2016-17 Edition

Department of Philosophy

Aaron James, Department Chair
85 Humanities Instructional Building
949-824-6525
http://www.humanities.uci.edu/philosophy/

Overview

Philosophy addresses itself to questions that arise insistently in every area of human experience and in every discipline within the university. Each discipline inevitably poses problems concerning the nature of the standards appropriate to it and the place of its subject matter within the total framework of human knowledge. If we are to understand science or art or literature, or such human practices as religion and moral thought, we are bound to address ourselves to philosophical issues relating to their nature, the uses of reason appropriate to them, and the contributions they make to our understanding and appreciation of ourselves and the world in which we live.

Undergraduate Program

Instruction in philosophy relies essentially upon discussion in which students are active participants. Wherever possible, therefore, classes are limited in size in order to permit sustained interchanges between students and instructor.

Some of the courses offered are of general interest to all students. Others are designed to explore issues that arise in selected and special disciplines such as art or science. The undergraduate advisor should be consulted for advice about courses best suited to the specialized needs of particular students.

The program of course offerings is also designed for those Philosophy majors whose intention may be either to enter some professional school upon graduation (e.g., law) or to engage in graduate work in philosophy.

The faculty encourages Philosophy majors and minors to seriously consider expanding their perspective through an experience of study abroad. The Study Abroad Center, which includes the University’s Education Abroad Program (UCEAP) and the International Opportunities Program (IOP), assists students in taking advantage of many worldwide opportunities for study and research. Specifically, those interested in analytic philosophy could consider the EAP programs in the United Kingdom, Canada, Sweden, Australia, and New Zealand, and those interested in Continental philosophy could consider the EAP programs in France, Germany, and Italy. See the Study Abroad Center section of the Catalogue or an academic counselor for additional information.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree in Philosophy

All students must meet the University Requirements.
All students must meet the School Requirements.
Departmental Requirements for the Major
A. Select one of the following:
Introduction to Philosophy
Puzzles and Paradoxes
Introduction to Ethics
Contemporary Moral Problems
B. Select one of the following:
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Introduction to Logic
C. Select two of the following:
History of Ancient Philosophy
History of Medieval Philosophy
History of Modern Philosophy
History of Contemporary Philosophy
D. Complete:
PHILOS 101 Introduction to Metaphysics
PHILOS 102 Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge
or
Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge
PHILOS 103 Introduction to Moral Philosophy
E. Select five of the following: 1
Writing Philosophy
PHILOS 105–199
1

Students planning to pursue graduate school are strongly advised to take PHILOS 105A and PHILOS 105B.

Residence Requirement: At least five upper-division courses required for the major must be completed successfully at UCI.

Additional Information

Career Opportunities

The study of argument and the precision and clarity of thought and writing required of Philosophy majors are excellent preparation for a variety of careers. Many undergraduates trained in Philosophy go on to professional schools in medicine, business, or law. The analytical skills developed in Philosophy courses are especially useful in legal education; indeed, many UCI Philosophy graduates have been successful at top law schools. Former Philosophy students have also used their skills to advantage in careers in government, business, teaching, law enforcement, and computer programming. Many Philosophy majors also continue their education at the graduate level, either in philosophy or a related discipline.

The UCI Career Center provides services to students and alumni including career counseling, information about job opportunities, a career library, and workshops on resume preparation, job search, and interview techniques. See the Career Center section for additional information.

Requirements for the Minor in Philosophy

Departmental Requirements
A. Select three of the following:
Introduction to Philosophy
Puzzles and Paradoxes
Introduction to Ethics
Contemporary Moral Problems
History of Ancient Philosophy
History of Medieval Philosophy
History of Modern Philosophy
History of Contemporary Philosophy
Introduction to Law and Society
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
B. Complete four additional upper-division courses selected from PHILOS 100W–199. (PHILOS 199 may be taken for four units only.)

Residence Requirement for the Minor: Four upper-division courses must be completed successfully at UCI. By petition, two of the four may be taken through the UC Education Abroad Program, providing course content is approved in advance by the appropriate department chair.

On This Page:


Graduate Program

The Ph.D. program in Philosophy is jointly and cooperatively administered by the Department of Philosophy in the School of Humanities and the Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science (LPS) in the School of Social Sciences. The graduate program has two distinct tracks—the Philosophy track and the LPS track—both of which begin from a common core of shared requirements in history of philosophy, logic, ethics, and metaphysics/epistemology. Students are advised to apply to the track whose faculty, areas of specialization, and curriculum most closely correspond to their interests. The Philosophy track is described here. See the Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science for a description of the LPS track.

UCI’s Philosophy Department is committed to providing students a well-rounded graduate education, including central areas of contemporary philosophy and a solid foundation in the history of philosophy. Those with interests in mathematics, the natural sciences, or the social sciences are encouraged to take courses in Logic and Philosophy of Science and to include LPS faculty members on their dissertation committees. The cooperative two-track program provides students the benefits of faculty expertise in a host of areas.

Every year the Philosophy Department invites distinguished philosophers from other universities to present their work to faculty and graduate students. Participation in this colloquium series, though not mandatory, contributes significantly to graduate education. Colloquia sponsored by Logic and Philosophy of Science might also be of interest to Philosophy track students.

Every new graduate student is assigned a faculty member whose purpose is to oversee the student’s progress through the major requirements for the advanced degree. The student consults with this faculty member each quarter about progress and any administrative or academic difficulties. After a student has satisfied course and distribution requirements and passed the Portfolio Exam (discussed below), he or she identifies a faculty member in the Philosophy Department as his or her principal dissertation advisor. Together they will recruit the other faculty members, from both inside and outside the Department of Philosophy, who will serve as the student's dissertation committee.

Requirements for the M.A. in Philosophy

UCI’s graduate program in Philosophy is a doctoral program. At present, no students are admitted to pursue only the M.A.

At least one year of study in the Philosophy program is usually necessary for award of the M.A. There is no list of required courses. The student may elect to follow either of the following routes to the degree: write a thesis on a subject to be chosen in consultation with an advisor and defend the thesis in an oral examination, or satisfy the Logic and Portfolio requirements (explained below).

Advancement to candidacy for the M.A. requires formal application to the Dean of Graduate Studies via the Philosophy Department Office. Application must be made with the recommendation of the Philosophy Department and must take place before the beginning of the quarter in which the student expects to receive the degree.

4+1 M.A. Degree in Philosophy, Political Science and Economics (PPE)

The goal of this program is to train students in three critically important and related approaches to understanding the social world around us. Philosophy develops analytic rigor and trains students to reason logically. Political Science provides an understanding of how institutions impact modern societies and helps students evaluate the choices that such institutions regularly make. And economics is the study of how individuals, firms, and governments make decisions which together determine how resources are allocated. An appreciation of economics has increasingly become crucial for an understanding of institutional policy making. The objective of the M.A. in PPE is to prepare students for careers in government, law, private or public corporations, and non-profit organizations.

In order to be admitted to the program, undergraduate students must submit an application in the winter quarter of their third year. More information can be found in the School of Social Sciences’ Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science.

Requirements for the Ph.D. in Philosophy

There is no set number of courses required for the Philosophy track, so that work can be tailored to the individual student’s needs and interests. However, as a prerequisite for the Ph.D. degree, every student is required to have some experience in teaching. Before students receive their first appointment as TAs in this department, they must complete the TA training program offered by UCI's Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center (TLTC).

Normative time to degree in the Philosophy track is seven years for the normally qualified student. Time to advancement to candidacy is four years. Time in candidacy is three years. Maximum time to degree permitted is nine years. A master's degree is not a prerequisite for the Ph.D. The following are requirements for the Ph.D.:

First-Year Seminar. An examination of some standard works in the history of Philosophy, value theory, metaphysics, or epistemology; required of all first-year Philosophy graduate students in the School of Humanities.

Distribution Requirements. Students are required to take a range of courses designed to expose them to the various historical periods and fields of philosophy. When course offerings are announced, students are notified about which courses can be used to satisfy which requirements. In some cases, the requirement satisfied will ultimately depend on the content of the student's term paper(s).

The Distribution Requirements are:

1. History. To satisfy this requirement, students must receive a grade of B or better in at least four courses covering at least three of the following areas: Ancient, Medieval, Modern Empiricism, Modern Rationalism, Kant, Nineteenth Century, and Twentieth Century.

2. Field. To satisfy this requirement, students must receive a grade of B or better in two courses in value theory, one course in logic, and two courses in metaphysics/epistemology, broadly construed.

These requirements must be completed by the end of the seventh quarter in residence.

Logic Requirement. Students must receive a grade of B or better in an approved logic course. This requirement must be completed by the end of the seventh quarter in residence.

Tools of Research. The student’s dissertation advisor may require his or her advisee to pursue the tool(s) of research deemed useful for the advisee’s dissertation research. A student might, for example, be required to take classes outside the Department of Philosophy or learn languages other than English. The Tools of Research requirement must be completed by the end of the 12th quarter in residence.

The Portfolio. A portfolio of at least two papers is an extended writing sample designed to demonstrate a student's ability (a) to understand, analyze, and evaluate positions and arguments in the philosophical literature, and (b) to formulate and defend an original philosophical thesis. These virtues must be displayed at a level of sophistication indicating the student's ability to write a Ph.D. dissertation.

The portfolio must be submitted to the Graduate Coordinator at the end of the fifth week of the student's sixth quarter in residence. Portfolios will be evaluated by the entire faculty of the Philosophy Department. (Philosophy track students may request that relevant LPS faculty also be present at the evaluation meeting.)

Prospectus Examination. In preparation for the prospectus examination, students choose a dissertation advisor and a dissertation committee. They consult with their thesis advisor and other appropriate faculty to prepare a reading list on their area of concentration and a brief dissertation proposal with a comprehensive bibliography. The exam is an oral exam and is normally completed at the end of the seventh quarter, but must be completed by the end of the ninth quarter in residence. The prospectus exam is to determine whether the dissertation project is viable and promises results that will fulfill standards expected for a dissertation in the profession.

Candidacy Examination. In preparation for the candidacy examination, students prepare at least a draft chapter of their dissertation, an outline of the organization of the work, and update their prospectus and bibliography in consultation with their dissertation advisor and their dissertation committee. Students apply for candidacy by filing appropriate forms, including a list (devised in consultation with their advisor) of appropriate members for their Candidacy Committee; one of these, the External Examiner, must come from outside the Department of Philosophy. The Committee is then appointed by the Philosophy Department, on behalf of the Dean of the Graduate Division and the Graduate Council, to administer the oral candidacy examination on the prospectus and draft chapter(s) to determine whether or not the student will be approved to continue work on the dissertation.

The Candidacy Examination is normally completed at the end of the ninth quarter, but must be completed by the end of the 12th quarter in residence. The Philosophy Department Chair, on behalf of the Dean of the Graduate Division and the Graduate Council, then appoints a Doctoral Committee (typically taken from the Candidacy Committee and naturally including the dissertation advisor) to supervise the writing of the  dissertation.

Dissertation Defense. Students must defend their dissertation during an oral examination administered by their Doctoral Committee.

Program in Law and Graduate Studies (J.D. /Ph.D.)

Highly qualified students interested in combining the study of Law with graduate qualifications in Philosophy are invited to undertake concurrent degree study under the auspices of UC Irvine's Program in Law and Graduate Studies. Students in this program pursue a coordinated curriculum leading to a J.D. degree from the School of Law in conjunction with a Ph.D. degree in Philosophy. Students must be admitted to both programs separately in order to pursue the concurrent Program in Law and Graduate Studies. Students admitted to the Program in Law and Graduate Studies have to complete all of the requirements of each degree. The normative time for completion of the Program in Law and Graduate Studies is eight years for the J.D./Ph.D.  combination. Additional information is available from the Program Director's Office 949-824-4158, or by email to plgs@law.uci.edu. A full description of the program, with links to all relevant application information, can be found at the Program in Law and Graduate Studies homepage.

The Salzburg Exchange Program

The Department of Philosophy and the Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science jointly administer an Exchange Program with the University of Salzburg. The program has two parts. The Scholarly Exchange provides opportunities for faculty and graduate students in Philosophy and LPS to visit Salzburg and for faculty and graduate students from Salzburg to visit one or the other of the UCI units. The Program also sponsors joint conferences, held alternately in Irvine and in Salzburg; these are co-sponsored by Salzburg and the UCI Interdisciplinary Program in the History and Philosophy of Science.

To be eligible for the Salzburg Exchange, a graduate student must have advanced to candidacy. The selected student spends one semester in Salzburg, usually teaching one course in the general area of the thesis topic. An upper-division course may be taught in English, but lower-division courses must be taught in German. (Some previous visitors have learned serviceable German by attending a Goethe institute during the preceding summer.) Typically, a Salzburg visitor will receive a Salzburg Fellowship intended to cover travel expenses, and a stipend; those who teach while in Salzburg will also receive a salary intended to cover living expenses (including health and dental insurance).

Application should be made to the Philosophy Department’s Salzburg Exchange Director by November 1 and should include a curriculum vita and syllabi for possible courses to be taught. The Director and/or the Philosophy Department Graduate Coordinator should be consulted for further information.

Optional Emphasis in Critical Theory

The School of Humanities offers an emphasis in Critical Theory that can be appended to the Philosophy track. A student interested in the emphasis begins by taking the three-quarter Critical Theory Workshop. With the recommendation of a workshop instructor or a Critical Theory faculty member in the Philosophy Department, the student may then apply to the Critical Theory Committee for admission to the emphasis. Emphasis students must complete the following requirements in addition to the usual Philosophy track requirements.

The Critical Theory Workshop. Students must successfully complete the three-quarter Critical Theory Workshop. This sequence is conceived as a reading group, normally conducted by a team of instructors, and developed with the input of all participants. Significant texts are discussed and analyzed in class; no term papers are required. (Students receive 0 units and In-progress grades for the fall and winter quarters; passing students receive 4 units and a Satisfactory grade for the spring quarter.

Advanced Critical Theory Requirement. Students must receive a grade of B or better in three HUMAN 270 courses offered under the supervision of the Critical Theory Committee. At least three such courses will be offered each year. With the approval of the Philosophy Department, these courses can be used to satisfy the tools of research requirement.

Mini-Seminar Requirement. Students must participate in two committee-sponsored mini-seminars (six–eight hours each) offered by visiting scholars on their ongoing research.

Research Paper Requirement. Students must complete a research paper under the guidance of a three-member committee, selected in consultation with the Director; at least one member must be from outside of the Philosophy Department. This paper may (but need not) be part of the portfolio or dissertation.

Upon completion of the emphasis requirements, a letter certifying that fact, signed by the Dean of Humanities and the Director of the Critical Theory Emphasis, will be added to the student’s dossier.

Optional Emphasis in Feminist Studies

A graduate emphasis in Feminist Studies also is available. Refer to the Gender and Sexuality Studies section of the Catalogue for information.

Courses

PHILOS 1. Introduction to Philosophy. 4 Units.

A selection of philosophical problems, concepts, and methods, e.g., free will, cause and substance, personal identity, the nature of philosophy itself. Course may be offered online. Materials fee.

(IV)

PHILOS 2. Puzzles and Paradoxes. 4 Units.

Introduction to the formal tools needed to comprehend and evaluate philosophical arguments and theoretical reasoning in general. Course may be offered online.

(IV, Vb)

PHILOS 4. Introduction to Ethics. 4 Units.

Selected topics from the history of ethics, e.g., the nature of the good life and the moral justification of conduct.

(IV)

PHILOS 5. Contemporary Moral Problems. 4 Units.

Selected moral issues of current interest, e.g., abortion, sexual morality, euthanasia, capital punishment, reverse discrimination, civil disobedience, or violence.

(IV)

PHILOS 6. Philosophy and Psychoanalysis. 4 Units.

An analysis of Freudian psychoanalytic theory and therapy, and its significance for such classical philosophical problems such as the mind-body problem, self-identity and self-deception, psyche and consciousness, innatism, and the origins of moral behavior.

(IV)

PHILOS 7. Introduction to Existentialism. 4 Units.

An analysis of themes in phenomenology and existentialism and their philosophical origins, e.g., consciousness, self and other, freedom and individuality.

(IV)

PHILOS 10. History of Ancient Philosophy. 4 Units.

Examination of the central philosophical themes developed by the pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and the Skeptics.

(IV)

PHILOS 11. History of Medieval Philosophy. 4 Units.

A study of some of the major theological and philosophical texts from the Medieval period.

Prerequisite: Recommended: PHILOS 10.

(IV)

PHILOS 12. History of Modern Philosophy. 4 Units.

A study of major developments in western philosophy from Descartes to Kant with readings from Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

Prerequisite: Recommended: PHILOS 10 or PHILOS 11.

(IV)

PHILOS 13. History of Contemporary Philosophy. 4 Units.

A study of recent philosophical developments in Anglo-American and Continental philosophy with readings from such figures as Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Quine, Heidegger, and Sartre.

Prerequisite: Recommended: PHILOS 12.

(IV)

PHILOS 22. Introduction to Law and Society. 4 Units.

What constitutes a legal system? What does it mean for a society to have a system as a part of the social fabric. Examines the social status of law and its use as a tool for fashioning society.

(III)

PHILOS 29. Critical Reasoning. 4 Units.

Introduction to analysis and reasoning. The concepts of argument, premise, and conclusion, validity and invalidity, consistency and inconsistency. Identifying and assessing premises and inferences. Deductive versus inductive reasoning, and introduction to the probability calculus. Evaluating definitions. Informal fallacies. Course may be offered online.

Same as LPS 29.

(II, Vb)

PHILOS 30. Introduction to Symbolic Logic. 4 Units.

An introduction to the symbolism and methods of the logic of statements, including evaluation of arguments by truth tables, the techniques of natural deduction, and semantic tableaux.

Same as LPS 30, LINGUIS 43.

(Vb)

PHILOS 31. Introduction to Inductive Logic. 4 Units.

Philosophical questions concerning the foundations of scientific inference, e.g., the traditional problem of induction, the Goodman paradox, the concept of cause, Mill's method of inductive reasoning, probability calculus, different interpretations of probability, and their interaction in inductive reasoning.

Same as LPS 31.

(II, Va)

PHILOS 40. Special Topics in Philosophy. 4 Units.

Lectures on selected topics at the lower-division level.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 100W. Writing Philosophy. 4 Units.

Discussion of those aspects of writing of special importance in philosophy, e.g., philosophical terminology, techniques for evaluating arguments, philosophical definitions and theories. At least 4,000 words of assigned composition based on philosophical readings.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as LPS 100W.

Restriction: Upper-division students only.

(Ib)

PHILOS 101. Introduction to Metaphysics. 4 Units.

A study of one or more of the problems of "first philosophy," e.g., substance, free will, causation, abstract entities, identity.

PHILOS 102. Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. 4 Units.

A study of one or more of the basic issues in epistemology, e.g., the role of perception in the acquisition of knowledge, the nature of evidence, the distinction between belief and knowledge, and the nature of truth and certainty.

Same as LPS 102.

PHILOS 102W. Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. 4 Units.

A study of one or more of the basic issues in epistemology, e.g., the role of perception in the acquisition of knowledge, the nature of evidence, the distinction between belief and knowledge, and the nature of truth and certainty.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Overlaps with PHILOS 102, LPS 102.

(Ib)

PHILOS 103. Introduction to Moral Philosophy. 4 Units.

A study of one or more of the problems of contemporary moral philosophy, e.g., the nature of justice, liberalism versus conservatism, happiness and its relation to virtue and right conduct, the objectivity of moral standards.

PHILOS 104. Introduction to Logic. 4 Units.

Introduction to sentence logic, including truth tables and natural deduction; and to predicate logic, including semantics and natural deduction.

Same as LPS 104, LINGUIS 142.

PHILOS 105A. Elementary Set Theory. 4 Units.

An introduction to the basic working vocabulary of mathematical reasoning. Topics include sets, Boolean operations, ordered n-tuples, relations, functions, ordinal and cardinal numbers.

Same as LPS 105A, LINGUIS 145A.

PHILOS 105B. Metalogic. 4 Units.

Introduction to formal syntax (proof theory) and semantics (model theory) for first-order logic, including the deduction, completeness, compactness, and Löewenheim-Skolem theorems.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 105A.

Same as LPS 105B, LING 145B.
Overlaps with MATH 150.

PHILOS 105C. Undecidability and Incompleteness. 4 Units.

Introduction to the formal theory of effective processes, including recursive functions, Turing machines, Church's thesis, and proofs of Göedel's incompleteness theorem for arithmetic, and Church's undecidability theorem for first-order logic.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 105B.

Same as LPS 105C, LINGUIS 145C.
Overlaps with MATH 152.

PHILOS 106. Topics in Logic . 4 Units.

Selected topics in mathematical or philosophical logic.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 105B or LPS 105B.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 106.

PHILOS 108. Topics in Induction, Probability, and Decision Theory. 4 Units.

Selected topics in induction, probability, and decision theory.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 108.

PHILOS 110. Topics in Ancient Philosophy. 4 Units.

Selected topics from the writings of Plato and Aristotle, e.g., Aristotle's criticisms of Plato's metaphysics, ethics, or politics.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

PHILOS 111. Topics in Medieval Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies of some of the major issues of concern to Medieval philosophers, e.g., universals, the nature and existence of God, faith, and reason.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times as topics vary.

PHILOS 113. Topics in Modern Philosophy. 4 Units.

Focuses on the works of central philosophical figures of modern Philosophy (e.g., Descartes, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Kant) or on the treatment of one or more central philosophical problems by a number of these figures.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 113.

PHILOS 114. Topics in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies of some of the major figures after Kant (e.g., Hegel, Nietzsche, Marx, Kierkegaard), especially in German idealism and social thought.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 115. Topics in History of Analytic Philosophy. 4 Units.

Review of central theories or figures in the history of analytic philosophy. Emphasis on writings of Frege, Russell, Schlick, Carnap, and Quine. Topics include the nature of meaning and truth, the synthetic/analytic distinction, and scientific knowledge.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 115.

PHILOS 116. Topics in Continental Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies of some of the major figures (e.g., Husserl), movements (e.g., phenomenology, existentialism) in early twentieth-century continental European thought.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 120. Topics in Metaphysics. 4 Units.

Examines central philosophical questions concerning our own fundamental nature and that of the world around us (e.g., causation and necessity, determination, free will, personal identity, the mind-body problem).

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 120.

PHILOS 121. Topics in the Theory of Knowledge . 4 Units.

One or more topics in the theory of knowledge, e.g., the nature of rational justification, of perceptual knowledge, of a priori knowledge.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 121.

PHILOS 122. Topics in Philosophy of Mind. 4 Units.

Selected topics involving the concept of mind, e.g., the relation between mind and body, the self, personal identity, consciousness, the unconscious.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 123. Topics in Philosophy of Religion. 4 Units.

Critical examination of concepts involved in the theological literature, e.g., the nature and existence of God, miracles, the problem of evil, divine command theories in ethics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 130. Topics in Moral Philosophy. 4 Units.

Selected topics in ethics.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 131A. Applied Ethics. 4 Units.

Topics may include capital punishment, world hunger, obligations to future generations, environmental ethics, animal rights, economic justice, sexual morality, affirmative action, racism and sexism, or legalization of drugs.

PHILOS 131C. Medical Ethics. 4 Units.

Analysis of moral issues concerning health care. Topics may include: just allocation of scarce medical resources, the doctor/patient relationship, genetic engineering, surrogate motherhood, abortion, euthanasia, or social policy concerning AIDS.

PHILOS 132. Topics in Political and Social Philosophy. 4 Units.

Selected topics in social and political philosophy, e.g., the functions of government, the justification of political authority, the nature of democracy, the varieties of liberty, and social justice. Readings from classical and contemporary sources.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 133. Topics in Philosophy of Law. 4 Units.

Selected topics concerning legal systems and the concept of law, e.g., the nature and purpose of law, the nature of authority, the relationship between law and morality, law and political-economic systems.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 140. Topics in Philosophy of Science. 4 Units.

Selected topics in contemporary philosophy of science, e.g., the status of theoretical entities, the confirmation of theories, the nature of scientific explanation.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 140.

PHILOS 141A. Topics in Philosophy of Physics. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of physics, e.g., the interpretation of quantum mechanics, the nature of spacetime, the problem of quantum field theories.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 141A.

PHILOS 141B. Geometry and Spacetime. 4 Units.

An examination of the foundations of the special theory of relativity, with emphasis on the geometry of Minkowski spacetime, and its relation to both Euclidean and non-Euclidean (hyperbolic) plane geometries.

Prerequisite: MATH 2D and (MATH 3A or MATH 6G).

Same as LPS 141B.

PHILOS 141C. Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. 4 Units.

An examination of the standard von Neumann-Dirac formulation of quantum mechanics. The quantum measurement problem is discussed along with several proposed solutions, including GRW, many-worlds, man-minds, and Bohm's theory.

Same as LPS 141C.

PHILOS 141D. Probability and Determinism. 4 Units.

An examination of a cluster of interrelated issues concerning probability, determinism, logic, and the foundations of quantum mechanics.

Prerequisite: MATH 2D and (MATH 3A or MATH 6G).

Same as LPS 141D.

PHILOS 142W. Writing/Philosophy of Biology. 4 Units.

Philosophy of biology, e.g., scientific method in biology, the structure of evolutionary theory, teleology, ethics, and evolution. Course work includes one 4,000-word and four 1,000-word papers.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Lower-Division Writing requirement.

Same as LPS 142W, BIO SCI E142W.

Restriction: Juniors only.

(Ib)

PHILOS 143. Topics in Philosophy of Psychology. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of psychology, e.g., the nature of psychological explanation, reductionism, issues in cognitive, behavioral, and neuroscience.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 143, PSYCH 123P.

Restriction: Psychology and Philosophy majors have first consideration for enrollment.

PHILOS 144. Topics in Philosophy of Social Science. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of the social sciences, e.g., is their goal to understand behavior or to predict and control it?; are they normative and the natural sciences not?; do they incorporate philosophical doctrines about language and mind?.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 144.

PHILOS 145. Topics in Philosophy of Language. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of language, e.g., the nature of meaning, mechanisms of reference, speech acts.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 145, LINGUIS 141.

PHILOS 146. Topics in Philosophy of Logic. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of logic, e.g., the nature of logical truth and our knowledge of it, the status of propositions, definite descriptions, and existential presuppositions.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 146.

PHILOS 147. Topics in Philosophy of Mathematics. 4 Units.

Selected historical and contemporary topics in the philosophy of mathematics, e.g., mathematical truth and ontology, mathematical knowledge, the nature and role of proof, the workings of mathematics in application.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 147.

PHILOS 150. Phenomenology . 4 Units.

A study of the foundations of phenomenology in Husserl and its background in Bolzano, Frege, Brentano, Meinong, Kant, and Descartes.

PHILOS 151. Existentialism. 4 Units.

A study of such central existentialist thinkers as Heidegger and Sartre.

Prerequisite: Recommended: PHILOS 7 or PHILOS 150.

PHILOS 190. Special Topics in Philosophy. 4 Units.

Lectures on selected topics to be given by regular faculty and visiting faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 199. Directed Special Studies. 2-4 Units.

Independent study on a research topic supervised by a faculty member.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

PHILOS 200. Special Topics in Philosophy. 4 Units.

Seminars on selected topics to be given by regular faculty and visiting faculty.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 201. First-Year Seminar. 4 Units.

An examination of some standard works in the history of philosophy, value theory, metaphysics, or epistemology; required of all first-year Philosophy graduate students in the School of Humanities.

Repeatability: May be taken for credit 2 times.

Restriction: Philosophy graduate students and Logic & Philosophy of Science graduate students only.

PHILOS 205A. Set Theory. 4 Units.

The basic working vocabulary of mathematical reasoning. Topics include: sets, Boolean operations, ordered n-tuples, relations, functions, ordinal and cardinal numbers.

Same as LPS 205A.

PHILOS 205B. Metalogic. 4 Units.

Formal syntax (proof theory) and semantics (model theory) for first-order logic, including the deduction, completeness, compactness, and Loewenheim-Skolem theorems.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 205A or LPS 205A.

Same as LPS 205B.

PHILOS 205C. Undecidability and Incompleteness. 4 Units.

Formal theory of effective processes, including recursive function, Turing machines, Church's thesis, and proofs of Goedel's incompleteness theorem for arithmetics, and Church's undecidability for first-order logic.

Prerequisite: PHILOS 205B or LPS 205B.

Same as LPS 205C.

PHILOS 206. Topics in Logic . 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of logic. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 206.

PHILOS 210. Topics in Ancient Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of ancient philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 211. Topics in Medieval Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of medieval philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 212. Topics in Renaissance Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of renaissance philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 213. Topics in Modern Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of modern philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 213.

PHILOS 214. Topics in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of nineteenth-century philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 215. Topics in Analytic Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of analytic philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 215.

PHILOS 216. Topics in Continental Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of continental philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 218. Topics in Contemporary Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of contemporary philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 220. Topics in Metaphysics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of metaphysics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 220.

PHILOS 221. Topics in Epistemology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of epistemology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 221.

PHILOS 222. Topics in Mind and Action. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of mind and action. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 230. Topics in Ethics . 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of ethics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 232. Topics in Political and Social Philosophy. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of political and social philosophy. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 232.

PHILOS 234. Topics in Aesthetics . 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of aesthetics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 240. Topics in Philosophy of Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of science. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 240.

PHILOS 241. Topics in Philosophy of Physics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of physics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 241.

PHILOS 243. Topics in Philosophy of Psychology. 4 Units.

Selected topics in the philosophy of psychology, e.g., the nature of psychological explanation, reductionism, issues in cognitive, behavioral, and neuroscience.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 243, PSYCH 231P.

PHILOS 244. Topics in Philosophy of Social Science. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy and social science. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 244.

PHILOS 245. Topics in Philosophy of Language. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of language. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 245.

PHILOS 246. Topics in Philosophy of Logic. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of logic. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 246.

PHILOS 247. Topics in Philosophy of Mathematics. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of philosophy of mathematics. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

Same as LPS 247.

PHILOS 250. Topics in Existentialism and Phenomenology. 4 Units.

Studies in selected areas of existentialism and phenomenology. Topics addressed vary each quarter.

Repeatability: Unlimited as topics vary.

PHILOS 298. Independent Study. 4-12 Units.

Independent research with Philosophy faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

PHILOS 299. Directed Research. 4-12 Units.

Directed research with Philosophy faculty.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: School of Humanities graduate students only.

PHILOS 399. University Teaching. 4 Units.

Limited to Teaching Assistants.

Repeatability: May be repeated for credit unlimited times.

Restriction: School of Humanities graduate students only.

Faculty

Ermanno Bencivenga, Ph.D. University of Toronto, Professor of Philosophy; Humanities
Sven D. Bernecker, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Philosophy
Marcello Fiocco, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Associate Professor of Philosophy
Margaret P. Gilbert, Ph.D. Oxford University, Abraham I. Melden Chair in Moral Philosophy and Professor of Philosophy
Sean Greenberg, Ph.D. Harvard University, Associate Professor of Philosophy
Jeffrey S. Helmreich, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Aaron J. James, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of Philosophy
Stephen N. Jolley, Ph.D. Cambridge University, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy
Bonnie D. Kent, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Philosophy
Joseph F. Lambert, Ph.D. Michigan State University, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy
Alan Nelson, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Chicago, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy
Casey C. Perin, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Philosophy
Gerasimos X. Santas, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy
Karl Schafer, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Philosophy
Martin Schwab, Ph.D. Heidelberg University, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy; Comparative Literature; European Languages and Studies (philosophy and aesthetics)
David W. Smith, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Philosophy
Nicholas P. White, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy (Greek philosophy, ethics, epistemology)
Peter W. Woodruff, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy

Affiliate Faculty

Jeffrey A. Barrett, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Philosophy
Jeremy Heis, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, Associate Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Philosophy
Penelope J. Maddy, Ph.D. Princeton University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Mathematics; Philosophy (philosophy of mathematics and logic, meta-philosophy)
Brian Skyrms, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Economics; Philosophy
P. Kyle Stanford, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Philosophy
Kai Wehmeier, Ph.D. University of Münster, Director, Center for the Advancement of Logic, its Philosophy, History, and Applications and Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Philosophy
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