California, Berkeley; University of Wisconsin at Madison, UCI Chancellor's Professor of School of Law; Criminology, Law and Society; History (labor and employment law, civil rights)
Richard I. Frank, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of History; Classics (Roman history, Classical tradition)
Dorothy B. Fujita-Rony, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies; Culture and Theory; History (U.S. history, Asian American studies)
Howard A. Gillman, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Chancellor and Professor of Political Science; Criminology, Law and Society; History
James B. Given, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of History
Qitao Guo, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of History (social, cultural, and religious history of pre-modern China (the Ming and Qing dynasties))
Douglas M. Haynes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Vice Provost for Equity and Diversity and Professor of History; African American Studies; Culture and Theory; European Languages and Studies (social and cultural history of modern Britain, social history of modern medicine)
Andrew Highsmith, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of History (United States history since 1865; cities and suburbs in American life; public policy history; political history; social inequality; land-use policy)
Lamar M. Hill, Ph.D. University of London, Professor Emeritus of History
Karl G. Hufbauer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of History
David B. Igler, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of History (U.S., American West, environmental, and Pacific history)
Adria Imada, Ph.D. New York University, Associate Professor of History (indigenous and Pacific Islands studies, race, gender and medicine, visual studies)
Jon S. Jacobson, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of History
Winston A. James, Ph.D. University of London, Professor of History; Culture and Theory (Caribbean, African American, African diaspora)
Michael P. Johnson, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of History
Mark A. LeVine, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of History; Culture and Theory (modern Middle Eastern history, Islamic studies, histories of empire and globalization)
Matthias Lehmann, Ph.D. Freie Universtät Berlin, Director of the Interdisciplinary Minor in Jewish Studies and Teller Family Chair in Jewish History and Professor of History; European Languages and Studies (early modern and modern Jewish history, Sephardic studies)
Lynn Mally, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emerita of History
Joseph H. McKenna, Ph.D. Fordham University, Lecturer of History (history of religious ideas)
Nancy Ann McLoughlin, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Associate Professor of History; European Languages and Studies (late Medieval Europe, intellectual history, gender)
Jessica Millward, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of History; African American Studies; Culture and Theory (U.S., slavery, African diaspora, African American gender and women)
Laura J. Mitchell, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of History (social and cultural history of South Africa, Africa, and the world)
Robert G. Moeller, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of History (modern European history)
Susan Katharine Morrissey, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of History (Russia, terrorism and political violence, suicide)
Keith L. Nelson, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, UCI Endowed Chair and Edward A. Dickson Emeritus of History
Rachel S. O'Toole, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Associate Professor of History; Culture and Theory (Colonial Latin America, African Diaspora, colonialisms, race, racism, indigenous histories, gender, Atlantic worlds)
Spencer C. Olin, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, Professor Emeritus of History
Allison J. Perlman, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Assistant Professor of History; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (history of broadcasting, American social movements, media law and policy, media activism, popular memory)
Kavita S. Philip, Ph.D. Cornell University, Associate Professor of History; Comparative Literature; Informatics (history of modern South Asia, science and technology, political ecology, critical theoretical studies of race, gender, colonialism, new media, and globalization)
Kathryn Ragsdale, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Lecturer of History (Japan: Meiji to present; Asia-Pacific War; Japanese film and popular culture)
Renee J. Raphael, Ph.D. Princeton University, Assistant Professor of History (early modern Europe, history of science, intellectual history)
Jaime E. Rodriguez, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Professor Emeritus of History
Ana Rosas, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Associate Professor of Chicano/Latino Studies; History (Chicana/o comparative history, immigration, ethnicity)
Emily S. Rosenberg, Ph.D. State University of New York at Stony Brook, Professor Emerita of History (U.S. and the world, transnational/global history, international relations)
Vicki L. Ruiz, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Distinguished Professor of History; Chicano/Latino Studies (Chicana/Latina history, U.S. labor, immigration, gender)
Sharon V. Salinger, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emerita of History (early America and early Modern Caribbean—social and labor history, race, gender)
Patricia Seed, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor of History (mapping: history and design, game design, navigation)
Timothy Tackett, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of History
Heidi E. Tinsman, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of History; Culture and Theory; Gender and Sexuality Studies (Latin America, gender and sexuality, world history)
Steven Topik, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Professor of History (Brazil, Latin America, world history, commodities especially coffee, the state in the economy)
Anne Walthall, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor Emerita of History
Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, UCI Chancellor's Professor of History (modern China, protest, world history)
Jonathan M. Wiener, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of History
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